Guerrilla Gravity Pedalhead 29er build - Page 2- Mtbr.com
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 101 to 147 of 147
  1. #101
    WNC Native
    Reputation: nitrousjunky's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,667
    Looking good! Go with the Orange seal, I've been using it or TruckerCo in everything. Stans of late, sucks IMO.
    "I ride to clear my head, my head is clearer when I'm riding SS. Therefore, I choose to ride SS."~ Fullrange Drew

  2. #102
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    25,924
    Wooohooo!

    All done.


    0330191909_Burst11 by Nate, on Flickr


    0330191911 by Nate, on Flickr

    I'm really surprised...the shop I have been using as my main shop actually had EVERYTHING I needed today. Bunch of little things, but particular stuff. Walked in, walked out, got everything finished. The brake bleed took me a little longer than I'm used to. But then again, I'm used to Shimano brakes. Once I got the hang of these Dominions, it went great. Love the 3 bleed ports. Didn't need all of them today, but they're there if I do. They feel incredible. Really solid grab similar to what Shimanos offer, but with a bit wider band of modulation than Shimano offers. Yet not so far as to feel like mush like SRAM. Installation and alignment was dead easy. Easiest brake for caliper alignment that I've ever messed with.

    The adjustment of the Oneup dropper was easy...and a pain in the ass. LOL. So at first, I couldn't figure out why the post wasn't actuating and why the cable end kept falling out. Turns out, there's a little washer inside the actuator that was tilted and messing things up. The shortening process was a pain in the ass because I only needed to shorten the drop length by 14mm. At least Oneup warns you that it gets more fiddly the shorter you cut the shim.

    The bike rides great. The M9100 is really nice. The shifter has firmer clicks than the M9000 (which is firmer than previous gen stuff), but the derailleur is absolute BUTTER. My driveway is steep AF, and downshifting under power is so smooth you might as well be on level ground soft pedaling.

    I still have the tires at 30psi, ensuring that they seal up. Even with the tires pretty much rock hard, the bike rode great. I'm sure once I get the pressure down to riding pressure, the bike will come alive.

    Weather would have been ideal for an inaugural ride today, but I just didn't have time. I'll get it out tomorrow, though. Less than perfect, but perfectly decent weather. Riding with the NICA team tomorrow at Dupont. Taking them up to the top of Cedar Rock. I'll probably be with the beginners or slow intermediates, so we'll probably out-and-back the more gradual side. But after practice, I'll head back up so I can rip down Big Rock.

  3. #103
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    188
    Cool!! When you get a chance can you weight it? The PH is a bit more modern than my 2017 EPO so if I want to go to steel that's a good choice. Riding a 25lb bike spoils a person.

  4. #104
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    25,924
    Quote Originally Posted by scycllerist View Post
    Cool!! When you get a chance can you weight it? The PH is a bit more modern than my 2017 EPO so if I want to go to steel that's a good choice. Riding a 25lb bike spoils a person.
    Sure. I had it in a shop yesterday and thought about it, but I wasn't totally done yet and didn't want to weigh it just yet.

    I will check my old fish scale, but it might be dead if I remember right.

    Most everything is reasonably light, except the frame and the tires, fwiw. Based on lifting it onto the roof rack, I am gonna guess 29lbs. We'll see after I get it on a scale.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  5. #105
    Bikesexual
    Reputation: jcd46's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    6,767
    Congrats Harold, looking sweet!
    Surly Krampus
    All City MMD
    Kona Unit

  6. #106
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    25,924
    This bike is absolutely killer.


    0331191500a by Nate, on Flickr

    I was taking it a bit easy at first, because I'm still feeling it out and getting used to it, but damn this thing is rad. I started playing around a bit more as the ride went on. Aiming over and through the chunky stuff rather than seeking out the smooth lines. Got a rim strike because the rear tire didn't totally seal and had a slow leak all day. I'm retaping the rim now (more accurately, letting the rim dry off after I've scrubbed it clean). Pretty sure the tyvek tape I used instead of stans tape was the culprit. At any rate, the Huck Norris insert did its job well. Softened the rim strike just enough that I didn't have to worry about rim damage.

