MB Action blows, but then what's new?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    indigosky
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    MB Action blows, but then what's new?

    This from R.C. at Mountain Bike Action Website:

    Q. I'm trying to choose between a Titus Racer-X in a 26 inch wheel version and one in a 29 inch wheel version. I will be using the bike for rocky techincal single-track in the Northeast. Which should I go with. Thanks RC. Keep up the good work.
    Bryan/mbaction.com - 1/19/2005 7:04:54 AM

    A. RC: I would stick with 26 inch weels because you will have many more tire choices, and replacement wheel parts will be available everywhere you ride. Choose 29 inch wheels if you are tall, ride a hardtail and like to ride fast over moderately rough and bumpy trails.


    No comment...

  2. #2
    Recovering couch patato
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    We did a very nice email action to Ritchey once. Is MB Action next? I'm up for it. Misinforming fellow riders that's just evil!
    Klok - XC - Skate - Ski

  3. #3
    jonny_mac
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    what is wrong

    with that? i have ridden 29ers and they are clumsy in singletrack, and
    it is harder to accelerate that bigger heavier wheel. they would be fine for
    fireroads. i dont like that magazine, but i dont think they were out of line there.

  4. #4
    indigosky
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonny_mac
    with that? i have ridden 29ers and they are clumsy in singletrack, and
    it is harder to accelerate that bigger heavier wheel. they would be fine for
    fireroads. i dont like that magazine, but i dont think they were out of line there.
    Um, I don't think my Karate Monkey is clumsy in singletrack, in fact I can get through technical tight singletrack better than on my old 1x1, because I'm "up above" the roots and rocks, not dropping in between them.

  5. #5
    Witty McWitterson
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    whatever j_mac...
    Just a regular guy.

  6. #6
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    It's IMO incorrect to declare that all 29" FS bikes per se are not worth it, and no 29"er can handle singletrack. Facts, generalizations and opinions collide.

    "26 inch bikes are only useful for really reeaaaly tight, smooth singletrack that's more or less level. They lack traction for steeper climbs, grip in high-speed cornering and are way too prone to endo going downhill, let alone with roots or rocks involved".
    Klok - XC - Skate - Ski

  7. #7
    featherweight clydesdale
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    Quote Originally Posted by indigosky
    This from R.C. at Mountain Bike Action Website:

    Q. I'm trying to choose between a Titus Racer-X in a 26 inch wheel version and one in a 29 inch wheel version. I will be using the bike for rocky techincal single-track in the Northeast. Which should I go with. Thanks RC. Keep up the good work.
    Bryan/mbaction.com - 1/19/2005 7:04:54 AM

    A. RC: I would stick with 26 inch weels because you will have many more tire choices, and replacement wheel parts will be available everywhere you ride. Choose 29 inch wheels if you are tall, ride a hardtail and like to ride fast over moderately rough and bumpy trails.


    No comment...
    The only 29"er MBA has written up is a Karate Monkey. It's heavy and my 2 hour demo of one left me unimpressed compared to my B-29. They really need more to test more models rather that write of the whole concept because of the Monkey.

    The most recent issue has a comment in the custom frame section of the "buyers guide" that if you want a 6" travel 29"er frame, your only choice is custom. I just want them to show me where.

  8. #8
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    they just don't understand

    I have got to assume the writers for MBA are all "too cool" kids of about 25 who mostly love downhill and other !Xtreeem! cycling. I don't really read many mtn bike magazines, but I am sure that most cycling industry journalists spend a lot more time looking at, talking about, and dreaming about bikes than riding them--Especially the "name brand" stuff. They just don't understand 29ers.

    I even remember reading one article about a year ago where they try to fit the cyclist with the bike. The guy had a decent amount of money to spend, and he explained the type of cycling he did and his height and weight(6"3" 200+) and then they picked 3 bikes that would be good--and one that would be best. The type of cycling was very similar to what I do and in fact similar to what a good amount of guys on this board do, and with his height you'd think that they would at least give a 29er a mention--but not even a peep. I think they ended up picking a Trek fuel or a heckler or some other FS.

    They just don't understand
    Don't get stuck on stupid!

