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  1. #1
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    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.

    Shopping for a new 29er: 135-150mm travel. So many good ones out there. I've done quite a bit of research, thrown a leg over all five of them (except the Smash). I have done a full day, three ride demo on the Fezzari and a two or three day multiple ride test on the Fugitive ( but not LT). I'm sure it's been done but would like to hear comparisons, pros/cons, opinions, first hand impressions etc.

    I'm looking for a bike that adds some overall downhill capability to my 27.5 Endorphin without giving up much in the smoother, up/down riding I do on a daily basis. Durability, customer support, and brand identity/part-of-a-family feeling are important to me.

    Here are my top four (or five) contenders in no particular order:

    Ibis Ripmo

    Knolly Fugitive LT

    Evil Offering

    Fezzari La Sal Peak

    Guerilla Gravity Smash (Just added this one)

    Santa Cruz High Tower (2020): This one just dropped about the time I started this thread and it ticks all my requirements so have to add it
    Last edited by KRob; 08-12-2019 at 03:23 PM.
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  2. #2
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    Well, you haven't ridden the Smash or the Fugitive LT, so I'd eliminate those at least until you ride them. Then I'd just pick the one that rides the best. The other stuff is too subjective. They're good companies and all are durable. I don't know what part-of-a-family means, but you must have your own sense of that.

    My son has a Ripmo and I've ridden it. Great bike, obviously and I do like their take on DW link.

  3. #3
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    Fugitive Lt for the win. Love mine.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    Well, you haven't ridden the Smash or the Fugitive LT, so I'd eliminate those at least until you ride them.
    I'd think the Fugitive LT would be a pretty safe bet even without riding it, given the time KRob has spent on other Knollys including the regular Fugitive. Durability, customer support and the brand stoke/family thing are all first-rate there too.

    The Knolly would be heavier, but probably also cheaper with an equivalent build than the carbon bikes. Are you looking at an off-the-shelf kit or building it up from a frame?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    Well, you haven't ridden the Smash or the Fugitive LT, so I'd eliminate those at least until you ride them. Then I'd just pick the one that rides the best. The other stuff is too subjective. They're good companies and all are durable. I don't know what part-of-a-family means, but you must have your own sense of that.

    My son has a Ripmo and I've ridden it. Great bike, obviously and I do like their take on DW link.
    I have done a spin around the trailhead ride on the LT but, yeah, I do need to get some significant time on the Fugitive LT and have opportunities where I could do that. I'm a Knolly guy and if they already had a carbon Fugitive LT out or the newer longer travel 29er out I probably wouldn't be here asking about options.

    I'm a little concerned about the weight of the Fugitive but until I ride it for an extended test I can't say if that's going to be a deal breaker. I love the close knit Knolly family. Love the sense of belonging to a group of like minded owners. Love that it's a small company with passionate attention to detail and building the strongest, longest lasting bikes on the planet.

    Having said all that, I'm very intrigued with this new crop of mid-long travel carbon 29ers that are flooding the market.

    Yes, the Ripmo does check all the boxes and I also like their take on the DW link.
    Last edited by KRob; 07-08-2019 at 06:01 PM.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    I have done a spin around the trailhead ride of the LT but, yeah, I do need to get some significant time on the Fugitive LT and have opportunities where I could do that. I'm a Knolly guy and if they already had a carbon Fugitive LT out or the newer longer travel 29er out I probably wouldn't be here asking about options.

    I'm a little concerned about the weight of the Fugitive but until I ride it for an extended test I can't say if that's going to be a deal breaker. I love the close knit Knolly family. Love the sense of belonging to a group of like minded owners. Love that it's a small company with passionate attention to detail and building the strongest, longest lasting bikes on the planet.

    Having said all that, I'm very intrigued with this new crop of mid-long travel carbon 29ers that are flooding the market.

    Yes, the Ripmo does check all the boxes and I also like their take on the DW link.
    I was also concerned about the weight of the Fugitive LT but I have to say my that I donít notice the 34.26 GX build at all. Bike climbs and decision awesome . The think climbs 10x better than my Carbon Warden.

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    The GG Smash has blown me away. I was asked by a friend recently on the trail how I am liking it and my answer was "I can't think of a bike I'd rather be riding."

    Climbs very well for its DH capability. I've cranked all day alpine climbs without a second thought while still ripping the descents. Durable, amazing GG customer support and owner's group. Made in the US at a reasonable price.

    Easy to mount a couple water bottles and a frame bag. I haven't worn a pack/hip bag when riding the Smash even on long 6hrs summer rides. I love that.

    Best handling bike I've owned and best suspension of all the various bikes I've tried. I rarely think about the Smash when I am on the trail. It's just always doing what it's supposed to and I can enjoy the shred.

    When it came to ordering the GF a new bike it really wasn't a question she wanted her own Smash. She'll have a carbon Smash shortly.

    FWIW - I ordered a Smash sight unseen and figured if I didn't love it I would sell it at the end of the summer. I'm super glad I did. GG has an extensive list of owners that'll let you demo their bikes. Give them a call and I wouldn't be surprised if you can throw a leg over one not too far from where you live.

    The PB Smash review is pretty bang on based on my experience.

    https://www.pinkbike.com/news/review...ity-smash.html

    The new carbon bikes are very similar to the 2018 metal models. Changes are incremental to refine the ride.
    Safe riding,

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  8. #8
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    I'm riding a metal GG Smash as well. I also live in the PNW and enjoy long climbs and multi-thousand foot descent on narrow ribbons of tacky brown loam through lush rain forests. I also regularly enjoy 3-4' drops at places like Oregon's Blackrock, Alsea Falls and Washington's Tiger Mtn.

    I'm a happy camper aboard my very capable Smash.

    I'd describe my suspension as plush (11.6 shock, 160mm PUSH-coiled Pike fork) and handling as confidence inspiring. A friend has a Knolly and I recognize the passion and family loyalty there -- if you get a Guerrilla Gravity bike you'll discover a similar dynamic. GG's customer service rocks and their bikes are regarded. Rightly so.

    If I couldn't have a GG Smash, the Ripmo would be right up there on my alternate list. Your list is a good one.
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  9. #9
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    I was between the Offering and the Ripmo but at my height 5'9" and right between a m/l and I always struggled with Ibis sizing with the mediums feeling a little small and didn't want the longer wheelbase for my type of riding with the large. I went with an Offering and it's a blast to ride and no regrets but if the Ibis sizing would have worked out better for me there was just so many more positives with the Rip as I'm sure you already know. Let's see bigger tire clearance, better dropper length, able to run a smaller chain ring, lighter frame weight, a little cheaper, and a longer warranty. As well as a great company to buy from although so far Evil has been great and like I said just a blast to ride, love the Delta suspension.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by David R View Post
    I'd think the Fugitive LT would be a pretty safe bet even without riding it, given the time KRob has spent on other Knollys including the regular Fugitive. Durability, customer support and the brand stoke/family thing are all first-rate there too.

    The Knolly would be heavier, but probably also cheaper with an equivalent build than the carbon bikes. Are you looking at an off-the-shelf kit or building it up from a frame?
    For sure. The Knolly will stay on the list and honestly is the standard by which all the rest will be judged in my book. My concern with the Fugitive LT is the weight. I rode the regular Fugitive all over Hurricane/St. George last year at the Knollyfest with a fairly light all air (DPX2 shock, 34 Float) build and didn't notice the weight at all. In fact just picking it up it felt to be about the same weight as my Endorphin which is 30 lbs. But this year at the Knollyfest everyone had LT's built heavy duty with coil shocks etc and while I didn't ride one, they felt hefty lifting them up into the truck and onto the racks... like 35 lbs. That's gotta kill some of the liveliness and playfulness I love about the Endorphin.
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  11. #11
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    Is the new Hightower going to make the list?

  12. #12
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    Value wise the Fezzari has got to be hard to beat and the #'s are very progressive. Given you did a big ride on it and it made your list...care to share your thoughts?

    Generally speaking these new 29'ers are awesome. Smooth, rough, DH, they do everything well. I'd echo vicb's thoughts in that I can't think of another bike I'd rather own except I'm on a Rallon. All these bikes are good but personality I'd lean toward the lighter weight for big back country days.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    I was between the Offering and the Ripmo but at my height 5'9" and right between a m/l and I always struggled with Ibis sizing with the mediums feeling a little small and didn't want the longer wheelbase for my type of riding with the large. I went with an Offering and it's a blast to ride and no regrets but if the Ibis sizing would have worked out better for me there was just so many more positives with the Rip as I'm sure you already know. Let's see bigger tire clearance, better dropper length, able to run a smaller chain ring, lighter frame weight, a little cheaper, and a longer warranty. As well as a great company to buy from although so far Evil has been great and like I said just a blast to ride, love the Delta suspension.
    That's about my only reservation with the Ripmo. The size large is a little more conservatively sized than some of the others. The size large felt pretty good just spinning around parking lot at the shop, but I can't help but think I might like the more stretched out geo of the others.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    Is the new Hightower going to make the list?
    I just saw the blurb about the new HT. Haven't really looked into it yet. I have ridden the HTLT and it is a nice bike for sure. Probably the only reason I don't have it on the list is because its geo is a little dated and it's from a bigger company.... although I know customer service is excellent from Santa Cruz and if I were to go with a bigger company it would be SC or Pivot.... not likely Giant or Trek or Specialized. I have no complaints at all with my 5010 ownership experience.
    Last edited by KRob; 07-16-2019 at 11:55 AM.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Value wise the Fezzari has got to be hard to beat and the #'s are very progressive. Given you did a big ride on it and it made your list...care to share your thoughts?
    I really liked the Fezzari. Pedaled incredibly well. Almost magical the way it handles techy, ledgy climbs. Great descender but not a plow bike by any stretch. More playful and active. The size L fit me perfect..... and like you said the price is almost impossible to beat. I haven't heard anything bad about Fezzari as far as durability and customer support but something about the price makes me wonder if it will withstand 4-5 years of constant 5-6 day per week rides in rough terrain with very spotty maintenance (I'm terrible) like my Knolly does. Ha ha.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    My concern with the Fugitive LT is the weight. I rode the regular Fugitive all over Hurricane/St. George last year at the Knollyfest with a fairly light all air (DPX2 shock, 34 Float) build and didn't notice the weight at all. In fact just picking it up it felt to be about the same weight as my Endorphin which is 30 lbs. But this year at the Knollyfest everyone had LT's built heavy duty with coil shocks etc and while I didn't ride one, they felt hefty lifting them up into the truck and onto the racks... like 35 lbs. That's gotta kill some of the liveliness and playfulness I love about the Endorphin.
    As much as I don't like to sound like a weight weenie, that's exactly how I feel too. The DPX2 and a fork like the MRP Ribbon Air would be a good in-between with the Fugitive LT. All other things being equal there's still going to be a bit of a weight increase over the Endo with the bigger wheels and slightly heavier frame, but perhaps not enough to be of any concern on the trail?

    Even though Santa Cruz may seem like a "big" brand compared to Knolly or Evil, it's pretty hard to look past the new Hightower IMO if you're shopping in this category [with a suitable budget!].

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    Delay gratification and ride lots of stuff. YMMV, but I found most bikes are really good these days. I ended up loving one - a Trek - I would not have considered in the past. After that an extended trip in CO with some bike renting let me check out even more brands and models. It all proved what's really most important - your bike engine. It was also really great to learn just now much you get diminishing returns as you spend.

    Even though I went for a bike with less travel than my last one, I'm not going to say that's what others should do. Go rent bikes and go to bike demos. Have fun.
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    Well, with your list I don't think you're going to go wrong. I was all hot and bothered for the new Yeti SB130 and took it out on a demo. It was the most comfortably climbing LT bike I've ever ridden for sure but it was kind of underwhelming for me going DH from a "fun factor" angle so I demo'd the Ripmo that the shop had in stock. While the Yeti was more comfortable, the Ripmo climbed even faster when the terrain got steeper....and it was so much more FUN going down. I was setting personal PR's up and down on the Ripmo...and now have one coming on Friday.
    Carpe Diem!!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post


    The GG Smash has blown me away. I was asked by a friend recently on the trail how I am liking it and my answer was "I can't think of a bike I'd rather be riding."
    Thanks for your impressions on the Smash, Vik. I've been following your Smash thread over on the GG forum and value your input. That's one of the reasons it's on my list. Gotta call Matt at GG and arrange a demo. Looking at the sizing recommendation guide on their site, it looks like I'm a pretty solid Size 3. Not sure if I'd feel more comfortable with a longer 50mm stem in the Short mode or a 40mm stem in the Long mode but it's cool you can make those adjustments. Plus I love the modular frame concept where you can mix and match things to create a totally different bike. The very reasonable pricing for carbon that is American made is enticing as well.
    Last edited by KRob; 07-10-2019 at 04:14 PM.
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  20. #20
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    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.

    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    Is the new Hightower going to make the list?
    Quote Originally Posted by David R View Post

    Even though Santa Cruz may seem like a "big" brand compared to Knolly or Evil, it's pretty hard to look past the new Hightower IMO if you're shopping in this category [with a suitable budget!].
    Itís on the list now. Just read the first ride reviews from Bike and MTBR. Seems to tick all the boxes and has all the needed updates I was looking for.

    https://www.bikemag.com/gear/mountai...ruz-hightower/

    https://reviews.mtbr.com/2020-santa-...weight-details
    Last edited by KRob; 07-08-2019 at 09:28 AM.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    Well, with your list I don't think you're going to go wrong. I was all hot and bothered for the new Yeti SB130 and took it out on a demo. It was the most comfortably climbing LT bike I've ever ridden for sure but it was kind of underwhelming for me going DH from a "fun factor" angle so I demo'd the Ripmo that the shop had in stock. While the Yeti was more comfortable, the Ripmo climbed even faster when the terrain got steeper....and it was so much more FUN going down. I was setting personal PR's up and down on the Ripmo...and now have one coming on Friday.
    Nice! Congrats on the new Ripmo. I was similarly excited for the SB130 but I think I want a little more travel than that and the SB150 from all accounts is skewed more to the DH/Enduro side of things than other 150-160 bikes. Plus Yeti's are expensive and have a rep for breaking.

    I got the same impression from short rides on the Rallon and the Pivot Firebird....more bike than I need most of the time.
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  22. #22
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    KRob I'm going to be ordering a new Smash in the next few days, size 3, so if you can wait the approx 8 weeks that it will take to get here you are more than welcome to take a little parking lot spin on it the next time you're in Vegas or I'm up there.
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    Quote Originally Posted by EugeneTheJeep View Post
    KRob I'm going to be ordering a new Smash in the next few days, size 3, so if you can wait the approx 8 weeks that it will take to get here you are more than welcome to take a little parking lot spin on it the next time you're in Vegas or I'm up there.
    Congrats Eugene! And thanks for the offer. I'll be in touch.
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Nice! Congrats on the new Ripmo. I was similarly excited for the SB130 but I think I want a little more travel than that and the SB150 from all accounts is skewed more to the DH/Enduro side of things than other 150-160 bikes. Plus Yeti's are expensive and have a rep for breaking.

    I got the same impression from short rides on the Rallon and the Pivot Firebird....more bike than I need most of the time.
    A friend demo'd the 150 after I rode the 130 so I rode that as well and it climbed almost as good as the 130 but it went DH thru chunky, steep terrain better than any other bike I've ever ridden.
    Carpe Diem!!

  25. #25
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    I kind of have experience with a good amount of your list, my last 3 bikes have been a Wreckoning, a Smash (aluminum), and a Fugitive LT. I've written a few comparisons between the Wreckoning and the Smash in the GG subforum, and the Smash and the Fug LT in the Knolly forum, but feel free to PM me if you want any more info on these/comparisons

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    A friend demo'd the 150 after I rode the 130 so I rode that as well and it climbed almost as good as the 130 but it went DH thru chunky, steep terrain better than any other bike I've ever ridden.
    Interesting. Did the SB150 feel overly long or unwieldy on tighter, slower tech or switchbacks?
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpearce1475 View Post
    I kind of have experience with a good amount of your list, my last 3 bikes have been a Wreckoning, a Smash (aluminum), and a Fugitive LT. I've written a few comparisons between the Wreckoning and the Smash in the GG subforum, and the Smash and the Fug LT in the Knolly forum, but feel free to PM me if you want any more info on these/comparisons
    Thanks! I'll check those out. Do you mind if I copy and past some of your responses over here for the sake of completeness and to help those who might stumble onto this thread with the same questions?
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Interesting. Did the SB150 feel overly long or unwieldy on tighter, slower tech or switchbacks?
    To be honest, we didn't ride anywhere "slower"....we were at Greer Ranch in SoCal but yes, I felt the length on one tighter, chicane section but it still skirted thru w/o a blip. If I lived in Whistler or within an hour of a similar terrain park, I'd have bought the 150 instead of a Ripmo. My buddy ordered one and it will be in saturday.
    Carpe Diem!!

