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    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build

    You can finally get a downcountry frame that ships factory-direct and looks badass.

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-1-cover-pic-500.jpg

    Light Carbon LCFS937
    Price: $550 ($80 USA shipping)
    Travel: 120-140mm front, 115-130mm rear
    Head angle: 67o
    Reach: 500mm (20.5”)
    Frame construction: Full Toray 700 carbon fiber
    Sizes: 17.5”, 19”, 20.5”
    More info: Light Carbon website

    Disclaimer: I will sell this complete build (with a new cockpit) in July for $4000 to make way for the next steed. $4k obo.

    The FS937 might just be the most visually assaulting and forward-thinking carbon frame that’s shipped consumer-direct by the factory. Even Pinkbike’s Brian Park cautiously praised it in his article on “5 surprisingly nice catalog frames” last year. One Pinkbike commenter asked, “What’s a designer like that doing on open-mold frames?”

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-pinkbike.jpg
    Pinkbike highlighted the “clean looking” LCFS937 frame (Photo: Pinkbike)

    Indeed, this frame is an original and creative work of bicycle art.

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-2-snow-pic.jpg
    I built up my FS937 with 115mm rear travel and 120mm front travel, weighing in just over 22 lbs. However, you can match your course and style by choosing your suspension travel strategically. For example, you can limit rear travel by using a different shock stroke (40mm is ~115mm travel, 42.5mm is ~123mm travel, and 45mm is ~130mm travel). You can also choose your front travel, as axle-to-crown lengths corresponding to about 120mm-140mm of travel in a 29er configuration will play well with the geometry.



    CONSTRUCTION AND FEATURES
    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-4-non-drive-side.jpg
    The FS937 is a looker. The massive seat-tube/top-tube triangle looks like an Evil bike on steroids, but the most original characteristic of this frame is the linkage sandwiched between a split seat tube. In theory, this linkage sandwich should be stiffer than a linkage forked around the seat tube. Indeed, it is.

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-shock-zoomed-out-2.jpg
    The suspension linkage is sandwiched inside a split seat tube

    Sandwiching the linkage between downtube stanchions is something that hasn’t been done before in XC/trail bikes, as far as I am aware. This is well thought out. The layup above the split in the seat tube is very beefy and quite wide. The large triangle feature at the seat tube/top tube junction helps space the seat tube wide enough without looking strange. The linkage is quite wide, probably wider than needed, but this can only translate to more stiffness.

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-triangle.jpg
    The seat tube/top tube junction is overbuilt for stiffness

    Nearly the entire frame is generously overbuilt. This adds a little weight, but it is confidence-inspiring when riding aggressively and provides outstanding stiffness. The seatstays are noticeably compliant, with integrated flex to accommodate the single pivot rear triangle design. The frame isn’t a delicate XC specialist—my 20.5” painted frame weighed 2580g—it’s built for burlier endeavors.

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-routing-ports.jpg
    Front cable ports are tightly fit and look clean

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-rear-routing-port.jpg
    Chainstay routing ports are clean and feature molded-in guides

    Internal cable routing is nicely executed. The chainstay brake and shifter cables are easy to route thanks to molded-in guides, while the front ports are tightly fit and easy to handle.

    Internally-routed dropper posts up to 170mm in size 17.5” and 200mm in size 19” can fit inside the seat tube. That, or you can stay rowdy and rigid like me.

    Toray 700 carbon fiber construction provides stiffness and reliability on par with industry standards. Frames are tested to 130% of SGS industry standards. 2-year manufacturer warranty comes with the frame.

    Light Carbon not only honors their 2-year warranty, they fix the problems. I have been in touch with a Cat 1 racer who somehow broke his trunnion shock mounting hardware resulting in a cracked linkage and front triangle. Light Carbon has since been shipping their frame with stronger (and heavier) trunnion mounting bolts and beefed up the layup in the linkage.

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-drivetrain.jpg
    The frame is 1x-specific and fits a 32T chainring. Light Carbon advertises that a 34T will fit, this would be almost uncomfortably tight. A threaded BB shell and integrated ISCG-05 chain guide mount are appreciated details, though I don’t have a need for the chain guide mount. Rear spacing is 12x148mm boost, and the rear triangle clears 29x2.4” tires.



    GEOMETRY AND SIZING
    SIZE S (17.5”) M (19”) L (20.5)”
    FORK AXLE TO CROWN 530 / 540 / 550 530 / 540 / 550 530 / 540 / 550
    STACK 562 / 566 / 569 623 / 579 / 582 589 / 593 / 596
    REACH 445 / 440 / 436 481 / 470 / 466 505 / 500 / 496
    WHEEL BASE 1174 / 1178 / 1182 1210 / 1214 / 1218 1246 / 1250 / 1254
    TOP TUBE HORIZONTAL 589 / 590 / 591 622 / 623 / 624 657 / 658 / 659
    HEAD TUBE ANGLE 67.5o / 67o / 66.5o
    EFFECTIVE SEAT TUBE ANGLE 75o / 74.5o / 74o
    BB DROP -40 / -36 / -33
    CHAIN STAY LENGTH 444.5
    HEAD TUBE LENGTH 95 110 125
    SEAT TUBE LENGTH 440 480 520
    FORK OFFSET 51 51 51
    REAR TRAVEL 115mm (165x40) / 123mm (165x42.5) / 130mm (165x45)
    MAX TIRE 29x2.35” or 27.5x2.8"

    The FS937 is the longest and slackest factory-direct frame in the Trail and XC category, with a 67-degree head angle, and a reach of 500mm in a size large.

    The wheelbase is very long, at 1250mm in size large. This is great progression to see in a factory design, where geo typically lags 2-3 years behind industry leaders.

    Unlike most Chiner frames, the design and geometry of this frame is entirely original, as far as I am aware. It’s refreshing to see a factory producing a frame that can compete with leaders in the industry.



    SUSPENSION DESIGN

    The FS937 keeps things simple with a single pivot design with integrated flex stays. Suspension is supple through the entire stroke, even during heavy braking on demanding descents. The seatstay caliper mount does not affect suspension performance as far as I can tell.

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-shock-hardware.jpg
    The shock is mounted with a 21.8mm (or 22.2mm) spacer kit and two machined spacers provided with the frame


    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-linkage.jpg
    The linkage is routed between a split seat tube

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-5-shock-mount-hole.jpg
    A hole in the downtube doubles as an access point to the shock air valve and a drain for the cavity burrying the lower mount

    The FS937 fits trunnion-mount 165mm eye-to-eye shocks. Fox offers 40, 42.5, and 45mm stroke DPS shocks (equating to 115mm, 123mm, and 130mm rear travel on this frame), and all you’ll need is a single 21.8mm 8mm mounting kit. (54*φ10mm - 22.2*φ8mm). Light Carbon also provided some machined steel spacers to fit on either side of the shock kit. I ordered a 22.2mm kit and this was just too tight, it took a few taps from a rubber mallet to work the spacers into place. There was absolutely no play in the shock setup, snug and able to move quite freely with properly tightened bushings, but unfortunately bushings instead of bearings means there is considerable stiction at the joints.



    BUILD KIT
    Appx. Value: $4000
    Trailside Weight: 22.26 lbs
    Travel: 120mm front, 115mm rear

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-tall-pic-snow.jpg
    Rear Shock Fox Float DPS Factory 165x40mm, Trunnion mount
    Fork Fox Float 34 SC Factory, 29”, 120mm Travel, 51mm offset
    Headset ZTTO Tapered
    Cassette SRAM X01 10-42T
    Crankarms Race Face Next SL Carbon 175mm, OneUp 32T Switch
    Bottom Bracket BSA 73mm, 30mm diameter
    Derailleur/Shifter Shimano XTR 11-Speed
    Chain PYC SP1101
    Handlebar Integrated 680mm width 80mm stem -17-degree rise
    Grips eBay Chunkies
    Brakes Shimano XTR Race
    Wheelset Speedsafe 280g 29” 28h 22mm internal width, Pilar XTRA 1420 spokes, DT 350 boost hubs XD straight pull
    Tires Schwalbe Rocket Ron Liteskin Evo 29x2.25”
    Seat Unbranded carbon shell/rails, foam padding
    Seatpost Unbranded ultralight Hylix-style 31.6mm, 350mm
    Pedals XTR SPD
    Bottle Cage Can’t decide

    Many of my components are reviewed (briefly) in this thread: https://forums.mtbr.com/weight-weeni...0-1094616.html
    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-rotors.jpg
    Ashima Ai2 rotors all the way, light and strong!