  9. #9
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    Mountain Bike Fiction

    Around here we call that bike mag Mountain Bike Fiction. How can we trust a publication that seems extremely biased towards just a few brands (mostly Specialized and Shimano) and riding styles (not all of us take bikes off big drops)? Trust opinions of the real users (that's us) and not some self-proclaimed, know-it-all mag. This is not the first time these guys have given 29" thumbs down.
    Last edited by Super E; 01-26-2005 at 09:41 AM. Reason: Can't spell

  10. #10

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    For me the most contentious thing he says is "replacement wheel parts will be available everywhere you ride", how is this not the case with 29" wheels? At least he doesn't spout the usual bs about "slow handling, slow acceleration, fire-road only" like Johnny Mac (who appears to be mostly a weight weenie, what brings him over here?).

    I'd say the generalization of "Choose 29 inch wheels if you are tall, ride a hardtail and like to ride fast over moderately rough and bumpy trails" is relatively positive considering MBA's general close-mindedness...

    Sam

  11. #11
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    MBA = sellout

    That magazine is a sell out. They will say anything to keep a sponsor or not offend those that are buttering their bread.

    That is the problem that I am seeing right now. When you don't have buy in or some sort of acceptance from those who have a great voice within the industry (ie, magazines, etc.), then how do you ever expect to see support from any manufacturer for a movement that is needing some attention right now.

    "The 29er is great for 6' 4" tall person and is great on flat sections that may be bumpy." Give me a freakin' break! That is the kind of blabber that will hurt the 29er movement. And it makes me sick!

    I think that before anyone just reviews something, they better have ridden the bike or whatever for at least one month straight, if not longer. Anyone with half a brain would see that a 29er is much better in so many other areas...especially for us short people.

    I am not renewing my MBA...I am tired of their biased reviews to bikes that are crap to begin with. My $.02...subscribe to Dirt Rag and Velo News!

    Sorry, I am done...thanks for letting me rant.

  12. #12
    The Duuude, man...
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    is there no hope for the weak minded masses?

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  13. #13
    Axe
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    Quote Originally Posted by indigosky
    A. RC: I would stick with 26 inch weels because you will have many more tire choices, and replacement wheel parts will be available everywhere you ride. Choose 29 inch wheels if you are tall, ride a hardtail and like to ride fast over moderately rough and bumpy trails.
    What is wrong with that? You got a stash of 2.3 - 2.5 29r tires somewhere? You can easily find a tube in any LBS?

    29r accelerates slower, given everything else beeing equal. Travel offered is shorter, and there is no replacement for travel, no matter the wheel size.

    29rs have a lot of advantages, but so do 26rs. Fairly reasonable opinion from MBA, no matter what kind of buttock orifices they are in general.

    Now, for the kind of riding Racer-X is designed for - I would pick 29r, but that's a different story.

  14. #14
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    why don't...

    Quote Originally Posted by jonny_mac
    with that? i have ridden 29ers and they are clumsy in singletrack, and
    it is harder to accelerate that bigger heavier wheel. they would be fine for
    fireroads. i dont like that magazine, but i dont think they were out of line there.
    You learn how to ride?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fattirewilly
    The only 29"er MBA has written up is a Karate Monkey.
    Not quite true. In 1999 MBA did a write up on this bike that Wes Williams sent them that had a 91' Manitou fork on it.



    They said pretty much the same thing then, but it was more appropriate at that time certainly. Also Don Cook wrote up a pretty positive 29" blurb that was in the same issue and they ran side by side.
    A bike by any other name is still a bike.

  16. #16
    Where's Toto?
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    RC's a butt. Question comes from a guy who has already made up his mind on what he's buying - a Titus Racer X. Only question is 26" or 29". Reba is available for either and is a nice complement to the X's travel. Wheel parts? Ok - I'll give that tire selection and tube availability might be limited, but the rest of the wheel is certainly not. As to ride, I would think the 26" and the 29" suspension designs provide nearly the same characteristics. As long as the rider is of average or above height frame size shouldn't be an issue. Clearly 26" and 29" wheels each have their pros and cons, but not for the reasons specified.

    Now ---- if you really want an example of why MTBA sucks, check out the latest issue (Mar05) --- the "buyers guide". Few 29ers listed. Surprisingly Lenz is there, however, most smaller builders are not - Surly?, IF?, Kelly? Vicious?, Wily?, Walt?, MC? Look at the brands that are -- Santa Cruz, Specialized, Cannondale, Trek, Iron Horse and so on. They also provide little information of use to the consumer - tells very little about the bikes. Very objective reporting.

