Is my bike outdated?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Is my bike outdated?

    I have a 2013 trance x0 29er - see link.

    (https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/trance-x-29er-0-2013).

    I've been taking lessons on local trails (i'm terrible at taking corners) and have been told that my bike is from a previous generation, and that modern bikes are far easier to maneuver downhill.

    I don't get it - the bike was top of the line 7 years ago. That's not that old. It's not like mountain bikes are insanely difficult do design - what did they not know 7 years ago that they know now that make modern bikes so much easier to maneuver?

    The same sorts of trails existed 7 years ago as existed now - given that I would have thought that a top of the line 7 year old bike should be able to do them no prob.

    I mean it seems sort of ridiculous to spend 5k on a bike, and be told a few years later that it's not that great for the local trails.

  2. #2
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    The short answer, is basically yes.

    However, the bike you have hasnít changed. It was a good bike then, and it is a good bike now. If you are happy with it, then there is no need to change, or feel pressured to buy a new bike.

    That said, bikes have actually advanced a lot in the last 7 years. There has been a bit of a revolution around bike design, and it actually started close to when you bought your bike.

    The cliff notes version of it is that mountain bikes used to be designed, and sized like road bicycles. However recently, they have been migrating more towards geometry hat is more reminiscent of off road motorcycles/motocross bikes.

    Which is basically to say that bikes used to be small, with steep head tube angles, and high bottom brackets. To make up for the small frames, they had long stems. This all made them relatively unstable at speed.

    Now bikes are longer, lower bottom brackets, and have shorter stems. The head tube angles have gotten slacker (more like a big chopper motorcycle), and seat tubes have gotten steeper to help make it easier to pedal uphill. This combined with the longer wheelbase makes the bikes much more stable going downhill and when going fast.

    I upgraded from a 2012 XC hardtail, to a 2018 full suspension all mountain bike. It was a noticeable change for the better for the type of riding I do. But depending on the place you live, and type of riding you enjoy, it may not be as noticeable.

  3. #3
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    To compare old vs new, pull up your bike on giants web archive and look at the geometry, and compare it directly to the new trance 29. Thatís just one aspect though. Suspension manufacturers continue to progress in their technology field, and that really is one of the biggest differences. New suspension tends to have much better damping and be more plush for small impacts while still being more supportive and controlled under load situations (beamed turns, or pedaling or pushing against the bike to load the suspension). What really happens is, a lot of small things come together to make the new trance a completely different experience than the old one.

    That said, if youíre happy with your bike, there is no need to run out and buy a new one. I still have my 2013 Anthem 29, which I bought instead of a Trance 29 at the time because I always viewed myself as more of an XC guy. But my 2019 Trance 29 doesnít suck.

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    My 2012 Anthem is my current XC race bike.

  5. #5
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    If you are having fun with it that's all that matters.

    But yes it's very outdated, that bike was part of the learning process when they defiantly did not know what they were doing with 29's.

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    In theory, yes, in practice, not necessarily. IMO if its working for you and you don't have any noticeable complaints with it that a modern geometry bike might solve then you are good to go.

    My daily ride is a 2008 Turner Sultan. A couple years ago I felt the pressure to pick up a new 2018 model FS bike with more modern geometry. After doing my best to give it a go for a year and a half or so I actually sold it this spring because I didn't like it as well as my older Turner on my local trails.

    So YMMV and the only way to know for sure is to demo a few new bikes.

  7. #7
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    Just don't ride a new one if you want to save money...lol. The new bikes seem to be significantly better.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dale-Calgary View Post
    ...that bike was part of the learning process when they defiantly did not know what they were doing with 29's.
    I'd definitely say the problem had more to do with ignorance than defiance.
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  9. #9
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    It's totally outdated on the internet.

