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Thread: KTM Scarp build

  1. #1
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    KTM Scarp build

    Picked up a KTM Scarp Prestige 29" from another MTBRer recently! Been working on building it up a little bit, so just going to post up the progress over the weeks and months.

    So far -

    - (used) Rockshox RS1 120mm travel, and hub 28 spoke
    - Hope Pro 4 orange hub, 32 spoke
    - My 80mm Bontrager Rhythm Pro stem from my Remedy
    - My Pro Taper carbon riser bars, cut to 720.
    - Galfer wave rotors, 160mm
    - My lightly used XT SPD pedals
    - ODI Rogue grips with orange clamps.


    Ordered but not received yet -
    - (used) Shimano XTR Di2 Firebolt shifter
    - Nextie carbon rims, 22mm internal for a nice round profile.


    Intending to order as money allows -
    - XT or XTR 2x crank 34/24
    - XT or XTR Di2 front and rear derailleurs.
    - Hope Tech 3 X2 brakeset, orange
    - Thomson elite seat post, 410mm
    - All Internal components for Di2
    - Not sure what spokes yet.
    - Bontrager XR2 or XR3 team issue tires.
    - Unknown saddle, possibly a Bontrager Evoke


    KTM Scarp build-img_20160721_191237926.jpg
    KTM Scarp build-img_20160721_191247950.jpg
    KTM Scarp build-img_20160721_191300635.jpg
    KTM Scarp build-img_20160721_191340356.jpg

  2. #2
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    Things moving along very fast actually.

    KTM Scarp build-img_20160730_203149551.jpg

    KTM Scarp build-img_20160804_221325398.jpg

    Wrapped the battery in Armaflex from my HVAC suction lines, to allow it to be held tightly in place, no noise, and easy to remove. The battery fits snugly in the top tube at the head tube junction, and the main internal junction box and wires are bundled up in the downtube at the head tube.
    I ran 1200mm wires the whole way, which allows access to everything at the head tube just by dropping the fork.

    KTM Scarp build-img_20160804_221343697.jpg

    KTM Scarp build-img_20160804_221743142.jpg


    Brakes just came today, so I just quickly mounted the master up to the bars.

    KTM Scarp build-img_20160805_144801663.jpg


    Tonight I'll pull the rear brake line off, and run it internally. There are NO external brake host connection points on the main frame. The swingarm has zip tie points, but the frame is ALL internal routing. Not a big deal, as I rarely have to remove the brakes anyway, but I found that interesting.


    I will also be cutting the rear derailleur Di2 wire, and putting it inside of a piece of macroline as used in paintball or airsoft. The wire COULD be routed up top, and along the suspension connections, but the underside of the frame has a nice exit point and a shifter housing anchor point. By running the Di2 wire inside the macroline, it can run along that designed area, and be darn near invulnerable to damage.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails KTM Scarp build-img_20160804_221743142.jpg  


  3. #3
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    Looks absolutely amazing! Weight?

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    Armored the Di2 wire for the rear derailleur and re-ran it.
    Very, very simple to do, and this should be incredibly strong to prevent any damage.

    Got the brake line run internally tonight as well. Still surprised by an internal brake line.

    KTM Scarp build-img_20160805_180618679.jpgKTM Scarp build-img_20160805_183001724.jpgKTM Scarp build-img_20160805_183037937.jpg

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerfisher11 View Post
    Looks absolutely amazing! Weight?
    Not sure right now on the weight. I'm not expecting it to be a featherweight bike, but I'm thinking she'll be around 25, hopefully just under.

    I'll keep posting build progress, and weight at the end.

  6. #6
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    Thanks, great updates, please keep them coming. KTM is underrated in the MTB game.

  7. #7
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    All I am waiting on now is the rims. Everything else has been installed and tested.


    Decided to NOT get a Thomson Elite 410mm seatpost, and instead put on a 150mm drop (450mm long) Fox Transfer seatpost. I like the extra length on the post in the frame, and I figured what should be a quick handling bike, being able to bump the seat down for any log hops would be a help.
    Ordered a new seat clamp, as the Fox Transfer seems to be VERY sensitive to pressure. Got a Hope orange bolt clamp instead of the KTM quick release clamp.