  17. #17
    jl
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    Quote Originally Posted by endure26
    Now ---- if you really want an example of why MTBA sucks, check out the latest issue (Mar05) --- the "buyers guide". Few 29ers listed. Surprisingly Lenz is there, however, most smaller builders are not - Surly?, IF?, Kelly? Vicious?, Wily?, Walt?, MC? Look at the brands that are -- Santa Cruz, Specialized, Cannondale, Trek, Iron Horse and so on. They also provide little information of use to the consumer - tells very little about the
    bikes. Very objective reporting.
    Endure26,

    Lenz is the same size as Wily, and Walt. They are the definition of small builders--company size is approximately one.

    Surly is not a small builder, they are QBP, they can be grouped with another brand a.k.a. Salsa. I would put IF, Kelly, and Vicious as small-to-medium shops.

    I'll have to check it out for myself... If I can find it ...
    We don't need more to be thankful for; we just need to be more thankful.

  18. #18
    Where's Toto?
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    Small builders may not have been the best choice of words. Point was that it seemed that a lot of the companies prefered by many of the folks that post here were clearly not represented. If a magazine is going to publish a "buyers guide", I would expect it to be a comprehensive review of what's available within different segments of the market. Not sure why some builders were ignored (maybe the folks at MBA don't realize there is an IF) -- but seems like a pretty lopsided guide.

  19. #19
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    Don't get me wrong I love my 29'er. It's about all I ride anymore, but I wouldn't exactly say RC is giving bad advice here. His reasons are a bit screwed up, but if I knew I would be riding mostly rocky technical singletrack I would also choose my 26. Just my take.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdutcher
    That magazine is a sell out. They will say anything to keep a sponsor or not offend those that are buttering their bread.

    That is the problem that I am seeing right now. When you don't have buy in or some sort of acceptance from those who have a great voice within the industry (ie, magazines, etc.), then how do you ever expect to see support from any manufacturer for a movement that is needing some attention right now.

    "The 29er is great for 6' 4" tall person and is great on flat sections that may be bumpy." Give me a freakin' break! That is the kind of blabber that will hurt the 29er movement. And it makes me sick!

    I think that before anyone just reviews something, they better have ridden the bike or whatever for at least one month straight, if not longer. Anyone with half a brain would see that a 29er is much better in so many other areas...especially for us short people.

    I am not renewing my MBA...I am tired of their biased reviews to bikes that are crap to begin with. My $.02...subscribe to Dirt Rag and Velo News!

    Sorry, I am done...thanks for letting me rant.

    I'm with Ya!

  21. #21
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    Yawn.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Scary
    I agree with MBA, 29'ers are heavy, slow turning, and stupid looking to boot. Amazing that all of the pro racers still use 26" and manage to climb steep pitches, grip in high speed corners, and rarely endo. 29'ers are for people who can't ride!
    Go back to weight weenies.
    Ride.

  22. #22
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    It seems 29ers have a big chip on their shoulders. Say anything against a 29er and you are a big loser.
    Well a couple of things. If MBA slighted a 29 and it finally made you realize that MBA was a tabloid piece of junk magazine then where have you been for the last decade or so?
    Buyers guides always blow. Name me one magazine that puts out a buyers guide that is decent?
    Tube and tire availablility is a big issue. How many shops carry a good selection compared to 26ers? A lot of shops don't even carry a good selection of 26ers.
    For short people I would think the toe to front wheel clearance issues on a 29er would be significant.
    Do you really think 26ers are more endo prone than 29ers?
    It is fine that you guys love your bikes so much, almost as much as the SS guys. I am just trying to get informed and understand these two trends.
    Racers may be slow to embrace technology but if there are true benefits to 29 and SS then in the not to distant future racers will switch over.

  23. #23
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    Answers

    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf
    It seems 29ers have a big chip on their shoulders. Say anything against a 29er and you are a big loser.
    Well a couple of things. If MBA slighted a 29 and it finally made you realize that MBA was a tabloid piece of junk magazine then where have you been for the last decade or so?

    1. I agree

    Buyers guides always blow. Name me one magazine that puts out a buyers guide that is decent?