    In real life, it's fine.
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  10. #10
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    I remember building up a frame in 2013 and thinking that Giant was already a little outdated in their geometry even then, especially their 29ers (I think that was around their 650b only push? They got weird for a quick minute). You'll never get around the longer chainstays or some of the other frame geometry, but you could always play with an angleset and slacken the head angle + steepen the seat tube. I don't see bottom bracket height listed but it's likely high enough to warrant coming down a bit. Not much harm in experimenting and it's a good way to understand what each change can feel like.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrmojorizing View Post
    I've been taking lessons on local trails
    This is far more important than your bike. If I gave you a 5k bike you still wouldn't be any better at cornering .

    Ride the bike you have, get better at technique then if you are a good rider and feel the bike holds you back -- buy a new one.

    PS. I just sold my 12 year old bike that was okay and bought a 5k bike so do what I say not what I do, and I probably suck at cornering

  12. #12
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    Years ago ( 2010ish) I went into my LBS and asked about a few upgrades for my 5 year old bike. Was told it wasn't worth sinking money into. They told me cycles were evolving fast as computers!

  13. #13
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    It was a great bike when you got it. Everything that's come out since hasn't magically changed it. It's the same bike now, except perhaps for a little wear and tear.
    What, me worry?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by keen View Post
    Years ago ( 2010ish) I went into my LBS and asked about a few upgrades for my 5 year old bike. Was told it wasn't worth sinking money into. They told me cycles were evolving fast as computers!
    Always trust salespeople.
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Always trust salespeople.
    Ha - A guy in the LBS tried to sell me a 2014 Hightower yesterday saying it was still relevant. I laughed and politely declined.

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  16. #16
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    It isn't that engineers were unable to make a proper bike back in 2013 and suddenly learned how to 7 years later. It really comes down to technology changing the way we ride bikes and where we ride our bikes. Better suspension systems and larger wheels/tires have allowed us to ride harder terrain then ever and go faster while doing it. Suddenly at these faster speeds the limitations of existing geometry was seen. So newer bikes are designed to be more stable and easier to handle going very fast downhill. Now its not like your 2013 bike is now suddenly not able to be ridden offroad. In fact, depending on where and how you ride a newer bike might not benefit you at all. But if you ride difficult trails, or ride in a group with people on newer bikes, you will definitely benefit.
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  17. #17
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    aaa

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dale-Calgary View Post
    If you are having fun with it that's all that matters.

    But yes it's very outdated, that bike was part of the learning process when they defiantly did not know what they were doing with 29's.
    assuming you're in Calgary what kind of bike would you recommend for bragg creek area trails if I like climbing, but am terrible at taking corners going down?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrmojorizing View Post
    assuming you're in Calgary what kind of bike would you recommend for bragg creek area trails if I like climbing, but am terrible at taking corners going down?
    A quick look at trailforks for the trails around there, it looks more like the trails are a ride to the top, then a ride that is mostly downhill. Is that correct?

    https://www.trailforks.com/region/br...lon=-114.72336

    Then I'd say a normal trail/all mountain bike would be great for you.

    Basically, the current bike you have is designed more for speed uphill (ie, your weight is very forward). This makes it feel "sketchier" on the downhills, as that same forward weight bias that helped you going up, is working against you going downhill (especially if it is steep).

    A modern trail bike has kind of "split the difference" between uphills and downhills with their current design. They have moved the seat forward, and made the front of the bike longer to make it still fit normally while seated. This means your weight is forward for climbs, making those just as easy as your current bike.

    They have also pushed the front wheel out at a bigger angle, which makes it much harder to feel like you're going to go over the handlebars if you hit a bump/rock/root wrong. This combined with the longer wheelbase from stretching out the front, and lower bottom bracket (where the pedals are), helps your center of gravity stay low which is more stable.

    So instead of hanging off the back of the bike to keep your center of gravity in the right place to not die on the downhills (maybe what is happening to you right now?), you're more centered and comfortable. You generally hear this described as being more "in" the bike, rather than "on top of" the bike like you feel with older designs or bikes that are too small for you.

    Also, bikes suspension has progressed a lot lately as well, even though most of us didn't mention it before. They've advanced, and bikes pedal a lot better now than they used to. So you'll also notice most trail/all mountain bikes have a fair bit of suspension travel now (130-160mm), but all should pedal pretty well.