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Thanks! I'll check those out. Do you mind if I copy and past some of your responses over here for the sake of completeness and to help those who might stumble onto this thread with the same questions?
    Have at it!

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    The smuggler is worthy of your little list
    shredable up and expecially down, some family style as well

    Orbea occam should be included as well, Its hard not to like that little shredder. orbea makes really high quality rides!

    sb136 $$$ is pretty sweet(could try a rear cc inline coil?), also have a sb150. definetly more chunk factor with the 150(coiled - makes the difference feel more pronounced imo)

    Anything you get will be a winner. almost went knolly before a sentinel... got tired of waiting and didnt want to deal with the weight. having trouble selling the warden carbon put me off a little bit as well. that said, a friend bought the one i had ordered and it rips. heavy yes, but its hidden well once rolling.

    will be watching to see what you choose.
    cheers

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    I would look hard at the ripmo and 130. I ended up with the ripmo. The 130 climbs slightly better than the ripmo, but the ripmo was more composed on the rough descents, and climbed almost as well. The ripmo is my go to ride, and am looking at a 150,firebird 29 or Rallon for my enduro bike.

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    Just to cloud things a bit more... Iíve been a Knolly guy for years (currently on a Carbon Warden), love it when I am back home in NVan/ VanIsle but not so much in my current Colorado location.

    Currently deciding between a Spot Mayhem and Revel Rascal. Not a ton of rider reviews, but have enjoyed my demo time on them. Iíd put them between the ĎSit high in the travel, poppyí DW Ibis, and the Ďsit deeper, glued to the ground, plush 4x4 Knollyí.

  33. #33
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    There is a funny thing that happens when you add a 29er to your quiver...

    I still had my Endorphin and Warden when I built up the Fugitive LT. I liked the Fugitive immediately in terms of comfort on bike, climbing and high speed descending. What took some time to get used to was the slightly muted feel of the front end of the bike in corners and lifting the front wheel. (larger wheels/1"longer wheelbase)

    Once I got used to that, the Fugitive became a grade A grin inducer.

    I had intended on keeping one of my 27.5 Knolly's, but found that I had a difficult time transitioning with the 29er. The Warden and Endorphin started to feel sketchy in comparison to the Fugitive. Like you, I am an experienced rider getting up in years and am liking the little extra confidence the Fugitive offers. If I can push the bike harder with a lower chance of crashing, I am willing to give up just a little playfulness.

    Saying that, I did some back to back laps on smoother low challenge trail near home between the Endo and Fugit. I figured the Endorphin would be the easy pick for these trails. To my surprise, I was happy on either bike.

    So, the Endorphin and Warden are gone and the Fugitive LT is currently my one bike quiver. It handles the big bike stuff like the Warden and climbs as well or better than the Endorphin.

    BTW: I ride the LT in slack mode. I have found that I like the seat angle and bb height better in that mode. It puts less pressure on my hands and rails high speed corners.

    2c.
    Last edited by bubba13; 07-05-2019 at 10:15 PM.
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  34. #34
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    I won't recommend my bike/brand based on your requirements. But I will say, having an integrated system for tools and spares as made riding life SO much better for me. Just grab the bike, air the tires, and ride (coil front and rear for me too). Tools, tube, etc all neatly stored on the bike in a way that you never think about them until you need them.

    Has nothing to do with climbing and descending. But being upset that your tube fell off somewhere back on the trail or forgetting your tool in you car sucks.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHAHEEB View Post
    The smuggler is worthy of your little list
    shredable up and expecially down, some family style as well

    Orbea occam should be included as well, Its hard not to like that little shredder. orbea makes really high quality rides!

    sb136 $$$ is pretty sweet(could try a rear cc inline coil?), also have a sb150. definetly more chunk factor with the 150(coiled - makes the difference feel more pronounced imo)

    Anything you get will be a winner. almost went knolly before a sentinel... got tired of waiting and didnt want to deal with the weight. having trouble selling the warden carbon put me off a little bit as well. that said, a friend bought the one i had ordered and it rips. heavy yes, but its hidden well once rolling.

    will be watching to see what you choose.
    cheers
    Heard a lot of good things about the Smuggler. Due to its progressive and aggressive geometry I know it punches well above its weight class, but still feel like 120mm rear travel doesnít get me into the more-capable-than-the-Endorphin category I am shooting for.

    Did you consider the Sentinel?


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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHAHEEB View Post

    sb136 $$$ is pretty sweet(could try a rear cc inline coil?),
    I did see something about this beefed up SB130 Lunch Ride. Iíd forgotten about it. Hereís a brief write up from PB. Sounds like a contender, but yeah, pretty pricey.

    https://m.pinkbike.com/news/yeti-sb1...tter-2019.html



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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by NS-NV View Post

    Currently deciding between a Spot Mayhem and Revel Rascal.
    Iíve been interested in the new Revel Rascal. Probably should try and ride one before I decide. I like that it licenses Canfield suspension technology and the group behind its development is highly respected.

    A little shorter travel than I wanted, but itís in the ballpark. Consider the waters clouded. Thanks for your input.


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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by bubba13 View Post
    There is a funny thing that happens when you add a 29er to your quiver...

    I still had my Endorphin and Warden when I built up the Fugitive LT. I liked the Fugitive immediately in terms of comfort on bike, climbing and high speed descending. What took some time to get used to was the slightly muted feel of the front end of the bike in corners and lifting the front wheel. (larger wheels/1"longer wheelbase)

    Once I got used to that, the Fugitive became a grade A grin inducer.
    Thatís one of the reasons Iíd avoided doing full demos on some of the 29ers on my list before. I knew it would make me long for a 29er before I was ready to buy. I know that feeling you speak of and I can forget it and continue to enjoy my Endorphin if I just say no to test rides, Ha ha.

    Now that Iím getting closer to pulling the trigger Iím gathering more information to help me whittle the list down.

    Did you go with an air shock on your Fugitive LT or coil, bubba? And approximately what does your bike weigh?


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  39. #39
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    Bible did some revel comparisons looks good and a different ride than the norm. Worthy contender

    Sentinel Carbon was a blast. Very fun bike. Liked it w a 150 fork as well

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Thatís one of the reasons Iíd avoided doing full demos on some of the 29ers on my list before. I knew it would make me long for a 29er before I was ready to buy. I know that feeling you speak of and I can forget it and continue to enjoy my Endorphin if I just say no.

    Now that Iím getting closer to pulling the trigger Iím gathering more information to help me whittle the list down.

    Did you go with an air shock on your Fugitive LT or coil, bubba? And approximately what does your bike weigh?


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    I'm still not sure what my Fugitive LT weighs. For me, it has not been an issue at over 200lbs. rider weight. I purchased the frame with the DPX2 shock and have been happy with that so far. Future plans include having a 2nd shock which will probably be a coil. Also may upgrade the Fox 36 from Fit4 to Grip2 cartridge. (staying with 51mm offset)

    After thinking about it some, I think I have narrowed down why I had difficulty transitioning between the Fugitive and the 27.5's. The Fugitive is much easier to tell what is going on at the front of the bike. The zone where you feel centered on the bike seems to be larger and more forgiving. Once my brain acclimated to the Fugitive, cornering actually feels and is faster, which I didn't think would be possible. I did not have this impression on my initial rides.
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    FWIW - I have no issues swapping between my 29er Smash and 275er Endo summer to winter. I don't enjoy swapping bikes back and forth from ride to ride, but when the seasons change it only takes an hour to get dialled back in on the fresh bike. The Endo rides as well as it always has and the difference in feel due to wheel size is kind of nice when you ride the same trails all the time.
    Safe riding,

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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    I really liked the Fezzari. Pedaled incredibly well. Almost magical the way it handles techy, ledgy climbs. Great descender but not a plow bike by any stretch. More playful and active. The size L fit me perfect..... and like you said the price is almost impossible to beat. I haven't heard anything bad about Fezzari as far as durability and customer support but something about the price makes me wonder if it will withstand 4-5 years of constant 5-6 day per week rides in rough terrain with very spotty maintenance (I'm terrible) like my Knolly does. Ha ha.
    Perceived value is just that, perceived value. I work in the jewelry industry, and raising the prices on product is often what is needed to make a slow seller sell. Crazy. I'd agree that the La Sal Peak is a new bike, and doesn't have a track record regarding breakage, good or bad, but I wasn't worried that what I paid for it meant that is was poorly made, just that they can still make their money without a full retail markup. It's not the lightest carbon frame out there, is stiff, rides great and the build quality looks high on mine, I think it'll last. Lifetime warranty if I manage to break it.

    So many great bikes out now, any one of them on your list is a winner.

  43. #43
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    True. I thought the build quality looked good and everything felt tight on the bike I demoed. I guess I was more concerned with the things like bearings, fasteners, build tolerance, quality of the carbon lay up, quality control etc. Those things cost money and eventhough Fezzari is consumer direct they still have to pass that kind of expense on to the customer or cut corners.
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    Posting an amalgamation of prior posts to provide some Wreckoning/Smash/Fugitive comparison by request:

    ______________________________________________
    Wreckoning vs Smash:

    I rode an Evil Wreckoning for 1 yr prior to my old Smash (aluminum with 140mm rear end); Wreckoning was 160/160 fox rc2/x2 and the smash was 160/145 with ribbon coil/push 11.6 (ran it briefly with a Rockshox superdeluxe also). The build (including wheels/tires) was transplanted from the Evil to the Smash. I felt the Smash to be the superior bike in everything but high speed through bigger chunk. Climbed better, did flatter sections better. Both carried speed about the same. I was more comfortable on the Smash in steeps but this was likely due to the size difference (around 15mm more reach, longer wheelbase). In high speed chunk the rear end wasn't as planted/stable as the Evil, despite lots of fiddling with shock settings and discussions with the guys at GG and Push. Tried both crush and plush modes.

    ________________________________________________

    Smash vs Fugitive:

    About me: 5í11Ē, 210 geared up mostly muscle. Iím an advanced/expert rider and would describe my riding style as forward and aggressive. Enjoy jumps but like smashing through rocks more. Previous bikes are Yeti SB95, Evil Following V1, Evil Wreckoning, GG Smash, and a few brief stints on Pivot Firebird 27.5 and SC Bronson (newest version). I live in SoCal, primarily San Diego area.

    The Fug is to serve as my primary trail and Enduro racing bike for 2019 and other than a hardtail is my only bike. It is replacing a Guerilla Gravity Smash that I had for a year.

    A word on sizing: I was back and forth between medium and large. As mentioned previously I'm 5'11" but with some weird body proportions. My weakness riding is more tight stuff (especially switchbacks) over tech and high speed. I ended up spending quite a bit of time talking with Noel (thanks for the advice!) on the phone and shared all the above info with him. His final recc was ďyouíre a solid mediumĒ, which is what I got with initial plans for a 40mm stem and plan for 150 fork.

    The bike: ridden in ST mode and LT mode. ST is fox 34 140 and rockshox deluxe 120. LT ended up with a DVO diamond 160 and topaz 135. Wheels are i9 enduro 305 tires Bontrager SE4 rear (with Vittoria Air liner) and either Conti Baron (winter/wet) or Kaiser (summer/dry) front.

    So quick first impressions, first and foremost is damn this is a pretty bike. The black cherry is hands down the best looking paintjob Iíve ever seen. As I mentioned in a previous post, finish and aesthetics are a league above (IMO obviously) the very industrial look of the aluminum GG. The main two things that I can take away from the ride are the cornering and the braking. The cornering is the best of any bike since my old Following. The braking thoughÖIíve never ridden, let alone owned, a bike that delivers so much braking traction. Smooth surface, rough surface, doesnít matter. I found myself on the last ride intentionally coming into corners way hotter than usually just to find the limits. Really awesome.

    __________________________________________________

    Fugitive LT: More forgiving through the rough than the ST Fugitive. The decrease in reach (ran as 135 back, 160 front) was noticeable and made me bump up a stem size to 50mm to compensate. Not a huge difference in pedaling to be honest. No plans to go back to ST mode at this time. In regards to sizing, after lots of back and forth I've come to the conclusion that the M is perfect for me when in ST mode, and just a touch too small (particularly in higher speed, wide open stuff) in LT mode with the 160 fork but would probably be fine with the 150 fork.

    Between the three, all are great bikes and hard to go wrong. I prefer the Knolly suspension to the GG suspension. I felt the GG had the most high end straight line stability but, as mentioned above, the rear end would get unsettled in high speed chop (while the Knolly didn't) which evened it out a bit. The Evil, despite the smaller sizing, definitely took the cake in high speed rough/chop (likely due to the increased rear wheel travel) but the slack seat angle was abysmal. Happy to answer any further questions!

  45. #45
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    Not much love for the Offering in this thread! I can't say it's the best climber but it sure is fun on the down. Mine weighs 31lb with an 11-6 shock and a lyric fork. With that setup I'm fine with my local trails but it might not be my first choice for an all day backcountry ride with 5000'+ of climbing. But then again my V2 Ibis Ripley LS doesn't compare in the fun dept so I would be hard-pressed on which bike to grab.

    Need to swing a leg over the new Ripley. The Ripmo is a bigger bike and would have a lot of overlap with your Endorphin.

  46. #46
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    I have ridden some of the bikes on your list...

    The Offering is solid bike that blurs the lines, leans more trail/AM. It pedals great and suspension is playful. It doesn't feel as deep as previous Evils but prefer the Offerings suspension. Its unfortunate but I fall in-between sizes. I am 5' 8" with short legs, long torso. The medium is fun, but in the end I struggled with the longer front center and riding the way I like to on a bike. I gave it a solid 7 months of trying the longer geometry. I can ride it, but its just not as much fun. The small Offering was too small.

    Forbidden Druid (not on your list) - this is a cool bike, I like the sizing and the small brand allure. The frame is well built. Not as playful as I prefer, but you can pop it....a bit of a slug going uphill, but will do it without much fuss. It corners very well and is very capable on the descents

    Ripmo - (haven't owned) checks a lot of boxes, but I remained worried about the blowing through the travel and bottoming out as reported by multiple people. I have had previous issues with bottoming out on Ibis bikes. However...see next comment on Ripley V4

    Ripley V4 - I am loving this bike!! The geometry is a nice middle ground. Surprisingly I am not bottoming this bike out. Now and then (1% of the time), it will uses all of its travel quickly but not a harsh bottom out - its weird but since it hardly happens its not really an issue. The Ripley is pure fun and handles a lot of trails, gap jumps, drops with compose. Again this bike is super fun and you can install a long dropper. It rides light which is deceiving in how capable it is. The frame is outstanding - simple but does everything right.

    Kona Process 153 29er- currently tinker with this as my bigger bike. This bike does a lot things well, but still too early to really comment.

    Yeti bikes - they have piqued my interest, but really worried about their quality. I have heard they have fixed some of their issues.

    Knolly/Pivot - they would be uber cool to check out, but I don't want a different wheel or cranksets for the super boost

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockman View Post
    Not much love for the Offering in this thread! I can't say it's the best climber but it sure is fun on the down. Mine weighs 31lb with an 11-6 shock and a lyric fork. With that setup I'm fine with my local trails but it might not be my first choice for an all day backcountry ride with 5000'+ of climbing. But then again my V2 Ibis Ripley LS doesn't compare in the fun dept so I would be hard-pressed on which bike to grab.

    Need to swing a leg over the new Ripley. The Ripmo is a bigger bike and would have a lot of overlap with your Endorphin.
    I loved the Following I tested a few years ago and I don't think I'd have a problem with the climbing capability of the Offering. You are comparing it to dw link Turners and Ibis so I can understand where you're coming from. I'm more interested in an active climber through rough, ledgy, loose terrain than ultimate efficiency on smoother climbs. Remember I'm coming from a Knolly which in my opinion climbs really well in the rough, techy stuff and is still totally acceptable to me on smooth climbs, even without flipping the climb switch. I'm perfectly happy to sit and spin smooth(ish) circles up a long non-tech climb all day with a little bob if it means I can have that super active, plush action on the downs that Knolly and Evil are known for.

    I definitely will keep the Offering on my list until I get a good test ride on one.
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  48. #48
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    So I know this is the 29er forum and I know you are looking for a longer travel 29er, BUT, you may want to look at what you really really want: "An Endorphin with more downhill capability".

    I'll admit I did not like my rides on the Endorphin, perhaps it was set up, but I didn't like how that bike rode BUT you do like it, so I'd suggest you stay with what you like: Knolly.

