New Bike Company - Needs your help! SAVE MONEY AND HELP LAUNCH A COMPANY- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    New Bike Company - Needs your help! SAVE MONEY AND HELP LAUNCH A COMPANY

    Hello MTBR Forum,

    After talking with Francis at MTBR about this 'spam', he assured me that as a 'sponsoring' member of the MTBR forum, it would be okay to post a direct post such as this. I won't do it very often, but I'm asking for your help.

    Firstly, many of you know me as the co-founder of Niner Bikes, and it was well reported that I left Niner in 2011 to branch out into new things. I spent the better part of two years designing the now award winning Factor Vis Vires road bike (Factor Bikes - home of the new Vis Vires). During that time, I still wanted to get out and play on the dirt, and so Domahidy Designs was born. Slowly, but surely, I designed bikes and built prototypes and refined them yet again. I worked on graphics and color schemes, always with a goal to launch a new boutique bike brand, but with no pressure on time frames. It would launch when it was good and ready, and that was fine by me.

    Once my work on the Factor started coming to a close, I was able to turn my attention back on Domahidy Designs, and so I spent my time finalizing everything and building the web site and Kickstarter campaign. Kickstarter, it seemed to me, was really the right way to get some of the funding I needed in place to make the first production run. It would allow me to get the word out about the company, and to pre-sell the first batch of production frames.

    I think there might be some hesitation from the public about 'pledging' to the Kickstarter campaign, and even some out there that probably think I walked away from Niner with enough cash to take care of this myself. Without going into details, that simply isn't the case. Domahidy Designs needs your support to launch. I have spent everything I currently have on putting the pieces in place to insure that Domahidy Designs is successful. I've done all of the prototyping and testing, I've built the web site, solidified my partnerships in Asia to insure the best possible quality, approved the painting facility to make sure the bikes look amazing and designed packaging to get these amazing looking frames to your door undamaged. I've put the infrastructure in place and am just ready to pull the trigger on the first production run.

    I've put together what I think is an incredible product. Although there is nothing 'revolutionary' about these bikes (at the end of the day, even I recognize that they are ti and steel hard tails), it's really the complete package that I believe makes a difference. It's the full length cable housing, the super small and beautiful cable guides for the brake line, the removable cable guides for the derailleurs, the versatility to run single speed or geared and even the belt drive compatibility, the actual tapered head tube rather than the large 'can' with the oversized lower headset cup, it's all of these combined things that makes a Domahidy Designs special. It's also the Kickstarter pricing:

    For the Reynolds 853 frame, regular price: $1099, Kickstarter price: $899

    For the Titanium frame, regular price: $2099, Kickstarter price: $1799

    For the complete XX1 bikes with Industry 9 wheels, these bikes are discounted significantly from their suggested retail prices.

    Reynolds XX1, regular price: $5699, Kickstarter price: $4999
    Titanium XX1, regular price: $6699, Kickstarter price: $5799

    Keep in mind these prices are the final prices, there is no additional tax or shipping (for US shipments) required, so the savings is even greater.

    In addition, I've just release information on the Kickstarter campaign that could save you up to $300 on your frame or complete bike: Purchase a frame or complete bike, and then spread the word. For every friend who also purchases one under the Kickstarter campaign, you will receive $50 off of your purchase up to $300 (to be refunded to you at the end of the campaign). So get together amongst yourselves, MTBR, and socially save yourselves money! (only one person can be claimed once as a friend though, so be strategic and fair to all).

    Lastly, I've also just announced two new pieces of news: Firstly, the frames come with a LIFETIME WARRANTY against defects. That's right, I'm standing behind these bikes 100% and offering a limited lifetime warranty (to the original purchaser only). Secondly, size SMALL AND XS will be available in 650b and have been added to the Kickstarter campaign.

    So if you're in the market for a new hard tail, please consider these bikes. I have so many amazing ideas for the future of Domahidy, but it's the present that I'm asking for your support. I have a little more than a week to make up the remaining funds to launch this company and place the first production order, but it won't take that much to put this campaign over the top. 10 people who buy a complete bike, or three of you get in on the amazing travel opportunity to Kenya or Ecuador. If 1000 of you just buy hats, I'm nearly there. It's simple and easy to pledge and I'm reaching out to you now for your help.

    https://www.kickstarter.com/projects...signs-bicycles

    Thanks in advance,

    Sincerely,

    Steve Domahidy
    Founder/President
    Domahidy Designs
    www.domahidydesigns.com

  2. #2
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    Good luck Steve! We all need more great bikes to choose from.
    Full rigid SS, Hardtail SS, Hardtail Geared, Full Suspension Geared.

  3. #3
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    I'm not quite sold on using Kickstarter to promote yet another seemingly unremarkable hard tail bicycle design which sources a frame from Taiwan and components that anyone could buy and assemble themselves for much less cost.

    What is your reasoning for using Kickstarter in this way? I would understand if there was something new and innovative about the bike, say a new suspension design, unique materials, or a new manufacturing process.

    I've seen your ads on MTBR and have read though your Kickstarted campaign, nothing I read would compel me to place an order on Kickstarter rather than to just go down the street and purchase at my local bike shop or assemble a bike myself from select components. I think you would need to come up with a bit more to stand out from the hundred other mainstream and boutique companies on the market.

    Kickstarter continues to get watered down with campaigns that are not unique or innovative, I've seen campaigns from established companies wanting to create a new version of something the same company is already selling or another campaign selling something cheap out of China that I've seen on Alibaba.com. Makes no sense to me.

    Maybe this is more of commentary about Kickstarter, knowing that they get their cut if the campaign funds regardless of the true nature of the product. Ultimately, I think crowd funding is a good idea, just not for anything and everything that someone wants to sell. I suppose Kickstarter is just another marking tool, if people like the product then they will pledge.

  4. #4
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    Good luck sir.... Pleasure to meet you in Charlotte

    Great luck to you....
    Quote Originally Posted by Epic_Dude View Post
    I'm not quite sold on using Kickstarter to promote yet another seemingly unremarkable hard tail bicycle design which sources a frame from Taiwan and components that anyone could buy and assemble themselves for much less cost.

    What is your reasoning for using Kickstarter in this way? I would understand if there was something new and innovative about the bike, say a new suspension design, unique materials, or a new manufacturing process.

    I've seen your ads on MTBR and have read though your Kickstarted campaign, nothing I read would compel me to place an order on Kickstarter rather than to just go down the street and purchase at my local bike shop or assemble a bike myself from select components. I think you would need to come up with a bit more to stand out from the hundred other mainstream and boutique companies on the market.

    Kickstarter continues to get watered down with campaigns that are not unique or innovative, I've seen campaigns from established companies wanting to create a new version of something the same company is already selling or another campaign selling something cheap out of China that I've seen on Alibaba.com. Makes no sense to me.

    Maybe this is more of commentary about Kickstarter, knowing that they get their cut if the campaign funds regardless of the true nature of the product. Ultimately, I think crowd funding is a good idea, just not for anything and everything that someone wants to sell. I suppose Kickstarter is just another marking tool, if people like the product then they will pledge.

  5. #5
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    Epic_Dude Kickstarter is the way that someone with an idea can get it out with zero marketing budget and let the world decide if it was a good idea or not. Before crowd funding, huge amounts had to be spent on market research, advertising, etc. to try to launch a new product. Those costs were spent whether the product ultimately got launched or not and many ideas died because they could not fund this initial investment.

    Even in the worse case scenario that you sited: a product available on alibaba that is then sold on kickstarter. I won't shop on alibaba because there are too many horror stories. If they have a product that many people want and someone does a kickstarter project for that and it is a success then the people that get the product are happy, the person who did the kickstarter project is happy and kickstarter is happy. If it fails then the loss is almost negligible to all concerned. Because of this reason, crowd sourcing is the most efficient way to bring new stuff to market and it is only going to grow in the future. And yes, even large corporations that could fund projects themselves are using it because it is way more efficient.
    Full rigid SS, Hardtail SS, Hardtail Geared, Full Suspension Geared.

  6. #6
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    Just what we don't need another friggen bike company

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Epic_Dude View Post
    I'm not quite sold on using Kickstarter to promote yet another seemingly unremarkable hard tail bicycle design which sources a frame from Taiwan and components that anyone could buy and assemble themselves for much less cost.

    What is your reasoning for using Kickstarter in this way? I would understand if there was something new and innovative about the bike, say a new suspension design, unique materials, or a new manufacturing process.

    I've seen your ads on MTBR and have read though your Kickstarted campaign, nothing I read would compel me to place an order on Kickstarter rather than to just go down the street and purchase at my local bike shop or assemble a bike myself from select components. I think you would need to come up with a bit more to stand out from the hundred other mainstream and boutique companies on the market.

    Kickstarter continues to get watered down with campaigns that are not unique or innovative, I've seen campaigns from established companies wanting to create a new version of something the same company is already selling or another campaign selling something cheap out of China that I've seen on Alibaba.com. Makes no sense to me.