    But again, your old bike hasn't magically changed into something awful. Its just that now they have gotten better.

    Id suggest finding a demo, or snagging a test ride on someones newer bike to see how they feel, just to find out if you want to invest in one. As you mentioned, bikes are expensive.

    Fair warning though, the changes are pretty dramatic, and the bike you end up renting/demoing/borrowing will likely feel a bit weird at first, as it is a different riding style that makes them "work". So the ideal is something more than a quick spin around the parking lot .

  20. #20
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    My bike is outdated, but that doesn't stop me from riding it and having fun on it.

    Here is a nice visual for you of the difference the 10 years between 2008 and 2018 made in bike design. My outdated bike on the right and my friend's modern bike on the left.
    Is my bike outdated?-0830191113.jpg

  21. #21
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    I think the only way you can really have an outdated bike is by having a 26er, or having something with a straight head tube. That *really* bones you out of modern equipment.

    You can fully modernize a 2013 trance. I dont think the bike was exactly dialed geometry wise in 2013, but its still a modern bike in terms of accepting the new standards for gear.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgltrak View Post
    My bike is outdated, but that doesn't stop me from riding it and having fun on it.

    Here is a nice visual for you of the difference the 10 years between 2008 and 2018 made in bike design. My outdated bike on the right and my friend's modern bike on the left.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    The differences are dramatic. Your bike almost looks like it was in a front end collision compared to the 2018 bike.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    The differences are dramatic. Your bike almost looks like it was in a front end collision compared to the 2018 bike.
    =sParty
    On the other hand, to me the modern bikes look a lot like our ten speeds looked in the late 70s and early 80s after we jumped them and raked the forks way out on flat landings...

  24. #24
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    Is my bike outdated?-ftoosc29v3_p1-02.jpg

    Specifically for the bike in the photo below I wonder if a simple frame upgrade would make a difference? (Maybe longer forks but all in that's probably <750).

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgltrak View Post
    On the other hand, to me the modern bikes look a lot like our ten speeds looked in the late 70s and early 80s after we jumped them and raked the forks way out on flat landings...
    Ha! True dat!
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  26. #26
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    it does make for a great excuse to tell the significant other why you need a new bike.
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrmojorizing View Post
    assuming you're in Calgary what kind of bike would you recommend for bragg creek area trails if I like climbing, but am terrible at taking corners going down?
    Bragg doesnt really need that much travel, mid range 130 in the back is fine. It has some loose stuff up top so I would put some really good tires on it like a Assegai up front and Dissector out back.

    And just ride that bike until you figure out what you want next. Its fine for now

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwiscott View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Specifically for the bike in the photo below I wonder if a simple frame upgrade would make a difference? (Maybe longer forks but all in that's probably <750).
    Thanks for the suggestion, but that bike is working fine for me the way it is. Last year it saw about 2500 miles of trails including a lift served park day, several days in Crested Butte and Moab, Monarch Crest, and several segments of the Colorado trail along with my normal riding.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    It's totally outdated on the internet.

    In real life, it's fine.
    Spot effing on.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgltrak View Post
    Thanks for the suggestion, but that bike is working fine for me the way it is. Last year it saw about 2500 miles of trails including a lift served park day, several days in Crested Butte and Moab, Monarch Crest, and several segments of the Colorado trail along with my normal riding.
    Sorry wasnít so much a suggestion ó just a pondering!

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgltrak View Post
    On the other hand, to me the modern bikes look a lot like our ten speeds looked in the late 70s and early 80s after we jumped them and raked the forks way out on flat landings...
    Exactly. Somewhere in the middle is where 90% of bikes should be for the reality of the trails they are being ridden on, and the skill level/ability of the person riding on them.

  32. #32
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    There's always a better bike.
    But no, your bike is fine.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgltrak View Post
    My bike is outdated, but that doesn't stop me from riding it and having fun on it.