    Stopped at The Hub after my ride to grab some tubeless tape, and had them throw the bike on the scale just for giggles. It comes in at 31.25lbs, which is a touch more than I expected. Must mean my Bucksaw is heavier than I thought. :-p At any rate, the Pedalhead rides way lighter than it is. Of course, I bet with lighter tires and no insert, I could get it below 30lbs.

    I'm going to have a blast on this bike this summer.

  7. #107
    AOK
    AOK is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: AOK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,076
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    damn this thing is rad.
    Pedšlheads are awesome and very fun. Best hardtail I have owned.

  8. #108
    Out spokin'
    Reputation: Sparticus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Posts
    9,649
    She's lookin' good, Vern!
    =sParty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  9. #109
    Short-Change-Hero
    Reputation: gregnash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,991
    That's awesome and good job on the wheels. Yeah the offset for the rear is a bit weird from what I have heard from those that build their own. But many frames have a slight offset aren't dead straight.

    Anyways, get out there and shred on her!!

  10. #110
    Combat Wombat
    Reputation: BrianU's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,401
    Looks great! What do you think of those hubs?

  11. #111
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    25,924
    Rim re-tape is exactly what the rear tire needed. Pressure held all night.

    Might get out and goof off in the neighborhood later this afternoon. I forgot to put the wheel sensor for my Garmin on before my ride yesterday, so I need to get it calibrated (it used to be on my road bike) before I ride more trails. A friend is in the area with his family for spring break right now, and we're talking about riding later this week. More flowy singletrack (perfect for this bike) at Tsali and again at DuPont.

  12. #112
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    25,924
    Quote Originally Posted by BrianU View Post
    Looks great! What do you think of those hubs?
    The Hydra hubs are incredible. Definitely quieter than Torch. It's kinda obvious when I'm riding with folks who have Torches (and there are a LOT of those on the trails around here), but the sound type is close enough that most probably won't be able to tell that they're something different. Time will tell if they're still loud enough to be used to signal my approach on busier trails. They also roll really nice. I haven't ridden anything especially slow and technical yet to take advantage of the engagement.

    It's kinda funny - for this being a black hardtail, it's already grabbed a bit of attention at the trailhead. So far, only one person has picked up that the drivetrain is different. And probably only because of the 3 black cogs on the cassette. I think it's the square tubing on the frame that catches people's attention. Not many GG's in the area, and most of those are full suspensions.

    So far I'm really happy with the fork, too. Hits a nice balance between plushness and supportiveness for me.

  13. #113
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Curveball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    2,956
    The bike looks awesome Harold.

    Glad it's working great for you.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  14. #114
    Short-Change-Hero
    Reputation: gregnash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,991
    @Harold What do you think of the Hayed Dominion A4s?!

  15. #115
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    25,924
    Quote Originally Posted by gregnash View Post
    @Harold What do you think of the Hayed Dominion A4s?!
    They feel great. Better than shimano. Better than sram guide.

    Also, bleeding, while more complicated than shimano by a bit, is still easy. and 3 bleed ports help you make sure you get ALL the air out. Definitely glad I bought a generic kit with fittings for almost every manufacturer. All I needed was the fluid.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  16. #116
    Short-Change-Hero
    Reputation: gregnash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,991
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    They feel great. Better than shimano. Better than sram guide.

    Also, bleeding, while more complicated than shimano by a bit, is still easy. and 3 bleed ports help you make sure you get ALL the air out. Definitely glad I bought a generic kit with fittings for almost every manufacturer. All I needed was the fluid.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
    Nice... aside from the fork that is probably one of the first things I will be upgrading on my GG The Smash. Heard decent things about the SRAM Code R that it comes with but still not 100% on them. Fork is definitely going to be a must in the near future (Stock YARI RC).

  17. #117
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    25,924
    Quote Originally Posted by gregnash View Post
    Nice... aside from the fork that is probably one of the first things I will be upgrading on my GG The Smash. Heard decent things about the SRAM Code R that it comes with but still not 100% on them. Fork is definitely going to be a must in the near future (Stock YARI RC).
    I've heard good things about the Codes, but I'm leery after SRAM's demonstrated ability to repeatedly make shitty brakes.