    If you are absolutely dead set on getting a longer travel 29er, I'd get the Fugitive LT and ride it, weight be damned! If they make a carbon frame, then switch frames later. You could also build it light and minimize the weight.

    All that said, I don't think a longer travel 29er is gonna suit your needs as well as a longer travel 27.5 simply because it will be a bigger bike due to having bigger wheels; longer and taller is just the nature of riding wagon wheels.

    I rode an aluminum GG Smash as a 29er and 27+, and though it really was a great longer travel 29er, it was a better 27+, which is what led me to trading out frames for a carbon GG Shred Dogg 27.5. Though I lost a little bit of the sled dog feel, I gained agility and playfulness.

    My 29er is an XC trail bike, 120/130, set up light weight for fast laps and long days on mellower terrain.

    My Shred Dogg has plus wheels, a coil and a 36, so not light, but it's burly!

    BTW: I ride St George a fair amount, it's day drive from Carson City, and the Shred Dogg was perfect for riding there, tons of grip, great climber, traction to the moon. Rode there a month ago before it got hot, just love Suicidal Tendencies and fast laps on Zen.

    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    For sure. The Knolly will stay on the list and honestly is the standard by which all the rest will be judged in my book. My concern with the Fugitive LT is the weight. I rode the regular Fugitive all over Hurricane/St. George last year at the Knollyfest with a fairly light all air (DPX2 shock, 34 Float) build and didn't notice the weight at all. In fact just picking it up it felt to be about the same weight as my Endorphin which is 30 lbs. But this year at the Knollyfest everyone had LT's built heavy duty with coil shocks etc and while I didn't ride one, they felt hefty lifting them up into the truck and onto the racks... like 35 lbs. That's gotta kill some of the liveliness and playfulness I love about the Endorphin.
    GG Shred Dogg 27+/29 (go fast!)
    RSD Wildcat V2 (backyard kicks)
    Pivot Shuttle 27.5 (wifeys)

  49. #49
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    Out of your list I've only been on the Ripmo. Also demoed an SB150 and Pivot Switchblade. I liked all three quite a bit. I purchased a Ripmo, but would be happy on all three. Well, if my Ripmo ever arrives that is, lol...waiting on it over a month now. And on Ibis' website, they have Ripmo deliveries out to October. So if you want the bike this summer, that may be a consideration.

    I didn't find the SB150 too long or unwieldy. Pretty similar to the Ripmo -- they were 1A and 1B in my preferences. Front end felt perhaps a little lighter on the climbs, and they were pretty similar going down the trail. The Switchblade climbed as well as either, but felt like a little "less bike" on the downhill side. I am a bit of a mauler/monster trucker in my riding style, though. I don't like to worry about lines too much And I'm content to climb sloooowly, for what its worth.
    '19 Ibis Ripmo
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  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    So I know this is the 29er forum and I know you are looking for a longer travel 29er, BUT, you may want to look at what you really really want: "An Endorphin with more downhill capability".

    BUT you do like it, so I'd suggest you stay with what you like: Knolly.

    If you are absolutely dead set on getting a longer travel 29er, I'd get the Fugitive LT and ride it, weight be damned! If they make a carbon frame, then switch frames later. You could also build it light and minimize the weight.
    .
    Makes sense, and there's probably a better than 50% chance that that's the way I'll go but the grass is always greener mentality has me looking at some other options.

    In fact, if I go with a Fugitive, I'd likely go with both a short and long shock and a fork that is (relatively) easy to adjust travel on so I could have both bikes. I really felt like the regular Fugitive did feel quite a bit like my Endorphin but was faster in the smoother JEM/Bear Claw Poppy types of terrain and nearly as capable in the rougher, more technical Zen/Grafton/Little Creek stuff. So if I didn't like the feel of the LT in the faster,smoother stuff which is predominately what I have locally (Ely, NV), I could leave it in the shorter travel, lighter mode for that, then switch it for my trips to more technical riding destinations like NorthVancouver/Squamish, Moab, and Phoenix.

    I guess I was hoping to possibly find a one bike compromise in a lighter, more pedal efficient 140ish travel 29er that could do well in both. Afterall Moab isn't all tech. Neither is St. George/Hurricane.
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  51. #51
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    Great comment Nurse Ben....I have been re-evaluating my longer bike and considering going back to 27.5. Before I do so, I am tinkering with another 29er as my longer bike and contemplating one other. Need to get a demo on it.

  52. #52
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    I just got done with a ride on my Offering that had about 2800 feet of technical climbing with some 17-19 degree grades and the traction was unbelievable. What was really enjoyable is not having to have the tip of my saddle stuck up my butt to keep the front wheel down. Was is fast, nope, but very fun and hardly spun a wheel.

  53. #53
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    Ely, now that's out there

    In Carson/Tahoe we have a fair amount of chunk, even the flow can be pretty rocky, so I still have my short travel 29er for making time ... but the Shred Dogg is still my first choice for nearly everything.

    I just got back from ten days in NoCal, OR, WA, I only took one bike (Shred Dogg) rode everything in Oak Ridge including ATC, did a big backcountry hike a bike in Bend, rode the DH park at Hood, Ape Canyon at St Helens, with plenty of long rides (>100 miles) on flowy single track, and though it's a burly bike, the SD never felt out of it's place, pedaled great.

    So yeah, if you get a chance you should try a GG bike.

    If you get over this way, I have a Sz 3 Shred and Greg Nash has a Sz 3 Smash.

    Edit: just got down reading through the Bike Bible Fugitive review and the interview with the Knolly CEO/Designer, gotta admit, that bike sure does look like a sweet ride, and yeah it weighs a ton, but so does a beer gut

    When I got my Carbon GG frame, I knew it was not going to save me any weight cuz it weighs the same as their aluminum frame, but it wasn't about the weight that led me to upgrade, it was about the strength and stiffness. You will definitely not have to worry about stiffness with the Fugitive!

    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Makes sense, and there's probably a better than 50% chance that that's the way I'll go but the grass is always greener mentality has me looking at some other options.

    In fact, if I go with a Fugitive, I'd likely go with both a short and long shock and a fork that is (relatively) easy to adjust travel on so I could have both bikes. I really felt like the regular Fugitive did feel quite a bit like my Endorphin but was faster in the smoother JEM/Bear Claw Poppy types of terrain and nearly as capable in the rougher, more technical Zen/Grafton/Little Creek stuff. So if I didn't like the feel of the LT in the faster,smoother stuff which is predominately what I have locally (Ely, NV), I could leave it in the shorter travel, lighter mode for that, then switch it for my trips to more technical riding destinations like NorthVancouver/Squamish, Moab, and Phoenix.

    I guess I was hoping to possibly find a one bike compromise in a lighter, more pedal efficient 140ish travel 29er that could do well in both. Afterall Moab isn't all tech. Neither is St. George/Hurricane.
    GG Shred Dogg 27+/29 (go fast!)
    RSD Wildcat V2 (backyard kicks)
    Pivot Shuttle 27.5 (wifeys)

  54. #54
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    Krob, I would experiment with the bike builder on Fanatik's website, which I've found to be pretty accurate, to get general weights for a few comparable builds (I know the Fugitive, Ripmo, and Sentinel are all on there).

  55. #55
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    Iím also in this same market and struggling. Any reason the Instinct and Jeffsy arenít mentioned here? Iím gong to get a Switchblade and Instinct BC demo in soon. Like the specs on the new alloy Hightower but itís looking like limited availability for a while.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tystevens View Post
    .... I purchased a Ripmo, but would be happy on all three. Well, if my Ripmo ever arrives that is, lol...waiting on it over a month now. And on Ibis' website, they have Ripmo deliveries out to October. So if you want the bike this summer, that may be a consideration....
    Last Tuesday I placed my order for Medium Ripmo in blue. I was told by my LBS that it would ship 7/20. Later I found the ibisB2B website and Monday it was showing Med blue Ripmo shipping 7/20. Now it showing Med blue / black on 9/10 and Large out in october. I can only hope the shipment of frames that was to arrive for shipping out this month is all spoken for any not delayed and that is why it shows being pushed out.

    If that is the case then your frame is probably in the same shipment as mine. I am guessing they order frames in batches from China or Taiwan (where ever they get them from) and once those X number of frame are allocated they are done. Then you would need to wait for the next batch 6 weeks later. Personally I need mine by 9/28 in my hands as that is my plan for doing my First Enduro of the season. However I really want it before then so I can get comfortable on the bike and dial it in before.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", 19' Vassago Optimus Ti SS 29", '19 Ibis Ripmo, XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Ely, now that's out there

    In Carson/Tahoe we have a fair amount of chunk, even the flow can be pretty rocky, so I still have my short travel 29er for making time ... but the Shred Dogg is still my first choice for nearly everything.

    I just got back from ten days in NoCal, OR, WA, I only took one bike (Shred Dogg) rode everything in Oak Ridge including ATC, did a big backcountry hike a bike in Bend, rode the DH park at Hood, Ape Canyon at St Helens, with plenty of long rides (>100 miles) on flowy single track, and though it's a burly bike, the SD never felt out of it's place, pedaled great.

    So yeah, if you get a chance you should try a GG bike.

    If you get over this way, I have a Sz 3 Shred and Greg Nash has a Sz 3 Smash.

    Edit: just got down reading through the Bike Bible Fugitive review and the interview with the Knolly CEO/Designer, gotta admit, that bike sure does look like a sweet ride, and yeah it weighs a ton, but so does a beer gut

    When I got my Carbon GG frame, I knew it was not going to save me any weight cuz it weighs the same as their aluminum frame, but it wasn't about the weight that led me to upgrade, it was about the strength and stiffness. You will definitely not have to worry about stiffness with the Fugitive!
    Ely: The Middle of Everywhere! Ha ha. Come on over. I'd be happy to show you around.

    The Fugitive is pretty amazing and I'm probably making too big a deal out of the weight. I rode my old coil-shocked 35 lb Chilcotin this morning and honestly didn't really notice the extra weight that much.

    My son just moved to Reno last year so Tahoe is on my list for this summer/fall. I'll definitely reach out to you and Greg to check out your GG bikes. Enlighten me on the Shred Dog. I've lost track of all their iterations and permutations on the original formula. So many options with their modular frame designs.
    Last edited by KRob; 07-10-2019 at 03:06 PM.
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  58. #58
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    All the GG front triangles are the same, the upper and lower cups can be "flipped" to adjust reach/wheelbase by 10mm, the lower cup has a low or tall option to adjust for stack and to tweak geo.

    Travel and rear center are adjusted with stay kits. Each wheel size and travel require a different suspension, though there may be some crossover. You can also do a "franken build" combo based on your own needs like a long chainstay/short travel Trail Pistol.

    All bikes have an adjustable rear shock position for Plush or Crush ride quality.Though all the bikes in the GG quiver have the same Plush/Crush adjustable suspension, only the Shred has the adjustable travel.

    Smash LT 29
    Trail Pistol, ST 29, also has a "Pistola" MT option
    Mega Trail LT 27.5
    Shred Dogg 27.5 ST/MT

    The Shred Dogg is the 27.5 short/mid travel bike, 130mm or 140mm out back, up to 170mm fork up front. I run mine 140/160. The Shred has the shortest rear center and the largest tire clearance (up to 2.8). The change in ride quality and suspension is very pronounced between Crush (130mm) and Plush (140mm), I prefer the "plush" feel and longer travel.

    Tahoe riding is amazing, well worth the drive, but we had a big snow year so lots of the TRT are still snow covered. Early August would be a good time to come over, it'll hot in Carson/Reno, but cool at the lake, and the trails won't be moon dust yet. We're snow free up high until November, sometimes even December.

    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Ely: The Middle of Everywhere! Ha ha. Come on over. I'd be happy to show you around.

    The Fugitive is pretty amazing and I'm probably making too big a deal out of the weight. I rode my old coil shocked 35 lb Chilcotin this morning and honestly didn't really notice the extra weight that much.

    My son just moved to Reno and Tahoe is on my list for this summer/fall. I'll definitely reach out to you and Greg to check out your GG bikes. Enlighten my on the Shred Dog. I've lost track of all their iterations and permutations on the original formula. So many options with their modular frame designs.
    GG Shred Dogg 27+/29 (go fast!)
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  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    I'm a happy camper aboard my very capable Smash.

    I'd describe my suspension as plush (11.6 shock, 160mm PUSH-coiled Pike fork) and handling as confidence inspiring.
    =sParty
    That's top-of-the-line as far as plush suspension goes. I'll bet it pretty much eats up everything in its path. Nice set up. I'd be tempted to go with the Push 11-6 because it's only $600 extra when ordering from GG. That's more than half off msrp.

    Thanks for your input. Another data point in favor of the Smash.
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  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sidewalk View Post
    having an integrated system for tools and spares as made riding life SO much better for me. Just grab the bike, air the tires, and ride (coil front and rear for me too). Tools, tube, etc all neatly stored on the bike in a way that you never think about them until you need them.
    I'm still pretty firmly in the pack-wearing minority, but I did rent a specialized 6fattie in Hawaii a couple years ago, and that SWAT compartment was pretty handy. GG has some clever attachment points for tubes and such too. Something to consider as I may give up my pack some day.
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  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpearce1475 View Post
    Krob, I would experiment with the bike builder on Fanatik's website, which I've found to be pretty accurate, to get general weights for a few comparable builds (I know the Fugitive, Ripmo, and Sentinel are all on there).
    That's a good idea. I did build me up an Offering on the Fanatik website a few weeks ago, just to see what my preferred build would cost. Pretty handy tool. Thanks for the reminder.
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  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    That's a good idea. I did build me up an Offering on the Fanatik website a few weeks ago, just to see what my preferred build would cost. Pretty handy tool. Thanks for the reminder.
    The bike builder on the GG site is accurate in terms of weight as well and gives you a fair number of build options.
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  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by sfr4dr View Post
    Iím also in this same market and struggling. Any reason the Instinct and Jeffsy arenít mentioned here? Iím gong to get a Switchblade and Instinct BC demo in soon. Like the specs on the new alloy Hightower but itís looking like limited availability for a while.
    No reason really other than you gotta start somewhere with the process and I don't have any prior connection or affinity drawing me to either company. I have two buddies down in Hurricane. One had the Jeffsey and one just bought on Instinct BC addition. They both seemed to be pretty happy on them and the numbers look right for what I'm shopping for. Although the Jeffsey owner broke his frame and has had a terrible customer service experience getting it replaced. He moved on to the Ripmo and loves it.

    Lot of good frames out there in this category. Probably a half dozen more that I could consider as well. Let me know how your demos go. I'd be interested in hearing your thoughts on the Instinct. I've ridden the Switchblade and while it felt pretty good, there was just something about it that left me wanting.
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  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    I just got done with a ride on my Offering that had about 2800 feet of technical climbing with some 17-19 degree grades and the traction was unbelievable. What was really enjoyable is not having to have the tip of my saddle stuck up my butt to keep the front wheel down. Was is fast, nope, but very fun and hardly spun a wheel.
    That's good to know. That's the kind of info I'm looking for. I do a lot of climbing and like I said above, not that interested in the speed it climbs the smooth stuff as long as it will claw its way up the loose techy stuff, tracking the ground without sinking too far into its travel.

    The other thing I've really liked about the geometry of these new 29ers, besides the long front center, is the steep seat tube angles. My Endorphin was pretty progressive in this area when it came out and I run my seat pushed forward for an even steeper effective STA, but the Fezzari La Sal Peak was even more upright and it felt good for the steep climbs (both smooth and techy).. Really puts you in a good power position over the pedals without having to get the nose of the saddle up your taint like you said. My ride on the Chilcotin today reminded me how that sucks. Need to fiddle with the seat adjustment tonight, ha ha.
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  65. #65
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    I ended up on a Fugitive LT after testing the Ripmo and SB130. Besides the steeper STA, it seems like they tuned in just enough additional pedaling platform to not need a climb switch for fire roads. The tech climbing traction is still tops but it feels firm under power even with a Float X2 in back.

    BTW, I thought the SB130 was great but couldn't decide if the M or L fit better. Between that and all of the online chatter over tire rub and damaged swingarms, I passed. The Ripmo fit/geo feels really close to the Fugitive LT in the M and L sizes, but it dove deep into its travel a couple of times when I didn't expect it. In the end, I think I was just looking for an excuse to favor Knolly over the others.

    GG seems like a great option but was barely on my radar last November.
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  66. #66
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    So many great bikes on the market right now. So many swiss army knife bikes that just do everything really well and excel in a couple areas. It can be intoxicating to look at, I've sat and stared at numbers all day. I thought the Ripmo was going to be the one, on paper it was perfect, it excelled at pedaling and climbing. I'll still say its the best trail bike I've ever owned, its light, fast and efficient but damn it was boring. The bike just didn't have any character to it, it was vanilla ice cream to me.