    Maybe this is more of commentary about Kickstarter, knowing that they get their cut if the campaign funds regardless of the true nature of the product. Ultimately, I think crowd funding is a good idea, just not for anything and everything that someone wants to sell. I suppose Kickstarter is just another marking tool, if people like the product then they will pledge.
    Then clearly this bike is not for you.

    I made a calculated decision to try and offset the costs of the first production run with frames that were already sold to customers who would be very stoked to get one of the first ones off the production line and at a discount. While I don't believe these first two offerings are earth shattering, I would argue that they are anything but unremarkable. Enough people show up on the group ride on a Specialized or Yeti, or Niner for that matter, and some people might want to show up on something different. This is not an open mold, off the shelf frame from Taiwan, it's something designed by somebody (me) who has more experience designing 29" wheel bikes than almost anybody on the planet (save for some of the custom builders who were doing it longer and Gary Fisher himself). The current SIR 9 was one of the final bikes I worked on before leaving Niner, and I really wanted to put a split on that bike for belt drive capability, but in the end, I didn't (and neither did George Perry, the current engineer who took my design to production after I left the company). I have made improvements in ride quality, too, with a stiffer and better tracking front end and I like the attention to detail I've poured over on this frame. While you think it's 'mundane', I don't share that view. We'll see if others buy in or pass, I guess, but in the end, I very much believe in these bikes and this brand. I wouldn't have launched it if I didn't. For sure, I've got a lot more up my sleeve, but innovative usually costs more money, so I needed to start with the basics, but do them exceptionally well.

    Steve
    Founder/President
    Domahidy Designs
    www.domahidydesigns.com

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tracer650 View Post
    Just what we don't need another friggen bike company

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk
    You're absolutely right, just need the big guys to dictate what you ride, after all they know best.
    Ripley LS v3
    OG Ripley v2 handed down to son

  9. #9
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    Since this is a forum, my intent not to start an argument but an intelligent conversation. I understand that creating a new bicycle company is not easy, particularly in a market where there are so many names on the market. Seems like anyone who has a few connections in Asia suddenly is in the bike business.

    I would like to hear more about innovation, ideas, new designs. Just seeing another AL or Ti bike is just not very exciting but I don't mind seeing what's next so more power to you, hope you sell some bikes.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Epic_Dude View Post
    Since this is a forum, my intent not to start an argument but an intelligent conversation. I understand that creating a new bicycle company is not easy, particularly in a market where there are so many names on the market. Seems like anyone who has a few connections in Asia suddenly is in the bike business.

    I would like to hear more about innovation, ideas, new designs. Just seeing another AL or Ti bike is just not very exciting but I don't mind seeing what's next so more power to you, hope you sell some bikes.
    Epic_Dude, I definitely don't want to get into an argument either, but just to set the record straight, I've been in the bike industry for over 25 years, I am the founder of Niner and designed every single Niner bike up until the Rip 9 RDO (the last bike I worked on before leaving the company) and have won numerous awards for my innovation including three IF gold awards. Last year, at Eurobike, I won the gold award for the Road Bike category AND the mountain bike category (with the RIP 9 RDO). So I would hesitate to say that I'm just anyone with a few Asian connections. I also know that although these two bikes don't scream innovation, Domahidy Designs is and will be an important company in the future of innovation, but we all have to start somewhere, and these two bikes are still incredibly fun to ride!

    Steve
    Founder/President
    Domahidy Designs
    www.domahidydesigns.com

  11. #11
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    Good to see someone who has been in the industry 25 years work on something new and again, with all of your experience I will be looking forward to seeing what you have in store once the company has launched. I have been in product design and development myself for almost 24 years and have been part of bringing many new designs to market, even have a few patents. It's very rewarding to develop something new and see it being used or in your case, enjoyed in the field. Again, good luck to you.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    You're absolutely right, just need the big guys to dictate what you ride, after all they know best.
    You hit the nail on the head here! Good luck with your company Steve!
    Last edited by Max24; 03-02-2015 at 09:24 PM.

  13. #13
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    They look nice - good luck. Read the kickstarter page - love the packaging idea. Why hasn't somebody done that yet? Simple, and brilliant.

  14. #14
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    No good

    Quote Originally Posted by yourdaguy View Post
    Kickstarter is the way that someone with an idea can get it out with zero marketing budget and let the world decide if it was a good idea or not.
    Based on that the world has decided that it is not a great idea. I think you hit the nail on its head for kickstarter being a validator for new enterprises.

    There are many bike companies delivering awesome bikes in any configuration you can imagine, as well as many US and offshore small frame builders. People on kickstarter are looking for innovation that will capture their imagination. Something new that has promise. This product is just another entry of a mostly standard product into a saturated market. I would guess that 10 years ago you would get much more traction for a metal hardtail.
    Like others said, if there was something new and interesting, like a new suspension design (or a new wheel size, 28"! ) there would be more interest.

    I think for such businesses kickstarter is the wrong place. But any other place (small business loan, professional investors) would have the same reservations.

    But at the same time, I am little surprised you raised that much money. Which in some way shows that there is interest and validation of the idea.

    Good luck, and when you have a full susser I will check it again

  15. #15
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    I thought the point of kickstarter was to allow people with a new idea and no budget to get something started and the backers got something out of it. You have a permanent ad on this site, that's right next to text box in a forum sponsored by Niner, your old brand.

    While the bike looks good, this kind of enterprise shouldn't need kickstarter considering the person starting it. I think the problem is that at 900 someone is making a decent margin on a frame. If I had to guess I would say it was a Giant made frame. It's a mass produced hardtail and kickstarter is being used to maximize profitability and open marketability. Everyone knows that the market is saturated with brands and despite this saturation, bikes are still very expensive. Hence the apprehension of yet another made in asia "boutique" brand, that people should buy just to have something different.

    If you have 25 years in the business, and have already created a very successful brand you shouldn't need kickstarter. You don't have credit with manufacturers you already use and know? Kickstarter is clearly being used outside of the context to which it was created and some people are picking up on that. Nothing that special about the frame, materials, or price from a technical standpoint.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTR-33 View Post
    I thought the point of kickstarter was to allow people with a new idea and no budget to get something started and the backers got something out of it.

    While the bike looks good, this kind of enterprise shouldn't need kickstarter considering the person starting it. I think the problem is that at 900 someone is making a decent margin on a frame. If I had to guess I would say it was a Giant made frame. It's a mass produced hardtail and kickstarter is being used to maximize profitability.

    If you have 25 years in the business, and have already created a very successful brand you shouldn't need kickstarter. You don't have credit with manufacturers you already use and know? Kickstarter is clearly being used outside of the context to which it was created and some people are picking up on that. Nothing that special about the frame, material, or price.
    GTR-33, I appreciate your observations, but I do want to set the record straight on this, nothing ever good comes from 'guessing'. This is definitely not a 'Giant' made frame. To my knowledge (and I've been to Giant's factory several times), Giant doesn't even have the capability to weld titanium. These are hand made frames from a very small factory, not 'mass produced'. Kickstarter is not being used to 'maximize profitability'.

    There is no 'outside context' here. As stated in this post, for reasons I'm not going to go into, I didn't walk away from Niner a rich man and this Kickstarter campaign is being used for the very real reasons that Kickstarter is needed: to raise capital to help pay for the first production run. I have sunk every dollar I have into getting the business set up and doing everything right before launching the brand and the Kickstarter campaign, to give people every confidence that Domahidy Designs is here to stay and that the Kickstarter campaign is a means to pre-sell frames (at a discount) to those interested in a killer new hard tail. In your world, this kind of product 'shouldn't' need Kickstarter, and I wish it didn't. But the reality is I thought it was a great way to get the word out, to raise some much needed capital and to help pre-sell some of the first batch of frames to meet minimum order qty's from the factory. I'm not sure why these threads have to spiral into negativity and guessed accusations, but to suggest I'm anything but an honest entrepreneur is just not okay. I've created a new brand, and that's no small task. I've spent a significant amount of money on it's development, and am certainly not living 'high on the hog' as a result of my experience. This is my love and passion, and I'm passing that experience on in a very cool product. Yes, as agreed, there is nothing revolutionary going on with these frames, but there are very few hard tails that tick all the boxes, and I believe these two from Domahidy Designs do just that.

    Steve
    Founder/President
    Domahidy Designs
    www.domahidydesigns.com

  17. #17
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    I met and enjoyed talking to Steve at NAHBS this weekend. Good guy who certainly seems to believe in his product. Kudos for that. I got to see his prototype Ti version and it certainly looks the part of a nice frame - good welds, good paint, attention to detail, etc. If I were in the market for a new frame, I'd give it a serious look.