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-saddle.jpg
    This 135g $29 saddle has nearly 2000 miles on it. You'd hardly know.

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-top-cap.jpg
    Integrated $50 235g carbon bar and fancy top cap

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-axle.jpg
    The stock axle that Light Carbon shipped with the frame is just 50g!

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-seatpost.jpg
    This seatpost is <150g and <$30. Reminiscent of the Tune Skyline.

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-fox-34-fork.jpg
    The Fox Float 34 SC Factory fork is fairly light and handles bigger hits more capably than a Float 32

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-grips.jpg
    Good grips for $0.99. Chunky like ESI Chunkies, cheap enough to replace.



    RIDE IMPRESSIONS

    I was pretty stoked rolling into the trail for the first time on this build. My first impression was how incredibly stiff the entire bike was even through hard corners. This translated to impressive control, allowing me to push very hard through sections I normally would coast or dial back the power. I'm not sure if this is just attributable to the overbuilt construction, but the unique suspension design of this frame could also be part of this amazing stiffness. Certainly, if this suspension layout was an experiment, it's a success.

    Descending. The most impressive (and fun) aspect of this bike is its incredible control and stability on descents. Huck as hard as I could, I could not get the rear to squeak, flex, or give under pressure. The long wheelbase was confidence-inspiring, providing great stability.

    Flats. On the flats, the bike carried momentum very well. However, accelerating out of corners took consciously more effort than my 21lb Pro-Mance M7007 or 18lb FM-299B. There was also a bit of pedal bob under power, more than I’d like to feel. I tried playing with shock rebound and pressure but couldn’t achieve a balance I liked. This may be an inherent limitation of the low pivot point required for this unique suspension design.

    Climbing. For a 120mm bike, the LCFS937 climbs well, but certainly not as well as my M7007. I felt slightly slow on climbs and had a hard time navigating obstacles and carrying momentum. Perhaps it was the 22.3 lbs of weight, which is heavier than 21lb on the M7007 or 18lbs on my most recent build, the TanTan FM-299B. More likely it’s the long wheelbase and slacker HTA. Of course, I’m judging by XC standards and can’t expect this to perform like a 100mm travel bike. For what it is, though, it’s very good. On an average ride, I'm super happy with it, but it may challenge my KOM-crushing ambitions.

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-shock-pocket.jpg
    The mud-collecting pool around the shock mount is drained by a hole molded into the side of the downtube, which doubles as an access point for the shock air valve. I don’t expect dirt collection here to be an issue because it is quite well protected by the wide downtube and beefy seat tube. But, if gunk around your shock makes you feel psycho, simply squirt it down with a hose nozzle on jet after the ride.



    BUILD TIPS


    • The frame requires a 180mm rotor in the rear.
    • Get a single 22.19 or 21.8mm M8 shock mounting hardware kit. For a Fox DPS Float Trunnion shock, get this: https://www.worldwidecyclery.com/pro...ece-aluminum-1
    • Only Trunnion shocks are compatible with this frame.
    • Shock eye-to-eye length must be 165mm, but you can choose between 40mm, 42.5mm, and 45mm stroke lengths to limit possible rear wheel travel (115mm, 123mm, or 130mm travel, respectively).
    • Plan on a 2-week lead time, and 1-2 weeks for delivery (to the USA).
    • Order directly from Light Carbon, or I’m happy to order your frame for you and help you plan your build at the cost of what Light Carbon would charge you. PM me with questions. I also can put together complete build kits for you.




    Is this frame for you?
    The FS937 falls confidently into the downcountry category. It can shred the downhills and carry speed on the flats but does not climb as efficiently as an ultralight 100mm-travel XC steed. That said, it offers control and stiffness like no XC whip can.

    This all translates to more fun. If you aren’t shaving grams to save milliseconds, this may be your ticket. It can nearly match the capability of a shorter travel rig on the climbs, but far outshines it on the descents. Along the way, it will absorb a few more bumps, add a little extra confidence, and just be an all-around fun trail bike.

    Pros:

    • Progressive long-and-slack geometry
    • Original aesthetic design with unique suspension linkage setup
    • Remarkably stiff linkage with superb control
    • Affordable
    • Fits long-travel dropper posts


    Cons:

    • Slightly sluggish on the climbs
    • Doesn’t fit the newer crop of 29x2.6” tires
    • Pedal bob due to low suspension pivot point


    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-3-side-snow-pic.jpg

    Stay tuned for a long-term update. Post up or PM me with any questions or comments!
    Last edited by sissypants; 04-16-2019 at 05:58 AM.

  2. #2
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    just stop with using the "downcountry" marketing bs

    cool bike, otherwise

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    just stop with using the "downcountry" marketing bs

    cool bike, otherwise
    Except for the wonky (his word, not mine) Chiner bits, Ashima rotors and the price. I'm up for $400 if the shock and fork aren't "wonky".
    :nono: :thumbsup:

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    Except for the wonky (his word, not mine)

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    Wow, these forums are loaded with veteran trolls. Grow up.

    For those who care about the bike rather than my semantics, I thought these pics might be of interest.

    I've been in touch with a guy who built up an LCFS937 and raced it at Sea Otter recently and shared some pics with me. He qualified in dual slalom finals for pro with the Santa Cruz Syndicate, got a great placement in the UCI Elite XC at bear mountain two weeks prior, then got 3rd in the pro enduro the next day. Pretty impressive, goes to show how versatile the bike can be.

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-img_2522.jpg

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-img_2520.jpg

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-img_2518.jpg
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  6. #6
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    ^^^This is my new favorite song! I must immediately play it for the wife until she rolls her eyes.

    Also...

    Quote Originally Posted by sissypants View Post
    Pretty impressive, goes to show how versatile the bike can be.
    Neato. Pics of someone else on a different bike.
    :nono: :thumbsup:

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    ^^^This is my new favorite song! I must immediately play it for the wife until she rolls her eyes.
    :
    I bought the book for my nephew for christmas

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    Neato. Pics of someone else on a different bike.
    This guy would have posted were it not for trolls like you that give these forums a bad rap. He told me exactly that. I thought others may still appreciate his experiences on the frame.

    I suggest you check out the off camber subforums. I hope this thread is helpful for people looking for bikes like this, I didn't write the post for nothing.
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  9. #9
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    Seems like a fair deal for $630. I'd like to see lockout cable routing for the rear shock.

  10. #10
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    Great looking bike!

    No dropper? The seat tube looks a bit long?

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    Thank you for taking the time to do this write up - be aware that it is appreciated.

    I am interested in building a ~140/130mm F/R 29er trail bike, and the geo on this frame is very close to my ideal. I am hoping for chainstays no longer than 440mm though, but this isn't far off. Otherwise the geo is pretty much spot on.

    I am not convinced that this design, with the internal approach to the way the stays/link are attached to the main frame, would be stiffer though. I was thinking that the usual approach, with the pivot bearings further apart, would be stiffer, and less susceptible to play if there were some slight gaps (or wear) around the bearing-to-pivot-pin interfaces. Interested in your thoughts. It is confidence inspiring that someone is using one for gravity related racing, but I suppose the issue I am worried about might not come up until the bike has been ridden a bit.

    Seems pretty well priced, maybe low enough to give it a go.

    Dunno if I'd call it latest geo though, as it seems that 2019 is the year of 77 degree seat tubes. Having said that, I am still finding ~75 degrees a bit steep, so I'm more interested in the slightly older 2017/18 geo anyway.

    Do you have any links to similar (completed) build threads / ride reports on this frame? I have been following the one on chinertown, but, other than your contributions, it hasn't got very far yet.

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    The dropper post cable routing looks like it might cause a few issues with that very tight radius from top tube up the seat post. Wonder if it's possible to route it via the bottom tube then directly up the seat tube?

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    Nice build!
    Thanks for the review!

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    Quote Originally Posted by robmac48 View Post
    The dropper post cable routing looks like it might cause a few issues with that very tight radius from top tube up the seat post. Wonder if it's possible to route it via the bottom tube then directly up the seat tube?
    Good point. It does indeed look like a very sharp angle there. There was a plastic routing guide in place when I got the frame, so actually routing the cable would be fairly easy, but that sharp kink could be challenging. I'm not running a dropper, so I don't know.