    I've owned numerous Knollys over the years (Endo v1, Endo v2, Chilcotin, Podium) and those bikes always had character, real active suspension, great technical climbers and exceptional down hill capability for the travel. Knolly was always pushing the geometry bar in the 26" days, I started riding 170 cranks back then because they dropped the BB's quicker than most other companies, there was trail bikes that could corner then there was Knolly's.

    Your in a good spot, there's so many quality bikes to choose from! Try an Offering, once I stopped riding Knolly's an Evil was the only bike that I truly fell in love with since the Endo v2.

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    I almost got a Ripmo last year when they first came out, same as a lot of folks I though the geo was spot on and it looked good on paper, but I got a GG Smash instead and that was a great bike for me at the time.

    So I got my first ride on a Ripmo last month, did some climbing and descending, and though it climbs fine, it rides tall and it just didn't do anything for me, not agile or flickable like my Smash, though it was a light and efficient climber.

    In comparison to my Signal Peak 29er, the Ripmo was a less efficient climber, less agile, and though it has more aggressive geo and more travel, it was not all that confidence inspiring esp compared to my Smash or Shred Dogg.

    So yeah, not a Ripmo fan, it's milk toast to me.
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  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    I almost got a Ripmo last year when they first came out, same as a lot of folks I though the geo was spot on and it looked good on paper, but I got a GG Smash instead and that was a great bike for me at the time.

    So I got my first ride on a Ripmo last month, did some climbing and descending, and though it climbs fine, it rides tall and it just didn't do anything for me, not agile or flickable like my Smash, though it was a light and efficient climber.

    In comparison to my Signal Peak 29er, the Ripmo was a less efficient climber, less agile, and though it has more aggressive geo and more travel, it was not all that confidence inspiring esp compared to my Smash or Shred Dogg.

    So yeah, not a Ripmo fan, it's milk toast to me.
    I was at an event recently and Cane Creek had a tent that had about 6 of the new GG bikes for demo. By buddy demo'd a Size 3 Smash with Helm/CCDB Air, he loved it so much he put his pre order in the next morning! The bike look awesome and I love the fact they're made in CO! He hasnt stopped buzzing about it and playing around with the builds / emailing them to find out different options he can do. He said the top end build with the 11-6 is something like 6600, price is unreal compared to most of the other brands.

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magsrgod View Post
    I was at an event recently and Cane Creek had a tent that had about 6 of the new GG bikes for demo. By buddy demo'd a Size 3 Smash with Helm/CCDB Air, he loved it so much he put his pre order in the next morning! The bike look awesome and I love the fact they're made in CO! He hasnt stopped buzzing about it and playing around with the builds / emailing them to find out different options he can do. He said the top end build with the 11-6 is something like 6600, price is unreal compared to most of the other brands.
    Yeah, I have ridden a lot of bikes, and there are bikes that do one thing or another better, but few that do everything well. My Shred ain't going anywhere for a while, and that's saying something considering I'm quite a bike whore

    Edit: I am tempted to trade in my Signal Peak frameset for a Trail Pistol frameset, run it as light as possible with an SC34, lots of carbon bling, make it a lightweight trail blaster.
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  70. #70
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    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.

    Quote Originally Posted by andy f View Post
    I ended up on a Fugitive LT... In the end, I think I was just looking for an excuse to favor Knolly over the others.
    I think I may be in this same camp. Good to hear more positive Fugitive feedback.


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    Last edited by KRob; 07-12-2019 at 06:37 AM.
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  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magsrgod View Post
    Your in a good spot, there's so many quality bikes to choose from! Try an Offering, once I stopped riding Knolly's an Evil was the only bike that I truly fell in love with since the Endo v2.
    High praise coming from a Knolly guy. Need to test the Offering.

    I did a quick sizing spin around the OTE lot on the Ripmo, Offering, and Fugitive LT a couple months ago. The shiny light weight plastic bikes felt really good and had my interest for sure.

    That character and uniqueness of the Knolly, GG, and Evil are a strong pull for me. As cool as the Ripmo and new Hightower may be, itís going to be tough to pick a bike that literally everyone else has....unless theyíre really that much better.


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    Last edited by KRob; 07-22-2019 at 11:10 AM.
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  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Good to hear some positive Fugitive feedback.
    I haven't heard anything but....

  73. #73
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    Double post
    2021 Stumpjumper - maybe soon
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sidewalk View Post
    I won't recommend my bike/brand based on your requirements. But I will say, having an integrated system for tools and spares as made riding life SO much better for me. Just grab the bike, air the tires, and ride (coil front and rear for me too). Tools, tube, etc all neatly stored on the bike in a way that you never think about them until you need them.

    Has nothing to do with climbing and descending. But being upset that your tube fell off somewhere back on the trail or forgetting your tool in you car sucks.
    Haha... the one thing I miss about my Stumpjumper compared to the Hightower is the SWAT Box... I never had to think about what to bring or wearing a pack.

    Now I am back to either riding with no tools or spares on my local daily rides and risking a walk home or I wear the Raptor 10 again... I guess at least now I have more water on me on those longer rides and spares for others when I lead group rides. :-)
    2021 Stumpjumper - maybe soon
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  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by David R View Post
    I haven't heard anything but....
    . Good point!


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    I currently ride a 2019 Stumpjumper 27.5 alloy... However, after test riding the Offering, I ordered one the next day. Loved how it felt. Should have it in hands any day now....

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hesher123 View Post
    Haha... the one thing I miss about my Stumpjumper compared to the Hightower is the SWAT Box... I never had to think about what to bring or wearing a pack.

    Now I am back to either riding with no tools or spares on my local daily rides and risking a walk home or I wear the Raptor 10 again... I guess at least now I have more water on me on those longer rides and spares for others when I lead group rides. :-)
    I've noticed a few other bikes (GG comes to mind) that has a storage setup. No SWAT, but better than randomly strapping stuff to your bike.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sidewalk View Post
    I've noticed a few other bikes (GG comes to mind) that has a storage setup. No SWAT, but better than randomly strapping stuff to your bike.


    After 2 years of lovely pack-free riding you'll be hard pressed to sell me a bike that can't fit 2 water bottles and a frame bag.
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  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    High praise coming from a Knolly guy. Need to test the Offering.

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    I finally got the Offering on a flow trail with some tables and gaps at Big Sky today. This bike is way more playful than either my V2 Ripley LS or Turner RFX.

    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.-mtn-meadow_2.jpg

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockman View Post
    I finally got the Offering on a flow trail with some tables and gaps at Big Sky today. This bike is way more playful than either my V2 Ripley LS or Turner RFX.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Playful and a capable downhill ripper. Thatís a nice combination. Very intrigued.

    Nice steeze, btw. You too appear to be a very capable downhill ripper.


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  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Playful and a capable downhill ripper. Thatís a nice combination. Very intrigued.

    Nice steeze, btw. You too appear to be a very capable downhill ripper.

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    Well, as you know at our advanced ages bad things happen when the tires leave the ground. I posted the pic not to stroke my 57 yr old ego but to emphasize the point. I do not feel confident in the air on my Ripley and my RFX, while quite stable, is not nearly as poppy. I have not been on other recent mid travel 29rs to compare but I'd like to try the Ripmo.

  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockman View Post
    Well, as you know at our advanced ages bad things happen when the tires leave the ground. .
    Ha ha. True that. A little pop over the occasional booter is still fun though. Glad to hear the Offering has that.


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  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    My Shred ain't going anywhere for a while, and that's saying something considering I'm quite a bike whore

    Edit: I am tempted to trade in my Signal Peak frameset for a Trail Pistol frameset, run it as light as possible with an SC34, lots of carbon bling, make it a lightweight trail blaster.
    The Shred Dog sounds a lot like my Endorphin (minus the plus tire capability). I'm running 150 (sometimes 160) mm fork with 130 travel rear and it is a great all around trail bike.

    How long have you had your Signal Peak? Maybe you could speak to some of the frame quality, durability, customer service questions I have with Fezzari. Like I said, I haven't heard any bad reports at all.... just not a lot of history or data points to help me out with my decision.
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  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    The Shred Dog sounds a lot like my Endorphin (minus the plus tire capability). I'm running 150 (sometimes 160) mm fork with 130 travel rear and it is a great all around trail bike.

    How long have you had your Signal Peak? Maybe you could speak to some of the frame quality, durability, customer service questions I have with Fezzari. Like I said, I haven't heard any bad reports at all.... just not a lot of history or data points to help me out with my decision.
    Rob if you can get out this way I have the new Revved SMASH. Get with Ben and I and you can throw a leg over both and try them out. Both are great bikes regardless.

  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by punisher911 View Post
    I currently ride a 2019 Stumpjumper 27.5 alloy... However, after test riding the Offering, I ordered one the next day. Loved how it felt. Should have it in hands any day now....
    Nice! Count another vote for the Offering. Did you happen to test ride any other bikes before you decided on the Offering?

    I'd love to hear your thoughts once you get it and get a few more rides in on it.
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  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Nice! Count another vote for the Offering. Did you happen to test ride any other bikes before you decided on the Offering?

    I'd love to hear your thoughts once you get it and get a few more rides in on it.
    I actually did not test ride any others. Picked it up today. Unfortunately the weather has gone to poo here in SE Michigan and lots of rain in the forecast. I will update once I get some quality rides on Demon.

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregnash View Post
    Rob if you can get out this way I have the new Revved SMASH. Get with Ben and I and you can throw a leg over both and try them out. Both are great bikes regardless.
    Thanks Greg! I've been following your Smash thread with interest and will definitely hit you and Ben up when I get over to Reno to visit my son sometime this summer or fall.
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Nice! Count another vote for the Offering. Did you happen to test ride any other bikes before you decided on the Offering?

    I'd love to hear your thoughts once you get it and get a few more rides in on it.

    Rob,
    I have an Offering and rode a V1 Following (with avalanche cartridge/shock tune) for 3 years before that. I haven't ridden the other bikes on your list, but did have a local trail demo on the SB 130 before purchasing the Offering.

    The Offering definitely climbs more efficiently and has a better pedaling platform than the V1 following. I've ridden them back to back with the same wheels and tires. They both climb ledgy tech terrain very very well. In my opinion they also climb smooth terrain very well, but a step below the SB 130 (and probably the Ripmo) in terms of pedaling platform.

    The Offering feels plusher, poppier, and more maneuverable than the SB 130 on the downs. The SB 130 had great straight line stability but felt a bit soulless to me (and I had thought I would buy one before I demoed). I really like the Offering and have had it all over Moab and CO front range trails where it has excelled. The tech climbing and descending ability was awesome on Blue dot/Portal and Ahab. Compared to the Following, it's a little more difficult to throw it around (much longer wheelbase) but it's muuuch more capable in chunk. Hope this helps.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Nice! Count another vote for the Offering. Did you happen to test ride any other bikes before you decided on the Offering?

    I'd love to hear your thoughts once you get it and get a few more rides in on it.
    Looks like tomorrow and Saturday morning will be my first real trail rides on the Offering. Will have much more to report on it after that. I also have a race on the 27th, so I will definitely spending the first few rides adjusting/setting up the bike to my liking/comfort. So far though, not loving the SRAM RE brakes. Hopefully they get a bit stronger after bedding in more. I know, brakes are not part of the pedaling/ride quality in bike comparisons, but they are part of the overall package to me. Maybe with some adjustments and time I will learn to like them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vega77 View Post
    The SB 130 had great straight line stability but felt a bit soulless to me
    I second this. I demo'd a SB130 a few weeks ago (I am searching for a new bike). It was incredibly stable and better than the other demos I tried at bombing downhill. However, The ride seemed sterile feeling. I ended up going with a 27.5" but had I stayed in the 29er realm, I would have gotten a Ripley

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    Have any of you ridden the Kona Process 153 CR/DL? I've demoed it a couple of times now and can't believe how playful and agile it is. Fast too.

    So many good bikes in this category, I love trying different models and reading the experiences of others. Curious to see what you settle on TS.
    "Slow is smooth, and smooth is fast."

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  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by kmj831 View Post
    Have any of you ridden the Kona Process 153 CR/DL? I've demoed it a couple of times now and can't believe how playful and agile it is. Fast too.

    So many good bikes in this category, I love trying different models and reading the experiences of others. Curious to see what you settle on TS.
    Haven't kept up with Kona offerings lately. Is that a 153mm 29er? And what is the CR/DL?
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  93. #93
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    Hey Krob, if you really want something not so mainstream....
    https://zerodebikes.com/katipo-trail


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    Yes, 153 rear, 160 front. CR is their designation for "Carbon" and DL is their high end build (Deluxe is what it stands for if memory serves). Reasonable price for the build. Seems to be kinda under the radar, but I was surprised how good it was. I liked it better than a few of the bikes on your list /in this thread.

    I do like my Smash, and GG is a great company, was just curious if you or anyone else had tried the Process.
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  95. #95
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    So much good advice in this thread.

    For a different take, I was in the same boat as OP last year. But I went a different direction. I chose to make my Endo the burly DH oriented trail bike and picked up a slack but short travel 29er. Maybe consider that option.

    My Knolly while a very capable all-rounder was a bit porky with a coil front a rear. Also, for non-burly, pedally rides nothing beats a lighter 29er at covering miles. Going dh its not a tire's size that lets me go much faster, its hitting the brakes while cornering, and I can't say a 29 vs 275 makes that much difference there. Unless the trails get really brutal I find the Endo with a 2.5 WT Minion on both ends to be plenty competent. Mind you I get my DH fix on a real DH bike with lift assist so my need to hit the big stuff on the trail bikes just ain't there. In the last 6 weeks for every one trail ride, I've DH'd at least 3 times. Furthermore, I'm biased in my thinking that I'd rather trail ride on less bike. Hauling around a long travel 29er with burly tires is a lot of work, and you need some real bad ass trails, ridden a lot, to justify those bikes.

    What I ended up doing was getting a shorter travel, slack 29 and building it up lighter. And man, does that thing rip. On the less aggressive dirt - which we all have to admit - is where we spend most of our time, that lighter 29 puts a pounding on the Endo. Beefing up the Endo, I felt made it a better bike, and eliminating it's XC-ish duties let it off the hook.

    Just some thoughts.

    That said, if I was going to get a longer travel 29 I'd go with the Ripmo with the Fug as a second. The Rip can build up much lighter and has a suspension design I'd theorize would be snappier than the Fug. Both companies have been great to deal with and take their work seriously. Those two things would make the bike much less of a one trick pony. If I was looking for a one trick pony, like to race enduro, then I'd be looking at the Fug.

  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by David R View Post
    Hey Krob, if you really want something not so mainstream....
    https://zerodebikes.com/katipo-trail

    I've been intrigued by the pinion internal gear box since they first started talking about them 10-12 years ago. So when Zerode finally incorporated one on what looks like a pretty well-sorted bike it caught my interest. Now they have a 140mm 29er. Wonder if there's anyway to demo one here in the states. Have you ridden one David?
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  97. #97
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    No I haven't, I'd really like to though! I've talked to a couple of people riding then in Rotorua and they all seem very happy, my biggest concern would be with the grip-shift but both guys said you adapt to it very quickly.

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    Got my first trail ride in on the Offering. It was a tech trail with lots of pedaling. It pedals nicely. Even standing up, it just moves. My Stumpjumper is a bobbing mess if I try to stand and pedal on a climb and will spin the tire. The Offering just keeps climbing while hammering the pedals standing, even though I know the psi was too high in the tires. Really happy overall with the Offering so far, just need to get it dialed in.

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by David R View Post
    No I haven't, I'd really like to though! I've talked to a couple of people riding then in Rotorua and they all seem very happy, my biggest concern would be with the grip-shift but both guys said you adapt to it very quickly.
    I've owned a few Rohloff and Shimano IGH bikes. Using a gripshift isn't a big deal vs. trigger shifters, but how an IGH/gearbox shifts is quite different than how a derailleur bike shifts. There are pros and cons to both. Like being able to shift while coasting and not being able to shift under power well/having a lot of slack in the drivetrain before the pedals engage [effectively low POE].

    It's definitely worth a demo to see if you think you can be happy with how the gearbox performs.
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  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by kmj831 View Post
    Yes, 153 rear, 160 front. CR is their designation for "Carbon" and DL is their high end build (Deluxe is what it stands for if memory serves). Reasonable price for the build. Seems to be kinda under the radar, but I was surprised how good it was. I liked it better than a few of the bikes on your list /in this thread.

    I do like my Smash, and GG is a great company, was just curious if you or anyone else had tried the Process.
    After researching all of the excellent bikes in this category I recently bought a Kona Process 153 CR. I chose that bike because it seemed to be a playful long travel trail bike as opposed to a purpose built enduro race bike. I have found that it lives up to that billing and is perfect for the varied trails that I ride. The bike is pure fun - agile enough for tight technical trails, efficient enough for XC/climbing with enough travel for rough trails. Definitely worth considering.