    As for Steve's use of Kickstarter, no one on here knows his situation or background. Personally, I have no issues with Kickstarter being used in this manner. Isn't Singular using it to introduce new frames like the the Buzzard and their new 29+ frame? Here you have an established company with assumed capital on hand using it to fund new products. What's the difference?
    Enjoy the ride!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Epic_Dude View Post
    I would like to hear more about innovation, ideas, new designs.

    So would I. So far the most interesting thing is the packaging style, which has been used for many years in other industries.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by LBIkid View Post
    I met and enjoyed talking to Steve at NAHBS this weekend. Good guy who certainly seems to believe in his product. Kudos for that. I got to see his prototype Ti version and it certainly looks the part of a nice frame - good welds, good paint, attention to detail, etc. If I were in the market for a new frame, I'd give it a serious look.

    As for Steve's use of Kickstarter, no one on here knows his situation or background. Personally, I have no issues with Kickstarter being used in this manner. Isn't Singular using it to introduce new frames like the the Buzzard and their new 29+ frame? Here you have an established company with assumed capital on hand using it to fund new products. What's the difference?
    Like I said, even large companies with capital are using crowd funding because it is more efficient. To the other questions I would say that I think the belt compatibility, the nice dropouts and the cable systems are not very common. Also, even Niner seems to be getting away from bikes that can be geared or SS since they now only have 3 bikes in their entire line that have the famous Biocentric EBB (one is a total race SS that is $2200 that almost nobody will ever run geared, and the ROS that has a very small market and is heavy as a truck and material wise should sell for half, and the other is the famous Sir probably the only Niner that will ever be run both going forward).

    I personally would rather have an eccentric BB and the belt compatibility and nude ti. And therein is the main problem I see. These frames look nice have a unique and valuable feature set and anyone would be proud to own one, but they are approaching the price level of a custom frame. If this doesn't get funded then that means the market as a whole either agrees with this point or has some other reason (which, Like I said I can't see much other reason not to like these frames/bikes) to not buy in.

    Yea, the Giant thing is totally bogus because they only do contract manufacturing for huge volume. And like Steve said, I have never seen Giant Ti.
    Full rigid SS, Hardtail SS, Hardtail Geared, Full Suspension Geared.

  20. #20
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    I'll only chime in to say this...Maybe people would be more willing to step up with funds for this if a few known and trusted MTBers/reviewers were to be able to get their hands on one of these frames and say that yes, they ride great, because honestly, while not super expensive for a custom Ti frame, you can pick up the TITUS Fireline EVO Ti frame for around a grand AND there are "trusted" people who can attest to the ride quality and build of the frame. Personally I wouldn't be giving anyone that sort of cash unless I could read/hear from others about how the frames handled and rode.
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    I have to agree with epic dude. Kickstarter was originally supposed to be for people who had no money, but had great ideas. It was a way to raise capital so those ideas could come to fruition. Without enough people who thought their idea had merit, the idea sank. Two great examples are the z torque cranks (which may have been a joke) and the carbon rotors from kettle cycles that were around for a while, and are now available on their website.

    On the other hand, there are people who already have brands, who have capital, who have advertising budgets, who already have websites and have successfully launched businesses who are using it to basically collect preorders, because they are afraid of failure and for the cost of actually pursuing a loan from a bank. They're going to tie up the customers funds and put the burden of funding their project on their customers, instead of themselves.

    I saw your kickstarter, and I really couldn't believe it. I mean, you bought a banner ad on MTBR to support your kickstarter campaign, after it had already been on bikerumor and elsewhere. That's like showing up to the bank asking for a low interest small business starter loan in your bentley. Why not just beg for preorders on your website like a legitimate business? You're obviously well past "man in a shed" stages.

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    I don't understand kickstarter, in terms of risk premium and the return for the "investor" but it seems like the market can decide whether a product is worth "investment" (I don't get it).

    The OP seems completely up-front about his product and experience. I don't see any point in giving him a hard time to protect the "sanctity" of kickstarter.

    The market has enough information and if it fails then the product may not have been "interesting enough" or to me (I am old) the risk premium was not sufficient. The risk being whether the threshold is met and I get a chance to purchase one of these bikes. If I put up money, then the future price for the bike has to reflect that premium. More risk=lower price.

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    Sandwich, your response makes me sad. I really didn't think that my Kickstarter campaign would be this controversial. There is so much vitriol out in the internet world, so much judgement. For sure, I expected some people to just not like the bikes, that's understandable. But I really didn't expect the judgement on how I'm choosing to launch my new brand. Why doesn't Domahidy Designs count as 'somebody with a great idea' (amazing bikes designed by somebody with years of experience making the absolute best production bike I know how to make, taking all of my knowledge and even making improvements on that) without the means to see my full vision come true? I've successfully launched a business in the past, but you have no idea what happened within the context of that business or how it was left. You are making radical assumptions (ones I believe a lot of people are making, I guess) about the final result of my co-founding of Niner. I have no assetts to get a small business loan, I have no savings. What little I had, I put into Domahidy Designs. The cost of a production run pails in comparison to a banner ad on MTBR, and so I spent my money on things I thought were important to see the brand through, a web site and the product itself. This is not all that different from the projects I've seen (and backed) on Kickstarter. I thought, if people liked the bikes, why wouldn't I try to pre-sell them, give people a discount for their belief in what I'm up to? I have plenty of people who would invest in Domahidy Designs, but I didn't want to have partners or owners in the company. That happened the first time and it didn't end very well for me.

    I'm sorry you see my Kickstarter campaign as a scam. That's simply not true. I don't think that buying ad space on MTBR is like driving my Bentley to go get a small bank loan. I definitely don't have a Bentley., and I am just trying to raise awareness and get some help for my new, small bike company.

    Steve
    Founder/President
    Domahidy Designs
    www.domahidydesigns.com

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandwich View Post
    I have to agree with epic dude. Kickstarter was originally supposed to be for people who had no money, but had great ideas. It was a way to raise capital so those ideas could come to fruition. Without enough people who thought their idea had merit, the idea sank. Two great examples are the z torque cranks (which may have been a joke) and the carbon rotors from kettle cycles that were around for a while, and are now available on their website.

    On the other hand, there are people who already have brands, who have capital, who have advertising budgets, who already have websites and have successfully launched businesses who are using it to basically collect preorders, because they are afraid of failure and for the cost of actually pursuing a loan from a bank. They're going to tie up the customers funds and put the burden of funding their project on their customers, instead of themselves.

    I saw your kickstarter, and I really couldn't believe it. I mean, you bought a banner ad on MTBR to support your kickstarter campaign, after it had already been on bikerumor and elsewhere. That's like showing up to the bank asking for a low interest small business starter loan in your bentley. Why not just beg for preorders on your website like a legitimate business? You're obviously well past "man in a shed" stages.
    Oh please! Huge corporation like Columbia Pictures are using crowd funding because it is efficient so you might as well get used to carping on the internet.
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    I'm not commenting on Kickstarter; but even the introductory prices seem high. Why not get a US made frame for the same amount? I don't know what kind fairy dust makes these any better than all the other Asian made frames.

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    Steve, I'm not saying it's a scam nor that you have the cash to launch this brand on your own, I just think it's disingenuous to the central idea of kickstarter. Your bikes are beautiful, your website is beautiful, and I think everything that you're doing stands on its own without a kickstarter campaign behind it. It just seems to me like you're presenting yourself as one of the big guys, while simultaneously asking for support as though you were a true little guy, which confuses me as to where you actually stand. It seems like you've done all the homework to get this thing off the ground, and now you just need money...which is something I've never seen a good brand do. Product first, advertising second wins in my book.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    I'm not commenting on Kickstarter; but even the introductory prices seem high. Why not get a US made frame for the same amount? I don't know what kind fairy dust makes these any better than all the other Asian made frames.
    +1 here. I just bought a very nice US made Vassago VerHauen which has a MSRP within about $100 of the introductory price of a steel Domahidy on kick starter. Not sure where the value or discount is for being an early supporter of Domahidy.

    Steve - it appears to me that you are being a little thin skinned about the criticism. Your replies imply that posters are calling your campaign a scam or that you are not being truthful. I read them as a critique of your raising money via kick starter vs more traditional means. And that they are unimpressed with the originality of the product. I didn't see anyone saying you were dishonest or scamming anyone.

    My two cents is that when Niner started, something like these products was new and exciting because there were not many production 29ers around. Domahidy is trying to introduce similar products into a very saturated market. I really don't see a lot of differentiation that would get me interested especially at a premium price point.

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    Kickstarter is simply a business tool. Let's not get all high-minded about how it supposed to be used. If enough people like the bike to buy in, great. If not, it's off to the drawing board. The market still dictates. The OP is just using a tool to minimize risk. If it works, good for him.

