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  1. #1
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    Like new 7 year old bike with full suspension....what to look for?

    It's a 2012 Trek Superfly with Fox shocks front and rear, hardly ridden at all and looks it. Price is $1K, might be able to get a little knocked off. I don't think it's seen any upgrades.

    My inclination is to take it to LBS but not sure seller is OK with that process just yet. So, what should I look for as a deal-breaker/maker? I don't want to waste time or pay the LBS if something is way out of whack.

    Also found a local 2017 Superfly 7 with Fox front shock only for $900. Being 56, I'm not going to 'shred' but for only $100 more, is the older model the better situation?

    thanks!

  2. #2
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    That price is way high for the '12 IMHO. Lack of use is not always good, suspension and hub seals, as well as tires can dry-rot and brake fluid can absorb moisture, etc.
    Niner Jet 9 RDO, Scalpel 29, XTC 650b, 04 Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Trek Rigid SS - No suspension, no gears....no problem

  3. #3
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    Thanks. I may go look at the '17 Superfly 7 afterall.

  4. #4
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    Older bike is not worth 1K-----maybe $500 at best----simply put the geo and suspension are not modern--but first decide fs or hardtail i the best for where you will ride---note folks ask crazy prices for used bikes--in my experience it is tough to get 50% for any used bike regardless of asking price----the used market really is a buyers market so do not be shy

  5. #5
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    < $500 for a low miles '12 Superfly fs? - sounds like something I'd like to be able to find, I agree the used market is tough, but I don't think it's that flat.

    Ebay sold is probably your best resource for pricing used bikes. Does the '12 you're looking at resemble this one?
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Used-Trek-S...IAAOSwETJbv0C5

    Like this one on bicycle blue book? You will find people who argue that bbb is low, but very few that will argue bbb is too high.
    https://www.bicyclebluebook.com/Sear...50&model=76011
    skidding is the signature of the novice; learn how to use your brakes.

  6. #6
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  7. #7
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    I had one exactly like that for a short time just over 3 years ago (no experience with the newer model you mentioned), I think I sold it for $1100 very quickly at that time, my gut is that it's in the $700-800 +- range, but do your ebay sold research.
    I liked that bike, the geo is dated but not bad at all (unless you're going to be going off big drops etc).
    The brakes are ok and probably the weak point, if you're a very 'avid' rider (pun intended) you'd probably be happier with a newer/better brake like a Shimano XT or even SLX.
    skidding is the signature of the novice; learn how to use your brakes.

  8. #8
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    I’d worry about suspension, seals are very old and unused, likely to fail, not worth buying, old geo, times marches on. Put your money toward a newer bike.
    XMed GG Smash 29/27+ (Frameset For Sale)
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  9. #9
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    Thanks y’all. Sound advice, thanks for taking the time to post.

  10. #10
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    Quick question; what year did ‘modern geometry’ start? Doubt I can afford a new bike so looking for good used.

  11. #11
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    You have excellent trails in Bentonville.
    I'd save up or sell some stuff toward a good fs bike. Or at least a Plus bike like a Stache. Wide rims are a big benefit for cutting down on crashes, imo.
    Look at the geo of a Jeffsy and compare the head tube angle, seat tube angle, chainstays and reach.
    Fezzari Signal Peak for a short travel 29. Maybe a little slacker.

    Make sure you get the right size bike. And that has nothing to do with standover. It has to fit while you're riding it.
    https://fortsmith.craigslist.org/bik...773766535.html
    https://springfield.craigslist.org/b...770558588.html

    Watch the Bible of Bikes tests for 2017 ridden in fall 2016 in Bentonville.
    https://www.bikemag.com/2017-bible-o...west-arkansas/
    Check out the recent two years for more info.
    https://www.youtube.com/user/TheBikemag/videos

  12. #12
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    Like new 7 year old bike with full suspension....what to look for?

    Quote Originally Posted by clubmanager View Post
    Thanks. I may go look at the '17 Superfly 7 afterall.
    That's a hardtail bike. Not equivalent. A hardtail may fit your riding conditions, but if it's bumpy, not.

    To all of you recommending a new bike, how much is a new Trek equivalent to that Superfly full suspension bike going to cost?

    An older bike that's been hardly ridden is worth a lot more than one that's been beat.

  13. #13
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    I am coming to the conclusion that a FS is the way to go and either a new or perhaps 1-2 year old bike checked out by LBS. I have also figured out that spending $1K ain't gonna happen and am working on securing another $1K.

  14. #14
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    After reading comment #11; am I correct in now thinking that a wider tire bike might be suitable in the place of FS? I'm sure FS is still more appropriate but given the price difference.....have to say I do like the wide tire bikes and at one point thought of getting a fattie just for fun. However, with the trails available here, I think a fattie wouldn't do.
    Again, I'm new to this so don't beat me up to badly!

  15. #15
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    Disregard, I'm just gonna shop local....'buy once, cry once'.

  16. #16
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    Wider tires have benefits as you develop your skills. You run them at lower pressures if they're on wide rims. This gives you a bigger footprint at slow to medium speeds. You'll get more traction but they also can lose traction and slide out more slowly. This can give you more time to make a line change correction and avoid a crash. As you get into really fast trails you'll need to up the pressure to protect your rims and some of the benefits are offset.
    That CL Trek Fuel is setup with 27.5+ and it has a very good rear shock. The Penske developed one. The Stache is setup with a good Manitou fork with a tunable metal shim stack and 29+ tires on wide rims. A really fun bike.

