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  1. #1
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    Ibis Ripmo vs Ripley

    I am struggling between purchasing the Ripley or Ripmo. I have read all the reviews and spent time riding the Ripley and had a quick run on the Ripmo.

    Both seem to be great bikes. If I knew I was only riding trail I would probably go with the Ripley but I do expect do some rougher stuff about 20% of the time. Maybe more as my skills advance.

    Those of you who own or have has significant seat time on the Ripmo can you offer any advice on using Ripmo as mostly trail bike?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rotex View Post
    I am struggling between purchasing the Ripley or Ripmo. I have read all the reviews and spent time riding the Ripley and had a quick run on the Ripmo.

    Both seem to be great bikes. If I knew I was only riding trail I would probably go with the Ripley but I do expect do some rougher stuff about 20% of the time. Maybe more as my skills advance.

    Those of you who own or have has significant seat time on the Ripmo can you offer any advice on using Ripmo as mostly trail bike?
    I think the Ripmo is an ideal trail bike for 90% of trails. The bike pedals great and feels just at home doing XC as it does on an enduro style trail.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rom3n View Post
    I think the Ripmo is an ideal trail bike for 90% of trails. The bike pedals great and feels just at home doing XC as it does on an enduro style trail.
    I go to school in San Luis Obispo, CA where the riding is fast, technical, and rough. I got the ripmo primarily for SLO, but I'm living at home now where the riding is much more cross-country, up and down, with some fun downhills.
    The ripmo feels absolutely great on the cross country trails; I am an experienced rider and have good fitness, so I can pedal the bigger bike around well. The bike climbs as well as, if not a better than, my old switchblade. For me, having more bike is fun; but if you are worried about flatground efficiency/speed, then I would just recommend using 2.3 rear and 2.4 front for a tire setup instead of the heavy, seemingly draggy 2.5s. The ripmo will allow you to reach higher speeds with more confidence compared to the ripley.

  4. #4
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    Thank you for the feedback veganshredde!

  5. #5
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    Hey Veganshredde - I saw on your post you switched from the Switchblade to the Ripmo. I am currently torn between both of these bikes. Any chance you could shed some light on the difference in riding between the two? Thanks!

  6. #6
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    I bought Romen's Ripmo, taking it out this evening for first ride. I also have spent time on my brothers Ripley LS, and he will want to demo the Ripmo tonight, and I will compare them both.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by veganshredder View Post
    I go to school in San Luis Obispo, CA where the riding is fast, technical, and rough. I got the ripmo primarily for SLO, but I'm living at home now where the riding is much more cross-country, up and down, with some fun downhills.
    The ripmo feels absolutely great on the cross country trails; I am an experienced rider and have good fitness, so I can pedal the bigger bike around well. The bike climbs as well as, if not a better than, my old switchblade. For me, having more bike is fun; but if you are worried about flatground efficiency/speed, then I would just recommend using 2.3 rear and 2.4 front for a tire setup instead of the heavy, seemingly draggy 2.5s. The ripmo will allow you to reach higher speeds with more confidence compared to the ripley.
    I'm on a Ripley LS and I feel more confident on it than more older 6 inch travel all mountain 26er. I haven't rode a Ripmo but I've heard that it climbs well for that category bike; feedback has been that if you're not looking to beat everyone up the hill, it'll get you up perfectly fine (long travel 29ers are climbing like short/mid travel trail 29ers now). I rather be over biked than under biked. Also, I feel like general fitness comes into play... if you're fit overall and you're not looking to race to the top, then by all means go for the more aggressive bike.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for everyone's comments. Very helpful.

    I demoed both the Ripley and Ripmo together with my son for 2 days on familiar trails. For background, I live in Austin, TX - which has trails that are very technical, a lot of steep up and down, drop-offs, twisty forest, but very little high speed trails. I currently own a 2017 27.5+ Stumpjumper for reference (super fun bike: 140/150mm travel).

    Climbing:
    Both Ripley and Ripmo climbed equally I thought. I was able to conquer all the same features as on my Stumpy, but I only felt 80-90% as tired at the top when on the Ibis bikes. Much more of a feeling I could ride all day.

    Steep technical descending:
    Ripmo definitely was easier and more controlled. But Ripley (130mm 29') was still more comfortable than my Stumpjumper. So for the type of downhill I do 90% of the time (steep and technical - sub 20mph) Ripley is fine. I felt I just needed to lean back a little further on the Ripley vs. the Ripmo to get the same level of control.

    Twisty trails and bouldering (sub 10mph):
    This was where I felt the biggest difference between the 2 bikes. Ripley gives more control and therefore more capability in the turns. For working through boulders, Ripmo can grind over things a little better, but feels like a big wagon-wheeled bike in comparison. Ripley did better over all because it could maneuver around rocks better when needed but still had 2.5" 29 wheels to go over things.

    Fast trails and berms (20+mph):
    Ripley can handle them fine. But Ripmo felt planted and relaxed.

    Bottom line:
    Ripley feels like an extension of my body. Or like a big BMX bike.

    Ripmo feels like a Cadillac. In a good way. Smooth and easy. But less like an extension of my body and more like I'm driving an awesome vehicle. Also, I probably would be less tired after riding a Ripmo all day than either the Ripley or Stumpy. But to some extent I felt the Ripmo makes my home trails too easy and removes a little too much of the challenge and spirit.