    Now, if somebody wants to start a thread over in General about the argument over whether bike start-ups using Kicstarter should be supported, go for it. There have been a number of sellers using Kickstarter. Otherwise, I don't think the OP deserves folks ranting in this thread.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    I'm not commenting on Kickstarter; but even the introductory prices seem high. Why not get a US made frame for the same amount? I don't know what kind fairy dust makes these any better than all the other Asian made frames.
    While the frame price may seem high to some for a production (non-custom) frame, it's not unheard of. Look at the prices on a Ritchey P-29, Niner SIR9, Spot Honey Badger, etc. and you will see that they are all on the same ballfield in terms of price and origin.
    Enjoy the ride!

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    Quote Originally Posted by AOK View Post
    +1 here. I just bought a very nice US made Vassago VerHauen which has a MSRP within about $100 of the introductory price of a steel Domahidy on kick starter. Not sure where the value or discount is for being an early supporter of Domahidy.

    Steve - it appears to me that you are being a little thin skinned about the criticism. Your replies imply that posters are calling your campaign a scam or that you are not being truthful. I read them as a critique of your raising money via kick starter vs more traditional means. And that they are unimpressed with the originality of the product. I didn't see anyone saying you were dishonest or scamming anyone.

    My two cents is that when Niner started, something like these products was new and exciting because there were not many production 29ers around. Domahidy is trying to introduce similar products into a very saturated market. I really don't see a lot of differentiation that would get me interested especially at a premium price point.
    AOK, I may be being thin skinned, that's entirely possible, but I don't think people were just giving their opinion that the bike is overpriced or not unique enough. There were several other posters making wild leaps about why I needed Kickstarter and even that I am being 'disingenuous'. As another person said, Kickstarter is about ascertaining risk, and I thought it best to reduce risk to the absolute minimum, which is why I spent the money on getting the web site done, producing all of the prototypes and going through exhaustive testing, taking my time with development over a two year period, and putting it all in place so that people pledging on Kickstarter could have confidence in the brand and the man behind it (and the name on it). I don't know how to do anything other than what I think is the 'right' way. I don't cut corners, I do this with all the passion in my blood and believe in what I'm doing. With Domahidy Designs, there is no risk. If you pledge for a frame on Kickstarter you're getting a frame. Period. There is a risk in whether or not you'll like the way it rides, but again, I believe that my heritage and time in development will belay those fears. I have put everything in place to insure the success of this company, and just needed a final boost in funds to help get the production order placed and allow me enough 'profit' to put into the next Domahidy Designs bike development.

    If it's the product that's lacking, then I can take that criticism, but people were pushing their opinions far past that.

    I can have a discussion based on product. Yes, I am not naive enough to know the market isn't totally saturated. It is, there are a lot of products out there, It's not remotely the market it was 10 years ago when I started Niner. But I believe my expectations are fairly tempered in this. I didn't plan to sell 1000's of these frames, but I wanted to launch the company with a great bread and butter product, and to be frank, even though the market is saturated, I looked to find a bike that met ALL of my needs after leaving Niner and couldn't find any. I wanted to buy a Ritchey because I really like and respect Tom, think those bikes are really cool and I liked the retro throw back paint job. No split for belt. Cielo, AMAZING frames made in the USA by Chris King, one of the most amazing artisans of our time. Again, no split. I'm also not stoked on the big 44mm can on the front of most steel bikes these days. I don't like the huge external cup required for the lower headset to be 'tapered steerer compatible'. It's just not in keeping with what I would call a 'dialed' bike. The current SIR 9 (which is $999) is one of the last bikes I worked on before leaving Niner. I designed the shape of those stays, the disc mount, went to 142/12 drop outs (although George Perry did a GREAT job taking my drop out design and making it WAY simpler) and worked with Reynolds for over two years on the bent down tube on that bike. But there were still some things with that frame that fell short for me, and so when I decided to start working on Domahidy Designs, I wanted to fix them all.

    The Vassago you speak of is USA made, and retails for $1049 ($50 less than my MSRP of $1099). I don't really think it's comparing apples to apples. The Reynolds 853 tube set is an expensive tube set that comes directly from the UK. My bike has a lot of features that the Vassago doesn't including the taper head tube (which is WAY more expensive to produce than the straight 44mm can), the removable cable guides, the 142/12 drop outs, mine comes with a single speed drop out as well as all of the bolts to fill in the holes where the cable guides would go if you're running the bike single speed, and a seat post collar and chain stay protector. I'm also paying for the best welders in Taiwan to 'hand build' these bikes. I know it's not USA made, and I know that does mean something, but labor rates in Taiwan are not as low as you might expect, and no matter what, a good welder is paid way more than the ones who aren't as good. So my cost of goods isn't that much less expensive. Why build in Taiwan? Because all of the pieces to the puzzle live on that island, and that's where I know how to get it done and get it done right. I also have a three color paint job which costs way more than the Vassago single color design. At the end of the day, these aren't meant to be budget bikes, but ones with all of the attention to detail as the ones you'd find at NAHBS, just production versions. That's my case for the price as it is. The things I did to make this bike stand out are all of the bits (including the packaging) that also add to the cost. So, at the end of the day, you'll have to decide if these things are worth the money or if they mean anything to you. If not, I totally get it. I won't be thin skinned about that.

    Steve
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    It baffles me that industry types come to MTBR, these threads almost always turn to poo.

    Domahidy, I don't think you're doing yourself justice by defending yourself with these long winded rebuttals.
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldHouseMan View Post
    It baffles me that industry types come to MTBR, these threads almost always turn to poo.

    Domahidy, I don't think you're doing yourself justice by defending yourself with these long winded rebuttals.
    Once they come here to promote a product they open up themselves up for everyone's opinions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OldHouseMan View Post
    Domahidy, I don't think you're doing yourself justice by defending yourself with these long winded rebuttals.
    He's passionate. He's got a lot invested. He's making a case for his bikes. I like it. If I were in the market, and this were my kind of bike, I'd be checking it out.

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    I think Domahidy's responses were articulate and honest. If I were in the market for a hard tail, I'd seriously consider one of his frames.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OldHouseMan View Post
    It baffles me that industry types come to MTBR, these threads almost always turn to poo.

    Domahidy, I don't think you're doing yourself justice by defending yourself with these long winded rebuttals.



    It sure beats the hell out of the normal opportunists and shills schlepping catalog frames as original work.

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    They frames look great and I dig the paint. I also really like the idea of having all the tools to run ss and geared with no wholes or cable stops. Nice work Steve. Good luck.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Domahidy View Post
    AOK, I may be being thin skinned, that's entirely possible, but I don't think people were just giving their opinion that the bike is overpriced or not unique enough. There were several other posters making wild leaps about why I needed Kickstarter and even that I am being 'disingenuous'.
    Like another poster said, you are passionate about your company and have a lot invested. I get that. But from someone with nothing invested, I think you are taking some of the comments too personally. It is the internet after all... you are going to get a lot of negative comments and wild theories on your motives. And I am pretty sure that 99% of asian sourced bikes I have ever seen introduced on this site have immediately had one or more "experts" speculating that they were manufactured by Giant. I just tend to agree with OldHouseMan that you are not helping your cause by getting in a pissing match with the naysayers.


    Quote Originally Posted by Domahidy View Post
    The Vassago you speak of is USA made, and retails for $1049 ($50 less than my MSRP of $1099). I don't really think it's comparing apples to apples. The Reynolds 853 tube set is an expensive tube set that comes directly from the UK. My bike has a lot of features that the Vassago doesn't including the taper head tube (which is WAY more expensive to produce than the straight 44mm can), the removable cable guides, the 142/12 drop outs, mine comes with a single speed drop out as well as all of the bolts to fill in the holes where the cable guides would go if you're running the bike single speed, and a seat post collar and chain stay protector. I'm also paying for the best welders in Taiwan to 'hand build' these bikes.
    Tubes - I am no expert, but the VerHauen ride is very nice at a competitive weight. Not sure that 853 would be much better honestly. (If you want to send me a sample 853 bike to ride I will gladly report back with my findings )
    Taper HT - The VerHauen is functionally the same with a 44mm head tube. At best your design allows for a zero stack lower cup. Not a huge advantage IMO.
    Dropouts - The VerHauen uses PMW sliding dropouts, so you can get pretty much any configuration (mine is 142/12) with the bonus of a high quality US made design.
    Finish - Purely aesthetics.
    Removable cable guides - again, I would argue purely aesthetics.
    Seat collar - comes with the VerHauen and with most frames...
    Manufacturing - VerHauen also hand built
    Belt drive capability - This seems to be the big differentiator for the Domahidy hard tails.

    Not trying to get into a Vassago vs. Domahidy argument here, just using my personal ride as a comparison point. I think your bikes look great, as does your kickstarter project. I just question whether you can build a brand on something that is so similar to so many other designs out there. Hopefully I am wrong and hopefully we get to see some of the other innovative ideas you have up your sleeve.