    2. Guitar Player's Buyers guide rocks!

    Tube and tire availablility is a big issue. How many shops carry a good selection compared to 26ers? A lot of shops don't even carry a good selection of 26ers.

    3. 26" inch tubes and 700x44mm tubes both work for 29 inch wheels. Many shops are QBP, or BTI users, so therefore have availability to most 29 inch tire offerings as well as 26".

    For short people I would think the toe to front wheel clearance issues on a 29er would be significant.

    4. Can be overcome in most cases. See WaltWorks or Wily Cycles for starters.

    Do you really think 26ers are more endo prone than 29ers?

    5. I don't think so....I KNOW SO!

    It is fine that you guys love your bikes so much, almost as much as the SS guys. I am just trying to get informed and understand these two trends.

    6. Glad your here!

    Racers may be slow to embrace technology but if there are true benefits to 29 and SS then in the not to distant future racers will switch over.
    7. Ahh! Racers! Whatever.....I'm goin' for a ride!
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  24. #24
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    What?

    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf
    It seems 29ers have a big chip on their shoulders. Say anything against a 29er and you are a big loser.
    Well a couple of things. If MBA slighted a 29 and it finally made you realize that MBA was a tabloid piece of junk magazine then where have you been for the last decade or so?
    Buyers guides always blow. Name me one magazine that puts out a buyers guide that is decent?
    Tube and tire availablility is a big issue. How many shops carry a good selection compared to 26ers? A lot of shops don't even carry a good selection of 26ers.
    For short people I would think the toe to front wheel clearance issues on a 29er would be significant.
    Do you really think 26ers are more endo prone than 29ers?
    It is fine that you guys love your bikes so much, almost as much as the SS guys. I am just trying to get informed and understand these two trends.
    Racers may be slow to embrace technology but if there are true benefits to 29 and SS then in the not to distant future racers will switch over.
    Do you currently own a 29er? You say that you are trying to get informed about the trends here between 26er v 29er. So, if the anwser is no, than you need to be on one and see for yourself.

    29er riders don't have a chip on our shoulders. I, for one, do not. I just don't think that MBA is a good example of a non-biased publication. If you have been a reader of that rag and you don't see that, than you are blind my friend. They go with the flow and their reviews are marginal at best. And yes, I have yet to see a good buyers good in quite a few years in any magazine. But, as I stated earlier, if you are going to review a 29er, you can't just do it on a couple of long rides. I have been riding a 29er for close to a year now. I recently got another 29er to try out. I took it out on a ride the other day (3.5 hour ride) and I immediately did not fall in love with it. Something was not right about it. Now, I love everything about a 29er, but this last ride was not the best. Am I done? Do I think that my recent acquisition of a 29er was wrong? Should I give the bike a bad review? No. I need to change some things and give it another whirl. By the end of the month of testing it out, I should have a good idea, if it is the right bike for me. MBA would stop after that initial break-in period review and already have a biased opinion. Have you ever seen them review something and say that they did not like the product in the beginning, but after 30 days of use, they did like it? The reader never knows too much about their testing. It does not seem thorough. IMO, it is biased based on some already pre-conceived notion!

    29ers have problems just as much as 26ers do, but those that choose to ride the 29er fully knows and understands that the benefits far out weigh any issues. A 29er rider may have problems finding parts and accessories, but we have more options than we did 2 years ago. Yeah, it is a slow process, but progress has been made.

    Racers may not like the 29er yet, but they will, if that is the way they want to. It is hard for people to adopt something that may not be as tried and true as one would like. Who knows?! Who cares?! Just ride whatever feels best for you.

    The whole point of my argument to this subject is that there are not enough of good solid, unbiased reviews of mountain bike related product.

  25. #25
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    Trends??

    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf
    It is fine that you guys love your bikes so much, almost as much as the SS guys. I am just trying to get informed and understand these two trends.
    you can't begin to understand SS's or 29er's if you have it in your mind that they are merely trends...
    SSing has been around too long to be discounted as a trend. that should be your jumping off point- open up a bit and get over that idea. it will help you "understand."
    Spinning and Grinning...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Scary
    I agree with MBA, 29'ers are heavy, slow turning, and stupid looking to boot.
    I agree Mr. Scary, a bike with 29 foot wheels would indeed be heavy, slow turning, and stupid looking to boot. However, we are talking about 29 inch wheels here....