    This is the pic LightCarbon uses to illustrate cable routing:

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-routing-guides.jpg

    I do not think it would be possible to route it via the bottom tube, the seat tube "stanchions" are thin enough and the layup seems like it should be thick enough to block any path through the tube.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    Seems like a fair deal for $630. I'd like to see lockout cable routing for the rear shock.
    It's very clean actually. You can see the hole that takes in the lockout cable here, then it's just routed right up the downtube. I'm not using remote lockout.

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-shock-port-hole.jpg
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    Quote Originally Posted by sclyde2 View Post
    I am not convinced that this design, with the internal approach to the way the stays/link are attached to the main frame, would be stiffer though. I was thinking that the usual approach, with the pivot bearings further apart, would be stiffer, and less susceptible to play if there were some slight gaps (or wear) around the bearing-to-pivot-pin interfaces. Interested in your thoughts. It is confidence inspiring that someone is using one for gravity related racing, but I suppose the issue I am worried about might not come up until the bike has been ridden a bit.
    Thanks, this was my main concern as well when buying this frame without any prior experience shared online as well. Personally, this bike is so much stiffer than my Pro-Mance M7007 which used a similar single-pivot design but with pivot bearings farther apart, so it's a fair comparison. There is absolutely *zero* play anywhere in the rear triangle or linkage. There is no sign that the linkage can be torqued side to side by pushing or pulling sideways on the rear wheel when holding the front triangle.

    Quote Originally Posted by sclyde2 View Post
    Dunno if I'd call it latest geo though, as it seems that 2019 is the year of 77 degree seat tubes. Having said that, I am still finding ~75 degrees a bit steep, so I'm more interested in the slightly older 2017/18 geo anyway.
    I wouldn't want a much steeper seat tube. I really like the longer reach this kind of geo gives, and I wouldn't want to sit any further forward over the BB. I have a feeling steeper STAs are more relevant in much longer-travel bikes.

    Quote Originally Posted by sclyde2 View Post
    Do you have any links to similar (completed) build threads / ride reports on this frame? I have been following the one on chinertown, but, other than your contributions, it hasn't got very far yet.
    Just the one on Chinertown: Lightcarbon LCFS937 Build
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    Great review, i learned a lot about this frame

    Quote Originally Posted by sissypants View Post
    Personally, this bike is so much stiffer than my Pro-Mance M7007 which used a similar single-pivot design but with pivot bearings farther apart, so it's a fair comparison. There is absolutely *zero* play anywhere in the rear triangle or linkage. There is no sign that the linkage can be torqued side to side by pushing or pulling sideways on the rear wheel when holding the front triangle.
    Do you think this "extreme" stiffness can explain the feeling you had of slow acceleration and slow climbing too as the bike is probably not lively enough under power
    It's known that some manufacturers do not go for maximum rigidity to keep grip and more easy bike for the commun biker.




    Quote Originally Posted by sissypants View Post
    I really like the longer reach this kind of geo gives,
    You kept the same cockpit as your previous bike, is that a choice not to adjust stem to longer reach and maybe different stack?
    Do you plan to test with shorter stem, wider bar to stick more with the DNA of that frame?

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by numberzero View Post
    Great review, i learned a lot about this frame. Do you think this "extreme" stiffness can explain the feeling you had of slow acceleration and slow climbing too as the bike is probably not lively enough under power. It's known that some manufacturers do not go for maximum rigidity to keep grip and more easy bike for the common biker.
    Thanks, good questions! No, I do not think the slower acceleration is due to the stiffness. If anything, a stiffer frame means more efficient power transfer. To be clear, the frame still accelerates quickly It's dependent mostly on the rider and build weight, but increased pedal bob due to lower pivot point is also a factor in how efficiently power is transferred. To address this I am running higher pressures in the shock than I'd consider ideal (200 psi vs 165 psi for my weight of 165 lbs).

    Quote Originally Posted by numberzero View Post
    You kept the same cockpit as your previous bike, is that a choice not to adjust stem to longer reach and maybe different stack? Do you plan to test with shorter stem, wider bar to stick more with the DNA of that frame?
    I understand most people have different preferences than me, but I like shorter bars because I clip trees often. I'd rather have shorter bars than more crashes. I went with this stem length because I wanted to run this particular integrated handlebar. The longer reach is perfect for me, and neither is the stack too low--I like a low position! True, if this were going to be used as a trail bike I can see most people going for wider bars, more spacers in the steerer tube, a short stem, maybe even shorter fork offset. This would all translate to faster steering and a more upright position, but wouldn't change my review.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by sissypants View Post
    It's very clean actually. You can see the hole that takes in the lockout cable here, then it's just routed right up the downtube. I'm not using remote lockout.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Ok that's pretty good. These lower antisquat bikes are great for tech climbing but they need a remote to climb mode or lockout for the smooth stuff.

    I'm also looking at the seat stay design. It looks too thick to facilitate a flex stay type action. The M06 type stay looks a lot better.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    Ok that's pretty good. These lower antisquat bikes are great for tech climbing but they need a remote to climb mode or lockout for the smooth stuff.

    I'm also looking at the seat stay design. It looks too thick to facilitate a flex stay type action. The M06 type stay looks a lot better.
    True, a remote would be very helpful on this bike.

    The Dengfu M06 has a very thin seat stay, easily able to flex, but Light Carbon reps also insist there's a flex stay built into this frame. It's a thick stay, I agree, but whatever it is it works well.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sissypants View Post
    but increased pedal bob due to lower pivot point is also a factor in how efficiently power is transferred. To address this I am running higher pressures in the shock than I'd consider ideal (200 psi vs 165 psi for my weight of 165 lbs).
    If we want antisquat near 100%, what is the ideal chainring to get chain aligned with main pivot? 28, 26 teeths?
    I'm not sure that putting too much pressure solves the problem, on my LCFS902 going under 25% sag makes the bike more bobbing in fact and i lose traction and confort, the sweet spot is between 25 and 30% sag. This new frame could be different but i think if you like pedaling you need a high pivot point or a lockout

  22. #22
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    Nice looking frame, but two aspects about this frame rule it out for me. Longish chainstays, something close to 17.5 inches. The other thing is the cracked frame on Chinertown really makes me question their quality control.

    I am interested in the Workswell WCB-M-145. That frame has shorter chainstays, has a Horst link rear ( I am old school and like the small bump compliance Horst link suspension frames offer) and I already have a Workswell hardtail, the 0-62 I believe, going on 3 years without any major issues.
    You cannot go against nature, because when you do, its part of nature too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ottoreni View Post
    Nice looking frame, but two aspects about this frame rule it out for me. Longish chainstays, something close to 17.5 inches. The other thing is the cracked frame on Chinertown really makes me question their quality control.

    I am interested in the Workswell WCB-M-145. That frame has shorter chainstays, has a Horst link rear ( I am old school and like the small bump compliance Horst link suspension frames offer) and I already have a Workswell hardtail, the 0-62 I believe, going on 3 years without any major issues.
    The Workswell WCB-M-145 is a nice bike, for sure. I considered it myself

    Regarding the cracked LCFS937 frame on Chinertown, I have texted with this rider and he said it was because his Trunnion mounting bolt gave out, which allowed his shock to get angled against the rocker link (not perfectly vertical), which then asymmetrically cracked the rocker link which in turn cracked the front triangle around the linkage pivot points.
    - Light Carbon immediately replaced his frame and his is back up riding and racing.
    - Light Carbon sourced solid bolts (instead of hollow bolts) to prevent future damage due to hardware failure
    - Light Carbon beefed up the layup in the suspension linkage to prevent linkages from cracking.

    I received the solid Trunnion mounting hardware with my frame, which means that likely all changes will be propagated to future builds. I hope that is reassuring. It goes to show that a brand not only stands behind their product, but makes appropriate modifications to address failures.

    Long chainstays are just long chainstays, this hasn't been a problem with me throwing the bike around or popping jumps.