  38. #38
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    You do need help! Send me a bike and I will ride it around and do FREE advertising!
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    Beautiful bikes Steve and good luck with the brand! Don't let these naysayers stop you from finding your dream. The details do matter even if the are small. I'll be looking for one of your ti frames in the future...
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    I think Lynx has a point, there needs to be a few of you MTBR influencers out on bikes pedaling positive vibes, so I'm offering this: for anybody interested or on the fence about buying in to my Kickstarter campaign, I will offer a 100% money back guarantee, for 30 days, starting on the day that your frame arrives at your home. Put it together, ride it, and if you don't like it, send it back and I'll refund your money, ALL OF IT, provided the frame is in reasonable shape (no dents or major damage from crashing, just normal wear and tear for a MTB bike that's been ridden for 30 days). Who else offers this? All I ask is that you please don't use my startup as your bike rental program.

    Steve
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    Hi Steve,

    Here are my comments, so take them or leave them! And no, you don't have to respond to them. I saw your Kickstarter campaign before reading through this thread, so already had my opinions formed. First, I have no issues with you using Kickstarter, seems like a smart idea to me. I am not pledging money because the bikes just don't click many boxes for me, therefor I'm not interested. They certainly look like nice high quality frames with some nice features and nice paint jobs, but the design and geometry are just too standard. 72 to 73 deg. HT and ST angles are not where it's at anymore. Maybe it's the Engineer in me, but I am looking for something innovative, and just don't see it.

    If this frame fit 29x3" knard tires, I would be looking alot harder. Have you ridden those tires? If not, you should, they just have to be experienced to get it. If it had a 69 or 70 deg. HT angle, again it would be more interesting. I like the hooded design of the dropouts, but they are still just your basic sliding dropouts with their inherent shortcomings.

    Anyway my point is that I can buy many different frames that will do the same thing as your frames, or at least very close.

    I really do hope you succeed with the new company and are able to realize your dream of owning and running a successful bike company. I will check in every once in a while and see what's up.

    Mark

    Edit: Just read up a bit on those Paragon Toggledrops, seems a little Rube Goldberg!

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    Best of luck with your new brand, the product looks like very nice. It is not an easy endeavor trying to develop a brand, but you have been part of the industry long enough to know how it works...raise capital the most efficient way you can, Kickstarter works fine (it is meant to kickstart funding for a business). It is going to be lower risk to do a kickstarter and start out by fulfilling small order quantities to get your bikes to market, than getting conventional bank loans (if you even qualify) and paying high interest rates while hoping the market will embrace the bikes you just procured. I am relatively new to the MTBR forums and don't post too often, but really, these are similar to any other enthusiast forums on the internet (automotive, guns, sports, etc). If you post, be prepared to get trolled...its sad the community just doesn't embrace what you are trying to accomplish, but everyone has their opinions, just deal with it and good luck to you.

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    Good luck Steve.

    Just a few comments: I am in the market for a new frame, I would gladly invest in an up and coming brand like yours - but I can not consider yours because of price. I understand the frames are priced as boutiques and respect that. But at some point, you may consider a lower end bike to get greater consumer base.


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    I'll chime in to say, the bikes look nice, but that I too find the geo nothing exciting, if it was 69-70 with a 100mm fork, then maybe. I believed the BS when I got my first 29er that they needed to be steeped angled to handle well or feel like a tug boat, yet I now ride a 68.5*, 48.25" WB monster and it isn't hell to climb, actually climbs very well and descending is a pleasure, and slow tech where it's sposed to handle like crap, definitely not, unlike that first 72* HTA flexy POS (which was described by the designer as perfection and couldn't be improved upon - 3 iterations later...).
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    Best of luck, Domahidy. Breaking into any industry isn't the easiest task, especially with a bunch of internet-nerd critics as your crowd here. I think your money back pledge will work well, considering no one else is providing that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by phsycle View Post
    Best of luck, Domahidy. Breaking into any industry isn't the easiest task, especially with a bunch of internet-nerd critics as your crowd here. I think your money back pledge will work well, considering no one else is providing that.
    Thanks phsycle. I really want to stand behind my product. LyNx, I'm not sure there is ever pleasing you. Just to say that you can never reduce an entire frame down to one number. I know there is a tendency to latch on to 'a head tube angle' or 'a chain stay length', hell, we're even guilty of promoting geo that way to some extent, but geometry is the entire bike and taking any one number out of context doesn't really work. With the Domahidy Designs bikes, the head tube angle is 71 degrees with a 100mm travel fork, which is where most people will run it. This is only 1 degree off your preferred 70 degree head tube angle. Take into account production tolerances, and I'm not sure there are too many people on the planet that can feel that difference. Did you know suspension manufactures call out a +/- 5mm (in some cases) tolerance for their crown to axle? That's a 10mm variance, alone that can account for a half a degree of head tube angle difference. We all get stuck on numbers because I think that's what makes things easier to understand. We're the generation of people who's attention spans require that everything be reduced to a sound byte. I'm just as guilty. So people reduce geometry to a sound byte. What head angle is the best for me? What chain stay length? It actually stifles creativity in design a bit because consumers latch on to these numbers and to consider something outside of them would cause a mini-brain melt. So manufactures just build to what is trending, which is the path of least resistance. In the end, it's easier than climbing the uphill battle of trying to explain geo figures that are outside the norm, so I totally get it.

    For me, in the beginning, the 72 degree head tube angle was necessary because fork rakes simply weren't big enough at the time to deal with the larger diameter of the front wheel. They were 26" fork rakes. Once the fork rakes became larger on the suspension forks, it freed up some ability to shallow out the head tube angle. At 45mm (which is where most modern fork rakes are these days for a XC 29er), I still love the handling of the bike with the head tube angle where I've got it, considering the crown to axle of rigid forks as well, I think the geo is dialed. Everybody has their own personal preference, though, and that's cool.

    I actually dream of doing a mind experiment: getting two frames and building them up EXACTLY THE SAME, both with 70 degree head tube angles, and then giving them to a group of riders to ride back to back. One of them will be marked as a 69 degree head tube angle, and the other will be marked as a 71 degree head tube angle. It would be interesting to find out how many of them were swayed by what was marked on the bikes vs. reality. How many of them would come back and say "The 69 was more stable at speeds and the 71 was easier to handle on the slow stuff"?

    Steve
    Founder/President
    Domahidy Designs
    www.domahidydesigns.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by phsycle View Post
    Best of luck, Domahidy. Breaking into any industry isn't the easiest task, especially with a bunch of internet-nerd critics as your crowd here. I think your money back pledge will work well, considering no one else is providing that.
    He's actually an industry insider. He got honest feedback on his product here.

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    Interesting note above about "production tolerances". Sounds like geo varies from unit to unit, so we should not get caught up on one aspect too much. I guess you need to buy 3 or 4 frames and check them if you're picky. I do this with camera lenses to make sure I get a sharp one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    He's actually an industry insider. He got honest feedback on his product here.
    Honest feedback from who? Anyone even ridden these yet that gave feedback? You've got to admit there is a lot of numbers-geeks, mag racers, and without pointing fingers, people that like to regurgitate hearsay with zero personal experience.

    This is Domahidy's cue to promote the upcoming demo days.

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    Quote Originally Posted by phsycle View Post
    Honest feedback from who? Anyone even ridden these yet that gave feedback? You've got to admit there is a lot of numbers-geeks, mag racers, and without pointing fingers, people that like to regurgitate hearsay with zero personal experience.

    This is Domahidy's cue to promote the upcoming demo days.
    From potential buyers with valid questions. Demo days would be great. The bike looks decent and I'd live to try it to see if I could tell the difference between it and the dozens of other bikes with the same geo also made in Taiwan.

  51. #51
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    It always amazes me how negative some people are on forums. I'm not the target audience for these first two frames but I do believe there is a market for them. As some people have stated there are other bikes available similar in function and geometry but I see the Domahidy frames as a step up in refinement. The question one has to ask is does the attention to detail make the price worth while. I'm guessing the majority of mountain bikers will answer no, but there will be enough who appreciate those details and be willing to pay a few dollars for it. I'm not sure if the Kickstarter will work out, I hope it does so Domahidy Designs can get off the ground as quickly as possible. I for one would like to see what other ideas Steve has.

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    Your bikes look nice. Geo is not the best(for me anyway), seat stay break design is unique, graphics/paint is above standard. Price is high compared to others.

    That being said... I personally would not buy one of your bikes.

    Make a bike with at least none Asian sourced materials (yes I know Reynolds is UK), build it in the USA, use as many US company components on it (maybe make some of your own) as possible. And then I would look and possibly buy.

    I wish all who are trying to start a company in this economy (and trade deficit) the best. Good luck to you.