    Sam

  27. #27
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    I regard the reduced endo factor as a factual benefit of 29" bikes. I used to endo all over the place, but in the last 2 years of 29"dom, I only managed once, by sticking my front wheel in a very muddy ditch in which my wheel fitted like a glove. So blame the Monkey!
    You'd have to either be a very openminded and knowledgeble engineer (extrmeely rare) to not need a testride to make up your mind on this. Get a 29" bike, and just TRY to endo the sukker. Good luck. Same for lifting a front wheel on a climb, much less likely to happen, and I rate that as a good thing. If I HAVE to pull a wheelie, use use my muscles to make that happen, and it does.

    Ride, and learn...
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf
    It seems 29ers have a big chip on their shoulders. Say anything against a 29er and you are a big loser.
    Well a couple of things. If MBA slighted a 29 and it finally made you realize that MBA was a tabloid piece of junk magazine then where have you been for the last decade or so?
    Buyers guides always blow. Name me one magazine that puts out a buyers guide that is decent?
    Tube and tire availablility is a big issue. How many shops carry a good selection compared to 26ers? A lot of shops don't even carry a good selection of 26ers.
    For short people I would think the toe to front wheel clearance issues on a 29er would be significant.
    Do you really think 26ers are more endo prone than 29ers?
    It is fine that you guys love your bikes so much, almost as much as the SS guys. I am just trying to get informed and understand these two trends.
    Racers may be slow to embrace technology but if there are true benefits to 29 and SS then in the not to distant future racers will switch over.
    I do believe 29ers are less prone to endos than 26ers. But this is an indirect effect of having a longer wheelbase and thus a lower center of gravity. I am sure you could build a 29er which is more prone to endos than most 26ers. I do not know whether the greater stability of the 29er wheel torque helps much for avoiding endos. It might cause the rear wheel to resist going over the front one if it is at a bit of an angle. I don't know.

    Tube and tire availability is a big issue, I don't think anyone here denies that. But that is not a design problem, that is an industry problem.

  29. #29
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    Opinion

    The writer asked for RC's opinion, so he gave it. He's not into 29ers, and to be fair, most people aren't into them (at least not yet.)

    Since we don't know where this guy rides and what type of technical terrain he rides (because they are are all different levels of technical,) none of us knows if the advice given is correct. Personally, when i ride big-move sub walking pace technical, I want a bike which is easy to manuever and is less stable, because i need to wheelie/nose-wheelie and weight and unweight eash wheel quickly. In these situations, the added wheelbase and lower CG(relative) of a 29er isn't ideal. In other situations, it can be superior. Nothing is perfect for everything.

    The lack of big tires is really a huge issue for technical riding. (although a lot of people are going to be disappointed when those new big tires saw through their chainstays)

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf
    It seems 29ers have a big chip on their shoulders. Say anything against a 29er and you are a big loser.
    If it seems that way, it's because over and over again we see statements from people who've never posted on this board before, and in most cases have never actually ridden a 29"er, make statements about how 29"ers suck. Every once in a while we'll see an intelligent and well articulated post from someone who's actually tried big wheels and found it just didn't work for them, but those are the exceptions. Otherwise almost all the negative opinions I've seen are from people who either haven't ridden 29"ers, or have ridden a borrowed bike that didn't fit them anyway around a parking lot.

    I should also add, even among the comments from those who have tried 29"ers and say they aren't good on tight singletrack, I daresay most of those were people who test rode Gary Fisher 29"ers, the only widely available production bikes in our category. Fishers are long in the wheelbase and (until this year) very low in the bottom bracket. In other words, not good singletrack bikes. The statements about 29"ers being more suited to fire road cruising than singletrack are largely based on Fisher bikes. My zippy-handling KM is at least as good on singletrack as any of my 26" bikes were.

    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf
    For short people I would think the toe to front wheel clearance issues on a 29er would be significant.
    You have to be under 5'3-5'6" for that to be a problem. I am 5'7" with average (9.5) size shoes, riding a Karate Monkey (which has a substantially shorter wheelbase than, say, a Fisher), and I have NO toe overlap problems. Yes, ultimately that IS the limiting factor in getting shorter people on 29" bikes, but you can still be pretty short and make it work. At least for people with average sized shoes and cranks, you can easily go down to about a 22" effective top tube and make it work pretty well without having to adopt ridiculously slack angles.

