Godzilla sized guys wants to ride bikes again.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Godzilla sized guys wants to ride bikes again.

    I'm 6'10" 360lbs and looking to get back into riding bikes. when i was a kids I rode my bike everyday bmx and a mountain bike all over the place. Now I'm an adult, a gaint and wondering if there is any bike out there that can support a man of my stature. I saw a post on here about an Access 23 inch frame with that setup as a 29er I think my height could be covered but what about the weight. a friend who rides daily says I need a steel frame and 48 spoke wheels which is pricey. I just need to know if there is a way for me to start riding again without having to go into debt to do so. Any help is appreciated.

  2. #2
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    There is a thread here somewhere about a bike built for a guy that is almost your same size. Look at the Surly Karate Monkey frame in XL. Something like this http://cgi.ebay.com/2010-SnowCat-29e...#ht_1820wt_905 might be strong enough for you but, I don't know that for sure. I will try and find that other thread.

  3. #3
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    There is a Clydesdale forum if you look on the main forum index. That should have lots of info.

  4. #4
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    A few things
    -Frame wise, a XL Surly Karate Monkey (4130 Cro-Mo Steel) should be more than ample for you
    -Fork, I would stick to a rigid, the stock Karate Monkey will suffice
    -Rims, Kris Holm or Salsa Gordo 29er 36 spoke will work
    -Spokes, DT Comps or Wheelsmith DB 14, Brass Nipples, 4x
    -Probably will want to spend extra on the rear hub and get something like a King with fun bolts and the stainless steel driveshell.
    -Parts, look at AM, FR, or DH strength stuff

    Hope this helps

  5. #5
    don't try this at home
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    talk to this guy - big_Jay you guys aren't related are you?
    will you rep me?

  6. #6
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    A friend of mine started out at 396# with an off the rack Rockhopper 29er, and has since gone through a complete drivetrain, and goes through rear wheels like crazy. His replacement higher end components and original frame have been holding up, but the wheels...YMMV

  7. #7
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    Not as big as you when I started (275) but I started with 36h Flow rims with dt comp spokes and they held up fine. I am most definitely a wheels on the ground rider though. If you like getting air YMMV. You might have a problem with forks. When I started I had a cheap fork that had a spring in it. The spring was to light for my weight and it made riding difficult, once I switched to an air fork I was much happier.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72
    A few things
    -Frame wise, a XL Surly Karate Monkey (4130 Cro-Mo Steel) should be more than ample for you
    -Fork, I would stick to a rigid, the stock Karate Monkey will suffice
    -Rims, Kris Holm or Salsa Gordo 29er 36 spoke will work
    -Spokes, DT Comps or Wheelsmith DB 14, Brass Nipples, 4x
    -Probably will want to spend extra on the rear hub and get something like a King with fun bolts and the stainless steel driveshell.
    -Parts, look at AM, FR, or DH strength stuff

    Hope this helps
    This is great advice....I have a buddy who is a similar weight (nowhere near OP's height) and he would didn't listen to me when I recommended a similar build above and went with a fairly lightweight XC build and a suspension fork. Needless to say he consistantly broke parts....particularly wheels (spokes ripping through eyelets), spokes and numerous XT freehubs. He could never get the fork to feel "right". Now he rides Hope hubs laced to 36 spoke Flow rims and a rigid fork. Been fine ever since. You'll definitely want to invest in a set of bomb proof wheels as mtnbiker72 suggested.

  9. #9
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    Seen a Surly built up for a guy really close to your size that was sweet. Dude was a large muscular man, offensive line in college. Other great options, from my perspective, would be the Banshee hardtail or, oddly, a GT Peace frame built up with better components. Redline might work too. Think gussets, large diameter tubes, and bikes that are more worried about durability than weight.
    I also will say I've seen more than a few broken Surly's that get warrantied very quickly- the key to this is to PURCHASE THROUGH A LBS that will do warranty work for you (steps off high horse).
    FWIW, I see no reason why you couldn't get a supsension fork if you are willing to spend some $. Try talking to the guys here (shameless plug for friend's business, live with it) www.suspensionexperts.com. I predict they will talk to you about coil springs and older White Bros. forks, but could be totally wrong....

  10. #10
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    Hey Im 6-8 320 lbs and have been riding a custom built on one scandal 29er im building up a new bike and im selling the frame carbon fork tomson seatpost and stem also have a stylo ss crankset for it.frame is in amazing condition,i had built it up as a single speed at a hair over 21 lbs.I have had no problems with this bike,just got the itch to build a new one.et me know if your interested.Also i have never had problems with crossma wheels,rode for years and they never went out of true.

  11. #11
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    The Karate Monkey with a effective top tube of 24.9" is too short for someone who is 6' 10"

    Look at bike frames with ETT of 26" or more. Otherwise your going to be cramped as hell in the cockpit.

    I'm 6' 4" and ride a XL Karate Monkey with a 120mm stem.

    Your best solution is going to a custom frame. They start at about $1,000. Complete for around $2,500. This may be too much to spend right now. But a regular bike will nickel and dime you to death, not to mention leaving you stranded on the trail because of broken parts.