  53. #53
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    Actually the 70* was with a 100mm sus fork or 480mm A2C rigid fork, that way when I put my preferred 120mm fork on it it would get to my preferred HTA of 69*, or close enough.
    Quote Originally Posted by Domahidy View Post
    LyNx, I'm not sure there is ever pleasing you. ........ With the Domahidy Designs bikes, the head tube angle is 71 degrees with a 100mm travel fork, which is where most people will run it. This is only 1 degree off your preferred 70 degree head tube angle.
    Really, because the Manitou Minute 120mm with a 44mm offset for the QR version and 46mm for the 20mm TA version were around back in 2008, which is when you were doing those designs that "mandated" those steep HTAs, despite people purchasing those frames designed for 100mm forks and running the same said 120mm Minutes to slack them out, your solution then, redesign for a 120mm fork using the same 72* HTA So what did people do, use 140mm forks to slack out that design, only in the 3rd iteration did something actually click and the geo was slacked to match what consumers were doing for nearly 4 years - you didn't listen to your customers back then and that has not changed today, everyone else still hasn't a clue and you are the only one who does.
    Quote Originally Posted by Domahidy View Post
    For me, in the beginning, the 72 degree head tube angle was necessary because fork rakes simply weren't big enough at the time to deal with the larger diameter of the front wheel. They were 26" fork rakes. Once the fork rakes became larger on the suspension forks, it freed up some ability to shallow out the head tube angle. At 45mm (which is where most modern fork rakes are these days for a XC 29er), I still love the handling of the bike with the head tube angle where I've got it, considering the crown to axle of rigid forks as well, I think the geo is dialed. Everybody has their own personal preference, though, and that's cool.
    You may be accustomed to dealing with a bunch of people who have the sensitivity of a piece of clay, but me personally, I can feel the difference in geo when I swap from running either matched tyres F&R to smaller rear or vice versa, enough so I adjust the saddle tilt and bar rotation I can most definitely feel the 1 degree geo change on my Banshee Prime pre-production and there was enough feedback from testers for them to determine that even a 1/2 degree could be felt and hence the design was changed to add 3 geo settings in 1/2 degree increments to production versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Domahidy View Post
    I actually dream of doing a mind experiment: getting two frames and building them up EXACTLY THE SAME, both with 70 degree head tube angles, and then giving them to a group of riders to ride back to back. One of them will be marked as a 69 degree head tube angle, and the other will be marked as a 71 degree head tube angle. It would be interesting to find out how many of them were swayed by what was marked on the bikes vs. reality. How many of them would come back and say "The 69 was more stable at speeds and the 71 was easier to handle on the slow stuff"?

    Steve
    Last edited by LyNx; 03-21-2014 at 06:52 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold
    You're doing mtbr wrong, you're supposed to get increasingly offended by the implications that you're doing ANYTHING wrong.

  54. #54
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    Yea Lynx, I had a 2014 Fox fork that was made such that the wheel was held in cocked to one side. It was off by about 5mm at the top. I posted about it on the local MTB club facebook page and said that I knew the first time I rode it that something was not right: "I could feel when I turned that it turned easier to one side". And naturally the local expert posted right back that there was no way I could feel that little of a difference and oh, by the way, was I sure it was a 2014 model.
    Full rigid SS, Hardtail SS, Hardtail Geared, Full Suspension Geared.

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    Uh, this thread isn't titled: New Bike Company Needs You to Explain in deatail why you don't want to buy our bike.

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    Domahidy - Do yourself a favor and put Lynx on your ignore list. Your mtbr experience will increase exponentially.

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    New Bike Company - Needs your help! SAVE MONEY AND HELP LAUNCH A COMPANY

    Quote Originally Posted by phsycle View Post
    Domahidy - Do yourself a favor and put Lynx on your ignore list. Your mtbr experience will increase exponentially.
    Were the posts that bad?

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    Were the posts that bad?
    Search his forum posts and enjoy your weekend.

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    This thread could be more proof that there's no such thing as bad publicity. I am not in the market now but I know you are out there...

    Good luck to the OP and his attempt to start a new business, way-to-go!

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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    Actually the 70* was with a 100mm sus fork or 480mm A2C rigid fork, that way when I put my preferred 120mm fork on it it would get to my preferred HTA of 69*, or close enough.

    Really, because the Manitou Minute 120mm with a 44mm offset for the QR version and 46mm for the 20mm TA version were around back in 2008, which is when you were doing those designs that "mandated" those steep HTAs, despite people purchasing those frames designed for 100mm forks and running the same said 120mm Minutes to slack them out, your solution then, redesign for a 120mm fork using the same 72* HTA So what did people do, use 140mm forks to slack out that design, only in the 3rd iteration did something actually click and the geo was slacked to match what consumers were doing for nearly 4 years - you didn't listen to your customers back then and that has not changed today, everyone else still hasn't a clue and you are the only one who does.


    You may be accustomed to dealing with a bunch of people who have the sensitivity of a piece of clay, but me personally, I can feel the difference in geo when I swap from running either matched tyres F&R to smaller rear or vice versa, enough so I adjust the saddle tilt and bar rotation I can most definitely feel the 1 degree geo change on my Banshee Prime pre-production and there was enough feedback from testers for them to determine that even a 1/2 degree could be felt and hence the design was changed to add 3 geo settings in 1/2 degree increments to production versions.
    Wow, I don't even know what to say. LyNx, we've already established that this frame isn't right for you. No problem. Please look elsewhere. I simply decided to let the people of this forum understand where and how the Domahidy Designs frames got their geometry, and with some historical context. Frankly, a 71 degree head angle is fairly accepted in the XC world. YOU like them slacker. THAT IS COMPLETELY OKAY. Some people like them the way I've designed them (including me). This is a purely XC machine with XC geometry. What you mean to say is "I didn't listen to YOU". To make accusations about my character based on the geometry I've decided on for the bikes that bear my name is simply astounding. I have never stated that others that like other geometry 'don't have a clue.' I haven't made broad accusations about others character because of the geometry that they like. In fact, I'm only making an accusation that you're kind of an ass because of the words that you type, and it has nothing at all to do with your geometry preference.
    Founder/President
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  61. #61
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    Those are nice designs, but you should look into building some up with Shimano XT/ SRAM XX1, or XTR/XTR.
    Dropping into a trail

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    Quote Originally Posted by CannondaleF9 View Post
    Those are nice designs, but you should look into building some up with Shimano XT/ SRAM XX1, or XTR/XTR.
    I've got an XX1 build on the site and as part of the Kickstarter campaign. The bike in light green is built that way.

    Steve
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  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Domahidy View Post
    I've got an XX1 build on the site and as part of the Kickstarter campaign. The bike in light green is built that way.

    Steve
    I mean have some bikes with Shimano brakes. That might make more people interested in your company.
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    Well, you now know not to use MTBR as a break out point for your next bike... Tough keyboard crowd in here. Best of luck with the sales.
    I like to ride Bikes. This might be turning into an obsession, not sure?

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    Quote Originally Posted by CannondaleF9 View Post
    I mean have some bikes with Shimano brakes. That might make more people interested in your company.
    Ah, got it. Shimano brakes are awesome these days. I do not have any bike pictured that way, but you can just buy a frame and outfit it any way you like.

    Steve
    Founder/President
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    New Bike Company - Needs your help! SAVE MONEY AND HELP LAUNCH A COMPANY

    Quote Originally Posted by jjcools View Post
    Well, you now know not to use MTBR as a break out point for your next bike... Tough keyboard crowd in here. Best of luck with the sales.
    Yep, free marketing doesn't always work if you want to completely control the conversation. Forums like this promote two way communication - that's why oil companies stay away.

    Good luck on the bike! I hope you succeed and reconsider US production and yes, non screaming brakes!

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    New Bike Company - Needs your help! SAVE MONEY AND HELP LAUNCH A COMPANY

    Steve, has anyone had a chance to ride any of your creations? (Credible) Reviews would go a long way to improving people's perceptions on the product. Good luck!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vic-20 View Post
    Steve, has anyone had a chance to ride any of your creations? (Credible) Reviews would go a long way to improving people's perceptions on the product. Good luck!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Vic-20, This months Mountain Flyer features the first full review of the bike. It's in Issue 35 and the text can be found under 'press' on the Domahidy Designs web site. It's a great review. Brian really loved the bike. Also, if you're in Colorado, Golden Bike Shop has a medium steel bike built as a single speed that can be taken out. This one is built with a belt and a rigid Niner fork. They used to have a ti one that was built with XX1, but I've got that back with me now. If you live in Denver and contact me directly, I will let you take it out for a ride.

    Steve
    Founder/President
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    www.domahidydesigns.com

  69. #69
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    That is a true no maintenance bike. Rigigd SS belt drive. Not fork maintenance, no chain maintenance, no gear maintenance. Just put air in the tires and ride. About every 4th time you wear out the back tire put a new front and a new belt on and go for another 10,000 miles.
    Full rigid SS, Hardtail SS, Hardtail Geared, Full Suspension Geared.

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    Hi Steve,

    As others said, good luck in breaking in the bike market, against some giants already well established in R&D and distribution.

