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  1. #1
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    New question here. Hardtail all-rounder for a heavy rider

    Hello!

    For the past year I've been eyeing multiple bikes for my local trail riding. I live in Lithuania so there's no huge mountains around but the trails I enjoy are pretty rooty, damp and long.

    I'm looking for an all-rounder hardtail that can climb well, maintain stability at speed and, most importantly, support my 93kg (205lbs) weight while I thrash it around. My height is 184cm (6ft), my inseam 85cm (33.5in). I've been riding a hybrid bike with 450mm reach for the last 5 years and feeling quite comfortable on it.

    First I decided to build my own bike using Specialized Chisel frameset, but after consulting the Frame forums here I understood that it might be too flexy, then I reverted back to one of my first choices - Commencal Meta HT AM Race 2019 (https://www.commencal-store.co.uk/me...19-c2x26307404). But the huge travel, formula hubs and powerspline BB has me second guessing.

    My budget is around 2000eur.

    Is there something you could recommend? Should I just got with the Meta?

    P. S. Since I live in Lithuania all the nice Honzo's and Diamondback's and Santa Cruz's are out of my reach. I can buy a european brand like Commencal, Focus, Cube, Canyon, Merida etc.

  2. #2
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    Given the title, I expected you to be a much larger dude. I don't think 184cm/93kg necessarily warrants a special bike.

    The Commencal looks nice, and I know the Chisel is really nice as well. The Chisel would be my personal choice as that kind of bike fits closer to the kind of trails I ride and like to ride. I also think, from a geometry standpoint, it would be a little closer to the hybrid you're currently riding. That is just a guess, though.

    If you see yourself getting into some gnarlier trails, I'd definitely lean towards the Commencal.

    But any chance you could ride them? I think that would help you make the decision more than anything.

  3. #3
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    Well I want quite a durable bike and Chisels frame looks extremely slender, to the point that I'm fearful it might flex too much. I notice that even my hybrid bike is flexy on a forest road.

    I'm really considering pulling the trigger on that Commencal but I'm still worried about my overall weight on it. I know a lot of Mavic or DT Swiss wheels say that max load is around 110KG on them (with bike). And I know that with all my kit I could close or over that limit, I don't think those e13 wheels on the Meta are much different. Should I be concerned about that?

    What other cons do you think the Commencal has, maybe I should swap something out?

    Sorry for the amount of questions but this is the first time in my life that I'm buying a bike by myself and with my own money, so I want to get it right the first time .

  4. #4
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    https://enduro-mtb.com/en/best-hardcore-hardtail/
    A Nukeproof Scout 290 Comp is a potential choice.
    Scout 290 Comp 2019 | Nukeproof

    https://www.chainreactioncycles.com/.../rp-prod170312
    Currently out of stock here.
    Mavic wheels are for road bikes. Their proprietary parts and low number of spokes are a no go.
    Dt Swiss rims are among the strongest.

  5. #5
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    +1 for the Nukeproof Scout ^^

    I'm 6ft & 107kg's & it's bomb proof.

    I run Stans 32h rims w/ 23mm ID, ztr hub front & dt swiss 350 hub rear.

    Wheels never need truing.

    Set w/ 140mm X-Fusion Trace fork.

    Bike is an AM smasher!

    'Born to ride!'
    "Mountain biking: the under-rated and drug-free antidepressant"

  6. #6
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by karlotikas View Post
    I know a lot of Mavic or DT Swiss wheels say that max load is around 110KG on them (with bike). And I know that with all my kit I could close or over that limit, I don't think those e13 wheels on the Meta are much different. Should I be concerned about that?
    Just because some wheel models have weight limits doesn't mean they all will. You can often buy lightweight weight weenie cross country wheels AND burly downhill wheels from the same company, and several models in between. I have a strong preference for wheels built with standard flange hubs, j-bend spokes, and rims that use standard spoke nipples. I've done my time on proprietary wheelsets. I had a Mavic mtb wheelset about 15yrs ago. It was fine, but if I ever really thrashed it, the proprietary spokes, nipples, and rims would have made it a real mess to try to repair. One of my wife's bikes had a proprietary DT Swiss Tricon wheelset that was a nightmare just to true. Sold it off and replaced it with a nice handbuilt wheelset with standard parts. I'm collecting parts for my first wheel build right now. I9 Torch Classic hubs (standard flange), DT Swiss XM481 rims, and DT swiss j-bend spokes. Just a quality aluminum wheelset with good hubs.

    You're not going to have much choice for wheels on an already-built bike. Most bikes come with whatever they come with. USUALLY if a company builds a bike advertised as being a little burlier, they'll put parts on it built for the riding the bike is intended for. All bets are off when you're scraping the bottom of the barrel with places like bikesdirect, though, because they DO put a bunch of random shit on a frame that doesn't necessarily match the riding the frame is intended for. But most of the time the wheels will suit the sort of riding the bike is intended for. Yes, cross country stuff can have weight limits. Burlier stuff is far less likely to.

    The nice thing about wheels is that they're a fairly easy thing to change if you decide you want to. And that's a good thing, because you can trash any wheelset if you crash (especially at high speed and/or with air), whether it has a weight limit or not.