    Also decided to do an "upgrade" to my Hope X2 brakes, and drilled/tapped the mouting flanges to put in two small metric set screws per brake. This allows very precise centering, and makes setup/install VERY easy.





    KTM Scarp build-scarp-cockpit.jpgKTM Scarp build-scarp-rear-2.jpgKTM Scarp build-scarp-rear.jpgKTM Scarp build-x2-drilling.jpgKTM Scarp build-x2-tapped.jpgKTM Scarp build-x2-setscrew.jpg

  8. #8
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    Got the rims yesterday, and between feeding the 5 day old and other things, spent from about 10:30 until 1:00 am building them up.
    They trued up very well, and I didn't have our Park TM-1 tension gauge, so I just had to go by feel.
    Put them on the bike and dished them that way, since the Park Truing stand we have is not centering right. I need to fix that!

    Nextie Carbon rims, 28 hole front, 32 hole rear. 22mm internal, 28mm external. Hookless matte UD carbon finish. 2.0/1.8/2.0 DT Swiss spokes, and aluminum 14mm orange nipples.

    Everything trues up EXTREMELY well considering I wasn't even tensioning at the time.
    Got the TM-1 today, and after a few minutes, I had all drive side spokes on the rear at 19.5-20 on the TM-1, which corresponds to roughly 90-95 kgf. The non-drive spokes all tensioned up to 20-20.5, or roughly 95-100 kgf. Max tension was showing as 130 kgf.
    Front wheel, before tensioning, my "feel" (which had significant desire for margin of error!!) was a 15, or 58 kgf. A few minutes, I had them pretty much exactly the same as the rear.

    Very nice to build up carbon rims. Hopefully they last.....

    Mounted up a set of Bontrager XR2 Team Issue tires, 2.35", and used some Orange Seal. The tires snapped onto the bead very nicely. I've never used hookless rims, so I was a little apprehensive. 30 psi operational pressure felt good.
    Nice rounded profile on the tires.
    I like Bontrager tires, and I KNOW I like the XR4/XR3, but I want this bike to be a quicker bike, so I figured I'll take a chance on the XR2s, not expecting as much traction.


    Bike is COMPLETE - except for a few small items for added "finishing touches" (non-QR seat clamp, GPS mount such and so forth.)
    Now, we just had a quick storm blow through, and it's 95* at 99% humidity, but I may take my fat and out of shape self out and go for a maiden ride here shortly.


    KTM Scarp build-frontwheel.jpgKTM Scarp build-frontwheeldone.jpgKTM Scarp build-rearwheel.jpgKTM Scarp build-rearwheeldone.jpgKTM Scarp build-wheels.jpg
    Last edited by DethWshBkr; 08-13-2016 at 05:06 PM.

  9. #9
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    Full parts list -

    - 2015 KTM Scarp Prestige (29" wheel) frameset, 19"
    - Used RockShox RS-1, 120mm travel with bar mount Full Lock
    - Slik Graphics decals for fork - orange
    - Bontrager Rhythm Pro 80mm +/- 7* stem, currently set as -7*
    - (Cut to) 725 mm wide Pro Taper AM Carbon bars
    - Ritchy Pro integrated headset (came with frame)
    - ODI Rogue lock-on grips, orange clamp rings
    - TOGS bar accessory, orange
    - (Due Monday) Hope seatclamp - non quick release
    - Fox Transfer 30.9mm diameter x 450mm long seatpost, 150mm drop.
    - Fox Transfer under bar mount paddle style
    - Fi'zik Arione VS K:ium railed saddle - orange sidepanels
    - Shimano XT SPD pedals
    - Shimano SM-BB92-41B pressfit bottom bracket
    - Shimano XTR M-9000-2 race 2x crank, 26/36 chainrings, 158mm Q-factor
    - Shimano XTR Di2 M-9070 2x front derailleur
    - Shimano XTR Di2 M-9070 11 speed medium cage rear derailleur
    - Shimano XT 11x40 11 speed cassette
    - (Used) Shimano XTR M-9050 firebolt shifter ***Synchroshift enabled to not need front shifter***
    - Shimano SC-M9050 XTR Di2 handlebar display unit
    - Shimano SM-BTR2 internal Di2 battery, mounted inside of top tube
    - (2x) Shimano Di2 1200mm long wires
    - (1x) Shimano Di2 1000mm long wire
    - (1x) Shimano Di2 600mm long wire
    - (1x) Shimano Di2 150mm long wire
    - (1x) Shimano JC-41 Etube internal junction box
    - Hope Tech 3 X2 disc brakes, orange anodized front and rear
    - 160mm Galfer wave rotors, front and rear
    - Hope 12x142 rear hub - 32 hole
    - SRAM Predictive Steering front hub 28 hole
    - Nextie NXT29AS28 22mm internal, 28mm external carbon fiber rims
    - DT Swiss Competition 2.0/1.8/2.0 black spokes
    - Wheelbuilder alloy spoke nipples, burnt orange
    - Bontrager XR2 29x2.35 tires