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  101. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    It's definitely worth a demo to see if you think you can be happy with how the gearbox performs.
    I'd think it would be a must when investing that sort of money in something significantly different eh.

    According to https://zerodebikes.com/world There are a few shops in the US that deal with Zerode, one in Salt Lake City and one in Boulder (I think you're somewhere near-ish to one of those places eh KRob?), I wonder if either of them are able to organise a demo?

  102. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dude! View Post
    I have ridden some of the bikes on your list...

    Forbidden Druid (not on your list) - this is a cool bike, I like the sizing and the small brand allure. The frame is well built. Not as playful as I prefer, but you can pop it....a bit of a slug going uphill, but will do it without much fuss. It corners very well and is very capable on the descents...
    From a high level, this is not a bad synopsis. That said, after getting used to the steep STA and getting my suspension dialled, I am approaching PRs on climbs. That may just be a product of my relative fitness level though. Also, while tough to get airborne at walking speeds, at speed, it is reasonably poppy, although again, that may be how my suspension is set up.

    There is some good info in here, in case you may be interested:

    https://forums.mtbr.com/general-disc...d-1100788.html

    As I stated in post #115 in that thread, my observations at that time included the following:

    1. Fast AF on the downs. Fastest bike by far that I have ever ridden. And I sense I am not near its limits yet. I may never find them - I can't go too much faster without seriously risking life and limb.

    2. Very versatile. You can straightline it through the gnarliest of shit at speed without hesitation. This thing is rock solid holding a line. But you can also launch it off of natural trail features effortlessly. It's a rare combo of a ground hugging speed machine, that transforms into a poppy lively bike searching for air when you want it to.

    3. It corners like it is on rails. I am shitty when it comes to high speed cornering. This bike makes me feel like a hero. I am not joking. There is something about the geo that allows me to intuitively execute all the technical stuff I have read about cornering techniques, without even thinking. This bike has made me a MUCH better biker. And like I said, I am still learning about it and getting more and more comfortable on it.

    4. The centre of gravity is loooooooooow. I have never been able to do effortless endless brake stands on any other bike like I can on this one. This really aids in low speed maneuvering on technical man made features.

    5. It's a visually stunning bike. It screams speed from every angle. I feel very proud to own this bike.

    6. The on-bike storage (including the reverse SWAT Box and extra bottle bosses) makes riding packless a breeze. Well thought out extra touches like this can be found front to back (including the super high quality hardware used).

    The downs:

    1. It's a decent climber, but this is not a high point for this bike, as far as I am concerned. I can still climb all the tech trails no problem. It's just that I feel a tad more tired at the summit than when I am on certain other bikes. That said, I never feel the urge to fiddle with the climb switch.

    2. The front end can be a bit of a beast to lift onto ledges when climbing. It's obviously 100% doable, but I need to exert myself much more on this bike than on other bikes.

    3. I noticed brake jack when I did not have the suspension dialled. That seems to have disappeared now that I am in the zone on my suspension settings.

    4. The driveline can be kinda noisy when pedalling under load. I am a little concerned about its life (and the availability of parts down the road).

    5. The shock stanchion can be tough to access for cleaning and measuring SAG.

    6. I don't really "get" the super wide seat mast, from either a design or engineering perspective. Obviously a first world problem.

    For climbing comments, see post #127.
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  103. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    I almost got a Ripmo last year when they first came out, same as a lot of folks I though the geo was spot on and it looked good on paper, but I got a GG Smash instead and that was a great bike for me at the time.

    So I got my first ride on a Ripmo last month, did some climbing and descending, and though it climbs fine, it rides tall and it just didn't do anything for me, not agile or flickable like my Smash, though it was a light and efficient climber.

    In comparison to my Signal Peak 29er, the Ripmo was a less efficient climber, less agile, and though it has more aggressive geo and more travel, it was not all that confidence inspiring esp compared to my Smash or Shred Dogg.

    So yeah, not a Ripmo fan, it's milk toast to me.
    Couldn't disagree more regarding the Ripmo riding tall. I specifically was looking for a LT 29er than didn't ride "tall" which is why I generally rode 27.5 bikes (and still prefer them in places like Sedona and Hurricane). Neither the Yeti SB130 or Ripmo rode tall IMO and while the Yeti climbed a lil' better, the Ripmo climbs great and RIPS going down. I'll agree on the flickable part though I've yet to ride a 29er that was truly flickable like a 5010 or SB5.

    I just got back from 7 straight days of riding in Oregon where we did 17K of climbing which I thought would do me in but the Ripmo just kept on chugging along.

    Even though I haven't ridden a GG (the new ones look OK but the old ones remind me of a beach cruiser so they don't appeal to me), I belong to another MTB board where numerous people have various GG bikes and they all LOVE them.
    Carpe Diem!!

  104. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by punisher911 View Post
    Got my first trail ride in on the Offering. It was a tech trail with lots of pedaling. It pedals nicely. Even standing up, it just moves. My Stumpjumper is a bobbing mess if I try to stand and pedal on a climb and will spin the tire. The Offering just keeps climbing while hammering the pedals standing, even though I know the psi was too high in the tires. Really happy overall with the Offering so far, just need to get it dialed in.
    Nice...the Offering was definitely the 1st Evil that enticed me.
    Carpe Diem!!

  105. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Nice! Count another vote for the Offering. Did you happen to test ride any other bikes before you decided on the Offering?

    I'd love to hear your thoughts once you get it and get a few more rides in on it.
    3 rides in on the Offering... getting the suspension dialed a little at a time. So far after every ride, Iím more and more glad I bought it. Such a difference compared to my Stumpjumper. The SJ is plush and absorbs everything in the trail in the effort of ultimate comfort, tires glued to the ground, with never a loss of traction, or tire spin. That being said, it pedal bobs a plenty. Standing to pedal is not even an option.

    The Offering however, stiff, playful, poppy, but not rigid. All the standard Evil descriptions apply. This thing jumps. Easily. On its own. But controlled. Doesnít just throw you in the air willy nilly. Pedal bob is non existent. Pedals efficiently, even when standing. The more I get it dialed in, the better itís getting too.

    Yes, a few of the differences can be attributed to carbon vs alloy, 29 vs 27.5. But Iím sure a majority comes down to geo and suspension design.
    Last edited by punisher911; 07-22-2019 at 07:08 AM.

  106. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    3. I noticed brake jack when I did not have the suspension dialled. That seems to have disappeared now that I am in the zone on my suspension settings.
    To be clear, you noticed the rear extending when you were hitting the brakes? (jack). This is usually most pronounced during hard braking in steeps when the bike gets even steeper while the suspension extends and stiffens. Makes riding chutes somewhat terrifying.

    The opposite of this is "squat".
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  107. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    To be clear, you noticed the rear extending when you were hitting the brakes? (jack). This is usually most pronounced during hard braking in steeps when the bike gets even steeper while the suspension extends and stiffens. Makes riding chutes somewhat terrifying.

    The opposite of this is "squat".
    No. Very poor terminology by me.

    What I meant was that my suspension felt less active with the rear brake applied. Semi locked up. For example, in braking bumps. Like I said though, this was much more pronounced when I did not have my suspension dialled. Now that I do, it has all but disappeared.
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  108. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    The bike builder on the GG site is accurate in terms of weight as well and gives you a fair number of build options.
    Just built me up a Fugitive on the Fanatik bike builder and was surprised that it weighed in under 32lbs with pedals. Build included: Ribbon Air, Fox DPX2, and carbon wheels, bars, and cranks. That's acceptable. I think the Offering I built up at Fanatik was around 29-30 lbs with pedals IIRC..... but quite a bit more expensive.

    I'm assuming with a similar build I could get the GG in that range (or less). I'll go check it out and report back.
    Last edited by KRob; 07-23-2019 at 12:47 PM.
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  109. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Just built me up a Fugitive on the Fanatik bike builder and was surprised that it weighed in under 32lbs with pedals. Build included: Ribbon Air, Fox DPX2, and carbon wheels, bars, and cranks. That's acceptable.

    I'm assuming with a similar build I could get the GG in that range (or less). I'll got check it out and report back.
    A Size 3 GG Smash = 6.5lbs & Lrg Fug = 8lbs so assuming same parts build you'd be at ~30lbs with the Smash.

    Frames both cost the same +/- $50USD.
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  110. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    I just got back from 7 straight days of riding in Oregon where we did 17K of climbing which I thought would do me in but the Ripmo just kept on chugging along.

    Even though I haven't ridden a GG (the new ones look OK but the old ones remind me of a beach cruiser so they don't appeal to me), I belong to another MTB board where numerous people have various GG bikes and they all LOVE them.
    Jealous. I've been wanting to get back to Oregon to do a more extended riding trip. I've ridden a little there (Sandy Ridge, Wilson River Trail, McKenzie River Trail), but now that my daughter and son-in-law have moved back I need to explore some more. Oakridge in particular. What all did you ride? Sounds like my kind of trip.

    And I agree with you, I don't think the alloy Smash is a pretty bike. I love the looks of the new Revved carbon Smash though. Really clean lines.
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  111. #111
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    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.

    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    So much good advice in this thread.

    For a different take, I was in the same boat as OP last year. But I went a different direction. I chose to make my Endo the burly DH oriented trail bike and picked up a slack but short travel 29er. Maybe consider that option.

    My Knolly while a very capable all-rounder was a bit porky with a coil front a rear. Also, for non-burly, pedally rides nothing beats a lighter 29er at covering miles. Going dh its not a tire's size that lets me go much faster, its hitting the brakes while cornering, and I can't say a 29 vs 275 makes that much difference there. Unless the trails get really brutal I find the Endo with a 2.5 WT Minion on both ends to be plenty competent. Mind you I get my DH fix on a real DH bike with lift assist so my need to hit the big stuff on the trail bikes just ain't there. In the last 6 weeks for every one trail ride, I've DH'd at least 3 times. Furthermore, I'm biased in my thinking that I'd rather trail ride on less bike. Hauling around a long travel 29er with burly tires is a lot of work, and you need some real bad ass trails, ridden a lot, to justify those bikes.

    What I ended up doing was getting a shorter travel, slack 29 and building it up lighter. And man, does that thing rip. On the less aggressive dirt - which we all have to admit - is where we spend most of our time, that lighter 29 puts a pounding on the Endo. Beefing up the Endo, I felt made it a better bike, and eliminating it's XC-ish duties let it off the hook.

    Just some thoughts.

    That said, if I was going to get a longer travel 29 I'd go with the Ripmo with the Fug as a second. The Rip can build up much lighter and has a suspension design I'd theorize would be snappier than the Fug. Both companies have been great to deal with and take their work seriously. Those two things would make the bike much less of a one trick pony. If I was looking for a one trick pony, like to race enduro, then I'd be looking at the Fug.
    Missed this post earlier. Good points Miker J! I think if I had a Warden, I'd be looking to go this way perhaps. Those short travel, aggressive 29ers like the Following MB, the new v.4 Ripley, Orbea Occam, and even the Fugitive built light in 120 mode absolutely rip on most normal trails. I have my Endo built fairly burly with 2.5 WT tires and 150-160 mm fork, and it does pretty well on some pretty gnarly terrain, but I certainly find its limits when the speeds pick up in the rough stuff or the drops/jumps get bigger.

    I may be wrong but I feel like I can get a slightly longer travel 29er (don't want to go crazy full enduro) at almost the same weight (or lighter) but slacker HA and steeper STA as the Endorophin which would give me the best of both worlds.

    Like I said in the original post, I want a little more capability than the Endo without giving up too much in the smoother, more xc terrain that, like you said, we all ride much of the time.

    Maybe after testing more of these 135-150mm 29ers I'll come to the same conclusion as you.
    Last edited by KRob; 07-23-2019 at 06:43 PM.
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  112. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by David R View Post
    I'd think it would be a must when investing that sort of money in something significantly different eh.

    According to https://zerodebikes.com/world There are a few shops in the US that deal with Zerode, one in Salt Lake City and one in Boulder (I think you're somewhere near-ish to one of those places eh KRob?), I wonder if either of them are able to organise a demo?
    Thanks for the link David. When I looked for distributers it only showed a couple shops in the US, both up in the PNW. I'll check with Guthrie Cycles in Salt Lake or use their rider community network to see if I can score a demo.
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  113. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Just built me up a Fugitive on the Fanatik bike builder and was surprised that it weighed in under 32lbs with pedals. Build included: Ribbon Air, Fox DPX2, and carbon wheels, bars, and cranks. That's acceptable.

    I'm assuming with a similar build I could get the GG in that range (or less). I'll got check it out and report back.
    My Smash I ordered has the Ribbon air, DPX2, but metal bars, wheels, and cranks, NX even, 2.5 frt tire and 2.4 rear and the website says 31.24 lbs, no pedals though. Six more weeks 'til it's here, hopefully it's not late!
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
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  114. #114
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    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.

    Quote Originally Posted by EugeneTheJeep View Post
    My Smash I ordered has the Ribbon air, DPX2, but metal bars, wheels, and cranks, NX even, 2.5 frt tire and 2.4 rear and the website says 31.24 lbs, no pedals though. Six more weeks 'til it's here, hopefully it's not late!
    Good to know. Sounds like we have very similar builds. I think I clicked on GX Eagle drive train and XO1 derailleur which might save a little more weight. Maybe with those savings I can get under 32 lbs with pedals. (How in the heck did you get yours up to 37# Gregnash?!?)

    Edit: I just went to the GG site and built up a custom build which came out to 29.3 lbs but was $500 more than their Race Build (with a few changes)which also weighed 29.3 lbs. One Up Components aluminum pedals are 355 grams so should be right around 30lbs. Nice.

    Have you heard from others whoíve ordered if GGís delivery estimates are accurate?


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    Last edited by KRob; 07-23-2019 at 07:35 PM.
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  115. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Have you heard from others whoíve ordered if GGís delivery estimates are accurate?
    My GG was as expected for weight and I haven't heard about anyone that received a bike that didn't match what they expected. There is going to be some variation in component weight especially items like tires. So whether you are looking at Fanatik's bike builder or GG's I'd read the results as +/- 0.5lb for a complete bike.

    That's why I compare frame weights between bikes to remove the noise since I'll be putting the same parts on whatever frame I were to buy and there is nothing you can do about the base weight of the frame.
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  116. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    Couldn't disagree more regarding the Ripmo riding tall. I specifically was looking for a LT 29er than didn't ride "tall" which is why I generally rode 27.5 bikes (and still prefer them in places like Sedona and Hurricane). Neither the Yeti SB130 or Ripmo rode tall IMO and while the Yeti climbed a lil' better, the Ripmo climbs great and RIPS going down. I'll agree on the flickable part though I've yet to ride a 29er that was truly flickable like a 5010 or SB5.

    I just got back from 7 straight days of riding in Oregon where we did 17K of climbing which I thought would do me in but the Ripmo just kept on chugging along.

    Even though I haven't ridden a GG (the new ones look OK but the old ones remind me of a beach cruiser so they don't appeal to me), I belong to another MTB board where numerous people have various GG bikes and they all LOVE them.
    Well, I switched back and forth from the Ripmo to my Shred Dogg and the difference was very noticeable to me and my buddy (he rides a 27.5 SC Hightower), but Koolaid works different in different folks

    I also just got back from ten days riding in Oregon, rode Oakridge (ATC, Waldo), Bend, Mt Hood, Mt St Helens, Weaverville, and the Shred Dogg was awesome, climbed like a machine, never felt over or under gunned.

    I am actually getting a new fork so I can run the Shred as a 29er for days when I want the high BB and big wheel roll over.

    Most flickable 29er I have ridden was a Canfield, super short chainstays and active suspension, next best was the aluminum GG Smash. I suspect there are others, maybe that Knolly... and more than likely a few short travel 29ers fit the bill.
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  117. #117
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    I've demo'd a bike I owned and loved....but I hated the demo bike. If the only info I had was the demo I'd tell you it was an awful bike. Since I owned it and loved it I knew there was a problem with the demo bike. That illustrates the problem with demoing bikes and drawing your conclusion from that one experience.
    Safe riding,

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  118. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    I've demo'd a bike I owned and loved....but I hated the demo bike. If the only info I had was the demo I'd tell you it was an awful bike. Since I owned it and loved it I knew there was a problem with the demo bike. That illustrates the problem with demoing bikes and drawing your conclusion from that one experience.
    I have also hated bikes I owned, but liked the same bike based on a demo, on-line reports, etc...

    So yeah, what's your point?