  17. #17
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    Since you mentioned you're not really going to 'shred', and you're just a little older than me, and given you have a budget, you might want to consider bikes that are a few years old and not 'modern',- you're going to have to spend a lot of money if you want the latest thing (less steep heat tube angle, wide rims) that is also lightweight.
    If you're just going to ride for fitness a couple of times a week on rolling trails with some moderate climbs and descents, a few roots and rocks, you would likely be very happy on something a bit older.
    Lots of guys ride older bikes and are really fast, the gains from the modern stuff is marginal unless you're on 'heavier' trails with drops/steeps/chunks.

    Take a look at the terrain you'll be riding on, and how fast you intend to be riding. I do most of my riding on an old 26er hardtail, and I have fun riding it (and I can keep it in my garden shed while keeping the race bikes clean and tuned). My newer carbon 29er bikes are a lot nicer and faster over most terrain (but those are 'dated' now too), the slightly old stuff is plenty good to consider, depending on how you use it.

    Take a good hard look at how/where you intend to ride. For smoother trails, a lightweight hardtail is hard to beat, often priced attractively and lower maintenance.
    skidding is the signature of the novice; learn how to use your brakes.

  18. #18
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    Dude, you're 56 years old....go with a full suspension bike....your body will thank you.* You are obviously a wise man as you are heeding the advice already provided on this thread - namely that the 2012 bike is overpriced and it could have maintenance issues from just sitting around.

    *This statement is not intended to offend, as I am nearly 50 myself and I have therefore judged myself qualified to make such statements.

  19. #19
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    Ha! No offense taken. The fact is, I am 56 and there are things that go with that. While I am in excellent shape, it doesn't mean I can ride like I did 25-30 years ago.
    So yes, I am going to concentrate on finding a good new or local used FS rig and if used, one that is inspected by one of the local LBS I like and trust.
    Thanks to all for steering me in the right direction.

  20. #20
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    Just some friendly advice... Trek has used custom Fox shocks on their various generations of bikes. The DRCV shocks have a trunnion mount and look like this:

    Like new 7 year old bike with full suspension....what to look for?-p4pb9739339.jpg

    YMMV but a riding buddy of mine had to send his shock to Oregon to a small, independent suspension tuning company for a rebuild. His local Trek dealer could not fix it, or get parts from Fox to fix it. If you can, I'd avoid any used trek, older than a few years, with a proprietary shock.
    The cake is a lie.

  21. #21
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    OK, thanks. Good to know....

  22. #22
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    You'll want to do your research on different forks and shocks.
    Price is a consideration.
    All need maintenance. Some, like Fox, seem to to need more frequent service.
    Most shops don't work on forks and shocks. They send them out.
    Dirt Labs service it.
    https://www.dirtlabs.com/shocks/
    I do my work. It's mostly simple.
    The DRCV ReAktiv shock shown above takes seals the same as an Evol plus one extra.
    https://forums.mtbr.com/shocks-suspe...t-1048100.html
    Oil is for lubrication only so not critical.
    The shock is run in the Trail setting.

  23. #23
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    Dude, as a new rider, don’t get hung up in all technical mumbo-jumbo being tossed about here. Keep it simple.

    Set a budget and buy the newest full suspension bike you can afford from a reputable manufacturer. If possible, demo or rent a couple bikes locally to ride and make a decision. Riding is the important thing.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  24. #24
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    FWIW, I have much older suspension bits that work fine. I really wouldn't worry about 'dry rot' a 6 year old bike unless it has been sitting outside a few feet from the ocean the whole time.

    Also, 'modern geometry' is not a must have IMHO either. I've actually found myself going back to a less 'modern' set up for most of the trail riding I do.
    Sinister Bikes
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  25. #25
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    TBH, the whole thing is making me a bit wonky; so I'm going to focus on a good used bike less than 5-6 years old with good quality components.....that I can afford and still look at myself in the mirror.
    Found a 3-4 year old (frame is 4 years old, components and build 3yo) Niner Jet 9 that is built up nicely for $1500; it's like new with full XT package and Fox shocks. The guy knows bikes and vouches for it 100%; will take it to LBS to have it checked.

  26. #26
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    Sorry if this is a double post; don't see the original.

    How about this bike? Thoughts?
    https://imgur.com/a/aYlpyEs

    Seller's description:
    $1,500. Niner 29’er Jet-9 full suspension MTB. Size large. Awesome efficient XC trail bike with no pedal bob. 100mm rear travel with a Monarch RCT3, 120mm Fox 32 in the front. Full XT group with 2x10. Low miles/great shape/no issues. Set up with tubeless 2.35” tires.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by clubmanager View Post
    Sorry if this is a double post; don't see the original.

    How about this bike? Thoughts?
    https://imgur.com/a/aYlpyEs

    Seller's description:
    $1,500. Niner 29’er Jet-9 full suspension MTB. Size large. Awesome efficient XC trail bike with no pedal bob. 100mm rear travel with a Monarch RCT3, 120mm Fox 32 in the front. Full XT group with 2x10. Low miles/great shape/no issues. Set up with tubeless 2.35” tires.
    That sounds like a solid deal to me.

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