    Here is a nice visual for you of the difference the 10 years between 2008 and 2018 made in bike design. My outdated bike on the right and my friend's modern bike on the left.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	0830191113.jpg 
Views:	95 
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ID:	1341981
    Thing is, if you repeat a popular narrative often enough, people will take it for the truth.
    I have a friend who co-owns a popular hi-end bike shop here in San Diego. In a moment of candor he told me, what if I shelled out 7-8000 bucks for the latest geo frame and the newest suspension and the newest everything. No doubt, he told me, I would ride faster on that bike than on my 2013 "fossil". To what end? He knows how much retained hardware I already have in my skeleton, most of it from a mere moment of inattention.Or three. With the new stuff, maybe I would be able to go as fast as I was going when I inflicted multiple fractures on my body at those times. But then, I would be able to let it roll even faster, and as is with human nature, that same moment of inattention followed by mistake would would come around again. Only this time to a 66 year old body, and all that entails.

    I realized that I'm STILL happy with my 10 year old bike/frame, and it's best that I get re-acquainted with it, after a long layoff due to some medical issues that came knockin' on the door.

    And I'm good with that. There's plenty of younger, just-gotta-have -the-latest tech riders around; let the Industry take their money for a change. As is, I'm good.
    Just call me Ray

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Radium View Post
    Thing is, if you repeat a popular narrative often enough, people will take it for the truth.
    I have a friend who co-owns a popular hi-end bike shop here in San Diego. In a moment of candor he told me, what if I shelled out 7-8000 bucks for the latest geo frame and the newest suspension and the newest everything. No doubt, he told me, I would ride faster on that bike than on my 2013 "fossil". To what end? He knows how much retained hardware I already have in my skeleton, most of it from a mere moment of inattention.Or three. With the new stuff, maybe I would be able to go as fast as I was going when I inflicted multiple fractures on my body at those times. But then, I would be able to let it roll even faster, and as is with human nature, that same moment of inattention followed by mistake would would come around again. Only this time to a 66 year old body, and all that entails.

    I realized that I'm STILL happy with my 10 year old bike/frame, and it's best that I get re-acquainted with it, after a long layoff due to some medical issues that came knockin' on the door.

    And I'm good with that. There's plenty of younger, just-gotta-have -the-latest tech riders around; let the Industry take their money for a change. As is, I'm good.
    Your not wrong, Ray. Let nothing I say below imply that. Iím only here to offer what is perhaps a tangential perspective to yours.

    You & I are the same age. Sounds like during our times weíve both smacked the ground more than once and hard enough to do some damage to our skeletons.

    As for the equipment we each choose to ride today...

    I donít ride as fast as I used to, thatís for sure. But one of the things I like best about late model bike geo is that itís so much safer when it comes to getting oneís wheels off the ground.

    Or more accurately, when getting oneís wheels back onto the ground.

    Throughout the past 4 years, Iíve taken to the air. The biggest drop Iíve done to date was a 6-7 footer at Duthie Hill in Washington state. I donít usually go that big, but 3-4 footers are in my wheelhouse and itís all because of longer travel, slacker angles and especially the longer wheelbase of my latest bikes. At 6í2Ē tall, my late-geo frames keep my high COG between the wheels which allows me to save it whenever attempting to stick the landing of a wonky takeoff.

    Speed thrills, speed kills. But leaping can be done safely... at least aboard the right equipment. Late generation frames are far superior for this, IMO.

    Should I add... ďso far.ď
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    Thanks for the replies everyone! They've been most helpful.

    Just browsing trial bikes. Do most trail bikes at around 3-5k seem to come with SRAM components these days?

    I have been very happy with the shimano xt components on my current 7 year old giant trance, and have heard not so good things about SRAM reliability and quality in the past (especially brakes), so am curious about this.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrmojorizing View Post
    Thanks for the replies everyone! They've been most helpful.

    Just browsing trial bikes. Do most trail bikes at around 3-5k seem to come with SRAM components these days?

    I have been very happy with the shimano xt components on my current 7 year old giant trance, and have heard not so good things about SRAM reliability and quality in the past (especially brakes), so am curious about this.
    Shimano didn't have a competing 1x12 drivetrain system until just recently (within the last year or so). And even then, only the higher end components were available initially (XTR). So for the past few years, most bikes had SRAM on them for their drivetrain at least.