    I am absolutely enjoying the bike. I am blowing PRs out of the water on the downhills and keeping even everywhere else. Just today I got 7th overall on the loop at a super-popular local trail, something like 2,500 attempts, and I wasn't even pushing that hard. I'll be back for the KOM for sure. I just feel like I can lay power down wherever and braap corners, pop ruts, rip through technical stuff, like no other XC bike I've had. I don't know what it is about the bike exactly, I'll sort it out.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by sissypants View Post
    The Workswell WCB-M-145 is a nice bike, for sure. I considered it myself

    Regarding the cracked LCFS937 frame on Chinertown, I have texted with this rider and he said it was because his Trunnion mounting bolt gave out, which allowed his shock to get angled against the rocker link (not perfectly vertical), which then asymmetrically cracked the rocker link which in turn cracked the front triangle around the linkage pivot points.
    - Light Carbon immediately replaced his frame and his is back up riding and racing.
    - Light Carbon sourced solid bolts (instead of hollow bolts) to prevent future damage due to hardware failure
    - Light Carbon beefed up the layup in the suspension linkage to prevent linkages from cracking.

    I received the solid Trunnion mounting hardware with my frame, which means that likely all changes will be propagated to future builds. I hope that is reassuring. It goes to show that a brand not only stands behind their product, but makes appropriate modifications to address failures.

    Long chainstays are just long chainstays, this hasn't been a problem with me throwing the bike around or popping jumps.

    I am absolutely enjoying the bike. I am blowing PRs out of the water on the downhills and keeping even everywhere else. Just today I got 7th overall on the loop at a super-popular local trail, something like 2,500 attempts, and I wasn't even pushing that hard. I'll be back for the KOM for sure. I just feel like I can lay power down wherever and braap corners, pop ruts, rip through technical stuff, like no other XC bike I've had. I don't know what it is about the bike exactly, I'll sort it out.
    Glad to hear the warranty issue is being handled quickly. That seems to be one of the biggest fears consumers have dealing with Chinese suppliers. My one warranty experience with Chinese suppliers was with a carbon rim. Shortly after building it up into a wheel, a crack developed around a spoke hole. A picture of the crack, a picture of the rim's serial number, $50, and a week later I had a new rim. Strangely enough, I am still riding the wheel with the cracked hole two years later. It has never fully broken.

    My WorksWell has been going strong the past two - three years. I have been happy with it..and it has short chainstays. I know that is a rider preference. I feel any chainstay near 445mm is more difficult to maneuver. I have two hardtails. My Workswell and a titanium hardtail and I am partial to the Workswell becuase its chainstays are about 8mm shorter.

    No doubt, this is one amazing looking frame, but not for me. In the long run I would always wonder about the chainstay length. I know myself, it would be nagging me all the time. A little doubt in the back of my mind.

    I am really looking hard into full suspension 29ers with chainstays around 435mm. Any you can recommend I look at?
    You cannot go against nature, because when you do, its part of nature too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ottoreni View Post
    No doubt, this is one amazing looking frame, but not for me. In the long run I would always wonder about the chainstay length. I know myself, it would be nagging me all the time. A little doubt in the back of my mind.

    I am really looking hard into full suspension 29ers with chainstays around 435mm. Any you can recommend I look at?
    I guess chainstay length is to you as weight is to me. I try to get over the placebo effect and just ride it FWIW, but the thought is always there... is the weight slowing me down?

    Here's a bike I've had in the past that was *really* good: https://forums.mtbr.com/29er-bikes/2...7-1076993.html

    The new TanTan FM06 also will be up on TanTan's website in the next few weeks, very similar to Orbea Oiz. They already have all sizes in stock. I can get those to people for $650 + shipping, TanTan will likely quote $699 + shipping. Pro-Mance has a very similar frame ready for release as well, just another month or two. Again, almost exactly like the Orbea Oiz.
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    oh why did they have to name it the FM06? We already have the M06 which is the Yeti ASR knockoff.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    oh why did they have to name it the FM06? We already have the M06 which is the Yeti ASR knockoff.
    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-fm06.jpg

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-fm06.png

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-fm06-geo.jpg
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    Ok, so we're talking about the same thing. There's a post on Chinertown with a guy who is running a similar 19" with 27.5x2.6 tires and recommends a 120mm fork. I'm still chicken on these shady flex stay designs though lol.

    The geo chart on the FM06 posted on 3-16-19 on TanTan's site has a different geo chart than the one above. TT and reach are different.

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    more XL/21s! yay! My Bulls has a small upper triangle like that FM06 has, I joke that it's the carrying handle, and I use it as a carrying handle.
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    Just wanted to say that the build in this thread is up for sale, $3000 plus shipping. Pretty sweet deal IMO given the Fox Factory suspension, high-end chiner carbon wheels, XTR brakes, lightweight drivetrain, and lightweight cockpit. I have under 1,000 miles on it. Time to move onto the next project

    PM me with any questions.
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    Sissypants

    Thanks for the detailed write up.

    Couple questions, if I may

    Do you think this frame would be suited for a gravity/fun oriented trail bike build? I’m thinking evil the calling. 130mm rear, 150mm fork, 2.6 inch 27.5 wheels. Jumps and drops and berms. Fun is the priority

    You reckon there’s enough space to mount a shock with a piggy back? There are 165x45 versions of both the RS super deluxe and the Fox dpx2 currently available on eBay. Wonder if either would fit?

    Thanks

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    Ya I'd like to know if I can run a dvo topaz on it.

    Also this is a sexy MF. And I'm getting one. Not because it's cheap or Chinese but because it's genuinely sexy and I'm magnetically drawn to it.

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    The FS937 doesn't seem to be available anymore and seems to have been replaced by the LCFS958. Does anyone know the differences between the two frames?

    I also was wondering how much of a pain it is to have the shock upside down like with regards to the lockout switch. I can activate the lockout on my Anthem while riding but it seems you'd have to dismount the bike to activate the lockout on the FS937/958, which is the main drawback for me.

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    The 958 is stffer and stronger according to Light Carbon.

    Yes the switch would be hard to reach while riding. I don't use a switch like that so I'm not worried. You could always get a remote it has the cable routing for it .

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    Looking for some feedback on this frame set up more in XC mode. I started PM'ing individuals but figured it's better to have it here.

    Is the consensus that if built with more XC parts it'll do ok but not climb the greatest and get a little more pedal bob when hammering and trying to go fast? I'm in minnesota so fairly flat and I tend to keep the wheels on the ground. I'm more of a go fast and catch some air sometimes than bombing downhills and hucking big drops to flat.

    I like the 115-120mm, threaded bottom bracket, and reach this frame offers that I'd pair with a 120mm fork and 29er wheels. The other frames in the running are TanTan FM06, DIYcarbon bikes f110, or one of the Scott Spark clones like the LCFS911.

    For reference I'm coming off a 2016 stumpjumper with 140mm front and 135mm rear that I spend most of my time riding with the rear "locked" out because otherwise it bobs a lot and I get pedal strikes. It's got more travel than I probably need. 100mm xc bike seems really far from 135mm so the 110-115 in the rear seems in the middle and comfortable.

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    It's a do it all bike. As far as pedaling it will pedal as well as your shock is set up.

    The Geo is spot on it doesn't feel big or long. And I am coming from a Recluse with 419mm chainstays. I sit down in the bike the weight is down low all the shock hardware etc is very low down. This means it corners like it's on rails.

    I also answered your pm on the chiner forums.

    If you want to run a dropper you are realistically looking at a 25lb bike and you will need to spend some cash to get there.
    My large frame came 2450 grams on my scale. I see the OP built his to 23lbs mine weighs 27.5lbs but I am running a coil fork and Magic Mary front tire with a dropper of course.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Van Deventer View Post
    It's a do it all bike. As far as pedaling it will pedal as well as your shock is set up.

    The Geo is spot on it doesn't feel big or long. And I am coming from a Recluse with 419mm chainstays. I sit down in the bike the weight is down low all the shock hardware etc is very low down. This means it corners like it's on rails.

    I also answered your pm on the chiner forums.