  18. #118
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Curveball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    2,956
    Quote Originally Posted by gregnash View Post
    Nice... aside from the fork that is probably one of the first things I will be upgrading on my GG The Smash. Heard decent things about the SRAM Code R that it comes with but still not 100% on them. Fork is definitely going to be a must in the near future (Stock YARI RC).
    GG can get you a good price on an MRP down the road if you become interested.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  19. #119
    Short-Change-Hero
    Reputation: gregnash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,991
    Quote Originally Posted by Curveball View Post
    GG can get you a good price on an MRP down the road if you become interested.
    Thanks for the info... thats good to know.

  20. #120
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    25,924

    0403191425_HDR by Nate, on Flickr

    Loving this bike!

    Took it out for a mellow Pisgah ride (Headwaters Rd. to Cove Creek Trail) and it was such a ripping good time. It climbed great up the gravel. I dialed myself WAAAAY back to make sure I didn't drop my wife on the climb, and it was so much easier than climbing with my Bucksaw in the same sort of conditions.

    Once the trail pointed down, it got even better. There were a few occasions where it was very obvious I was riding a hardtail, but they mostly weren't the times you'd think. The most technical spots on the trail, I couldn't tell. It was very obvious when I was on high speed chattery stuff, but small drops were nothing. Roots weren't an issue. Slow, techy rolldowns weren't an issue, either. Didn't have anything too big on this ride, but I'm certainly not intimidated to step it up on this bike at all.

  21. #121
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    25,924
    Also...my tire pressure woes in the rear tire continued.

    I appear to have found the culprit, though. Soon enough before my ride that I was able to get it fixed without futzing with my tires on the ride. Valve core on the rear e13 valve was leaking. Damaged seal, it looks like. Orange seal may have contributed to it...there were glitter pieces jammed in there and causing problems.

  22. #122
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    25,924
    Replacement cable guides from GG came yesterday while I was out riding, so I put those on today. Much better than the ghetto trimmed plastic packaging I was using to get by.


    0405191833 by Nate, on Flickr

    I also switched the semi-metallic pads to metallic pads on the Dominions. I was getting an occasional vibration thing on the semi-metallic pads, especially under hard braking. It was weird. I could modulate the brakes to exactly the point where they would start to howl and vibrate and play a tune with my rear brake, it was that consistent. I've been wanting to try the metallic pads out, anyway, so figured it'd be a good time to try them.

    Yesterday's ride.


    IMG_20190405_002558_131 by Nate, on Flickr

  23. #123
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    25,924
    FWIW, switching to the metallic pads made all the brake noise go away.

  24. #124
    jcd's best friend
    Reputation: Battery's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    2,005
    Looking great man! I've always enjoyed build threads and building my own bikes from scratch.
    Trek …monda | Transition Scout | Transition PBJ | Framed Attack Pro

  25. #125
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LyNx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    23,899
    Not sure how many have seen this thread, but another PH owners is getting some serious brake mount flex on his, wasn't sure if any of the other owners could shed some light on this
    https://forums.mtbr.com/brake-time/e...y-1101085.html

    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  26. #126
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    25,924
    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    Not sure how many have seen this thread, but another PH owners is getting some serious brake mount flex on his, wasn't sure if any of the other owners could shed some light on this
    https://forums.mtbr.com/brake-time/e...y-1101085.html

    lol, I commented in that thread. no, mine does not do that

  27. #127
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    25,924
    Rode Spencer Gap in Pisgah yesterday.

    If you know the trail, the upper part of the descent has been reworked a bit and it's pretty fast and flowy, but with a fair number of rocky sections. Not the chunkiest trail in the area by far, but it presents a nice combination of flow, opportunities to get some speed, and rocks. It was kinda the next step in increasing the rockiness for riding this bike.


    0413191646 by Nate, on Flickr

    And since I've said before that there are times where it's hard to tell I'm on a hardtail, moving to this one definitely made it clear that I was on a hardtail. The bike is still fast, and I set several PR's (on both climbing and descending segments), but hitting those rocks at speed was rough. I need to work on riding more smoothly, that's for sure. Too many years on a full suspension bike.