    Now that Shimano has a viable competing 1x12 system, you're starting to see some of the 2021 models being spec'd with Shimano as well.

    That said SRAMS drivetrains work well. And most complaints about SRAM brakes that I know of were related to the Guide series. And now those have been mostly replaced with the G2 brake. So I wouldn't be unduely worried about SRAM vs Shimano, at least in terms of Drivetrain/Brake reliablility.

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    I went through this very situation recently. Was riding a Rocky Mountain ETSX70 pimped out with XTR on Crossmax's Fox Talas. Very expensive 15 years ago. If I wasn't on that I was on my 2007 Cannondale 1FG 26" single speed. By current trends these bikes are completely outdated many times over. I got rid of the ETSX a few years ago and just rode the 1FG for many years and had a ton of fun and got a great workout.

    Fast forward to this year where I finally made the jump to an INTENSE Spider 275c and a 2019 Evil Following MB.

    My old bikes on the same trails were slow and precise requiring constant line adjustments and excellent bike control. New bikes are like "mountain goat rocket bikes." I mean I literally rip through trails 2-3 miles per hour at LEAST faster then the old bikes and this is on tight east coast single track. I work hard on my 1FG, I have an ear to ear grin on my Evil. Not sure I'll ever unrack the 1FG again or even the Spider 275c for that matter. I have a 2020 Tallboy 4 incoming as well so I can decide between the Evil and it for my ultimate short travel single bike quiver.

    I know it's expensive but if you can afford it a new bike is a ton of fun.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctorsti View Post
    I went through this very situation recently. Was riding a Rocky Mountain ETSX70 pimped out with XTR on Crossmax's Fox Talas. Very expensive 15 years ago. If I wasn't on that I was on my 2007 Cannondale 1FG 26" single speed. By current trends these bikes are completely outdated many times over. I got rid of the ETSX a few years ago and just rode the 1FG for many years and had a ton of fun and got a great workout.

    Fast forward to this year where I finally made the jump to an INTENSE Spider 275c and a 2019 Evil Following MB.

    My old bikes on the same trails were slow and precise requiring constant line adjustments and excellent bike control. New bikes are like "mountain goat rocket bikes." I mean I literally rip through trails 2-3 miles per hour at LEAST faster then the old bikes and this is on tight east coast single track. I work hard on my 1FG, I have an ear to ear grin on my Evil. Not sure I'll ever unrack the 1FG again or even the Spider 275c for that matter. I have a 2020 Tallboy 4 incoming as well so I can decide between the Evil and it for my ultimate short travel single bike quiver.

    I know it's expensive but if you can afford it a new bike is a ton of fun.
    I had a simlar experience going from my 2012 XC hardtail (26in tires, 70 degree HTA, 100mm stem, 100mm travel), to my 2018 Kona Process 153 29'er.

    I rode the exact same trail. The trail is ~1100ft of descending, and my average speed was almost 50% higher on the new bike. To be fair though, those rides were months apart, so some skill increase could have happened, and the bikes are from different categories for sure. Still though my top speed went from ~15mph to ~23mph, and I literally cut my time down from ~15min, to ~8min.

    Now, increased speed does come with some increased risk, and isn't the most important thing about riding, as others have mentioned. But I actually felt more in control/safer/less on the edge while on the newer bike. I actuallty didn't notice my speed was higher until looking at my GPS files.

    The upside of the higher speed though, is that many trails have a "trail speed" that they expect you to have to be able to clear jumps/etc. And on my old hardtail, none of those features made any sense "how could anyone have that much speed". Now a number of trails seem to flow much better, which is a nice perk as well.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrmojorizing View Post
    Thanks for the replies everyone! They've been most helpful.

    Just browsing trial bikes. Do most trail bikes at around 3-5k seem to come with SRAM components these days?