    If you want to run a dropper you are realistically looking at a 25lb bike and you will need to spend some cash to get there.
    My large frame came 2450 grams on my scale. I see the OP built his to 23lbs mine weighs 27.5lbs but I am running a coil fork and Magic Mary front tire with a dropper of course.
    Thanks for the reply here and to the PM at chinertown. I'm not a weight weenie, but light is good so being a budget build base frame weight is something to keep in mind. I was hoping this would be a good tweener build between the 100mm spark or oiz clones. But my gut tells me this will be too far towards the longer travel/trail/enduro side of things than I want to go with weight/climbing/pedal bob.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerpss View Post
    Thanks for the reply here and to the PM at chinertown. I'm not a weight weenie, but light is good so being a budget build base frame weight is something to keep in mind. I was hoping this would be a good tweener build between the 100mm spark or oiz clones. But my gut tells me this will be too far towards the longer travel/trail/enduro side of things than I want to go with weight/climbing/pedal bob.
    Cerpss you're overthinking this. I built this bike to be fun on trails, and it ended up being a KOM machine on trails where XC-specific steeds only can shine. Well, it shone. Like Kevin said the weight is really down low so you can rip the corners and shred the downhills and the long wheelbase gives you stability like nothing else to tear through technical sections, and on the uphills you just gotta dial in your shock. It's not about bob, it's not about inefficiency, it's about whether you have the pressure dialed for your trails, and maybe a lockout if you're into that kind of thing.

    That said, I don't know how other users have been faring with the frame but I eventually sold it off. I grew quite frustrated of my issues with the linkage bolts coming loose (I think I described that here?) and the lack of willingness from Light Carbon to replace lost bolts (after falling out during rides, literally) at anything less than an astronomical cost. I was also worried that my frame would eventually crack like some others I know, and once that happens I'd be off the bike for a while and have a hard time getting my money back out of it. And then Light Carbon went and plagiarized my entire review on their website without asking... that's an insanely rookie marketing blunder.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sissypants View Post
    Cerpss you're overthinking this. I built this bike to be fun on trails, and it ended up being a KOM machine on trails where XC-specific steeds only can shine. Well, it shone. Like Kevin said the weight is really down low so you can rip the corners and shred the downhills and the long wheelbase gives you stability like nothing else to tear through technical sections, and on the uphills you just gotta dial in your shock. It's not about bob, it's not about inefficiency, it's about whether you have the pressure dialed for your trails, and maybe a lockout if you're into that kind of thing.

    That said, I don't know how other users have been faring with the frame but I eventually sold it off. I grew quite frustrated of my issues with the linkage bolts coming loose (I think I described that here?) and the lack of willingness from Light Carbon to replace lost bolts (after falling out during rides, literally) at anything less than an astronomical cost. I was also worried that my frame would eventually crack like some others I know, and once that happens I'd be off the bike for a while and have a hard time getting my money back out of it. And then Light Carbon went and plagiarized my entire review on their website without asking... that's an insanely rookie marketing blunder.
    I do over analyze. Part of being an engineer..and being cheap. I just don't want to end up wasting $600+ on a frame that I end up not liking. I'm gun shy since I haven't been able to dial in my stumpjumper. I've methodically worked through pressure and rebound combinations and can't get it firm enough without it trying to buck me off and/or my rear wheel leaving the ground due to rebound. I've resulted to riding it pretty much exclusively with the shock in the "climb" position but that causes other issues.

  40. #40
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    When you buy cheap, you buy double. Looks badass though!

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    Still having fun on mine all my meaningful PRs are now on this bike.
    Haven't had any issues with the linkage bolts maybe I should check them again though.

    I did have the TRUNNION bolts coming loose when I first got it but a little locktite solved that and after many checks and rechecks they have not come loose.


    I don't plan on getting off this bike for a least 2 years maybe more.
    And the only thing I see enticing on the horizon is the Shimano gearbox. Definitely be getting on one of those bikes.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Van Deventer View Post
    Still having fun on mine all my meaningful PRs are now on this bike.
    Haven't had any issues with the linkage bolts maybe I should check them again though.

    I did have the TRUNNION bolts coming loose when I first got it but a little locktite solved that and after many checks and rechecks they have not come loose.


    I don't plan on getting off this bike for a least 2 years maybe more.
    And the only thing I see enticing on the horizon is the Shimano gearbox. Definitely be getting on one of those bikes.
    So just to be clear, you're saying Loctite solved ALL your issues? I also had one of the trunnion bolts coming loose on me, by the way. Had to tighten it before every single freaking ride.

    I'm in discussion with TanTan about having them produce this frame, since it is a public mold after all. I know they produce it in Jiangsu and Xiamen, so it should be possible to also ship the mold to Shenzhen. I told TanTan that they need to manufacture the linkage with twice as much carbon at the joints, and reinforce the seat tube with extra carbon at the linkage junction. They were enthusiastic, and they'd do a good job on sourcing good hardware and I know they'd stand behind their product, unlike LightCarbon which has evaded me.

    Having thoughts about this bike again. It was so much fun to have, even with the issues. Hands down the most fun bike I've ever had! I would totally try a better production version.

    It will be a while before an affordable Shimano gearbox hits the market. Think XTR-level and only on premium frames through end of 2021.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sissypants View Post
    So just to be clear, you're saying Loctite solved ALL your issues? I also had one of the trunnion bolts coming loose on me, by the way. Had to tighten it before every single freaking ride.

    I'm in discussion with TanTan about having them produce this frame, since it is a public mold after all. I know they produce it in Jiangsu and Xiamen, so it should be possible to also ship the mold to Shenzhen. I told TanTan that they need to manufacture the linkage with twice as much carbon at the joints, and reinforce the seat tube with extra carbon at the linkage junction. They were enthusiastic, and they'd do a good job on sourcing good hardware and I know they'd stand behind their product, unlike LightCarbon which has evaded me.

    Having thoughts about this bike again. It was so much fun to have, even with the issues. Hands down the most fun bike I've ever had! I would totally try a better production version.

    It will be a while before an affordable Shimano gearbox hits the market. Think XTR-level and only on premium frames through end of 2021.
    Honestly beside the TRUNNION bolts I've had no issues.

    Hell it's not even name brand loctite just some cheap stuff Walmart had.

    I don't know that my linkage bolts have come loose though I did tighten them a bit when I got it.

    Maybe they started loctiting them after your complaints.

    Did 31 miles on mine yesterday it's just perfect for my trail.
    I'm running a 160mm coil fork with a 44mm offset so mine probably handles significantly different then yours.

    But man when you get the counter lean mastered this thing can hold lines in Corners so well. Of course you'll need a dropper to get low enough to really experience this to its fullest.

  44. #44
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    Does anyone know how to go about doing a linkage analysis for this frame?

    I'm trying to get a custom shock done for it.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by sissypants View Post
    So just to be clear, you're saying Loctite solved ALL your issues?.
    On all these Chinese frames, you need to disassemble every joint and put it all back together with any blue Loctite.

    My FS airwolf frame was doing same thing, and I re did it all, and not a single issue since and I abuse this frame.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Van Deventer View Post
    Does anyone know how to go about doing a linkage analysis for this frame?

    I'm trying to get a custom shock done for it.
    Your only going to get so much out of it, since they design it for said specific length and travel, which is dictated by the swing arm and pivot. Without a different pivot, you are really stuck leaving at its stock dimensions.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Outhouse View Post
    Your only going to get so much out of it, since they design it for said specific length and travel, which is dictated by the swing arm and pivot. Without a different pivot, you are really stuck leaving at its stock dimensions.
    No I am referring to a shock tune from Avalanche. Not a custom length.

  48. #48
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    Scored a fox float factory 165x45 on eBay for 168$.

    It is a 2019 and tuned for the evil following.

    The interesting thing being that it is a new digressive tune. Which means it has more damping at the beginning and then falls off.

    This results in a nice platform but is still supple over small bumps but gets out of the way on big hits.

    For a light rider like me this fits me and the 958 like a glove.

    I was having trouble with my old shock using all my travel. If I ran 30% sag then I couldn't use all my travel and it started being a little hard off the top.

    Now I'm running 23% sag and still using 90% of my travel on 3-4 foot drops. This just riding around my local campus doing drops and stairs.

    It feels nice but tomorrow I will do around 30 miles of trails and see how it does.

    Also I am running a rwc bearing in the top and no joke it's as supple as my recluse was with a coil shock on it.

  49. #49
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    Just took my suspension apart and can confirm that all pivots had locktite on them.

    As usual the bearings were a bit notchy little too much torque also.
    Took the seals off relatively easy. No grease inside maybe a light oil. Pummped them full of grease and replaced the seals. They then moved about 80% smoother.

    Kind of a pain putting back together and lining everything up. Worked each pivot separate and torqued until tight but not so tight I felt the bearing start to bind.