    I know koolaid is a powerful intoxicant, but how can anyone with at least an elementary education not understand that a taller wheel makes a bike taller? In addition a taller wheels limits geometry, travel, etc...

    Seriously, what do they teach people in school these days?
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  119. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Jealous. I've been wanting to get back to Oregon to do a more extended riding trip. I've ridden a little there (Sandy Ridge, Wilson River Trail, McKenzie River Trail), but now that my daughter and son-in-law have moved back I need to explore some more. Oakridge in particular. What all did you ride? Sounds like my kind of trip.

    And I agree with you, I don't think the alloy Smash is a pretty bike. I love the looks of the new Revved carbon Smash though. Really clean lines.

    -Not Bike related BUT, do yourself a favor and hit Ashland up too when in Oregon.
    Especially in early Summer when Time Warp is Open.

    You. Won't. Be. Disappointed.
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  120. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Have you heard from others whoíve ordered if GGís delivery estimates are accurate?
    All I've seen is from the Smash thread that they were behind alot in the beginning but catching up, and a recent post that it arrived early (by a few days)

    Homie at GG told me to expect radio silence for about 4 weeks, then email updates after that.

    If I remember right the snow starts flying in Ely around Halloween!
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    some weird crazed desert dweller.

  121. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by EugeneTheJeep View Post

    If I remember right the snow starts flying in Ely around Halloween!
    Ha ha. Sometimes, but the riding is often good clear into early December. Hopefully you donít have to wait that long.


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  122. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMFT View Post
    -Not Bike related BUT, do yourself a favor and hit Ashland up too when in Oregon.
    Especially in early Summer when Time Warp is Open.

    You. Won't. Be. Disappointed.
    Noted, thanks. Iíve had Ashland on my list as well as Alithea Falls, Black Rock and Hood River..... etc, etc. so many.


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  123. #123
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    I have you looked Alchemy Arktos ST 140mm front and 120mm rear... received good reviews on the bike bible. The team at alchemy very responsive/superb customer service. Just ordered and had received the bike yesterday, but the swing arm was damaged in shipping. I left them a v/m and they called me back in 10 mins, explained situation and provide pics... within 20 mins they followed up saying they were shipping another bike out. Should have bike by end of week.

  124. #124
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    Post lots of pics when you get the replacement.

    Quote Originally Posted by dc40 View Post
    I have you looked Alchemy Arktos ST 140mm front and 120mm rear... received good reviews on the bike bible. The team at alchemy very responsive/superb customer service. Just ordered and had received the bike yesterday, but the swing arm was damaged in shipping. I left them a v/m and they called me back in 10 mins, explained situation and provide pics... within 20 mins they followed up saying they were shipping another bike out. Should have bike by end of week.

  125. #125
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    will do... the craftsmanship of bike was top notch.

  126. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigdrunk View Post
    Post lots of pics when you get the replacement.
    big, just uploaded a few to:

    https://forums.mtbr.com/custom-build...a-1085984.html

  127. #127
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    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.

    Quote Originally Posted by dc40 View Post
    Just read the review of the Alchemy Arktos 140mm 29er in Mountain Flyer yesterday. Looks really good.

    Wouldnít have argued with a little steeper (and shorter) sta but otherwise I like that itís not too radical.


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  128. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Just read the review in Mountain Flyer yesterday. Looks really good.

    Wouldnít have argued with a little steeper sta but otherwise I like that itís not too radical.


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    I wish they would've made the seat tube a little shorter but I really like the higher stack height, should make it feel pretty roomy in the cockpit

  129. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Just read the review in Mountain Flyer yesterday. Looks really good.

    Wouldnít have argued with a little steeper sta but otherwise I like that itís not too radical.


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    The review in Mountain Flyer is on their new 975 Arktos (mullet) 160F/140R vs Arktos ST 140F/120R.

    I am on the Arktos ST. The "ST" has 20mm less front and rear suspension, HTA is 66.1 (vs 65), STA 75.5 (vs 74.5), has alittle bit more reach, and a little bit less stack.


    Also, looking at the geo setting there are difference between 975 Arktos and Arktos.

  130. #130
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    I am with you, only if the seat tube was a little shorter (my Revive 185mm wonít fit but not even close to a deal breaker). Also not a huge fan of the lower stack heights on the new generation of frames so the higher stack on the Arktos is a welcome thing.

    Also, I think the build kit pricing is pretty solid. On the cheapest build you get Fox Factory DPS2 and Grip2 36 and DT M1700 wheels where most other brands are coming with Performance Elite shocks/forks and M1900 or worse wheels. If you ever want to upgrade to Chinese carbon rims the hubs from the M1700 wheels are worth keeping.

    If somebody buys my Knolly frame in the classifieds (itís too small for me)I will be ordering a grey XL Arktos ST frame immediately.

    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    I wish they would've made the seat tube a little shorter but I really like the higher stack height, should make it feel pretty roomy in the cockpit

  131. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by dc40 View Post
    The review in Mountain Flyer is on their new 975 Arktos (mullet) 160F/140R vs Arktos ST 140F/120R.
    .
    Umm. If youíre talking about 29Ē front and 27.5 rear, I donít think so. They call it the Arktos 29 and say nothing about mullet wheel configuration. Itís in the October issue that just came in my mail two days ago.




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  132. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigdrunk View Post
    I am with you, only if the seat tube was a little shorter (my Revive 185mm wonít fit but not even close to a deal breaker).
    Yeah, 19Ē seat tube on the large is a little too 2014. Curious. Maybe thatís why all the build kits come with 125mm droppers.

    Probably should ride one, but on closer examination all the numbers are pretty conservative/safe.


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  133. #133
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    This is coming from out of left field, but. I just did a multi day demo on a Ripley v4.

    I sized up to XL because the seat tube on the large was so short. (16.5") I was still able to run the 185mm Bikeyoke dropper on the 18.8" xl seat tube with a 33" cycling inseam. To my surprise the XL worked out really well for me once I got the seat and bars in the right spot. It was also the Baller XTR build with I9's and 35i carbon rims and 2.35 Schwalbe rubber.

    To sum it up, the Ripley is a freaking rocket. Dude is on to something with this bike. The XL has around .5" more wheelbase than my Large Fugitive, but it was still very lively. I'm not sure how Ibis pulled that off. The rear suspension was excellent and was able to handle way more than 120mm of travel should be capable of. I'm not saying the Ripley could replace my Fugitive, but for at least half of my regular trail rides, it would be an excellent option.
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  134. #134
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    Man, I keep looking at that new Ripley. It's gorgeous and I really love Ibis as a company.

    I'm about to taper back to a one-bike quiver for awhile, but the vast majority of my riding is on South Mountain in Phoenix (with some Flagstaff, Sedona and Tucson sprinkled in), so I need a little bit of travel.

    I'm most likely going with the new Hightower, but that Ripley ...
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  135. #135
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    If you like the Ripley, you should check out the Ripmo. More travel but almost no penalty.
    My name is Chris and I ride a Ripmo now.

  136. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prophet Julio View Post
    If you like the Ripley, you should check out the Ripmo. More travel but almost no penalty.
    Ha, Blatant has a Ripmo!

    I'm really finding the new geometry quite fun on the Evil Offering but would like to check out the new V4 Ripley to see how it rides. I still have my V2 Ripley LS but to be honest I preferred the original. The V2 was lacking some pop compared to the V1 and the low bb and pedal strikes drove me crazy. And even with the long and slack changes it really didn't improve downhill prowess. At least for me but I'm with Blatant on preferring a bit more travel. We both ride similar areas.

  137. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vega77 View Post
    I really like the Offering and have had it all over Moab..... where it has excelled. The tech climbing and descending ability was awesome on Blue dot/Portal and Ahab.
    My favorite kinds of trails. I'll keep that in mind when considering the Offering. Thanks.
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  138. #138
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    Yeah, the new Ripley is a rocket yet magically, gains some significant improvements in the aggressive trail category as well. My buddy who broke his YT Jeffsey and while waiting for the replacement frame ordered a Ripmo? Anyway, while waiting for the Ripmo to deliver he demoed the v.4 Ripley at our local enduro, which is pretty trail bike friendly but not tame by any stretch and totally scorched it. He said it was super fast and hella fun.

    Truth be told... for 90% of the riding I do locally, and 70% of the riding I do at my second home in Hurricane, the Ripley would probably be the perfect bike.
    Like MikerJ mentioned several posts up in this thread, I also tend to prefer being under-biked on most normal trails.
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  139. #139
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    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.

    Quote Originally Posted by Prophet Julio View Post
    If you like the Ripley, you should check out the Ripmo. More travel but almost no penalty.
    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Truth be told... for 90% of the riding I do locally, and 70% of the riding I do at my second home in Hurricane, the Ripley would probably be the perfect bike.
    Like MikerJ mentioned several posts up in this thread, I also tend to prefer being under-biked on most normal trails.

    .....BUT if I can have my cake and eat it too...... why not have more travel, right?
    Last edited by KRob; 07-31-2019 at 09:08 PM.
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  140. #140
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    Yeah, I had a Ripmo. Probably the only bike in a long history of bikes that I regret selling. I'd still say it's the best all-around bike on the market.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  141. #141
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    Love the Ripley V4...one of the best bikes that I have ridden in some time. Surprised how capable it is!

  142. #142
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    Not meaning to muddy the waters even more, but if I were in the market for a new 130-140mm travel 29er, I would take a very long hard look at the Druid from Forbidden Bikes. Heck, I am not close to buying a new bike anytime soon and am still taking a long hard look every other day.

    Per all the online reviews I have read (Pinkbike, EnduroMTB, NSMB, etc), it is a great overall trail bike with supreme descending chops in that travel category. In addition, it's from a small Canadian startup company with very unique design and looks absolutely fantastic.

  143. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by fizzywater View Post
    Not meaning to muddy the waters even more, but if I were in the market for a new 130-140mm travel 29er, I would take a very long hard look at the Druid from Forbidden Bikes. Heck, I am not close to buying a new bike anytime soon and am still taking a long hard look every other day.

    Per all the online reviews I have read (Pinkbike, EnduroMTB, NSMB, etc), it is a great overall trail bike with supreme descending chops in that travel category. In addition, it's from a small Canadian startup company with very unique design and looks absolutely fantastic.
    Yeah, someone else mentioned that one up higher in the thread so have been checking out the reviews. Sounds really interesting. One guy said it was the fastest bike he'd ever ridden descending. One said it wasn't a great climber but another said it climbed really well. Not sure how I'd ever get a chance to demo one, but it certainly piqued my interest.
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  144. #144
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    Ripmo cake is sooo good!
    My name is Chris and I ride a Ripmo now.

  145. #145
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    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.

    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Yeah, someone else mentioned that one up higher in the thread so have been checking out the reviews. Sounds really interesting. One guy said it was the fastest bike he'd ever ridden descending. One said it wasn't a great climber but another said it climbed really well. Not sure how I'd ever get a chance to demo one, but it certainly piqued my interest.
    That was me.

    I can now say, after having put in some serious time on it (including the last 7 days straight), that my Druid is THE FASTEST bike on the downs I have ever been on. It is a complete beast and 100% defies its 130mm travel. It is also the best climber and cornerer I have had. Does this sound too good to be true? You bet it does. I'm still waiting to wake up from my dream...

    I paid for it, but when you get on it, trust me - you know where your hard earned cash went. I do not regret for a moment spending what I did on this bike.

    It's a blast on the bermy flowy stuff but OMG, get it on the techy gnar and the faster you go, the more it floats - down and up.

    It took me a bit to get it set up. I used 2 ShockWizes I borrowed. It also took me a while to get used to the steep STA. Now that it have it dialled, and am used to not inching to the front of my saddle on climbs, this thing is a masterpiece. I only hope I don't break it, or wrap myself around a tree trying to find its upper limits.

    I PRed my favourite trail 2 nights ago. That was day 5 in a row so my legs were pretty knackered.

    Anyway, this is clearly the bike I have been searching for, for a long long time. It may or may not be the same for you. There are too many variables involved to make such a sweeping statement.

    One thing for sure - there is a metric fk tonne of wicked bikes out there right now. So enjoy the journey. Hope the destination is exactly what you are hoping for.

    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.-img_8468.jpg

    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.-img_8476.jpg

    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.-img_8477.jpg

    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.-img_8480.jpg

    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.-img_8478.jpg

    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.-img_8940.jpg

    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.-img_8854.jpg

    PS - the design of this bike is incredible. The reverse SWAT Box and double water bottle cage bosses make riding packless a piece of cake. Total overkill actually for a tube, levers, CO2 cartridge and head, bear repellent, pump and a water bottle.

    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.-img_8354.jpg

    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.-img_8351.jpg

    And I havenít even begun to try to describe the sheer beauty this thing exudes. It screams speed from every angle.

    KRob - feel free to PM me with any questions. Happy to address whatever I can.
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  146. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    That was me.

    Wall of text and pictures on a beautiful bike

    Wow, that bike is gorgeous! I love that bottom placement of the rear shock. WOuld def like to test drive that bike!

  147. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by JSGN View Post
    Wow, that bike is gorgeous! I love that bottom placement of the rear shock. WOuld def like to test drive that bike!
    Thank you. I am very proud to own this bike. Very grateful.

    Like I said though, there are at least 2 dozen bikes out there that are all top of game right now. We live in an incredible time. Lots of bitching about changed standards but who can possibly deny that we are at the height of bike design. I have demoed lots of bikes over the past year and yeah - we are very fortunate to have such an incredible selection among class leading, readily available bikes. A credible argument can be made in support of any one of the bikes listed in the posts above. And more.
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  148. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Thank you. I am very proud to own this bike. Very grateful.

    Like I said though, there are at least 2 dozen bikes out there that are all top of game right now. We live in an incredible time. Lots of bitching about changed standards but who can possibly deny that we are at the height of bike design. I have demoed lots of bikes over the past year and yeah - we are very fortunate to have such an incredible selection among class leading, readily available bikes. A credible argument can be made in support of any one of the bikes listed in the posts above. And more.
    Really cool bike, Mike. The placement of the swat box and shock makes for a really low center of gravity I imagine. What are some of the advantages and downsides to the idler cog at the high single pivot?


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  149. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Really cool bike, Mike. The placement of the swat box and shock makes for a really low center of gravity I imagine. What are some of the advantages and downsides to the idler cog at the high single pivot?


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    Super low COG. To the point that indefinite brake stands are effortless.

    I assume itís the low COG and rearward axle path that largely account for the incredible cornering ability. I can drift the back end of that bike like no other. And slam through trees turning very quickly from one side to the other, with the bike laid down very low. As stated in a number of reviews, when the suspension compresses, which occurs during hard cornering, the wheelbase grows, adding stability. The same occurs on landing after catching air.

    The linkage guys will cringe at this but my understanding (from 30,000 feet) is that the idler allows for the placement of the drivetrain such that a rearward axle path is possible with no accompanying pedal kickback. This is the third creation of Owen Pemberton I have owned. My 2015 Range, with its rearward axle path, was a beast on the downs but with no high pivot, the pedal kickback and shock extension under load were ridiculous. But he came close.

    The downsides of the high pivot design may include increased driveline resistance, although I notice none (while there is increased mechanical noise from the driveline, I actually find it quite pleasing to my ears). Another downside I noticed at first was a bit of extra effort required to lift the front end at low speed (for example, when lifting the front end onto ledges while climbing). This, though, has largely disappeared as I have become more familiar with how this bike rides. The only real downside with the idler that I sense is future problems replacing any of these rather unique components if they fail.

    There is a lot more to say on all of this, but I need to crash. Suffice it to say that this bike, with its rearward axle path, floats through square edged hits with ease, on the downs, the ups, and everything in between.

    I will try to find some time tomorrow to edit this response.
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  150. #150
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    And now we have the SB140 (which can go from 27.5 to 29er) to throw into this mix. Not a bad time to be enjoying this sport indeed Mike and Krob. Definitely looking forward to demoing the Fugitive, Smash, Ripley and Ripmo soon and if the stars align a Druid and Arktos. Seems like fit (As everything seems so capable; which is a great problem) is really going to drive my next bike as being 6'2" with a short 32 inseam I am concerned about being on the cusp and having to size up to frames designed for 6'6" riders. I don't have much experience sizing myself up to things (yep I read all the geometry charts and try my best to interpret what I have felt on a bike with what I see in these charts) and being someone who rode his BMX till he was able to get a car (and Krob if I should start a different thread please let me know) and thinks smaller wheelbase is better for Hurricane, Moab, Lunch Loop technical trails which of these bikes what would fit me best?

  151. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by SMKNTRLS View Post
    And now we have the SB140 (which can go from 27.5 to 29er) to throw into this mix.
    You mean just 29er up front, as mixed wheel size, right?