    I have been very happy with the shimano xt components on my current 7 year old giant trance, and have heard not so good things about SRAM reliability and quality in the past (especially brakes), so am curious about this.
    Well, yeah it seems most bikes in that range come with SRAM. I'm not going to knock on SRAM, but I happen to greatly prefer Shimano drivetrains and would very much like to see them on more bikes. XT is really great stuff.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrmojorizing View Post
    I have a 2013 trance x0 29er - see link.

    (https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/trance-x-29er-0-2013).

    I've been taking lessons on local trails (i'm terrible at taking corners) and have been told that my bike is from a previous generation, and that modern bikes are far easier to maneuver downhill.

    I don't get it - the bike was top of the line 7 years ago. That's not that old. It's not like mountain bikes are insanely difficult do design - what did they not know 7 years ago that they know now that make modern bikes so much easier to maneuver?

    The same sorts of trails existed 7 years ago as existed now - given that I would have thought that a top of the line 7 year old bike should be able to do them no prob.

    I mean it seems sort of ridiculous to spend 5k on a bike, and be told a few years later that it's not that great for the local trails.
    It simply isnt necessary. The trance is a great bike (rented one for a few days). The maestro suspension is a rip off of dw-link and is one of the more firm designs for climbing. I just sold my 2012 tallboy LTc which is still a great bike. The main thing I didnt love about it is that VPP has so much pedal bob when climbing. On the downs it was perfect. The giant maestro doesnt have that issue. I have two bikes now an (outdated) turner czar which I love and v1 ripmo with new style geometry which Im still figuring out.

    With the tallboy ltc on steep climbs I had to get the nose of the seat in my asscrack, with the new steep seat tube angles I can pedal while seated.

    When I bought the czar a few years ago, it really ruined vpp for me so I was waiting to buy a longer travel dw-link bike.

    If you do want to upgrade now is a good time because so many people are getting into biking because of coronavirus. You can get a really good return on your older bike.

    I personally only buy frames and migrate parts over.

  41. #41
    No Clue Crew
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    The modern current Trance IS a great bike. One of the most fun rigs Iíve owned in the last couple years. The OP is talking about a 2013 Trance, which was pretty universally recognized even back then as having, uh, unusual geometry.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  42. #42
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    Iím a perpetual beginner. Started with a 92 gt timberline full rigid brand new. 9 years later bought me and my wife two Gary fisher tassajara hardtails. Loved that bike. Climbed like a mountain goat, handled well ( for my skill level ) and put over 10,000 miles on that bike.

    2017 I bought an 09 fsr x country full suspension bike. My first squishy bike. My back loved it. The rest not so much. It was beyond sketchy. I felt cramped and over the bike. Not even on it, let alone in it. The Horst link bobbed like crazy unless I had it set to the trail setting. At least it had hydro discs on it. It stopped well. I also way more wrecks in 2 years than I had in the entire time I rode the fisher.

    Last year, five days before I blew out my knee I ordered a 29Ē 130/140 mm trail bike. It felt like a chopper more than a mountain bike in the driveway. On the trail it came alive!climbed better than the hard tail, descended faster than anything Iíd ever ridden, rolled over crap I couldnít clear with two good legs and standing up on the fsr or the fisher. I rode twenty miles on it the week before my surgery. Couldnít help myself. For now I ride seated as I canít stand up due to a weak quad. I can sit and spin up hill and cruise downhill and corner better than I could on my old bikes when I was healthy.

    That saying if your bike isnít holding you back, ride the wheels off of it! When you need a new bike youíll know. Ride a bunch of newer bikes too see how the handle. Youíll be amazed at how much better they feel.

  43. #43
    Meatbomb
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    2013 stumpy... It still rolls so I'm riding it.....I don't need a new bike every 2 years to be cool..

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo View Post
    2013 stumpy... It still rolls so I'm riding it.....I don't need a new bike every 2 years to be cool..
    Right on, Bro! I was just out riding' my Ellsworth Evolution (2013) today, and I realized that making any more speed fro the 'new' geometry or whatever would be a fool's errand, and when I crash at that higher speed, I could very likely snap me neck-pipe, which looks like a WW2 battlefield, radiology-wise.
    I'm perfectly happy with that "Worth-Less" , so it's gonna be my bike for good.
    Just call me Ray

  45. #45
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    452 chainstays.
    That was the problem at the time.
    Giant couldn't figure out how to make them shorter. Like everyone else was.
    And so they instead told everyone 27.5 was the only way forward. Ha Ha.
    We didn't go for that. Giant had to do the engineering. Now 435.
    Still not much, imo.