  7. #7
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    Thank you all for informative comments. I will be looking into builds with wheels that are not proprietary.

    I just noticed that the new Nukeproof Scout 290 has a 24 spoke rear wheel. Mavic XA. That seems like a no go.

    And Commencal Meta HT AM Race seems to have non-proprietary wheels with e13 trs rims, sapim race spokes and formula hubs. Would this be a better choice then?

  8. #8
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    There's some really greta advice here already. Rather than suggest a bike can I ask you a question?

    What bike shops are close to you and what brands do they carry?

  9. #9
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    What about a NS Eccentric. Comes in either an aluminum or cromo frame. Wheel set seems decent, and itís in budget.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by driver bob View Post
    There's some really greta advice here already. Rather than suggest a bike can I ask you a question?

    What bike shops are close to you and what brands do they carry?
    There's quite a handful of shops around me but all of them only carry road or hybrid bikes. The wildest it gets is a couple of mid-tier XC bikes from yesteryear like Cube Reaction or Merida big.nine. None carry enduro hardtails.

    And regarding the wheels - I think I will ask around if any of the shops have any experience with e13's like the ones on the Meta.

    @unrealityshow Thanks! I like the specs of the Eccentric, but the externally routed cables put me off :/. Overall I think Meta looks better, but that's subjective.

  11. #11
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by karlotikas View Post
    @unrealityshow Thanks! I like the specs of the Eccentric, but the externally routed cables put me off :/. Overall I think Meta looks better, but that's subjective.
    External cable routing shouldn't put you off, unless it uses split housing. That's a road bike thing that should never have been done on mtb's.

    Sure, it looks less clean. But external full-length housing is dead easy to maintain. Internal routing is easier to maintain now than it used to be (on most frames, at least), but there's nothing wrong with external.

    I would only ever buy a frame with internal routing if two things were true:
    1. it also used full length housing (through the frame)
    2. and that frame had routing tubes inside the frame to make it easy to feed new housing through

    Such bikes do exist, but it's not something that gets touted in most specs, so you usually have to put hands on one to check how the internal routing is done. I'd never buy an internally routed frame where the frame entry/exit points were also housing stops, because those are still possible entry points for contamination that shortens the lifespan of your cables and housings.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by karlotikas View Post
    Thank you all for informative comments. I will be looking into builds with wheels that are not proprietary.

    I just noticed that the new Nukeproof Scout 290 has a 24 spoke rear wheel. Mavic XA. That seems like a no go.

    And Commencal Meta HT AM Race seems to have non-proprietary wheels with e13 trs rims, sapim race spokes and formula hubs. Would this be a better choice then?
    Re, 24 spoke count...

    That does seem a little off o_0

    However, I've run Easton Heist out back w/o issue & it's a 28 spoke count wheel.

    EH uses straight pull spokes... an lbs tells me straight pull makes no difference to strength of wheel.

    So, 28 spoke count would seem plenty...

    At 93kg, running 2.8" tires - on a 24 spoke count wheel??

    Not outside the realm of plausible.

    'Born to ride!'
    "Mountain biking: the under-rated and drug-free antidepressant"

  13. #13
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    Transition Vanquish or Throttle? Ibis DV9?
    Last edited by Callender; 3 Days Ago at 09:44 PM.

  14. #14
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    205? That's not really heavy.

    I spent 8 years on a Scott Scale 29er at 200-220lbs plus gear. My buddy is borrowing it now and he is 250-260lbs. The bike has not had a problem with the weight up to this point.
    '18 Scott Spark 730, 27.5+
    '10 Scott Scale 29er

  15. #15
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    Agreed with everyone else... 205 and 6' is not really heavy, take a gander in the "Clydesdale" forum and you will see some BIG guys in there.

    Other options....
    - Production Privee Shan
    - Cotic SolarisMax
    - Cotic BFe
    - Sick Bicycles Wulf
    - Nukeproof Scout
    - Commencal Meta AM
    - NS Bikes Eccentric
    Just to name a few that should be easily attainable where you are. Check out online shops like ChainReaction Cycles, or Bike-Discount.de for more stuff.

  16. #16
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    Have you concidered titanium? Some very good builders in Europe. And 205 is not heavy. All of Trek bikes have a 300 US pounds limit all in including the bike and all the stuff you may add as a reference.

  17. #17
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    Kona Honzo...the end. 🙂
    CADRE RACING

    Singlespeeder Powered by Veggies
    http://misfitpsycles.com/

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluebeat007 View Post
    Kona Honzo...the end. 🙂
    Are you suggesting Honzoís donít crack or break?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluebeat007 View Post
    Kona Honzo...the end. 🙂
    Op says in his original post that the honzo isnít available in his country.

  20. #20
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    I bet a few of these bikes would work.https://m.pinkbike.com/news/5-more-h...-geometry.html

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by unrealityshow View Post
    Op says in his original post that the honzo isnít available in his country.
    Dang, I missed that.
    CADRE RACING

    Singlespeeder Powered by Veggies
    http://misfitpsycles.com/

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