    P.S. that Forbidden Druid is a beaut. The CS to WB proportions are almost exactly what I consider dialed too! I would've gone only +10mm CS +40 WB per size, rather than +12 and +38. Found another one I'd recommend in smaller sizes, which is quite a short list.

  152. #152
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    That Druid is probably the most attractive bike on the market. I'd definitely like to throw a leg over one. Hope the company blows up and has great success.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  153. #153
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    Ninjichor your question was spot on. You are right as they were discussing the mullet config/mixed wheels (had to check) and I was dreaming it was like the SB5+ that I spent a lot of time thinking about building up with a 29er wheel set as the 5.5c just seemed like too much bike for my needs. Needs seem to be changing though ;-), but back to the topic at hand:

    That Druid looks interesting (more lower of center gravity bikes like the Evil and High towers) but it also looks like a lot of maintenance and lots of small areas to catch dirt and grime and hard to get out? Of course, my areas of riding the dirt and grime doesn't affect me too much but the first does as I suffer from the same maintenance issues as Krob ;-).

  154. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by SMKNTRLS View Post
    ...That Druid looks interesting (more lower of center gravity bikes like the Evil and High towers) but it also looks like a lot of maintenance and lots of small areas to catch dirt and grime and hard to get out? Of course, my areas of riding the dirt and grime doesn't affect me too much but the first does as I suffer from the same maintenance issues as Krob ;-).
    The shock stanchion is buried in the frame and tough to get at. It's accessible, but barely. Apart from that, I don't see maintenance being much of a concern. No more than any other bike. I am a little worried though about breaking something unique in the drivetrain, like the idler pulley, and not being able to easily replace it.
    2021 Norco Bigfoot VLT 1
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    MBMike let's hope it takes off (pun intended) and we have another creative group of engineers supporting our passion and therefore don't have to worry about that. Now affording the upfront costs is my next hurdle for any of these steeds. How does it hook up breaking wise on rough chatter, etc? Rear suspension stay active and will it stop on a dime or skip around? I like stopping :-)

  156. #156
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    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.

    Quote Originally Posted by SMKNTRLS View Post
    MBMike let's hope it takes off (pun intended) and we have another creative group of engineers supporting our passion and therefore don't have to worry about that. Now affording the upfront costs is my next hurdle for any of these steeds. How does it hook up breaking wise on rough chatter, etc? Rear suspension stay active and will it stop on a dime or skip around? I like stopping :-)
    To me it feels like the suspension locks up to some degree on braking. Itís still very active but compared to hitting chunk with no braking, it does feel a little less active.

    I noticed it more before I had my suspension dialled.

    If you can lay off the brakes itís a magic carpet ride. I am trying to brake in different places than normal so I can let the bike blast into and through berms for example. If I do that, speed bumps before the berm are non-existent.

    As for the berms themselves, after decades of serious riding I am finally able to corner in the manner you read about in Lopesí book and other credible biking bibles.

    Every time I write something like that, I want to get back out there. That bike has made me a MUCH better rider than I am. Itís all very exciting.

    PS - we all know that nothing comes for free in the linkage game. Itís all about compromise, priorities, and balance, and matching ride qualities with oneís skill level, preferred terrain and sense of fun. Overall, I would say that Horst links are the most active linkage designs I have ridden. However, for steep AF, shit your pants, rip the ass of your shorts on your rear tire terrain, I will reach for a single pivot over a Horst link all day, every day. To date I have owned around 6 Horst links, and about a dozen single pivots. Active or not, getting through the truly effed up terrain is MUCH easier on a single pivot. I have had that Druid down shit that I would not dream of bringing previous Horst links down. Call me crazy, but shit is way more predictable (for me) on a single pivot - I seem to stay way lower in the rear and things are much more composed and controlled. Everyone is different though.

    One final thing - I am trying to be as accurate as possible in answering your questions, but I still donít have enough ride time in. I am still learning the ins and outs of this bike every time I go out.

    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.-img_9034.jpg

    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.-img_9036.jpg

    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.-img_9037.jpg

    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.-img_9038.jpg
    2021 Norco Bigfoot VLT 1
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  157. #157
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    I am going through the same decision. trying to decide between a Ripmo or Offering, and now, the druid just got added to the list.
    ~JP
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  158. #158
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    Just got back from another ride. I am moving cornering above descending in the Druidís list of strengths. First time in my life on any bike I have been able to hit berms at speed with no braking. The Druid is rock solid on cornering, and super confidence inspiring.

    Really though, it does everything well. The only negative I can point to after this ride is that I usually have grease on the inside of my right calf post-ride.

    I think a lot of bikes out there right now are incredible but the fact is that I have never been able to do the things I am doing on my Druid on any other bike.

    I thought it was tough to get the front end up when I first got it. I must have figured out how to do this because now it is effortless.

    I would be interested in hearing any criticism of this bike because in absolute honesty, I am not aware of any. None. Zero.

    And itís as fun on flowy bermy fast new school trails, as it is on double black gnar.

    I hope people can demo it eventually. I would really be interested in hearing othersí thoughts on it, good and bad.

    This is the best purchase I have made in my life. And I am not restricting this to bikes.
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  159. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stu Pidassle View Post
    After researching all of the excellent bikes in this category I recently bought a Kona Process 153 CR. I chose that bike because it seemed to be a playful long travel trail bike as opposed to a purpose built enduro race bike. I have found that it lives up to that billing and is perfect for the varied trails that I ride. The bike is pure fun - agile enough for tight technical trails, efficient enough for XC/climbing with enough travel for rough trails. Definitely worth considering.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
    Got another ride on it, and still really liking the Process 29er.

    Krob, per our discussion elsewhere, hereís a recap of what Iíd told you.

    Itís a playful bike. Itís really fun to corner on and is noticeably easy to corner fast on relative to a lot of bikes in the field. Despite being a pretty playful and quick handling bike, I never noticed any nervousness or lack of stability. Honestly, I doubt itís as outright fast in chunky straight lines as the SB150 I rode or some of the other bigger, plow oriented Enduro bikes Iíve demoed, but I donít value that as much or ride those kinds of trails as often. The Kona is really stiff, and has a rock-solid feel, but, to use clichť MTB terms ďplayful and poppyĒ. Like we talked about, kind of a stiffer, longer travel Riot.

    I thought it was a good climber. Not svelte feeling as the Ripmo, but good traction, good pedaling support. Itís short CS and good handling made it pretty easy to get the front up and over ledges and rocks, and the low standover, moderately slack HTA and balanced, planted feel made slower, rocky tech lines comfy. I did not get to climb any peddaly steep sections where I sat and spun the cranks, mostly just punchy tech stuff, so I canít give a full review of seated climbing position on anything like that, but it didnít feel like the front was prone to wandering.

    One of the things I liked is that while there are so many good bikes out right now, at the same time, the Kona is kinda rare in the enduro bike category because it's one of the few bikes that hasn't gone as crazy with the "long, low and slack" GEO approach. As a large it has a moderately long front triangle (475mm reach) as opposed to many that are 485 or 490 in large, or too small in large at 450ish and too large in XL. It has a moderately long WB at 1218ish (going off memory) but not so much like so many that are in the 1250+ range. It also has a slightly higher BB which I love because I hate peddle strikes and ratcheting everywhere gets old in my rocky terrain. The HTA of 66 degrees for a 29er is slack enough while keeping the bike manageable on less steep trails. I have talked to a couple guys on the forums running a 170mm for steeper, chunkier areas and really liking it like that. The short CS were really fun. The bike is stiff, handles really well, and seems pretty well priced for the spec.

    Iíve got a few more demos planned for it and will see how it goes on more varied terrain. Let me know as you throw a leg over more of these bikes!

    EDIT - Here's that video I mentioned of a Kona shop owner putting the bike through it's paces. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCDFMUawpsY&t=
    "Slow is smooth, and smooth is fast."

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  160. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpbova View Post
    I am going through the same decision. trying to decide between a Ripmo or Offering, and now, the druid just got added to the list.
    I'd suggest the Ripmo if you're a size L, Offering if you're size M (also okay in L), and Druid in any size.

  161. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    I'd suggest the Ripmo if you're a size L, Offering if you're size M, and Druid in any size.
    I'm 5'9" with a 30" inseam.

    I have never ridden an Evil, but the bike is more interesting to me than the Ripmo in its playful nature. I may be over complicating it. The Ripmo is an awesome bike. The thing that worries me about the Druid is that it is not proven. I think it needs another year or 2
    ~JP
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  162. #162
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    Sounds like the Ripmo is the natural low-drama choice for you then. Getting that close to perfection is kinda boring...

    My story about Evil. I bought a M Following, one of the early adopters. I was one of the riders that had the achy knee issue. People were blaming it on the slack SA, but I was blaming it on the pedal kick-back. That kickback was so strong that it was actually accelerating over bumps (the resistance of holding the pedals level against the pedal kickback was the equivalent of pedaling the crank forward by ~12 degrees, or however strong the kickback was). The community was really fanatical--they'd witch hunt for any negative criticism. Honestly, it didn't seem fit for my pedally riding style anyways; it felt like a mini-DH sled.

    I had a Ripley at a time and went back to it, appreciating what I missed, such as the kind of playfulness you get from low weight and ridiculously short wheelbase. The Evil's "super-model" (or rock star) attraction and personality wasn't really a keeper. Save the curiosity for a demo (one-night stand). Ripley had its faults, but the Ripmo looks like one that's easy to settle down with, thanks to the improved geo. Wish other brands offered a similarly short seat tube, even if there's risk of the tire hiiting the saddle on bottom out.

  163. #163
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    It is low drama, but that is why the evil is sexier. Good to know about the pedal kick back. Has evil not solved this issue?

    I ride central NC and occasionally western NC. Not a ton of climbing or descending on my every day trails. I wanted something lively on the trail and that was why the evil caught my eye.
    ~JP
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  164. #164
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    Interesting comments on the pedal kickback. Can't say I notice it much on the Offering. There's tradeoffs to every design but one thing for sure, it pedals well when pointed down and is quite lively. Just rode mine in an xc-ish enduro race this weekend and did pretty well for an old guy. That's exactly why I got it. More fun on my local trails than my Ibis Ripley LS. I still have my 6" travel Turner RFX for bike park days and DH-ish enduros.

  165. #165
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockman View Post
    Interesting comments on the pedal kickback. Can't say I notice it much on the Offering. There's tradeoffs to every design but one thing for sure, it pedals well when pointed down and is quite lively. Just rode mine in an xc-ish enduro race this weekend and did pretty well for an old guy. That's exactly why I got it. More fun on my local trails than my Ibis Ripley LS. I still have my 6" travel Turner RFX for bike park days and DH-ish enduros.
    I believe a lot of deep-travel harshness is mis-categorized as "pedal kickback" and horst-links that use an abnormally large amount of travel uphill in rough terrain due to low AS have programmed people to think that using "equal" travel for a object uphill and downhill is also "kickback" when encountering the DH object. Real kickback isn't possible unless you are significantly more than 100% AS, which is very rare these days, except for a few manufacturers that still have no clue what they are doing. There are some variances for where you place your weight, but not enough to account for these reports IMO.

    I also think that a lot of mini-link/DW link shock tunes have been pretty poor, due to OEM limitations and notions that LSC isn't needed for chassis stability. Also, custom tuned stuff makes such a big difference in the big picture that IME you can't really judge a bike's bump-absorption much without going to this level. These days I factor that into the cost of a new frame/bike. It's so much better than fighting the OEM stuff.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  166. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I believe a lot of deep-travel harshness is mis-categorized as "pedal kickback" and horst-links that use an abnormally large amount of travel uphill in rough terrain due to low AS have programmed people to think that using "equal" travel for a object uphill and downhill is also "kickback" when encountering the DH object. Real kickback isn't possible unless you are significantly more than 100% AS, which is very rare these days, except for a few manufacturers that still have no clue what they are doing. There are some variances for where you place your weight, but not enough to account for these reports IMO.

    I also think that a lot of mini-link/DW link shock tunes have been pretty poor, due to OEM limitations and notions that LSC isn't needed for chassis stability. Also, custom tuned stuff makes such a big difference in the big picture that IME you can't really judge a bike's bump-absorption much without going to this level. These days I factor that into the cost of a new frame/bike. It's so much better than fighting the OEM stuff.
    To be honest, I don't really know what all that means but with a single pivot I'm more concerned about brake dive in corners.

  167. #167
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    Re: kickback, I would describe it as being the difference between jogging on concrete while wearing combat boots vs running shoes.

    I think my problem is that I didn't ease into the change, and just went all out trying to find/push limits from the start, expecting my body to eventually adapt. I've ridden high anti-squat before... wait, now that I think about it, I haven't kept any bikes like this. The last bikes I've kept are a RM Thunderbolt BC and Cannondale Jekyll 27.5, and now my custom-geo single pivot is taking over their roles.

    Now that I don't think about the deficiencies of kickback and finding the sweet spot in fore-aft balance, I think about stuff like handlebar height. xD

  168. #168
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    So many great bikes mentioned in this thread, man what a great era! That Druid is saweet looking and intriguing design.

    If your not stuck on a boutique carbon bike, open to a direct sales model and aluminum have a look at the Commencal META TR29. This bike is a beast for a 150/130. Not the most high tech linkage for climbing but workable with a good shock. Not even close to the efficiency or steep STA of the Ripmo which I found literally amazing for going up, but holy-crap point that thing downhill and it comes to life.

    It is extremely playful. Not quite an Evil Following, but a perfect balance of flick and stability I am coming to really enjoy.

    For me an XL Ripmo was near perfect fit comfort wise. Extremely capable when opening it up but a real dud in the slower speed tight, turny, poppy fun dept. I would describe it as a "leaner" with that offset fork. I didn't like the floppy feeling. If your terrain and style call for that it could be great. If you like to play around tight turns and pop off stuff, kinda meh for me.

    Check out the META TR29, nice builds and good pricing.

  169. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by TraxFactory View Post
    So many great bikes mentioned in this thread, man what a great era! That Druid is saweet looking and intriguing design.

    If your not stuck on a boutique carbon bike, open to a direct sales model and aluminum have a look at the Commencal META TR29. This bike is a beast for a 150/130. Not the most high tech linkage for climbing but workable with a good shock. Not even close to the efficiency or steep STA of the Ripmo which I found literally amazing for going up, but holy-crap point that thing downhill and it comes to life.

    It is extremely playful. Not quite an Evil Following, but a perfect balance of flick and stability I am coming to really enjoy.

    For me an XL Ripmo was near perfect fit comfort wise. Extremely capable when opening it up but a real dud in the slower speed tight, turny, poppy fun dept. I would describe it as a "leaner" with that offset fork. I didn't like the floppy feeling. If your terrain and style call for that it could be great. If you like to play around tight turns and pop off stuff, kinda meh for me.

    Check out the META TR29, nice builds and good pricing.
    I am open to direct to consumer, however, I want to custom build. When I buy a frame from Canyon or other directs, it comes out to about the same price when I am done with a build. The commencal is a lot cheaper though. I worry about it being dated in a year or so.

    My local trails in central NC are tight turns. Quick ups and downs. Some jumps, but mostly trail type conditions. I feel like the Ripmo would neuter this type of terrain. The Offering would offer a little more in the fun dept.

    Western NC is big ups and super fun downs. I still might choose the offering over the Ripmo for everything but Climbing in these conditions too

    But what do I know. I haven't ridden them
    ~JP
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  170. #170
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpbova View Post
    I am open to direct to consumer, however, I want to custom build. When I buy a frame from Canyon or other directs, it comes out to about the same price when I am done with a build. The commencal is a lot cheaper though. I worry about it being dated in a year or so.
    Actually you can just buy a frame or "a la carte" the build. I opted to just get the frame.

    I found the evil linkage driven mono to be really nice all around and an excellent climbing platform. Especially loved the bottomless feel. Good stuff.

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  171. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by EugeneTheJeep View Post
    My Smash I ordered has the Ribbon air, DPX2, but metal bars, wheels, and cranks, NX even, 2.5 frt tire and 2.4 rear and the website says 31.24 lbs, no pedals though. Six more weeks 'til it's here, hopefully it's not late!
    I have a ride 1 in the cart...
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  172. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redmon View Post
    I have a ride 1 in the cart...
    You'll love it. My GF's Ride 1 Smash just showed up and it's a thing of beauty. My metal 2018 Smash is the best bike I have owned by a longshot and the new carbon bikes look amazing. She's out of town until Friday and super excited to get back so she can get the new GG dusty.

    I keep building up fantasy carbon Trail Pistols and putting them in my cart before I remember I should be kinder to my VISA card. Maybe next year. My Knolly Endo is starting to get nervous.
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  173. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    You'll love it. My GF's Ride 1 Smash just showed up and it's a thing of beauty. My metal 2018 Smash is the best bike I have owned by a longshot and the new carbon bikes look amazing. She's out of town until Friday and super excited to get back so she can get the new GG dusty.