    I think that's it....


    KTM Scarp build-ktmscarp.jpgKTM Scarp build-ktmscarp2.jpgKTM Scarp build-ktmscarp3.jpg
    Last edited by DethWshBkr; 08-13-2016 at 06:10 PM.

  10. #10
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    First ride today.
    I have had hardly any riding in the last two months, due to work. Been so stupidly busy it's not even funny. That's one reason I was able to get the bike put together so fast. I had anticipated a few months, not 1!
    I did a loop on a very smooth trail system. It's not technical at all, but does have a fair amount of roots and such. The Remedy is WAY too much bike for these trails, and in fact, a hard-tail is plenty sufficient.

    Nevertheless, this bike moves. It should have been called the Scalpal, not the Scarp, but Cannondale took that name already. It handles great! Quick and light, but even tempered and comfortable. My best time is a 55:36 on this 9.5 mile loop on my Remedy, which is 12th fastest of 124 people. It was ridiculously warm and sticky beyond sticky. Having just had our second son five days ago, sleep has been light, and I just am NOT in any decent shape. Pulled a 1:04:32 today on the Scarp. Very happy with this due to my last ride being 1:11:14.

    I cannot complain about the fork at all. I was curious to see if there was a lot of vague handling due to the inverted fork. I could NOT detect any control issues. Yes, it's not technical, so perhaps that will change, but from what I felt so far, I am VERY happy. I am NOT thrilled with the brake hose routing. If anyone else uses an RS-1, make SURE you have nothing blocking the hose at all. If anything blocks it, the hose will not ride up inside the guides, and will instead try to bump into your spokes. Corrected it temporarily, but I'll add some zip ties to secure it much better.

    Carbon wheels spin up VERY nice. They do not deflect at all, but do make some noise. So far, me likey.
    The 160mm rotors are decent, but of course, no where near the 203/180 I have on the Remedy. Considering this bike's designed purpose, it's fine!
    Front suspension I had to 130 psi, and I still had about 1" left on the travel. Rear, I had to 205 psi, and I'd say roughly 10% left.
    The seat post DID slip down inside the frame a few times, so I had to stop and move it back up. Going to be pulling the post and putting more Fiber Grip carbon assembly gel on the post and frame.

    Definitely developed a somewhat bad clicking/banging noise in the frame. I figure it's the Di2 internal junction box. I had it wrapped in a thick Armaflex, like the battery, but when I armored the rear derailleur wire, I did not do that. I will be pulling the fork off and "re-Armaflexing" the internal box to silence it.

