Is it just my riding position?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Me ride.
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    Is it just my riding position?

    Over the past month I've test-ridden some 29ers:

    Rockhopper Comp
    Carve Expert
    Cannondale Trail SL 2
    Kona Kahuna DL
    Trek Cobia
    Diamondback Overdrive Pro

    What concerned me was that my toes hit the front tire during turns way more often than I would expect.
    Is this a common drawback to the 29er geometry?
    The frame sizes I rode ranged from 19-21.
    My foot is on the pedals in the same position as on my 26er.
    I'm 6'2" with size 12 feet.
    I love the feel of the 29ers--it's like floating on a cloud--but constantly hitting the tire would take a lot of getting used to.

  2. #2
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    What kind of pedals are you using? When I rode a 29er for the first time I was using flat pedals and my toes hit the front tire a few times during turns because my feet had the tendency to slide forward on the pedals while I was riding.

    I got a set of clip in pedals and I've had zero issues with this since the pedals stay securely on the balls of my feet.

    I ride a 17.5" Trek X-Cal. I'm 5' 10" and wear size 13 shoes.

  3. #3
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    Is it just my riding position?

    Not that it proves anything, but my experience at 6'3" with US13 feet is that I've never had toe contact. This is both with clipless and with flat pedals. I think there's something else going on.

  4. #4
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    6'1" size 11-12 never hit the pedals. Didn't even know I could until reading this. Do you ride on the balls of your feet? Sounds like maybe you are pedaling with your arches. I do use power straps and clips before that so my feet are held back in place, maybe I'd hit too with flats.

  5. #5
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    If you tend to ride with the pedal nearer the arch of your foot rather than the ball, yes, you may have more toe strikes on a 29er v. a 26.

    As mentioned, clipless fixes that but I can also ride flats on my steeper bikes and not have too many toe strikes simply because I've developed the habit of keeping the pedal under the ball of my foot when on flats.

    Have some watch you pedal and corner and help you determine where your feet are positioned.
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  6. #6
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    Size 12, ride a Canfield Yelli, medium frame, ride flats with feet centered more towards the arch than on the ball and I don't have toe/tire overlap. It could be a combination of the position of your foot, size of shoe exterior, and frame geometry of the bikes you have been testing. if you can, try a frame with a slacker head angle and/or one that has the front axle somewhat more forward in comparison to the steerer tube.

    I was concered about toe overlap when I purchased a medium because I had previously ridden larges. But I would not be concerned about it on a large frame in general. Sometimes feet get measured wrong, too. In the winter I ride my Yelli with low cut hiking boots, which look bigger on the exterior than my normal 5/10s and I have never had a toe strike.

  7. #7
    Always Learning
    Reputation: BruceBrown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexDeLarge View Post
    Over the past month I've test-ridden some 29ers:

    Rockhopper Comp
    Carve Expert
    Cannondale Trail SL 2
    Kona Kahuna DL
    Trek Cobia
    Diamondback Overdrive Pro

    What concerned me was that my toes hit the front tire during turns way more often than I would expect.
    Is this a common drawback to the 29er geometry?
    The frame sizes I rode ranged from 19-21.
    My foot is on the pedals in the same position as on my 26er.
    I'm 6'2" with size 12 feet.
    I love the feel of the 29ers--it's like floating on a cloud--but constantly hitting the tire would take a lot of getting used to.
    Seems pretty odd as I wear a size 12 Shimano and Specialized shoe with the SPD cleats mounted all the way back as close to the arch as I can get them - and even running a 2.4 tire up front, the toes doen't even come close to touching the tire (I ride size 21" or XL bikes). Not even in my Shimano size Euro 48 winter boots is it even close. I use Xpedo and Shimano SPD pedals on all bikes. I have 180mm cranks on all my 29"ers. Clipped in, and with a 2.4 tire up front, there is about 1 1/2" clearance space between my toe and the tire on the Dos Niner with my regular XC mtb shoes. On my RIP 9 with a 2.3 tire up front and my Euro size 48 Shimano winter cyclying "boots", there is a full 2" between the toe of the shoe and the tire. I suppose every bike is different, but if you are clipped in - I just don't get it.

    Need more information on what pedals and cleats you are using to see why you are rubbing. Maybe shoot a picture. My son wears a size 13 shoe and has no problems on size L bikes (he wears Shimano mtb shoes with SPD cleats).
    Last edited by BruceBrown; 11-20-2013 at 09:19 PM.

  8. #8
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    you are not dreaming, its real.

    i had similar problem with my yelli screamy and flat pedals.
    feets tends to slip toward the arch on bumpyer rides and then would hit front wheel in sharp turns.

    the steeper the angle the more it can happen, riding on the ball of feet with flat pedals is the ideal way to ride but reality is that your feets wont always stay in the same place ... i never had to think about it until i rode a 29er, problem is accentuated with them.

    to resolve the problem i've switched to 170mm cranks and installed an angle set(i wanted the angleset anyways).
    expensive cars are a waste of money. Expensive bikes...not so much!

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