    IMHO, your first line-up it's quite innovative. Nonetheless, your stated that you got other ideas in mind yet to come into the market. Bit pricey, indeed, but still a fair deal.

    Dirty trails to you and your bikes, would like to ride one anytime.

    Bests,

    B.

  71. #71
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    New Bike Company - Needs your help! SAVE MONEY AND HELP LAUNCH A COMPANY

    Quote Originally Posted by jjcools View Post
    Well, you now know not to use MTBR as a break out point for your next bike... Tough keyboard crowd in here. Best of luck with the sales.
    I dunno - MTBR can be very kind to new designs that get people excited. Look at the threads on the Yelli Screamy, Chromag Surface, Banshee Phantom, and Singular 29+ (also a kickstarter I might add) as examples of some well received new designs from smaller companies.

  72. #72
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    Something Similar Worked

    A similar business model seems to have worked for these guys:

    Asylum Cycles Turns to Crowd Supply to Create Its Meuse Carbon Disc Brake Cyclocross Bike ? Updated | Cyclocross Magazine ? Cyclocross News, Races, Bikes, Photos, Videos

    I can say from experience, They're nice bikes.

    If I was in the market for a new frame, a Domahidy Design frame would be near the top of my list.

    Best destiny with your venture Steve.
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  73. #73
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    Steve,
    I've seen the bike at GBS. It's beautiful. I wish that I were in the market right now. Best of luck with your business!

    This is an interesting thread - how many other people are attaching their first and last names?

    Darren Lee
    Is this where I write something witty?

  74. #74
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    There's always room for quality and craftsmanship. Obviously I don't know your books, but I applaud the use of non-deficit funding for business. I've known some brilliant people (not necessarily bike builders) that lacked business acumen and borrowed themselves into failure and never got to see their ideas realized.

    For those who seem to balk at the idea of more options for equipment, go ahead and bookmark Specialized: Choose Region + Language and don't worry about what the rest of the cycling community does.
    Calmer'n you are.

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by Domahidy View Post
    . . . Why build in Taiwan? Because all of the pieces to the puzzle live on that island, and that's where I know how to get it done and get it done right. . . .
    This is the line people have been touting forever now. Just because it is the easier thing to do doesn't make it right, or even a good business decision given your price points and intended market.

    If this kickstarter was to fund a small US factory in Portland, there would be ZERO flack in this thread. In fact you'd have a ridiculous amount of funding right now. People obviously care about US made bikes. It is up to you as a big player in the industry to rebuild it.

  76. #76
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    Furthermore, when did everyone become the GD internet police. Who cares how anyone uses kickstarter? It's the investor's responsibility to research their investments. If you don't like how a company or individual uses this service, how about just not giving them your money, instead of complaining.
    Calmer'n you are.

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    New Bike Company - Needs your help! SAVE MONEY AND HELP LAUNCH A COMPANY

    Quote Originally Posted by goldencalf View Post
    Furthermore, when did everyone become the GD internet police. Who cares how anyone uses kickstarter? It's the investor's responsibility to research their investments. If you don't like how a company or individual uses this service, how about just not giving them your money, instead of complaining.
    If the OP didn't want feedback or comments about his business model, he should not have posted in a public forum.

  78. #78
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    ..ok
    Calmer'n you are.

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    Nice bikes Steve and good luck. If it was not for people like you, there would not be independent businesses in this country. Ignore the negative comments, I would bet they are the same entitled selfish bastards that voted for Obama and and still believe we should all be equal. Thanks for trying to increase your worth however possible in lieu of letting some of us tax payers just continue to put money on your CC so you can get your groceries for free. In south where I pay high taxes on my water so the jack a$$ down the street can get his for free, at least your giving a product back for an initial investment.

    Who gives a crap where it is made. If us Americans would get off our greedy a$$es and show some work ethic and seek a fair and equitable pay for the work, people woulnt have to go overseas to find good help. Look at our unions in this country..3 times the rate of Hispanic help and work about 25 percent as good. No, I am not for giving our work away, but somebody has to do it.

    Now let me go pick from one of my three overseas made Spot frames that are 853, sport a belt, and ride like a dream. The hard tail is not dead, just not for pu$$ies.

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbkendall View Post
    Nice bikes Steve and good luck. If it was not for people like you, there would not be independent businesses in this country. Ignore the negative comments, I would bet they are the same entitled selfish bastards that voted for Obama and and still believe we should all be equal. Thanks for trying to increase your worth however possible in lieu of letting some of us tax payers just continue to put money on your CC so you can get your groceries for free. In south where I pay high taxes on my water so the jack a$$ down the street can get his for free, at least your giving a product back for an initial investment.

    Who gives a crap where it is made. If us Americans would get off our greedy a$$es and show some work ethic and seek a fair and equitable pay for the work, people woulnt have to go overseas to find good help. Look at our unions in this country..3 times the rate of Hispanic help and work about 25 percent as good. No, I am not for giving our work away, but somebody has to do it.

    Now let me go pick from one of my three overseas made Spot frames that are 853, sport a belt, and ride like a dream. The hard tail is not dead, just not for pu$$ies.
    Wow. This thread did manage to find the bottom of the barrel.

  81. #81
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    mtbkendall said.... Who gives a crap where it is made. If us Americans would get off our greedy a$$es and show some work ethic and seek a fair and equitable pay for the work, people woulnt have to go overseas to find good help. Look at our unions in this country..3 times the rate of Hispanic help and work about 25 percent as good. No, I am not for giving our work away, but somebody has to do it.



    In my opinion most Companies go offshore

    1) To avoid the hassles of manufacturing products themselves. ( we should just call them exclusive distributors )

    2) To increase their profit margins.


    Don't kid yourself, there are plenty of highly skilled, hard working Men and Women in this country. How dare they want to earn a decent living.

    I looked at the bikes and I liked them , but the first thing I looked at was where it was made ( one of the most frustrating things a company does is put ...Designed in _____ ....who cares).

    It's never too late to change your business model. There are some excellent OEM builders in the USA that build in steel,aluminum and Ti. and they build in small batches.

    I am in the market for a bike,but it will be made in the USA and at the price point of these bikes it should be.

  82. #82
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    Good luck

    Best of luck. I like the idea of using Kickstarter for new bike companies - anything to make it a little easier for new companies to bring us new bikes!
    Don't let the downers get you down!

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    Steve, Don't take the negative banter to heart. I love your moxy and I love your idea. Like anyone with a dream, one has to ignore the negative energy and use it to create more resolve. You description of the product has me wanting to check one out. I can feel your passion in your statements. I attended my first hand built show last year in Denver and was blown away by the quality and innovation coming from some of these guys. So it resonates with me when I hear your description. The campaign will be successful and it will resonate with the right people who your bike should be ridden by. Carry on, carry on. You have my positive vibes. We need more people like you

  84. #84
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    Come up with simpler names...guarantee you +10% market share.

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    Quote Originally Posted by El Castigador View Post
    Come up with simpler names...guarantee you +10% market share.
    Hey guys, thanks for the support! El Castigador, yeah, Domahidy isn't an easy name, I totally agree. I've hesitated for years about putting my name on bikes because of this, but I liked the logo I came up with, it stood out as being built around design, and didn't need to focus on the name itself. In the end, it's unique and gets people talking, so that can't be bad, and I didn't have to worry about expensive trademark searches!

    I'm going to reach the goal. I know, right now, it looks like a crazy hill to climb, but I'm climbing it, one frame and bike at a time and it will be climbed by the end of this Kickstarter campaign. I appreciate all the support, and the criticism. I listen and hear it.

    Steve
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    www.domahidydesigns.com

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    Steve! Great seeing you at NAHBS and hanging out a bit. I gotta say that this is the internet and the good, but mostly the bad will always be stated with a bravery from behind the keyboard unlike what a "hands on" experience would bring you. Also a multi-decade industry whor..... guy, anytime someone can find the least bit of controversy in something, they refuse to step one foot past that thick wall of trees where reasoning, understanding, and even civility exists.

    That said, I have seen the industry go from going in a few simple directions into exploding into several complicated ones. That is good and bad. Innovation goes up, but trying to find a niche that sticks is harder than ever. Steve it taking it back a step trying to offer something that's better, but still falls somewhere around a "big company's" top offering hardtail price wise, and under what would be a full custom frame. Better bang for your buck.... on the higher end. My personal opinion is that Steve's bikes are not for everybody..... not even for that many people. But considering how many people could benefit from something in this in-between category, I say FIRE AWAY! I know some have a tendency to take someone's business plan they spent years developing and come up with a better one in 5 minutes, but if you don't like what he's doing, go ride the bike you do like. Don't be this guy.....

    New Bike Company - Needs your help! SAVE MONEY AND HELP LAUNCH A COMPANY-cinzano6.jpg

  87. #87
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    I wish you luck, but as a graphic designer, I had no idea what your logo said. You do not want consumer confusion as to what your brand name is. From your current logo, I had no clue. Just a little critique. Just my 2 cents.