    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf
    Do you really think 26ers are more endo prone than 29ers?
    Yes! The hubs are 10% lower on 26"ers, but your weight isn't any lower. Of course they are more endo prone!

    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf
    Racers may be slow to embrace technology but if there are true benefits to 29 and SS then in the not to distant future racers will switch over.
    I expect to see that happening. Until recently this 29" board was relatively quiet, and most of the names in the threads were recognizable to those of us who've been here a while. Suddenly in the last 3-4 months we've become one of the busiest forums on mtbr, with new names popping up daily. Interest in 29" bikes appears to have skyrocketed recently, and at this point it looks like only a matter of time before more recers start experimenting with it. If a few of them start having successes, it will quickly snowball and other mfrs and racers will jump on board.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf
    It seems 29ers have a big chip on their shoulders. Say anything against a 29er and you are a big loser.
    Well a couple of things. If MBA slighted a 29 and it finally made you realize that MBA was a tabloid piece of junk magazine then where have you been for the last decade or so?
    Buyers guides always blow. Name me one magazine that puts out a buyers guide that is decent?
    Tube and tire availablility is a big issue. How many shops carry a good selection compared to 26ers? A lot of shops don't even carry a good selection of 26ers.
    For short people I would think the toe to front wheel clearance issues on a 29er would be significant.
    Do you really think 26ers are more endo prone than 29ers?
    It is fine that you guys love your bikes so much, almost as much as the SS guys. I am just trying to get informed and understand these two trends.
    Racers may be slow to embrace technology but if there are true benefits to 29 and SS then in the not to distant future racers will switch over.
    29’er Enlightenment

    It all came clear to me when I looked in my garage. Lined up from smallest to biggest were all of my boy’s bikes and my rigs. A variety of 12”, 16”, 20”, 24” and 26” wheeled bikes (too many kids too many bikes).

    When Santa brought my 3 year old a 16’er bike for Xmas to replace his 12”er the first thing I noticed was how stable he looked on that bike. I then also remembered the same situation with my 7 year old.

    After reviewing this board I went to my LBS and rode a 29”er to see what it was all about. WOW I was hooked! For one the bike felt like it fit. Let’s face it MTB’s bikes are made for 95% of the population (right handed, under 6” and under175lbs) At 6’3”, 215lbs and left handed I am screwed! Think about it. If you are over 6’ how does it feel sitting in an Airplane (coach or business class)? I can not speak for the rest of my fellow 29’er fascists but for someone over 6” 29’ers are ideal. Why would a 5’8” and a 6’ 3” rider both have 26’ wheels and 175mm cranks? Doesn’t make sense

    I am currently selling off my entire high end 26’ wheeled bikes and plan on building up KM SS and Astrix Monk FS.

    Yes the FS and tire market is not developed to meet the current demand but it will catch up. Look at what the demand was for SPD shocks, UST tires and all of the other products the MTB community has demanded in the past.

    The 29’er revolution can not be stopped!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Scary
    I agree with MBA, 29'ers are heavy, slow turning, and stupid looking to boot. Amazing that all of the pro racers still use 26" and manage to climb steep pitches, grip in high speed corners, and rarely endo. 29'ers are for people who can't ride!
    You're right, Nat Ross, Cameron Chambers and Mike Curiak can't ride.

    Go back to weight weenies, they may welcome you're attitude over there but I doubt it.

    B
    www.thepathbikeshop.com

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeeZee
    29’er Enlightenment
    After reviewing this board I went to my LBS and rode a 29”er to see what it was all about. WOW I was hooked! For one the bike felt like it fit. Let’s face it MTB’s bikes are made for 95% of the population (right handed, under 6” and under175lbs) At 6’3”, 215lbs and left handed I am screwed! Think about it. If you are over 6’ how does it feel sitting in an Airplane (coach or business class)? I can not speak for the rest of my fellow 29’er fascists but for someone over 6” 29’ers are ideal. Why would a 5’8” and a 6’ 3” rider both have 26’ wheels and 175mm cranks? Doesn’t make sense

    I am currently selling off my entire high end 26’ wheeled bikes and plan on building up KM SS and Astrix Monk FS.
    Welcome to the adult sized world set of wheels, DeeZee.

