Kenda Klaw XT = 40-65psi?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Kenda Klaw XT = 40-65psi?

    I just got in my kenda klaws today for the 29r and noticed that they are stamped 40-65psi.
    I usually run my psi a little high being approx. 200lbs, but up to 65psi? Really?

    I have heard so many people speaking about running 29r's with less pressure too.
    Is this high pressure to help keep this big tire seated?
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  2. #2
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    Not me

    I've been running Klaws front and rear for just over a year now and have kept them right around 30psi and have had no problems at all. Front rim is an Alex TD17 and the back is a Velocity Dyad.

    I never even read the sidewalls.

  3. #3
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    I just have read about a few folks having the tire unmount on the trails and want to make sure I don't end up like that. LOL.
    Thanks.
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  4. #4
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    Those PSIs are lawyer guidelines. They've got little to do with reality. I weigh 170 and run 32-35 back and 28-30 front. And those are high because I don't like to flat.
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    I agree with wooglin

    The stamped psi ratings don't mean much, except it's probably a good idea not to exceed the maximum rated pressure.

    For most offroad purposes I run my Klaws at 18-20 psi front, 20-23 psi rear, and still almost never get flats. I'm 160 pounds, the bike's about 28.
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  6. #6
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    No problems here

    I run 30 to 35 psi on my rear Klaw on both bikes and have never had an issue. I weigh 209+gear.

  7. #7
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    I am still a newbie on the 29r, but my first few rides provided a pretty soft ride @ 42 psi vs. a 26r at the same psi.
    I am speaking about the tires themselves felt like they havd less air, more squishy, but that was with the NANO's, not the Klaws.
    Good information though guys, at least I will have an idea of my limits. Our trails are all rocks, roots and sharp corners and small drops, so I will be keeping the pressure up at least a little.
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    Quote Originally Posted by F5000sl
    I am still a newbie on the 29r, but my first few rides provided a pretty soft ride @ 42 psi vs. a 26r at the same psi.
    I am speaking about the tires themselves felt like they havd less air, more squishy, but that was with the NANO's, not the Klaws.
    Good information though guys, at least I will have an idea of my limits. Our trails are all rocks, roots and sharp corners and small drops, so I will be keeping the pressure up at least a little.
    You might try running a bit less pressure in those. I run 28-30 rear and 25 ish front. Those pressures will yield a much smoother ride for you as well as good traction. That's what works for me on my local trails. Later

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by F5000sl
    I am still a newbie on the 29r, but my first few rides provided a pretty soft ride @ 42 psi vs. a 26r at the same psi.
    I am speaking about the tires themselves felt like they havd less air, more squishy, but that was with the NANO's, not the Klaws.
    Good information though guys, at least I will have an idea of my limits. Our trails are all rocks, roots and sharp corners and small drops, so I will be keeping the pressure up at least a little.

    Same weight approx. as you. 32 lbs and at most 35 with those tires. Running tubes. 40 is too much unless you are doing some stuff that I never came upon. They climb and hook up much better with the lower pressure.
    my builder: Neil at Cernitz Bike

  10. #10
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    I just did my first ride on Buttermilk / FH tonight with the Klaws and they worked well at 40-45psi, even on the damp roots and such. The front is a little twitchy, so I may lower the pressure to help with that. I'm figuring about 35-37psi.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by F5000sl
    I just did my first ride on Buttermilk / FH tonight with the Klaws and they worked well at 40-45psi, even on the damp roots and such. The front is a little twitchy, so I may lower the pressure to help with that. I'm figuring about 35-37psi.
    I'm about the same weight as you and I'm on similar trails (central NC), and back when I had Klaw's on my Mt. Tam I ran them right around 35 psi -- maybe a little under. I never had any problem with pinch flats (which I hate and fear), and probably could have gone a little lower with no problem. Again, I thought they were great tires in the slop.

    Enjoy it!

  12. #12
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    I weigh quite a bit more than you (250#+) and run essentially all 29er tires (>2.0") - rigid SS or FS gearie - in the low 30s front and upper 30s rear.

    Unless you're trying to pinch flat them you shouldn't have issue, Klaws or otherwise.
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlowBoy
    The stamped psi ratings don't mean much, except it's probably a good idea not to exceed the maximum rated pressure.
    Actually, it's not that bad. The rated max is half the tire failure psi. I run 60 psi tires at 100 psi all the time riding skatepark and street.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Soupboy
    I weigh quite a bit more than you (250#+) and run essentially all 29er tires (>2.0") - rigid SS or FS gearie - in the low 30s front and upper 30s rear.

    Unless you're trying to pinch flat them you shouldn't have issue, Klaws or otherwise.
    i pinched my rear klaw at 40psi down a rocky downhill recently... infact it is the second time i believe i pinched them at around 40.

    the sidewalls sem superthin to me and if this keeps up i am gonna go to an exi outback. i love the tread on the klaw but can't seem to keep them from flatting under my 230lbs.

    45psi for me.... in the back much less (30 or so) in my exi up front.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ihatemybike
    Actually, it's not that bad. The rated max is half the tire failure psi. I run 60 psi tires at 100 psi all the time riding skatepark and street.
    You're right that the stated max psi is normally half the tire failure psi. But that testing is done in a static situation -- the manufacturer gradually increases the pressure until the tire blows up. Real world riding puts dynamic forces on the tire that could cause it to fail at a substantially lower pressure.

    On most tires you can probably go well above the rated pressure without getting in trouble, but I wouldn't recommend anyone go way over unless they are prepared to deal with sudden tire failure. On a confined skatepark course or in trials-y urban riding that might be OK, but on a high speed downhill the consequences could be catastrophic.
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  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by GlowBoy
    On most tires you can probably go well above the rated pressure without getting in trouble, but I wouldn't recommend anyone go way over unless they are prepared to deal with sudden tire failure. On a confined skatepark course or in trials-y urban riding that might be OK, but on a high speed downhill the consequences could be catastrophic.
    In my experience blow outs on the lower rated tires aren't any more frequent or worse in degree than higher rated tires. Granted I've never gone past 180% the max rated psi, in the 18 years I've been over-inflating. I do not recommend over-inflating tires for XC or DH use, but for road riding, skatepark, street, and dirt jumps it's perfectly fine.

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