    Tomorrow changing out my ribbon coil for a fox 34 150mm. Should shave just over 1 pound off my bike putting it at 25.5lbs. Not bad for a full on trail bike.

    The 34 will also receive a Vorsprung fractive tune shortly so the damping is set to my weight and riding.

  50. #50
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    I am now looking into the LCFS958. Has anyone tried a piggyback shock like the DVO Topaz with this frame?

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    I was thinking the Topaz 2 would work. The Topaz may fit but yiu might have to remove a knob.

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    Upset

    So ended up getting a LCFS958....was disassembling today and it doesn't look like there's a bearing race molded into the front triangle for the trunnion hardware...in fact it looks like the race was filled in with some kind of filler. If that is the case then the trunnion hardware (which was included) would be using the front triangle as a bushing.

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-img_4733.jpg
    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-img_4732.jpg

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by TokulTime View Post
    So ended up getting a LCFS958....was disassembling today and it doesn't look like there's a bearing race molded into the front triangle for the trunnion hardware...in fact it looks like the race was filled in with some kind of filler. If that is the case then the trunnion hardware (which was included) would be using the front triangle as a bushing.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I think all the Chinese trunnion are like that.

    My solution was to loctite the threads and grease the rest of the assembly. Get it tight enough that its solid but can still move.
    The loctite will keep it together and the grease will allow it to pivot. Haven't had any problem with it yet.

    Periodically check the trunnion bolts though.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by TokulTime View Post
    So ended up getting a LCFS958....was disassembling today and it doesn't look like there's a bearing race molded into the front triangle for the trunnion hardware...in fact it looks like the race was filled in with some kind of filler. If that is the case then the trunnion hardware (which was included) would be using the front triangle as a bushing.

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    How's the frame finish aside from that? I am very close to pulling the trigger on one of those plus a pair of trail wheels and a handlebar from LC. Can't decide between UD or clear gloss but I think at this frame pricepoint I am probably overthinking it. Have read through this thread and the thread on Chindertown and people who have it seem to be generally happy with it.

  55. #55
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    The gloss is much nicer looking imo.

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    I really like the matte finish on the uni carbon and how it comes out in the right light. Everything else seems to be fairly high quality, but I haven't started building the frame up yet.

    For those that are curious, I did fit a Super Deluxe RCT into the frame without issue. I also ended up loctiting the trunnion hardware and wrapping it in teflon tape in order to minimize the metal on carbon contact. I'll take some pictures and start my own build thread once a few more components arrive, but I'm thinking this bike is gonna turn out pretty BA

    The one thing I am curious about is the 145x65 coil shock that Ohlins makes, curious if that would fit but I don't want to spring (sorry) that much coin on something that may or may not work.

  57. #57
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    Interesting i didn't know a 165x45 coil shock existed.

    Will have to check it out.

    That super deluxe thats the piggyback version?

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Van Deventer View Post
    Interesting i didn't know a 165x45 coil shock existed.

    Will have to check it out.

    That super deluxe thats the piggyback version?
    Yep Super Deluxe RCT has the piggy back, the Deluxe is the none piggy back version is my understanding. The Ohlins runs for $650 w/out a spring but if you want to try it out I would be very interested in the results so post an update if you end up getting one

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    Both i and chainreactioncycles have sent ohlins emails inquiring about the exact measurements for the 165x45 trunnion.

    I plan on having 2 different builds that i can swap out. One xc one enduro.

    The xc will have a fox step cast 120 34 and a fox factory 165x40.
    The enduro will have a trust shout fork and now possibly this ohlins shock.

    And the shout on this frame is magic if you like to corner.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by TokulTime View Post
    I really like the matte finish on the uni carbon and how it comes out in the right light. Everything else seems to be fairly high quality, but I haven't started building the frame up yet.

    For those that are curious, I did fit a Super Deluxe RCT into the frame without issue. I also ended up loctiting the trunnion hardware and wrapping it in teflon tape in order to minimize the metal on carbon contact. I'll take some pictures and start my own build thread once a few more components arrive, but I'm thinking this bike is gonna turn out pretty BA

    The one thing I am curious about is the 145x65 coil shock that Ohlins makes, curious if that would fit but I don't want to spring (sorry) that much coin on something that may or may not work.
    Thanks for the information on the Super Deluxe. I recently posted inquiring about piggyback clearance on the lCFS958 on Chinertown forums but when no one chimed in, I asked John @ LC who said that it's a no go. I had my doubts (from some pictures, looks like there is plenty enough clearance) so I ordered a different shock and went with a non-piggyback one. I don't have my frame yet.

    I look forward to seeing your build!

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Van Deventer View Post
    Both i and chainreactioncycles have sent ohlins emails inquiring about the exact measurements for the 165x45 trunnion.

    I plan on having 2 different builds that i can swap out. One xc one enduro.

    The xc will have a fox step cast 120 34 and a fox factory 165x40.
    The enduro will have a trust shout fork and now possibly this ohlins shock.

    And the shout on this frame is magic if you like to corner.
    Definitely let me know if the shock fits, as it seems like the frame is pretty progressive and could benefit from the coil. Haven't ridden any Trust forks, but I ride up in Bellingham, WA pretty frequently and have seen Jeff Kendall-Weed out on his Trust equipped bikes a few times.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by hmorsi View Post
    Thanks for the information on the Super Deluxe. I recently posted inquiring about piggyback clearance on the lCFS958 on Chinertown forums but when no one chimed in, I asked John @ LC who said that it's a no go. I had my doubts (from some pictures, looks like there is plenty enough clearance) so I ordered a different shock and went with a non-piggyback one. I don't have my frame yet.

    I look forward to seeing your build!
    Yep no problem! I talked to the guy who allegedly designed the frame (lives in the US) and he said that the frame was designed to fit the Super Deluxe so I went for it. Bought it brand new and it was returnable so pretty low risk exercise. Should have most of the goodies this weekend minus the wheels (still trying to find some) so keep your eyes open for the build thread starting Saturday!

  63. #63
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    I have talked with the us rep for ext racing shox and confirmed they can and will build a 165x45 ext storia shock.

    These are fully custom shocks that are built in Italy tuned for you and have a hydraulic bottom out feature.

    Pinkbike review https://m.pinkbike.com/news/review-e...-v3-shock.html

    Exciting option for short travel bikes out there.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by TokulTime View Post
    Yep no problem! I talked to the guy who allegedly designed the frame (lives in the US) and he said that the frame was designed to fit the Super Deluxe so I went for it. Bought it brand new and it was returnable so pretty low risk exercise. Should have most of the goodies this weekend minus the wheels (still trying to find some) so keep your eyes open for the build thread starting Saturday!
    Is there any way you can get the suspension kinematics from him?
    Would come in handy for anyone wanting a aftermarket shock tune.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Van Deventer View Post
    Is there any way you can get the suspension kinematics from him?
    Would come in handy for anyone wanting a aftermarket shock tune.
    I can try, but no guarantees. I was talking to him via Instagram so the contact is kind of hit or miss.

    Did you ever hear back from Ohlins/CRC about fitting their coil in there?

  66. #66
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    No i didnt.

    But..i did contact ext and they can build a 165x45 storia shock.
    The fit will be really close i am waiting in measurements right now.
    After springs the price would be about the same for ohlins vs ext. And ext is full custom. And has a hydraulic bottom out which would be very nice on a short travel bike like ours.

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by TokulTime View Post
    Yep no problem! I talked to the guy who allegedly designed the frame (lives in the US) and he said that the frame was designed to fit the Super Deluxe so I went for it. Bought it brand new and it was returnable so pretty low risk exercise. Should have most of the goodies this weekend minus the wheels (still trying to find some) so keep your eyes open for the build thread starting Saturday!
    TokulTime, have you started your build yet? I am looking for some inspiration to spec out this frame!

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by hmorsi View Post
    TokulTime, have you started your build yet? I am looking for some inspiration to spec out this frame!
    Not yet! I can list out the parts I've received though. Waiting on the bars and stem to start the build (ordered from CRC and taking FOREVER to get here). Also need suggestions for a dropper. Drivetrain is coming off my sentinel and that's getting upgraded to XT 12 Speed

    FORK: 2020 Factory Fox 34 FIT4 150mm 51mm Offset
    SHOCK: 2019 Rockshox Super Deluxe RCT
    Brakes: 2019 TRP Trail SL w/ 203mm Rotors F/R
    WHEELS: Bontrager Line 30 Comp w/ 108T upgrade
    Derailleur: 2018 X01 Eagle
    Shifter: 2018 X01 Eagle
    Cassete: GX Eagle

    Also looking for suggetions on tires if anyone has ideas?