  34. #34
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    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by SingingSingleTracker
    Welcome to the adult sized world set of wheels, DeeZee.
    Thank you it is good to be here

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Scary
    I agree with MBA, 29'ers are heavy, slow turning, and stupid looking to boot. Amazing that all of the pro racers still use 26" and manage to climb steep pitches, grip in high speed corners, and rarely endo. 29'ers are for people who can't ride!
    You do realize that this is the 29er forum right? Just curious.

    I would feel pretty comfortable saying that you don't have a significant amount of time on the bikes in question.

    I would also be pretty comfortable saying that there are a number of people on this board who could give you a run for your money.

    Just a few thoughts.

    B
    www.thepathbikeshop.com

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quasi
    I do believe 29ers are less prone to endos than 26ers. But this is an indirect effect of having a longer wheelbase and thus a lower center of gravity. I am sure you could build a 29er which is more prone to endos than most 26ers. I do not know whether the greater stability of the 29er wheel torque helps much for avoiding endos. It might cause the rear wheel to resist going over the front one if it is at a bit of an angle. I don't know.
    Huh? The height of your center of gravity is where it is. It doesn't know about your wheelbase.

    Longer wheelbase (well, longer front center - long chainstays won't make too much of difference) can help, if your bike is longer. That would depend on the bike design - it seems like they generally have longer top tubes, but they also tend to steeper head tube angles which pulls back the front center

    The big difference is in the wheel size - for a given bump size, the bigger wheel will have a smaller horizontal force component. It's that horizontal force undershooting your center of gravity that sends you over the bars. Or in other words, they're more likely to roll over something than get stopped.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeeZee
    29’er Enlightenment
    Why would a 5’8” and a 6’ 3” rider both have 26’ wheels and 175mm cranks? Doesn’t make sense.
    They sit on the same toilet bowl and walk through the same door and use the same spoon.

    Same reasoning some stupid builder use in not offering smaller sizes for 29r frame - that they are for big people.

    They are not. Wheel size is not the most important part of fit by a fair margin.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe
    They sit on the same toilet bowl and walk through the same door and use the same spoon.

    Same reasoning some stupid builder use in not offering smaller sizes for 29r frame - that they are for big people.

    They are not. Wheel size is not the most important part of fit by a fair margin.
    Thanks Do you ride a FS bike?

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    If you go back to my post you will see that I am not a big fan of MBA and never have been.

    I do agree that trying to fit people of vastly different sizes on the same size bikes and wheels is probably not the best thing. As pointed out children ride smaller bikes with smaller wheels. Tall people would probably be better suited on 29 inch wheels.

    When NASA goes into space, I don't think they design things around feel but around known facts. From speeds to orbits to the angle they approach the atmosphere for re entry etc. When it all comes down to it, the feel that one has on their bike should be reduceable to physics and testing and not grin factors. If a 29er rolls over the average MTB terrain better then I would think that would be an advantage and something that I think is testable. If it climbs slower due to greater weight then that should be measureable too.

    I have seen so much hype over the years and people who swore up and down over different technologies yet when you see them a couple of years later that technology is no where to be seen.

    I certainly am not closed minded regarding 29 inchers, although I have come to a conclusion on SS. I think SS is great for people who want to build power and become animals on the climbs but I don't think it is for me since my knees can't take it, I like to do technical climbing and I love to haul butt on sand wash downhills. At 5'6" I am leery of the overall bike size with 29 inch, the lack of 2.3 and up tires for sand desert riding and the possible toe to wheel overlap and I want a 100MM fork. If I was a tall guy I would probably give it a whirl.

    I guess that is the last I'll say on this subject.

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    How retarded was the latest issue of MTA. Sorry to hijack but they suck balls. Lets list every POS made and see who cares. At least give some reviews even if you were paid off by the vendors.

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    ... and if we just ...

    Quote Originally Posted by TrailVictim
    How retarded was the latest issue of MTA. Sorry to hijack but they suck balls. Lets list every POS made and see who cares. At least give some reviews even if you were paid off by the vendors.
    My outlaws gave me a subscription for Xmas last year. Received my final copy last week. Threw it in the "recycle bin" without looking at it. I learn more in one day reviewing this board than a year of looking at that rag.

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