    The Di2 stuff is interesting. The Synchroshift works like an absolute champion. When in the large ring, and shifting the whole way to the cassette, at cog 1 (lowest gear) the display unit does give a very audible, yet not obnoxious "beep beep". The next downshift dropped to the small ring and dropped down the cassette one cog darn near perfectly seamlessly. I DO wish I could alter the mapping, so instead of one cog, it would drop two cogs, but ah well. ***Edit - I just hooked back up to Etube Project, and apon closer examination, I CAN change a LOT about the shift points. I'm going to play with that a lot now! I did change the mapping a lot, and I'll be trying it out. Nice thing, if I do not like the new mapping, the display unit allows me to change to the other map on the fly.*** I also do wish that when Synchroshift was active, you could Multishift. On my road bike, (Ultegra Di2) if you HOLD the shifter button, it just keeps shifting until you release the button. It's not necessary, but in a few instances such as fast stops from high speed, where you are on the brakes hard - the Multi-shift is phenomenal on the road bike. It can be difficult to go through the cassette when braking extremely hard on the road bike. Di2 makes it easy. ***Second Edit. I messed up again. E-Tube project DOES ALLOW multishifting, based on what click I want to initiate a multishift. The Firebolt shifter has two clicks on each trigger. The first click up or down is ONE shift. If I go into click number two, the rear derailleur flies up or down the cassette, and initiates a synchroshift and just continues to shift the cassette. VERY NICE, and exactly what I had hoped for. I can make multishift initiate on the first click, but we will see if I want to do that.***

    The gearing ratios on the 11/40 cassette are CLOSE. As a result, I wanted to shift 2-3 cogs at a time sometimes, up or down. UNLIKE my Sram X1 and Shimano Rapidfire, where you can push the shifter in further to shift 2, 3, or 4 cogs per swipe, the Di2 while in Synchroshift requires you to release and re-push the button for EVERY cog. With such a close ratio, it got a tad annoying. ***The preceeding paragraph is pretty much negated by the previous edit on the paragraph preceeding that one!***
    The ergonomics on the Firebolt shifter are so-so. I found it difficult to rapidly shift multiple gears, but I do not have it adjusted quite comfortable. I made a few changes while riding, but that's limited.
    The clutch mechanism on the XTR derailleur was necessary, and very powerful. Without it on, I noticed a relatively significant amount of chain slapping around. I don't get that on my Remedy with the X1 derailleur. The Di2 motor definitely was under a lot more strain when the clutch was engaged, but supposedly that is only going to drain the battery faster.

    The Hope X2 brakes are yet again, nothing short of phenomenal. Took a short while to bed the brakes in, but once done, Hope perfection

    My Remedy has spoiled me for the ability to just bash and beat a bike. The Remedy just ABSORBS everything. The Scarp does not absorb stuff as nice, but it is a very nice riding machine. Once, I had the rear wheel off the ground coming into a corner through some roots. The Remedy would just track and absorb it all. Now, I need to do some suspension adjustments for rebound and such, but the bike definitely does not feel like it will be nearly as forgiving as the Remedy. I don't expect this thing to be a basher either. It's a racing machine for sure, and a very controllable friendly racing machine!

    Weighing it on the bathroom scale shows 25 lb +/- a pound. I will get it meaured accurately as soon as possible. I was estimating 25 lb with the dropper and the 2x crank/front derailleur.


    My brother did a quick road test on it just 30 minutes ago, and he also said he can feel this thing feels like a very fast race bike. Soon as I get him on it, we'll see what he can do! His time on the course I did today is 49:17, for a 5th overall on his Specialized Camber Expert.


    More miles for more smiles now!
    Last edited by DethWshBkr; 08-13-2016 at 09:28 PM.

  11. #11
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    Super nice build there DWB! Really nice job job tying it all together into a very race-able xc ripping rig. Also nice choice on colors and lacing up your own wheels...that part must be very rewarding when done, riding your own wheel build? That is uncommon to see the brake lines internal for sure, but the Hopes should do ya good.
    If you're interested in making this xc bike more of a trail bike, like you said, beef up the tires to 2.4's, lower the pressure a bit. Maybe dial up the front and rear suspension....all part of the fun with a new build!

    Congrats on the baby and the new bike!
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  12. #12
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    KTM Scarp build

    Nice build here! I like your caliper adj mod, ala Hayes style.
    Regarding your RS-1 how do you have it set up (for your weight and riding style/ race/ trail?), tokens, pressure, rebound? I've had one for close to a year now and love the fork. You do have to keep the brake hose free from touching or connected to any other lines, I had mine routed on the outside for a bit but it's better inside as the guides/ hose is a straighter shot.
    I swap a couple forks on my Following a Stage 140 and this RS-1. It's not the easiest fork to set up, it's sensitive to adjustment even though you can only adjust air pressure air volume and rebound. I've got mine dialed in pretty well, it's super supple and bottomless to the point that it feel like more travel than 120mm. Its also a very good handling fork on all, terrain and works well with stiff wheels so your Nextie build wheels should be pretty stiff. I'm running Derby 35XC 28 hole rims, SRAM PS and I9 Torch rear.
    I've hurtled mine down double black diamond trails and jump lines and it takes big hits like a champ.