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Van Deventer View Post
    No i didnt.

    But..i did contact ext and they can build a 165x45 storia shock.
    The fit will be really close i am waiting in measurements right now.
    After springs the price would be about the same for ohlins vs ext. And ext is full custom. And has a hydraulic bottom out which would be very nice on a short travel bike like ours.
    I'll keep that in mind, this is going to be my secondary trail/xc/loaner bike for friends when they visit so not sure if I want to spend that much. Probably going to let my dad ride it as well as he's just getting back into riding so air shock is probably easier option for adjusting between him riding and myself.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by TokulTime View Post
    I'll keep that in mind, this is going to be my secondary trail/xc/loaner bike for friends when they visit so not sure if I want to spend that much. Probably going to let my dad ride it as well as he's just getting back into riding so air shock is probably easier option for adjusting between him riding and myself.
    If thats the case for sure air is the better option.

    Curious at how much your fork weighs. I bought one taken off a Genius and was shocked to find it weighed 20 grams less then a 36.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Van Deventer View Post
    If thats the case for sure air is the better option.

    Curious at how much your fork weighs. I bought one taken off a Genius and was shocked to find it weighed 20 grams less then a 36.
    I can bring it into work sometime this week and throw it on the scale, that's pretty crazy that is came in that close. Not sure how the castings for the lowers differ but would be interesting to see what the actual difference are

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by TokulTime View Post
    I can bring it into work sometime this week and throw it on the scale, that's pretty crazy that is came in that close. Not sure how the castings for the lowers differ but would be interesting to see what the actual difference are
    The fox rep told me the 34 150 uses the ebike chassis. Mine was a performance elite so im curious if the factory version is lighter.

    I had bought it for a lighter build. I was shocked when it weighed more then my Ribbon coil it was supposed to replace.

  73. #73
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    New LCFS Build

    I originally got the LCFS937. I built it and broke it in 6 miles
    They warrantied it and I received the New LCFS958. I paid the 150 extra to paint it like the old Porsche/Gulf LaMans Car from 1970.
    I built it as a 150/130 With MRP Ribbon Fork and Fox Float Shock
    LightCarbon Carbon rims with DTSWISS350 hubs. 2.5 Tire in front 2.4 Rear
    LightCarbon Carbon Handlebar 800mm Can Creek Headset with a Raceface Stem
    One Up Dropper and ESI Chunky grips. Went with SRAM GX Eagle and Shimano XT new 2 pot brakes. Just shy of 29 lbs. Total

    It took me a month to get used to the longer wheelbase ( my old steed is 27.5 bike)
    But now It is a trail chunder bustin fun fast ride.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-new-bike-resized.jpg  

    Last edited by Crest Monkey; 06-17-2020 at 08:46 PM.

  74. #74
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    Love the paint

  75. #75
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    Looks amazing. What heigh and inseam are you? By large do you mean the 20.5" or 19"?


    Thanks

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by georgeous View Post
    Looks amazing. What heigh and inseam are you? By large do you mean the 20.5" or 19"?


    Thanks
    You stole my IRL nickname.

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    Perfect crime.

    What size is your one too Kevin and your height, inseam etc? Want to make sure I get the right size as I can't try it out..

    Cheers

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by georgeous View Post
    Looks amazing. What heigh and inseam are you? By large do you mean the 20.5" or 19"?


    Thanks
    I am 6' tall inseam 32 ~180ish lbs it is the 19" frame
    >500 miles now and outside of the one trunnion bolt backing out a bit a first (re lubed and locktite no more problems)

    The one thing I need is a remote for the rear shock. FOX doesn't sell that size with the remote ability. FOX makes you send it in and they will convert the top cap.
    I will be doing this!

  79. #79
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    Great thanks! Pretty similar to me so I'll order the same one, cheers!

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by georgeous View Post
    Great thanks! Pretty similar to me so I'll order the same one, cheers!

  81. #81
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    The 958 looks really nice (especially yours) and I like the BSA, but there doesn’t seem to be an abundance of used shocks without a piggyback. What shock did you use? Also, how does it climb?

  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryapad View Post
    The 958 looks really nice (especially yours) and I like the BSA, but there doesn’t seem to be an abundance of used shocks without a piggyback. What shock did you use? Also, how does it climb?
    I have the FOX Factory Float DPS. NO piggyback! It will not fit..

    I love the way it climbs. I do close the lockout if the trail has any technical or just charging up long climbs.
    It's the way the stays hold that a perfect 30-50 mm of travel. Smooth & stable. Stays connected climbing... It is moving a tad, but not fully locked. No pedal bob like open can get.
    And it is stiff enough that if you forget to open it...You will notice the lack of tire contact on rough stuff.

    Remote will keep me from reaching down though to flip, So If you get the FOX it should go to FOX for the Upgraded Remote ability.

    I am 1 mph avg faster than I was on my 27.5 bike. Going from a 150 coil rear to this FOX 130 air shock is noticeable in my feedback from the bike, but the long wheelbase makes it rip downhill very stable and fast.
    Same bottom bracket height as my 27.5 but I don't have pedal strikes like I used to.

  83. #83
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    I've been following that thread for a while. I was considering building this bike but ended up buying a V1 Hightower. Now I'm jealous of the steep seat tube angle of that bike.

    Did anyone build it with a 140mm rear and 150mm front? How would be the head angle and seat tube angle with this combo?

  84. #84
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    Close to pull the trigger on this awesome frame, but need advise on sizing.
    I am 189 cm / 6.2 ft and inseam 86 cm / 2.82 ft.
    I guess XL Will fit me?

    Cheers Kristian

  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kadath View Post
    I've been following that thread for a while. I was considering building this bike but ended up buying a V1 Hightower. Now I'm jealous of the steep seat tube angle of that bike.

    Did anyone build it with a 140mm rear and 150mm front? How would be the head angle and seat tube angle with this combo?

    the design will not go to 140mm
    130 is max, you can go shorter travel but not more than 130mm

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kristian T View Post
    Close to pull the trigger on this awesome frame, but need advise on sizing.
    I am 189 cm / 6.2 ft and inseam 86 cm / 2.82 ft.
    I guess XL Will fit me?

    Cheers Kristian
    at 6.2 you could go either 19 or 21 inch model. (you a 'tweener)

    at 6.3 I would go 21 inch
    this wheelbase and reach are long

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crest Monkey View Post
    at 6.2 you could go either 19 or 21 inch model. (you a 'tweener)

    at 6.3 I would go 21 inch
    this wheelbase and reach are long
    Thanks, now I am even more confused

  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kristian T View Post
    Thanks, now I am even more confused

    19 would work out fine for you

    im running a chiner 19 with 34 inseam, 6 foot tall 190lbs, bike fits like a glove, hair big, but I like that

  89. #89
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    HI crest monkey, 6 weeks later, any additional thoughts? Very interested in this bike, I would set it up more XC plus, 130mm up front, 120 in the back. XL. I have bought wheels from light c way back in the day, but not frame. Is there a separate thread for the 958? (oh and I am going to "borrow" your paint scheme)

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by jvossman View Post
    HI crest monkey, 6 weeks later, any additional thoughts? Very interested in this bike, I would set it up more XC plus, 130mm up front, 120 in the back. XL. I have bought wheels from light c way back in the day, but not frame. Is there a separate thread for the 958? (oh and I am going to "borrow" your paint scheme)
    LOL!
    That paint scheme gets a LOT of looks and then the question...
    WHAT IS THAT? ( to make it easy I say its a Chiner29er and if they are still curious I tell them the rest)

    I have almost 750 miles on it. Southern Cal terrain from coastal mesa trails and canyons to Mountain forests...

    This bike Is Solid. I have had 0 problems since the Trunnion bolt backed out in the first ride.

    My other bike is a 160/150 coil with short chain stays. As much as that soaked up bumps at speed it became twitchier trail-braking.