    So I chose the Ripley and ordered one last week. Will keep the Stumpjumper for my son and visitors to ride!

  9. #9
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    Yeah, that's exactly what I'd expect. I've ridden Austin on my Pivot and a big bike like the Ripmo would just be too much bike IMO, even though it's rocky and you have a few places where it'd help. With the Ripley you can add power-strokes here and there in the twisties and get that "instant acceleration" to generate forward movement to clear obstacles and such, whip it back and forth easier, etc. That's also a pretty extreme gap between bikes, in terms of travel, usage, etc. No doubt the Ripmo is a fun bike, but you'd need a lot of high-speed vertical IMO to really have fun on it. That's how it was with my old E29.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  10. #10
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    I also have a Ripmo. My daily trails are mellow cross country But I wanted something I could also take to destinations and gravity parks. It feels great at home and I never feel over-biked. It is also very at home when things get rowdy. It is a great one bike quiver


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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimaus View Post
    Thanks for everyone's comments. Very helpful.

    I demoed both the Ripley and Ripmo together with my son for 2 days on familiar trails. For background, I live in Austin, TX - which has trails that are very technical, a lot of steep up and down, drop-offs, twisty forest, but very little high speed trails. I currently own a 2017 27.5+ Stumpjumper for reference (super fun bike: 140/150mm travel).

    Climbing:
    Both Ripley and Ripmo climbed equally I thought. I was able to conquer all the same features as on my Stumpy, but I only felt 80-90% as tired at the top when on the Ibis bikes. Much more of a feeling I could ride all day.

    Steep technical descending:
    Ripmo definitely was easier and more controlled. But Ripley (130mm 29') was still more comfortable than my Stumpjumper. So for the type of downhill I do 90% of the time (steep and technical - sub 20mph) Ripley is fine. I felt I just needed to lean back a little further on the Ripley vs. the Ripmo to get the same level of control.

    Twisty trails and bouldering (sub 10mph):
    This was where I felt the biggest difference between the 2 bikes. Ripley gives more control and therefore more capability in the turns. For working through boulders, Ripmo can grind over things a little better, but feels like a big wagon-wheeled bike in comparison. Ripley did better over all because it could maneuver around rocks better when needed but still had 2.5" 29 wheels to go over things.

    Fast trails and berms (20+mph):
    Ripley can handle them fine. But Ripmo felt planted and relaxed.

    Bottom line:
    Ripley feels like an extension of my body. Or like a big BMX bike.

    Ripmo feels like a Cadillac. In a good way. Smooth and easy. But less like an extension of my body and more like I'm driving an awesome vehicle. Also, I probably would be less tired after riding a Ripmo all day than either the Ripley or Stumpy. But to some extent I felt the Ripmo makes my home trails too easy and removes a little too much of the challenge and spirit.

    So I chose the Ripley and ordered one last week. Will keep the Stumpjumper for my son and visitors to ride!
    Jimaus--

    I didn't see your comparison before I did my own and posted it over on the Ibis forum. We came to a lot of the same conclusions.
    http://forums.mtbr.com/ibis/ibis-rip...l#post13864509

    I am still curious how the Ripmo would stack up against the Yeti SB130.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrHog View Post
    Jimaus--

    I didn't see your comparison before I did my own and posted it over on the Ibis forum. We came to a lot of the same conclusions.
    http://forums.mtbr.com/ibis/ibis-rip...l#post13864509

    I am still curious how the Ripmo would stack up against the Yeti SB130.
    sb130 seems to be a great bike but I'd be scared that complicated rear causes problems/noise in the future. Bike magazines bible of the bike has both and the dec issue will compare them.

  13. #13
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    I'd look at Outdoorgearlabs bike comparisons. They do actual comparisons. Bike Bible stuff is fine but there is so little detail or empirical information usually. Outdoor gear labs has been doing it best by far for years. Maintenance is even one of their graded categories unlike everything else. Fwiw they love the Ripmo and historically have liked Yeti as well. They didnt consider the Switch Infinity to overly problematic maintenence wise. The only thing needed is cleaning once in a while like everything and adding some grease to the grease ports (very quick and easy).

    Fwiw as a tall guy, the Ripley freaking sucked. It's a laughably small bike and I'm not going to ride an 80-90mm stem. Ripmo and Yeti are sick bikes but in XL they are really long (I haven't ridden the yetis). Sure the extra reach and STA steepness is nice but there is not getting around how long they are on certain single track stuff in XL size. Not as much fun in XL.

    The wheelbase of new stump jumper worked for me but the reach was laughably short for some reason and STA slack (crappy). I ended up with a Rocky Mountain Instinct I custom built to be in between a Ripmo and a Ripley. It's neither long nor short and a 150mm fox 36 Grip2 is a nice pair with 140mm dpx2 on big minion tires. A few dials and it gets real playful or decently sticky to the ground (not ultra plush unless I switch to BC which I have shock and air spring for). Climbs really really well in 140mm version and is a blast to ride. Only 29lbs with that Enduro build, big tires and suspension in the XL. Crazy light for that makes it nice.

  14. #14
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    Arenít you a relatively new rider? How many bikes have you personally owned besides your Rocky?
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  15. #15
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    Facts, as measured in my garage just now:

    XL Ripmo wheelbase: 49.125 inches

    XL 2019 Stumpy wheelbase: 48.625 inches
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

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