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  13. #13
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    Weighed the bike today on a Park hanging scale.

    With the dropper, (150mm drop, 450mm total length) TOGS, Garmin mount, a bottle worth of Orange seal, including my XT pedals and a little bit of dirt:
    27 lb, 0 oz.
    Not a featherweight, but it rides lighter than the scale shows, so I'm very, very pleased.
    If I got rid of the dropper, and put on a light set of bars (The pro taper bars are an enduro bar, not an XC weight bar), and got rid of the 2x, I could get it to 26 lb. I like it as it is though, so I'm not going to do that!!)

  14. #14
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    Out of curiosity where did you get the frame? Do they sell the frame individually? I was thinking of getting a Lycan LT and building it up to my liking but I couldn't find a place that does frame only.

  15. #15
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    . ..
    Last edited by DethWshBkr; 09-17-2016 at 04:53 PM.

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    I realize this is an old thread but any issues on using the internally routed dropper. Read a review on singletracks that stated the frame didn't accept one but I see you've got a Transfer on yours.

    Thanks!

  17. #17
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    NO issues whatsoever. It was not "easy" to run it, and it has a rather hard bend at the bottom bracket, but it works perfectly, and the force on the lever is extremely light. I just ran the housing internally starting at the head tube, and fed it down through. I had to pull it out the side of the BB shell. I then had to drop a cable down from the top of the seat tube, and get it fished through the side of the BB as well. Then I ran the cable through the housing, while leaving the cable exposed out the top. Essentially, the cable was acting as a guide, and allowing me to pull and yank the housing through to the top of the seat tube.
    I then eyeballed the post insertion, and estimated where to cut the housing out the head tube.
    I had to then push through, down into the down tube, and mounted the seat post and proper cable. I was able to "walk" the cable/housing back up the down tube, and out at the head tube. Mount the fork up, set the controls, and cut the cable.

    It was a chore, but I was NOT running it externally!! I had to do it three times so far, and it wasn't so horrendous I wouldn't do it again, so it's worth it in my opinion!
    "Go soothingly in the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon"

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    Awesome! That was one of my only reservations about getting the bike. I think I'm going to run a 120 fork and make it an all day endurance rig

    How are you liking it after having it awhile?

  19. #19
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    I love the bike.

    It is not nearly as forgiving as my Remedy. I have it set for 120mm front, and I know I need to get the suspension worked.

    In the knarly stuff, it definitely requires more finesse and forethought than my Remedy. The Rem, I can just PLOW stuff, and it soaks it up (Remedy is 160 front, 140 rear, where the Scarp is 120 front, 100 rear). The Scarp, of course by design, does not handle the chunder so well. But, it' is a beautiful bike, and I am glad I got it.
    Having ridden KTM MX bikes since 2001, I was very happy to get a KTM mountain bike.

    I did break the frame however, while on the saddle in very rocky rough stuff. Haven't had any issues with the new frame, but I am mindful and somewhat extra cautious of abuse to the bike.

    I did an XC race about a month ago, and it was some of the most enjoyably knarly technical downhill stuff I have ever ridden on. People were bleeding all over the place. I wished I would have had my Remedy for the downhill section, but overall, again, I love the Scarp.
    "Go soothingly in the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon"

  20. #20
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    Hi, I know this thread is dated now but needing some help from someone who actually owns a Scarp I think. Iíve just been lucky enough to pick up one of these frames (prestige 29 2015) but itís come with no rear shock or the spacers for shock or any user manuals. Iím finding it really difficult to find anything online about the rear shock apart from that the Scarps came with Rock Shox Monarch XX or Fox Float CTD BV. Could anyone tell me which model I actually need, (travel/mounting size etc) Iíve measured the travel / eyelets but that doesnít seem to have lead me to an answer. TIA (Ps: this is my first post

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