    Also, I can certainly see where stiffer shoes are going to be beneficial for me moving forward. And possibly with more cushion, even.

  28. #128
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    12,742
    I've had foot problems riding fast through rocky terrain. After a couple hours the bottoms of my feet were numb even with gel insoles. Adidas has a BASF midsole that got rid of that for my riding. Looks like white Styrofoam in the Supernova(enough for me) and Ultra(thicker) models. Called Boost. They offer models with Goretex also in trailrunners.

  29. #129
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    25,924
    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    I've had foot problems riding fast through rocky terrain. After a couple hours the bottoms of my feet were numb even with gel insoles. Adidas has a BASF midsole that got rid of that for my riding. Looks like white Styrofoam in the Supernova(enough for me) and Ultra(thicker) models. Called Boost. They offer models with Goretex also in trailrunners.
    Just a few minutes of a particularly rocky spot was enough to make my feet a bit sore. Had to stretch and walk around a bit after that section until they eased up. My 5.10 Freerider Contacts are a couple seasons old and will probably need replacing this season. I think I primarily need sole stiffness, but a little extra cushion wouldn't hurt.

  30. #130
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Curveball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    2,956
    How's the Ribbon fork working for you?
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  31. #131
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    25,924
    Quote Originally Posted by Curveball View Post
    How's the Ribbon fork working for you?
    it's outstanding. I think I might soften it up just a touch, but it's easily the best fork I've ever used.

    I appreciate how supportive it is when I'm out of the saddle with just a light bit of low speed compression damping. the ramp cartridge works as advertised for bigger hits. I just think I want it a touch more linear earlier in its travel so the ramp cartridge can work a bit more later.

  32. #132
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    92
    Heard he stole it.

  33. #133
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    12,742
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Just a few minutes of a particularly rocky spot was enough to make my feet a bit sore. Had to stretch and walk around a bit after that section until they eased up. My 5.10 Freerider Contacts are a couple seasons old and will probably need replacing this season. I think I primarily need sole stiffness, but a little extra cushion wouldn't hurt.
    I don't have efficiency as a higher priority than comfort. I need to be able to ride to have fun. I have Freerides in a closet. I only used them once for my trails. I'm out of the saddle for most of the time up and down with weight on the pedals. Got to have the cushion. The Boost layer in Adidas doesn't wear out like in other shoes. Continental tire material for the tread. The uppers stay cool in the Summer but that's a tradeoff because the material that works for ventilation isn't as hard-wearing. I'm trying the Goretex versions now.Guerrilla Gravity Pedalhead 29er build-1supernova_gore-tex_shoes_black_b96282_03_standard.jpg Good interface with stubby pins or rounded pins.

    .
    Guerrilla Gravity Pedalhead 29er build-1supernova_gore-tex_shoes_black_b96282_010_hover_standard.jpg
    The white stuff is the BASF Boost.
    https://www.adidas.com/us/supernova-...es/B96282.html

    I'm using these for morel season too. They run a half size small or more.

  34. #134
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    I don't have efficiency as a higher priority than comfort. I need to be able to ride to have fun. I have Freerides in a closet. I only used them once for my trails. I'm out of the saddle for most of the time up and down with weight on the pedals. Got to have the cushion. The Boost layer in Adidas doesn't wear out like in other shoes. Continental tire material for the tread. The uppers stay cool in the Summer but that's a tradeoff because the material that works for ventilation isn't as hard-wearing. I'm trying the Goretex versions now.Click image for larger version. 

Name:	1Supernova_Gore-Tex_Shoes_Black_B96282_03_standard.jpg 
Views:	29 
Size:	40.8 KB 
ID:	1247527 Good interface with stubby pins or rounded pins.

    .
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	1Supernova_Gore-Tex_Shoes_Black_B96282_010_hover_standard.jpg 
Views:	24 
Size:	58.8 KB 
ID:	1247528
    The white stuff is the BASF Boost.
    https://www.adidas.com/us/supernova-...es/B96282.html

    I'm using these for morel season too. They run a half size small or more.
    They are great shoes, I have several pairs, but they would be absolutely useless as bike footwear for me. Too soft on the upper and zero toe protection.