    Waltworks and Curtlo seem to have excellent reputations as custom builders while not charging an absolute fortune.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by pushinpixels
    The Karate Monkey with a effective top tube of 24.9" is too short for someone who is 6' 10"

    Look at bike frames with ETT of 26" or more. Otherwise your going to be cramped as hell in the cockpit.

    I'm 6' 4" and ride a XL Karate Monkey with a 120mm stem.

    Your best solution is going to a custom frame. They start at about $1,000. Complete for around $2,500. This may be too much to spend right now. But a regular bike will nickel and dime you to death, not to mention leaving you stranded on the trail because of broken parts.

    Waltworks and Curtlo seem to have excellent reputations as custom builders while not charging an absolute fortune.
    Also look at Carver if you go custom. http://www.carverbikes.com/Custom/custom-ti.html

  13. #13
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    I wish I remembered who the guy was who posted on MTBR late last summer who was 7' and about 440 lbs. He mentioned what he rode that worked well for him . . .

    My sympathies to the OP as I'm closer to the opposite end of the height spectrum at 5'6" and finding a rig that truly fits right and has the suspension and geometry I want can be PITA difficult. I can't imagine how difficult it must be for him.

  14. #14
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    I don't know what your threshold is for "not going into debt" but you can get a 23" Specialized Hardrock Disc 29er for $580. Ask the dealer to swap out the tires for the biggest ones that fit. Replace stuff with DH/Freeride level components as it breaks.

    Ride it as often as possible!

  15. #15
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    the wheels on that hardrock will fail. and probably soon unless he's on smooth pavement. but the specialized 23" frames are pretty big. a few make a 25" and if you can sit on any, that'd be excellent. i recently sold a 23" specialized 29er to a buy who was 6'10 but not much over 230. skinny guy who just wanted a basic mtb. with the OPs weight, wheels are going to be an issue almost no matter what.
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  16. #16
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    here are some links to a custom build or two that discuss their components. May be outside your budget, but it'll give you an idea what people do...

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...t=rohloff+zinn

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...t=rohloff+zinn

  17. #17
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    Get some of the good priced MTX33 wheel builds that http://www.lacemine29.com has for sale. I started out at your weight, but about 7in shorter. These wheels have been great. Don't listen to all the haters.

    My first bike was a motobecane fantom pro sl with air shock on front. This bike has been great. All I needed was wheels to support my weight. You aren't some genetic freak, just a big dude who can ride a normal bike with a great wheel build. I immediately hit single track with this setup and have now dropped 80lbs.

  18. #18
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    i was up to 320 and didnt bust anything on my bike.a set of cross max xl wheels will do you,

  19. #19
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    Specialized offers a 29er in a hardrock, rockhopper, and stumpjumper hardtail and a camber and fsr stumpy 29er in full suspension. They would offer a good starting point and a top notch bike as well. By this i mean a 23" frame. All would be a good choice depending on how much you want to spend. You'll have to learn to tru wheels to keep them in good shape but its not that hard. Alot of shops offer free classes. As for C Dunlop, he doesnt have a clue. Bikes are made to withstand lots more weight than what you would guess because manufactures are not willng to take the chance that us fat boys would sue them. Truing wheels is a must for us big guys.

  20. #20
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    First, welcome back!!!

    I would second the MTX33 wheels from www.lacemine29.com. I'm considerably smaller than you, but want a cheap, wide, bomb proof wheel and have been thining about getting a set. Thats going to be the foundation of whatever bike you get. Even if you buy a complete bike, sell the stock wheels and have the shop put these one (you'll need bike specific tools for the cassette swap).

    You might talk to a local shop about what they have/could get that would fit for someone your height. If you receive criticism, its not a shop that deserves yours - or any of ours - money. Also, the bigger bike companies have pretty decent warranties on their bikes, which might be something you need initially.

  21. #21
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    Thirding the MTX33, or Gordos, or Kris Holms. On King or Hadley hubs. I'm almost 3 bills, and I ride the LaceMine29 Burly wheels (on Hope hubs) and they're the stiffest, strongest wheels I've ever owned.

    For the frame, I wish people would stop telling a man his size to get a 23" top tube bike. That's f*ing ridiculous! That's barely a BMX bike for him. Go ride a mountain bike 4" too short for you and tell me how much fun you have.

    The frame is the most important component. That has to fit well, or else every bit of the ride suffers. IMO, go custom. It's more expensive, but considering the fact that mountain biking is hazardous, and you will hit the ground MUCH harder in a fall than anyone else remotely your size, you need the right platform first and foremost.

    For a custom frame, I'd say go Gunnar.

    Look what they built for Yao Ming (the NBA star):


    Their prices are extremely reasonable, with much better service and responsiveness than Curtlo (google threads about him).

  22. #22
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    I'm 6'8" 225lbs and would go with a used Karate Monkey and see how you like it.....it's a good start. I bought one (5) years ago and still own it, but ride my Specialized Stumpjumpers FSR and SS (XXL's) these days. I would not go with the Rockhopper or lower model Specialized as frame / forks are flexy, even at my weight.