    I keep building up fantasy carbon Trail Pistols and putting them in my cart before I remember I should be kinder to my VISA card. Maybe next year. My Knolly Endo is starting to get nervous.
    The craftsmanship on GG's metals frames was superb, not surprised to hear that their carbon frames are beautiful. I think if I buy a carbon frame from GG it will be TP as well.

    Have you thrown a leg over a Carbon frame Smash yet? Curious how similar the new frames/suspension rides to the AL frames.
    "Slow is smooth, and smooth is fast."

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  174. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by kmj831 View Post
    The craftsmanship on GG's metals frames was superb, not surprised to hear that their carbon frames are beautiful. I think if I buy a carbon frame from GG it will be TP as well.

    Have you thrown a leg over a Carbon frame Smash yet? Curious how similar the new frames/suspension rides to the AL frames.
    Ya I figure a dual coil metal Smash and a dual air carbon TP would be a good 2 bike fleet.

    I have sat on a Size 3 carbon Smash, but not ridden one. It would take me a day or so to setup a bike so I could make a really useful comparison and I haven't had the opportunity given I live on an island off the west coast of Canada.

    The ride reports from owners of both carbon and metal GG's has been positive with respect to the new models.
    Safe riding,

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  175. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregnash View Post
    Rob if you can get out this way I have the new Revved SMASH. Get with Ben and I and you can throw a leg over both and try them out. Both are great bikes regardless.
    What size did you get and how tall are you?
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  176. #176
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    Quote Originally Posted by SMKNTRLS View Post
    And now we have the SB140 (which can go from 27.5 to 29er) to throw into this mix. Not a bad time to be enjoying this sport indeed Mike and Krob. Definitely looking forward to demoing the Fugitive, Smash, Ripley and Ripmo soon and if the stars align a Druid and Arktos. Seems like fit (As everything seems so capable; which is a great problem) is really going to drive my next bike as being 6'2" with a short 32 inseam I am concerned about being on the cusp and having to size up to frames designed for 6'6" riders.
    I didn't know the SB140 could be run 29er as well. Hmm.
    RE: Sizing. One of the nice things about a lot of these new geo 29ers is they come with short seat tubes. So the XL sizes may work really well for you, Rich. Enough length in the cockpit for your 6'2" frame but able to run short dropper posts to match your shorter inseam.
    Last edited by KRob; 07-07-2020 at 09:12 AM.
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  177. #177
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    Great topic and Ill probably make a decision based on what I have read here. To be honest Im going back and forth between the ripmo and the smash.

    Ripmo build:

    Total Price: $4399 Print Spec Find a Dealer Contact Us

    Behold the NX build, a tasty mix of excellent components that allows us to get a complete Ripmo to you for just $4399 (M.S.R.P. in the USA).
    Component
    Standard Component
    Upgrade / Option
    Fork
    Fox Float 36 Performance Series 160mm, 29Ē, 110x15

    Shock
    Fox Float Performance Series, DPX2 with EVOL, 210 x 55

    Wheels
    Ibis S35 Aluminum / 29" / Ibis Hubs

    Tires
    Maxxis Assegai 29Ē x 2.5Ē WT, EXO+ casing, 120tpi

    Brakes
    SRAM Guide T

    Brake Rotors
    SRAM Centerline 200/180 rotors

    Cranks
    SRAM NX Eagle, DUB spindle, 30t Steel Ring

    Bottom Bracket
    SRAM DUB BSA

    Rear Derailleur
    SRAM Eagle NX 12 Speed

    Shift Levers
    SRAM NX 12 Speed

    Cassette
    SRAM PG 1230 11-50T

    Chain
    SRAM Eagle NX with Power Lock, 12 speed

    Headset
    Cane Creek 40 ZS44/ZS56

    Grips
    Lizard Skins Charger Evo

    Handlebar
    Ibis 780mm Alloy

    Stem
    Ibis 31.8mm (50, 60, 70, 80, 90mm)

    Seatpost
    KS E30i Dropper (125 or 150mm)

    Saddle
    WTB Silverado 142

    Vs

    smash:

    RIDE 1 BUILD KIT
    SUSPENSION
    Fork:
    Rock Shox Lyrik RC - 150 mm Travel
    Shock:
    Rock Shox Deluxe RT
    COCKPIT
    Stem:
    Race Face Aeffect R - 50 mm Long
    Bars:
    Race Face Next R - 780 mm Wide
    Grips:
    SDG Slater Lock-On
    Saddle:
    GG Custom SDG Radar
    Seatpost:
    SDG Tellis - 150 mm Travel
    BRAKES
    Brakeset:
    SRAM Code R
    Rotors:
    SRAM Centerline F200/R180
    DRIVETRAIN
    Shifter:
    SRAM GX Eagle
    Derailleur:
    SRAM GX Eagle
    Cassette:
    SRAM 1275 10-50t
    Crankset:
    SRAM Descendant Carbon Dub
    Chainring:
    32t
    Chainguide:
    None
    Chain:
    KMC X12
    WHEELS - TUBELESS
    Wheelset:
    DT Swiss XM 1501 i30
    Front Tire:
    Maxxis 2.3 DHF 3C/EXO/TR
    Rear Tire:
    Maxxis 2.3 Aggressor EXO/TR
    Tubes
    Tubeless - Stan's No Tubes Sealant

    Weight:

    and.....
    La Sal Peak Elite

    FRAME: Fezzari ST15 CleanCastô Carbon, 150mm travel TetraLinkô Suspension. ISCG-05 mounts, CleanCatchô rattle-proof Internal cable routing. FrameDefense Tech derailleur hanger. Max tire clearance 29x2.6 SUSPENSION: RockShox Lyrik RC2 160mm, 42mm offset, 15x110 Thru Axle, RockShox Super Deluxe RC3 DRIVETRAIN: Full SRAM GX Eagle WHEELS: Stans Flow MK3 29er or Stans Baron S1 27.5+





    I haven't bought a bike in 10 years and still rocking the Big Top.(if you can call it that)
    They both seem to ride awesome. I feel like the smash is great value for the build vs the ripmo DW link which I am a big fan of.

    Opinions for a guy out of the loop?
    "Im just going to explore a little bit..."

    Dont make me be the bad guy...

    Do I need a pass to ride this trail?

  178. #178
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    Quote Originally Posted by kmj831 View Post
    Got another ride on it, and still really liking the Process 29er.

    Krob, per our discussion elsewhere, hereís a recap of what Iíd told you.

    Itís a playful bike. Itís really fun to corner on and is noticeably easy to corner fast on relative to a lot of bikes in the field. Despite being a pretty playful and quick handling bike, I never noticed any nervousness or lack of stability. Honestly, I doubt itís as outright fast in chunky straight lines as the SB150 I rode or some of the other bigger, plow oriented Enduro bikes Iíve demoed, but I donít value that as much or ride those kinds of trails as often. The Kona is really stiff, and has a rock-solid feel, but, to use clichť MTB terms ďplayful and poppyĒ. Like we talked about, kind of a stiffer, longer travel Riot.

    I thought it was a good climber. Not svelte feeling as the Ripmo, but good traction, good pedaling support. Itís short CS and good handling made it pretty easy to get the front up and over ledges and rocks, and the low standover, moderately slack HTA and balanced, planted feel made slower, rocky tech lines comfy. I did not get to climb any peddaly steep sections where I sat and spun the cranks, mostly just punchy tech stuff, so I canít give a full review of seated climbing position on anything like that, but it didnít feel like the front was prone to wandering.

    One of the things I liked is that while there are so many good bikes out right now, at the same time, the Kona is kinda rare in the enduro bike category because it's one of the few bikes that hasn't gone as crazy with the "long, low and slack" GEO approach. As a large it has a moderately long front triangle (475mm reach) as opposed to many that are 485 or 490 in large, or too small in large at 450ish and too large in XL. It has a moderately long WB at 1218ish (going off memory) but not so much like so many that are in the 1250+ range. It also has a slightly higher BB which I love because I hate peddle strikes and ratcheting everywhere gets old in my rocky terrain. The HTA of 66 degrees for a 29er is slack enough while keeping the bike manageable on less steep trails. I have talked to a couple guys on the forums running a 170mm for steeper, chunkier areas and really liking it like that. The short CS were really fun. The bike is stiff, handles really well, and seems pretty well priced for the spec.

    Iíve got a few more demos planned for it and will see how it goes on more varied terrain. Let me know as you throw a leg over more of these bikes!

    EDIT - Here's that video I mentioned of a Kona shop owner putting the bike through it's paces. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCDFMUawpsY&t=
    Thanks for putting those together. Looks like a really fun bike. I don't know if you've been to Whistler, but he is absolutely flying on A-Line and Schleyer in that video.
    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
    Isaiah 58:14

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  179. #179
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redmon View Post
    What size did you get and how tall are you?
    I ended up getting one of the first Size 3, I am 6' tall, short inseam (31") with longer torso and arms (+1"-1.5" ape index) and I run it with the saddle about middle, long position and a 35mm stem. This setup has been PERFECT at this point and love the way it rides. The 35mm stem has made things feel a lot more responsive in turning, not that it felt slow or lethargic in the first place. One thing that I have noticed though is on tighter turns I can hit my knees on the bar if I am not careful. Bike absolutely rips, love to be thrown around and begs for speed on the down.

  180. #180
    Straight out tha traila
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redmon View Post
    I have a ride 1 in the cart...
    I had mine in the cart for about 2 months before pulling the trigger! SHould be here in about 4 weeks now.........
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    some weird crazed desert dweller.

  181. #181
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Thanks for putting those together. Looks like a really fun bike. I don't know if you've been to Whistler, but he is absolutely flying on A-Line and Schleyer in that video.
    I've never been, but it looked fast to me. He's also a super nice, down to earth guy. I've been on the phone with him a couple of times, would happily throw business to him.

    Yea, when you ride the bike, you can tell that "fun" was a primary driver behind the design. That's very much part of the character of it. It's cool to ride different bikes and get a feel for the priorities the company had in mind for them.

    I need more bikes. Simple as that.
    "Slow is smooth, and smooth is fast."

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    realestate-professionals.com

  182. #182
    orthonormal
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    New Knolly models (yes, plural) to be released at Crankworx on 8/14.
    The glass is twice as large as it needs to be

  183. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by andy f View Post
    New Knolly models (yes, plural) to be released at Crankworx on 8/14.
    Yeah, I saw that. Wonder what it is? I noticed on the KnollyNation site it said they had something in steel coming (probably a steel Cache). 27.5 Podium might be a good guess. Longer travel 29er?

    I doubt it's the carbon Fugitive, but that would interest me.
    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
    Isaiah 58:14

    www.stuckinthespokes.com

  184. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Yeah, I saw that. Wonder what it is? I noticed on the KnollyNation site it said they had something in steel coming (probably a steel Cache).
    Progressive steel hardtail. I think you may be right about a steel road/gravel/CX bike as well though.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  185. #185
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    If you are into motos the Knoll-E e-bike is going to be SICK as well!
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  186. #186
    orthonormal
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Progressive steel hardtail. I think you may be right about a steel road/gravel/CX bike as well though.
    I zoomed in on the photo in the Knolly email. One rider had drop bars, the other had normal mtb bars. Too low res to make out any details on the frames.
    The glass is twice as large as it needs to be

  187. #187
    Hisforever
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    New Knolly bikes ! cool
    One thing about the druid i did Not like was the front end felt too light. this was with a grip 1 36 DT ex1501 wheels, gx build. chassis just didnt feel that balanced, didnt spend that much time with it but after riding sb130 it just didnt have the spark of the yeti, it was very good just didnt have a 'magic' kinda feel. Maybe size medium was just too small.
    one of the Best looking bikes for sure. Just my opinion but i think the pivot mach 5.5 & yeti sb130 are two of the best lookers atm.
    cheers

    Ibis Ripmo -wifes
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  188. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redmon View Post
    Great topic and Ill probably make a decision based on what I have read here. To be honest Im going back and forth between the ripmo and the smash.

    * * *


    I haven't bought a bike in 10 years and still rocking the Big Top.(if you can call it that)
    They both seem to ride awesome. I feel like the smash is great value for the build vs the ripmo DW link which I am a big fan of.

    Opinions for a guy out of the loop?
    Well, I can honestly say my new Ripmo is amazing. Only a few rides in on it, but its better than I hoped, to be honest. I knew it would pedal better than my Enduro (which it definitely does). I didn't think I'd be faster or more comfortable on the DH side on the Ripmo than I was on my Enduro, but I'm definitely faster (according to Strava I've PR'ed several downhill sections on my first rides on the on the Ripmo) and feeling like I can ride anything I want already.

    I'm sure the Smash is a great bike as well -- I doubt you can go wrong with either. But I'm certainly not regretting the Ripmo.
    '19 Ibis Ripmo
    '13 Felt Z4

  189. #189
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Progressive steel hardtail. I think you may be right about a steel road/gravel/CX bike as well though.
    Aggressive steel HT. That makes sense.
    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
    Isaiah 58:14

    www.stuckinthespokes.com

  190. #190
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    Got it narrowed down to four.... or five.

    Quote Originally Posted by SHAHEEB View Post
    the Druid....
    one of the Best looking bikes for sure. Just my opinion but i think the pivot mach 5.5 & yeti sb130 are two of the best lookers atm.
    cheers
    See a few people have said that about the Druid. I guess I'm going to have see one in person but I thought the Druid looked a little wonky/out of proportion with the massive seat tube and super sloped, kinda skinny top tube. Not that that would keep me from buying one if it rides as well as reported.

    I agree with you on the 5.5 and SB130, though. Beautiful, well-proportioned lines. I'd put the Rimpo in there for good looking too. (Again, not that that matters too much to me, obviously. I ride a Knolly. Industrial, precision-made, handsome, means business but not art in the same sense.)
    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
    Isaiah 58:14

    www.stuckinthespokes.com

  191. #191
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    See a few people have said that about the Druid. I guess I'm going to have see one in person but I thought the Druid looked a little wonky/out of proportion with the massive seat tube and super sloped, kinda skinny top tube. Not that that would keep me from buying one if it rides as well as reported.
    I agree with you on the druid. Looks like a Frankenbike to me. Evil makes some good looking bikes, but Ripmo is hands down the best looking bike out right now
    ~JP
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  192. #192
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    An individual sense of aesthetics is always interesting.

    I owned a Ripmo as my main bike for roughly 8 months. To this day, I'd say it's probably the overall best bigger travel bike on the market. But I never thought it looked particularly good.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  193. #193
    I Tried Them ALL... SuperModerator
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    Pivot Firebird29. Play fair...
    "This is a male-dominated forum... there will be lots of Testosterone sword-shaming here" ~ Kenfucius

  194. #194
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    KRob, what are you going to get?
    My name is Chris and I ride a Ripmo now.

  195. #195
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    An individual sense of aesthetics is always interesting.

    I owned a Ripmo as my main bike for roughly 8 months. To this day, I'd say it's probably the overall best bigger travel bike on the market. But I never thought it looked particularly good.
    Agreed. Ripmo looks good on paper for me but I think they look hideous both online and in person. Just can't bring myself to spend that much money on something I don't like the looks of...

  196. #196
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    should i not like pivot anymore after a warranty claim went awry? had a Mach 5.5 go in for a crack on the stay, now they want to charge 550 for rear stay. bike looks brand new otherwise

    meh, maybe pass on pivot cycles...

    Ibis Ripmo -wifes
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  197. #197
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHAHEEB View Post
    should i not like pivot anymore after a warranty claim went awry? had a Mach 5.5 go in for a crack on the stay, now they want to charge 550 for rear stay. bike looks brand new otherwise

    meh, maybe pass on pivot cycles...
    Is it outside of the warranty terms? They did well with my warranty claim (mfr defect caused crack from main pivot on front triangle). Original owner within the time period, no questions and new frame sent.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  198. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    An individual sense of aesthetics is always interesting.

    I owned a Ripmo as my main bike for roughly 8 months. To this day, I'd say it's probably the overall best bigger travel bike on the market. But I never thought it looked particularly good.
    Hmmm. To each his own. I think Ibis makes some of the most visually appealing frames out there.

  199. #199
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    I think within a year is legit? new last July

    Ibis Ripmo -wifes
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  200. #200
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prophet Julio View Post
    KRob, what are you going to get?
    Good question: Leaning towards the Fezzari La Sal and Fugitive LT (and have added the Kona Process 153 CR/DL to my not-so-short lis)...... but can't discount any of the others until I ride them. Tough choices. Going to do some demos this Fall.
    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
    Isaiah 58:14

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