    Big supportive pedals and impact pro's for me and that seems to keep foot fatigue away and comfort at a good level on the hardtail.

  35. #135
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    25,924
    Quote Originally Posted by Frosty2019 View Post
    They are great shoes, I have several pairs, but they would be absolutely useless as bike footwear for me. Too soft on the upper and zero toe protection.

    Big supportive pedals and impact pro's for me and that seems to keep foot fatigue away and comfort at a good level on the hardtail.
    Yeah, I am definitely feeling more like this on the shoe matter. Never had a chance to try on any impacts, but the ones I have seen on the trail have been bulky and hot-looking. Being that I ride in the southeast, that's a concern, too. I did a ride recently where there were 15 major stream crossings that soaked my shoes. And more I didn't even bother counting that were smaller.

    So, I think something different might be on order when I replace my Freerider Contacts (which eb doesn't seen to understand are totally different from the regular Freeriders, which I also own, but have been retired from riding duty). Not totally sure what it is yet.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  36. #136
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    6,892


  37. #137
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    12,806
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    My 5.10 Freerider Contacts are a couple seasons old and will probably need replacing this season.
    I replace my Freeriders every year as they get soft. They are fine in every other respect, but my feet need a bit more support then they offer once beaten up for a full year.

    That said I have tried much stiffer shoes and didn't like them due to the lack of pedal feel. So it's a bit of a balancing act to get the right level of stiffness vs. flex.

    We ride year round here so if a shoe lasts a year I can live with that.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  38. #138
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    25,924
    Quote Originally Posted by jncarpenter View Post
    How do they compare to other 5.10 shoes? Freerider series? Impact series? You don't exactly offer up any details, especially regarding my concerns about stiffness and shock absorption. I am currently leaning towards the Freerider Pros, in all honesty. I had the opportunity to demo a pair of them on the trail a couple years ago. They were definitely stiffer and had more cushion than the regular Freeriders I was using at the time, but I felt they deadened feedback from the trail too much, so I bought Freerider Contacts (which are intermediate between the regular Freeriders and the Freerider Pros on stiffness and cushion). Now I'm seeing the advantages of even more stiffness and cushion, and for that matter, 5.10 says the Pros dry faster, which is something else I want.

    I will probably also be looking at other options on the market before I buy anything, though. The last time I bought shoes, most of the competitors to 5.10 weren't available. So I plan to look around.

  39. #139
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    25,924
    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    I replace my Freeriders every year as they get soft. They are fine in every other respect, but my feet need a bit more support then they offer once beaten up for a full year.

    That said I have tried much stiffer shoes and didn't like them due to the lack of pedal feel. So it's a bit of a balancing act to get the right level of stiffness vs. flex.

    We ride year round here so if a shoe lasts a year I can live with that.
    That's a good point. Riding here is also year round (except on days like today where we've had 2 inches of rain by noon and my phone is blowing up with flood warnings).

  40. #140
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    6,892
    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    I replace my Freeriders every year as they get soft. They are fine in every other respect, but my feet need a bit more support then they offer once beaten up for a full year.

    That said I have tried much stiffer shoes and didn't like them due to the lack of pedal feel. So it's a bit of a balancing act to get the right level of stiffness vs. flex.

    We ride year round here so if a shoe lasts a year I can live with that.
    Have you considered THESE? I now have them on all my bikes...yes, road bike too!


  41. #141
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    12,806
    Quote Originally Posted by jncarpenter View Post
    Have you considered THESE? I now have them on all my bikes...yes, road bike too!
    I've tried some my friends have and I didn't like them. The friends who bought them have all gone back to normal platform pedals. They would have given me their pedals if I wanted them. I'm glad they work for you. Some people seem to love them. Other people not so much.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  42. #142
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    25,924
    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    I've tried some my friends have and I didn't like them. The friends who bought them have all gone back to normal platform pedals. They would have given me their pedals if I wanted them. I'm glad they work for you. Some people seem to love them. Other people not so much.
    Pedal width is a far more critical dimension for me, and those pedals are simply too narrow for my feet. I am not interested in super long pedals. While they might address issues from overly flexible shoes, SOME shoe flex is actually helpful as it lets you wrap your foot around the pedals some. These overly long pedals prevent that from ever happening. Bike James should stick to his fitness programs.