    The 958 has a long wheel base and is very stable. Carves turns. Switchbacks are not a problem (once I back-brained the wheelbase change).
    The 29er wheels just go over everything. Less pedal strikes and Overall I am way faster on my rides. PRs on many segments after many years of hammering them. That alone tells me the bike is a great design.
    I have done some long rides and it is comfortable in my set up, but I could see getting a Sid Ultimate or MRP SL,a lighter crank set/cassette and skinnier tires and make it a lot lighter. 26lbs it would really fly.

    My current set up bombs rocky downhills really well.Climbs very well Open or locked out (open will "inchworm if hitting dip or go over rock while climbling)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-chiner29er-top.jpg  


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    So, I ordered an RS Super Deluxe and I'm hoping it will fit. Has anyone actually tried fitting it before? I got a good deal so I can just sell it and make my money back but I'm really hoping it fits.

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by rubybear View Post
    So, I ordered an RS Super Deluxe and I'm hoping it will fit. Has anyone actually tried fitting it before? I got a good deal so I can just sell it and make my money back but I'm really hoping it fits.
    Pretty sure I read somewhere that it was designed with a Super deluxe in mind.
    I think its over on the chiner forums.

  93. #93
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    haha I read that too so I went for it. But I'm just worried given the conflicting opinions!

  94. #94
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    I was hoping this thread would disappear so I didn't have to see the word "downcountry"

  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by rubybear View Post
    So, I ordered an RS Super Deluxe and I'm hoping it will fit. Has anyone actually tried fitting it before? I got a good deal so I can just sell it and make my money back but I'm really hoping it fits.
    Do let us know if the Suoer Deluxe fits!

  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crest Monkey View Post
    Do let us know if the Suoer Deluxe fits!
    I have the 19.5 and also went for the super deluxe 165x45 based on rumours it might fit and a good deal.

    Good news, you can get it in, ish


    Summary;
    from what I could tell (slipped a bit of paper between the shock and the frame) it just touched the LSC adjuster to the frame at full bump. I removed the adjuster knob (grub screwed into a small shaft) to be sure and there's loads of clearance then. I think a slightly turned down adjuster knob would sort this, it's really close.

    Can't operate the lockout unfortunately with the stock lever, I think a shorter one would work.

    Turning the body mounted rebound adjuster is a bit of an art form and you can't see the text so remember which way to turn it before you fit it.

    Can get a shock pump on, but undoing the cap with your fingertips is quite a painful endeavour.


    The trunnion mount is nasty on this, doesn't seem to have bushings so I'm going to make a reduced trunnion bolt to allow a split bush to fit over it so it has something to slide on.

    Overall this bike is legit though, especially for the money, I love it already - admittedly based off one ride.

  97. #97
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    Can confirm, RS Super Deluxe Ultimate fits. The only issue is that the lever to open or close it will not flip. Must be open at all times. I suspect the RTR version of the shock would fit nicely. The LCS knob has barely any clearance but no rubbing. If you're a person that is constantly fiddling with this it might not be a good idea to get this shock. I can turn it but it is slow and kind of hard. The rebound speed adjustment can be turn but it will be a pain if you're constantly adjusting.



    LCS Settings and Rebound









    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-img_20200817_144430.jpg  

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-img_20200817_144445.jpg  

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-img_20200817_144459.jpg  

    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-img_20200817_144511.jpg  


  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by rubybear View Post
    Can confirm, RS Super Deluxe Ultimate fits. The only issue is that the lever to open or close it will not flip. Must be open at all times. I suspect the RTR version of the shock would fit nicely. The LCS knob has barely any clearance but no rubbing. If you're a person that is constantly fiddling with this it might not be a good idea to get this shock. I can turn it but it is slow and kind of hard. The rebound speed adjustment can be turn but it will be a pain if you're constantly adjusting.



    LCS Settings and Rebound









    Interesting, what size frame is yours? If you take the air out if the shock does the LSC knob touch the frame at full bump?

  99. #99
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    My frame is the 20.5 and the pictures are with all the air out of the shock. I was messing with it fully compressing it to be sure and I don't see any rubbing. Perhaps my frame is a bit longer down there . Do you know if the internal cable routing will allow the cable housing to go in through the frame?

    Here's another angle with the guide underneath to show about how much clearance there is.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-img_20200817_164701.jpg  


  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by rubybear View Post
    My frame is the 20.5 and the pictures are with all the air out of the shock. I was messing with it fully compressing it to be sure and I don't see any rubbing. Perhaps my frame is a bit longer down there . Do you know if the internal cable routing will allow the cable housing to go in through the frame?
    Ah possibly!

    If you mean for the gears and dropper then yes.

    Brake has a pipe through the chainstay laminated in to guide the hose. On the chain side there is no tube through so you have to tape the cable outer to those thin plastic strings they leave in...

    I did the brake first and thought oh great there's internal tubes so pulled out the gear string they'd left in thinking there would be one on that side too, which then took an hour to pull a new one through.

    They go through the downtube too but are just loose in there so again just use their plastic strings to pull them through.

  101. #101
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    I would like to buy the frame but no one is answering my emails. Is it still for sale from LightCarbon?

    Thanks

  102. #102
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    I bought mine about 5 weeks ago so would have thought so.

    [email protected] was who I was speaking to.

  103. #103
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    Finished my build today! 130mm shock + 140mm fork and carbon wheelset.

    Sidenote... Is anyone running a 170mm dropper? I'm having issues routing it. There's no space for the cable to "fold" around the kink. I'm thinking of giving it a shot and if it doesn't work I might try a wireless dropper or a oneup dropper.

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build-img_20200902_190756.jpg  


  104. #104
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    Nice trail bike

  105. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by rubybear View Post
    Finished my build today! 130mm shock + 140mm fork and carbon wheelset.

    Sidenote... Is anyone running a 170mm dropper? I'm having issues routing it. There's no space for the cable to "fold" around the kink. I'm thinking of giving it a shot and if it doesn't work I might try a wireless dropper or a oneup dropper.


    Nice Paint Job!
    Are you running a rear shock remote?

  106. #106
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    Thanks! I call it Mt. Fuji Shrimp.

    I'm not running a remote lock. Didn't see the point and also don't know if I can add it.

  107. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by rubybear View Post
    Finished my build today! 130mm shock + 140mm fork and carbon wheelset.

    Sidenote... Is anyone running a 170mm dropper? I'm having issues routing it. There's no space for the cable to "fold" around the kink. I'm thinking of giving it a shot and if it doesn't work I might try a wireless dropper or a oneup dropper.

    I just tried a 180 OneUp on my 19"
    It Does NOT fit.
    Stuck with 150mm

  108. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crest Monkey View Post
    I just tried a 180 OneUp on my 19"
    It Does NOT fit.
    Stuck with 150mm
    How was the fit? I'm on the 20.5" frame and I was thinking a 180 dropper shimmed down to 160 would be perfect. Was the green actuator sticking out from the bottom hole?

  109. #109
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    No but it was .5 inch from the hole. No room for the bend of the cable
    Mine is a 19inch...You may get by
    I went through Backcountry for the post.
    they are great about returns.

  110. #110
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    Want to pull the trigger on one of these frames but the lack of bushing/ bearing system on trunnions mount has me a bit concerned. Anyone have any pics of the trunnion mounting hardware included w frame? Looking into some adaptation for a bushings. Seems ppl aren’t too overly concerned.


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  111. #111
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    [QUOTE=funnyjr;15022525]Want to pull the trigger on one of these frames but the lack of bushing/ bearing system on trunnions mount has me a bit concerned. Anyone have any pics of the trunnion mounting hardware included w frame? Looking into some adaptation for a bushings. Seems ppl aren’t too overly concerned.


    It's just a bolt through the side (Included).. Work great. No other hardware required
    Over 1000 Smiles now.
    The upper eyelet is 30x8. I suggest RWC Bearings
    https://www.enduroforkseals.com/

  112. #112
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    Light Carbon FS937: Downcountry 29er Build

    So the trunnions just rotates without any need for bushings?
    I saw earlier post about the wear it caused to the frame so that’s why I ask.


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  113. #113
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    just grease
    The wear in that poster pic is from too tight. (I believe)
    The bolt does rotate. but very little.
    They need to be snug but not tight and I applied blue loctite to the threads to keep them from backing out..No problems or bolt back out.

    The headset is the same too.
    Just drop in the headset on the carbon cups.

    I have had no problems or unusual wear.

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