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    Exactly how have modern bikes changed in geometry compared to my 2013 trance (not familiar with typical mountain bike geometry terms)? Is it possible to update the component of the 2013 trance to make it match more modern geometry? It's hard to find demos during covid (other tan a stump jumper 29 or a pivot trail 429, but i'm not sure these bikes have enough travel).

  47. #47
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    Short answer: No, not possible. Go dig up the geometry chart from your bike and compare it to any equivalent modern bike. Youíll see the difference.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  48. #48
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    Lots of great advice already given here. I struggle with the same dilemma with my 2014 Santa Cruz Tallboy LTc. It's a slippery slope once you start browsing shiny new bikes.

    Some things I ask myself:
    - Am I still having fun on my bike?
    - Do I feel like I've reached the limits of what this bike is capable of?
    - Is there anything I really dislike about this bike?
    - Are there things that can be upgraded to get a few more seasons out of it?

    As mentioned above, things have definitely changed/progressed in design so I think trying to demo the crop of new geo bikes would certainly help. And since you mentioned wanting to get better at cornering, pay special attention to this when on a demo, it's possible certain bikes could give you a confidence boost.


    And if you've got some disposable income, I'd say go for it.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrmojorizing View Post
    Exactly how have modern bikes changed in geometry compared to my 2013 trance (not familiar with typical mountain bike geometry terms)? Is it possible to update the component of the 2013 trance to make it match more modern geometry? It's hard to find demos during covid (other tan a stump jumper 29 or a pivot trail 429, but i'm not sure these bikes have enough travel).
    Longer front triangles (combined with shorter stems)
    Slacker head tube angles
    Steeper Seat tube angles
    Lower BBs
    Shorter offset forks
    chainstay length has been played with back and forth a bit, depends on the maker

    You could slacken the headtube angle with an angle adjusting headset (potentially) and/or offset bushings for the shock (though this will affect the seat tube as well, not neccessarily in a good way).

    If you like what you ride, keep riding it. Ive got a couple of recent bikes, but also a 2014 Santa Cruz that is still properly brilliant, despite it being outdated by current standards.

    Current situation accepted, try ans many new bikes as you can.

  50. #50
    wuss
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    I just updated from a 2010 bike to a modern one.

    It feels different enough to require a few rides to adjust, but itís still a bike. I think Iím faster, but my friend who has always been faster then me is still faster - and he still rides a 10 year old bike.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrmojorizing View Post

    I mean it seems sort of ridiculous to spend 5k on a bike, and be told a few years later that it's not that great for the local trails.
    Better then being told a few days later though?

    If you read the forum youíll sometimes get the impression that only 1-2 bikes are great.

  52. #52
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    I have just worked through this issue myself....moving from my 2011 Stumpjumper to a 2020 Trek. I didnít really notice how bikes were advancing in geometry over time, until my new purchase.

    I had ditched the 110mm stem that came in the Stumpy long ago, but you can really see the difference in geometry with the bikes side by side.

    They ride differently, but both are still fun to ride....



    Interestingly, itís an XXL Stumpy and an XL. But pretty close in dimensions.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  53. #53
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    Didn't read the whole thread, but if no one mentioned it, and you understand geometry, check geometrygeeks.bike out, see if they have your bike, and compare to the modern version in the same size.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by acmcdonaldgp View Post
    They ride differently, but both are still fun to ride....
    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Indeed they should ride differently ... since one is a bike and the other a moped.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  55. #55
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    The main difference between then and now is slackness of head angle with extra wheel base and reach. The net result is a more stable for platform for descending.

    If you descend technical trails then a new steed will definitely be a step change.
    If you have easy benign trails the new geo wont have that much impact.

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