  43. #143
    Short-Change-Hero
    Reputation: gregnash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,991
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Pedal width is a far more critical dimension for me, and those pedals are simply too narrow for my feet. I am not interested in super long pedals. While they might address issues from overly flexible shoes, SOME shoe flex is actually helpful as it lets you wrap your foot around the pedals some. These overly long pedals prevent that from ever happening. Bike James should stick to his fitness programs.
    Correct. He has sold a lot people on what is nothing more than his interpretation of the mechanics and kinesthetics behind the pedal stroke. What he doesn't tell you is that really it takes more than the 100days of riding to really feel whether or not the pedals are a true fit for you. Much like cockpit and saddle adjustments when moving to a new bike, these things take time. He runs off the misconception that you will know right away that they are the best pedal in the world, which they are far from.

    If his claims were actually that true then you would see TONS of professional (both well known and lesser known) riding them constantly, regardless of sponsorships. Pedals like the Deity T-Macs or the Nukeproof Sam Hills are pedals that are developed with the help of riders, ridden by their named riders through multiple professional races, and have shown to stand up to what their sponsors and developers say are "the best".

    Bike James relies on smoke and mirrors to get people to buy his stuff. Hey if they work for you that is awesome, go ahead and pay the super expensive price for them. I will stick with my DMR Vault which offer incredible support and power from my size 11 shoe.

  44. #144
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    25,924
    Quote Originally Posted by gregnash View Post
    I will stick with my DMR Vault which offer incredible support and power from my size 11 shoe.
    Vaults are my faves as well. Width is just right for my feet (very similar shoe size to yours). I also really like that service kits are actually affordable (not the case for some pedal brands).

  45. #145
    Short-Change-Hero
    Reputation: gregnash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,991
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Vaults are my faves as well. Width is just right for my feet (very similar shoe size to yours). I also really like that service kits are actually affordable (not the case for some pedal brands).
    Same here, and like the way the pins are. That was really the main seller for me, the easily replaceable nature of the pins. Even if the head where the allen key goes get deformed you can usually fit a wrench around it to get it off.

  46. #146
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    188
    Has anyone tried the Reebok Classic Skate Steel Toe Oxford? I bash my feet sometimes so I'm considering them but can't try them on locally.


    I just switched to cheapo Roc Bros wide pedals and notice an improvement for support.

  47. #147
    Short-Change-Hero
    Reputation: gregnash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,991
    Quote Originally Posted by scycllerist View Post
    Has anyone tried the Reebok Classic Skate Steel Toe Oxford? I bash my feet sometimes so I'm considering them but can't try them on locally.


    I just switched to cheapo Roc Bros wide pedals and notice an improvement for support.
    Why steel toe? Get yourself a proper pair of riding shoes that have the reinforced toe and you won't have problems. My old 5.10 VXi Elements were stellar in that regard, nice toe cap that was heavier duty but you pay the weight penalty.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Guerrilla Gravity - Pedalhead
    By stumpynerd in forum Guerrilla Gravity
    Replies: 1131
    Last Post: 1 Week Ago, 08:18 AM
  2. Need Help/Suggestions on a Guerrilla Gravity Smash Clyde Build
    By fishrising in forum Guerrilla Gravity
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 09-04-2017, 11:20 AM
  3. Guerilla Gravity pedalhead owners out there?
    By mal1969 in forum Guerrilla Gravity
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-19-2017, 04:34 AM
  4. Guerrilla Gravity Megatrail Review
    By colbatguano in forum Guerrilla Gravity
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 04-19-2015, 11:56 AM
  5. Nomad 3 or Guerrilla Gravity Megatrail
    By JLipman in forum Guerrilla Gravity
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10-02-2014, 10:39 PM

Members who have read this thread: 492

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.