    I think it's good to have many different brands. So again, good luck.

  88. #88
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    Cafe Roubaix is a stellar example of that lol.
    Calmer'n you are.

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    Okay, I know what you're thinking: "This guy only has 52 hours left to make up more than half his needed amount. There's no way he's going to make it." Interest in Domahidy Designs is really hitting a peak and I know of several transactions that are going through today that will change the balance of this Kickstarter campaign.

    So if you're on the fence because of one of the reasons stated in this forum thread, then you'll likely stay on the fence. But if you're on the fence because you don't think I'm going to make my goal and you won't be getting a frame, then jump off the fence and pledge! I'm going to make my goal, I'm going to make the kickstarter campaign amount, and everybody who pledges for a frame or a complete bike (or a hat) will get just that.

    Thanks in advance for your support. And all of the feedback from this thread? I appreciate that too!

    Steve
    Founder/President
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    www.domahidydesigns.com

  90. #90
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    Most of us are pulling for you Steve.
    Full rigid SS, Hardtail SS, Hardtail Geared, Full Suspension Geared.

  91. #91
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    As a former graphic designer I have to agree with this. I almost said something but didn't want to join "camp criticism" so I just bit my tongue. I don't think the pronunciation is as big a deal as the readability tho. E.g., Campy/Compagnolo.
    Calmer'n you are.

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    If it were me I would start the kick starter campaign and then fund myself for the slow buzz feed it will create. Especially if someone already had the money to begin with.... And itís a great platform to get the 650b rolling too since its not tied to a name like NINER. Kudos to you and your efforts thus far!

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by azcanc View Post
    If it were me I would start the kick starter campaign and then fund myself for the slow buzz feed it will create. Especially if someone already had the money to begin with.... And itís a great platform to get the 650b rolling too since its not tied to a name like NINER. Kudos to you and your efforts thus far!
    You can't do that with Kickstarter and they even monitor for such behavior. Steve has been a Kickstarter supporter 5 times in the past (mostly bike related) and after looking at the things he has backed, I have to say the world missed a gem with the Kappius hub. If you want to view the projects that Steve was willing to give his own money to in the past there is a link directly under Steve's picture in the kickstarter page. I think that Kappius should get with Bill Shook with a licensing deal. Those hubs are really sweet.
    Full rigid SS, Hardtail SS, Hardtail Geared, Full Suspension Geared.

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    Also, those criticizing Steve for coming here, I just want to say that if I knew about the Kappius hubs, I would have been a backer. But I never found out about them and they didn't get funded. Let everyone learn about every project and let them decide if they want to fund it.
    Full rigid SS, Hardtail SS, Hardtail Geared, Full Suspension Geared.

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    Thanks for the kind words @yourdaguy, Kappius Components is still charging full speed ahead with our hubs and a carbon 29er rim that will be fully released at Sea Otter. Kickstarter would have really helped us move up production timelines so I really hope Steve will be successful. I know how much it can help. Some Kappius wheels would look pretty sweet on a Domahidy, that's for sureÖ

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    Did I read about someone running your hoops at the Cape Epic?
    Calmer'n you are.

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    Okay, MTBR, I AM SOOOO CLOSE! Massive support for Domahidy Designs over the last couple of days puts me on the home stretch to success! With ONE DAY to go, I only have $7900 left to be fully funded. I can't be this close without crossing the finish line!

    BTW, It was a MASSIVE shame that the Kappius hubs weren't funded. They are killer hubs with the biggest leap forward in technology advancement in hubs for a REALLY long time. I talk to product managers all the time about buying up that IP because it really is better than what's out there. I'm happy to know things are moving forward with Kappius!

    Sorry, that aside, please help Domahidy Designs get over the top! Seriously, at this point, if 200 of you just buy hats, I'm there! (I'd rather sell you frames or bikes, though)

    Steve
    Founder/President
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    www.domahidydesigns.com

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    Hey Steve, contrary to most of the comments, I actually have a question about the frames. I had a Ti hardtail Unicoi from Litespeed years ago and the backend felt noodley. Is that still a problem with Ti? Is the aluminum going to be stiffer?

    I do wish you all the luck with this adventure. Remember the naysayers don't have a dime in this and anyone with a keyboard becomes an expert. It's just not as easy as it looks. The HammerHead adventure taught me that and I assume played into your decision for the Kickstarter. For all your help, I am going to figure out a way to get one of your frames.

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by Go4bling View Post
    Hey Steve, contrary to most of the comments, I actually have a question about the frames. I had a Ti hardtail Unicoi from Litespeed years ago and the backend felt noodley. Is that still a problem with Ti? Is the aluminum going to be stiffer?
    Go4bling, no noodle feeling on the back end of the DD ti bike. Planted torsionally but nice and forgiving. Ti, like any material, can be made to do what you want it to do. I can't speak for the early Unicoi frames, they may have been too aggressive with their wall thickness in order to keep the weight down, and the rear end got wonky because of it. Weight wasn't the bottom line on this frame, so I didn't try to push the weight down so low that it compromised the ride quality. I don't make an alloy bike, so I can't comment on that. The steel bike rides very similar, but it's obviously heavier. It also doesn't have quite the same 'spring' feeling as the ti does. It's SOOO comfortable, though. I love the way a steel bike glides over obstacles, especially with 29" wheels.

    Thanks for the support!

    Steve
    Founder/President
    Domahidy Designs
    www.domahidydesigns.com

  100. #100
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    Congratulations Steve!
    Full rigid SS, Hardtail SS, Hardtail Geared, Full Suspension Geared.

  101. #101
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    Yep congrats on meeting your goal!

  102. #102
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    3 more hours! It's so amazing, I'm there, but I'm really bummed I'm not heading to Kenya or Ecuador with somebody. Nobody's going to step up for the 'halo' pledge? It was such a cool package, I thought for sure somebody would be in to it. It's actually a pretty amazing deal, all expenses paid adventure trip to either Ecuador or Kenya. For the last three hours, I'll also upgrade the bike to a titanium one (instead of a steel one). Who's in????
    Founder/President
    Domahidy Designs
    www.domahidydesigns.com

  103. #103
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    ? - in regards to the way kick starter works. How do the totals we are seeing for your packages amount to the 80k? its looks as though its only around 48k? is the rest made up of 1$ donations? Just curious and congrats on the successful campaign. a

    A.

  104. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by azcanc View Post
    ? - in regards to the way kick starter works. How do the totals we are seeing for your packages amount to the 80k? its looks as though its only around 48k? is the rest made up of 1$ donations? Just curious and congrats on the successful campaign. a

    A.
    azcanc, the way Kickstarter works is that you can bid $1 OR MORE (the 'or more' is kind of the key here) on any of the pledge amounts. Many people who contributed to this campaign, like my family, didn't even choose a 'gift', but only gave because they wanted to see the success of my new upstart (so those don't show up under the 'awards' section). A few of my friends 'over pledged' for various things.

    I owe ALL THAT PLEDGED to my campaign a HUGE THANK YOU!!!! I am very stoked at getting through this Kickstarter campaign. It was a new experience for sure, and not as easy as it looks. I didn't plan for needing an 'advertising budget' but the campaign needed more exposure, so I did what I had to do.

    I'll send out a final 'THANK YOU' in two hours, once I'm totally in the clear! Thanks again MTBR! More fun stuff from Domahidy Designs coming down the pipeline, especially now that I have some capital to work with to get the ideas from my head into reality.

    Steve
    Founder/President
    Domahidy Designs
    www.domahidydesigns.com

  105. #105
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    Congrats ! Those bikes look sick -_-

  106. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by azcanc View Post
    ? - in regards to the way kick starter works. How do the totals we are seeing for your packages amount to the 80k? its looks as though its only around 48k? is the rest made up of 1$ donations? Just curious and congrats on the successful campaign. a

    A.
    I was curious about that myself but didn't want to be rude. Thanks for asking and thanks (Steve) for the reply. I was initially a bit skeptical of the Kickstarter concept (you pay me first, THEN I make stuff) but you've represented yourself well, especially considering the negativity.
    Good luck in your endeavors!
    Not without incident.

  107. #107
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    Thank you everybody, Domahidy Designs is funded and off to an amazing start as a fresh new company. So many more ideas and designs to share with you, but thanks for your support on these first two. I get they're not for everybody, but I suspect that everything I create will always have a crowd that they're not for.

    Now, my boys and I are heading off to Moab for some riding and play time, and when I get back, I have a production order to place and some serious work to do!

    Steve
    Founder/President
    Domahidy Designs
    www.domahidydesigns.com

  108. #108
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    best frame I have ridden so far... New Bike Company - Needs your help! SAVE MONEY AND HELP LAUNCH A COMPANY-dscn0762.jpg

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