  23. #23
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    ^ +1,000

    Well put, my good man.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by C Dunlop
    Let's get 360lb into perspective. That is double what I would consider average.
    It's not so much what you're saying, but more the tactless way in which you are saying it. You may think you are "just keepin' it real, brah"... but you're really coming across like a ****** nozzle. Go back and read the OP's original posting... he is well aware of his current health situation and seems knowledgeable about the limitations of most bikes when it comes to handling his "godzilla-sized" stature. And preaching to him regarding BMI when you know nothing about his adipose versus muscular tissue composition, shows you know very little.

    I'm around his weight, but more than a few inches shorter... I'm thankful when I first posted a few weeks ago I found a plethora of helpful and encouraging replies. The last thing I needed was a bunch of discouraging ********.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by goblue9280
    You may think you are "just keepin' it real, brah"... but you're really coming across like a ****** nozzle.

    And preaching to him regarding BMI when you know nothing about his adipose versus muscular tissue composition, shows you know very little.
    Exactly.

  26. #26
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    Attempting re-rail.....

    Hey, why don't all the closet nutritionists take a break and lets give this fellow some advice on BIKES!!!!!
    That's what he came here for, so why not help the guy out....

    Happy New Year everyone.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by schnee
    For the frame, I wish people would stop telling a man his size to get a 23" top tube bike.
    I think the folks have been referring to the seat tube length @ 23"+, not the ETT.
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  28. #28
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    I am a big guy too, 6'7.
    I break a lot of stuff, so get a good idea what is strong and what isn't

    The key thing about your size, is not your weight (which will drop rapidly when you get biking a lot) but the power you can put out. You should be able to flex frames and snap drive-trains when you push hard.

    A lot of peeps say a hardtail is the way to go, I disagree.
    A FS frame is designed to transfer force to one area the shock, a HT spreads it around the frame. The shock can take a lot of abuse, it is what it is there for.

    For drivetrain, these are the cheapest options I have found unbreakable).

    KMC X9 chains are strong, very strong. SRAM 991 CROSSTEP is also a very strong chain. Ignore shimano and other SRAM chains.
    The best cassette is XT, SLX seems to work too. Ignore SRAM cassettes of similar price.
    Deore STEEL chainrings are very good, but if buying a crankset all in one, the SLX double is stiff, cheap, and comes with steel rings.

    Wheels, 36 spoke 4x Kris Holm Freeride rims work great for me.
    Rear hub is a tough one, ratchets tend to break.
    The easiest way around this it to get a hub without ratchets, like the Chris King.
    Very expensive and worth every penny.


    For frames and forks, I would say a 20mm front hub and 10/12 rear is critical.
    This will keep your wheels pointing in the correct direction.

    My frame/fork is a Niner WFO/Dorado.
    Stiff strong frame and fork. Immensely fun to ride.
    The most important thing to me is that it fits (if anything a little big), so this should be good for you.

    So all pretty high budget options, but should fit you, be fun and last for ages.
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by C Dunlop
    nothing off the peg is designed for the morbidly obese, except clothing in the US.

    a karate monkey will be too small, but might do as a bike-path bike.

    At your weight you will be breaking wheels and putting enourmous strain on frames, saddle rails and seatposts. A thomson seatpost is about the only thing that will have a chance under your weight. You'll break pretty much every saddle rail out there. You'll need a 36h front wheel and a 40h rear, at the very least. Phil wood do hubs with in 40h. The mavic a719 is available in 40h. 13gauge spokes (2.2mm) are available from any good wheel builder.

    Just like the suspension in your car, your dining room chairs and (I imagine) a lot of other things, you'll break it. That's life until you lose at least 100 pounds.
    It looks like you have a history of being a Jack Wagon. The guy is 6'10". At 360 pounds it doesn't mean he is, "morbidly obese". There is a guy at my gym who is a little shorter and at 350 pounds, he is totally ripped. You should be more carefull about the things you say to people.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn
    It looks like you have a history of being a Jack Wagon. The guy is 6'10". At 360 pounds it doesn't mean he is, "morbidly obese". There is a guy at my gym who is a little shorter and at 350 pounds, he is totally ripped. You should be more carefull about the things you say to people.
    +1000

    He should especially be careful to someone who is 6' 10" and 360 pounds

    BMI is a poor indicator

  31. #31
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    OP, take heart, glad you're considering trying biking.

    I also fight weight a lot. Nothing better than a great sport like mtb'ing to get you going.

    Here's August 1st to Dec 1st 2010 for me. I'm down another 10 from there and pushing hard, although I'm now to where muscle mass is really starting to offset fat loss.

    I've been through a lot of bikes, and my double-large riding buddy has been too.
    I strongly recommend a XL Karate Monkey, rigid monkey fork, 130mm or so stem with positive rise, a lot of spacers under the stem, 2" riser bar, some cheaper hubs, like shimano XT, and some Salsa Gordo rims.
    For cranks, LX or XT. Post, Thomson Elite.
    Rest of parts per your spec, but I'd go sram X9 - comparatively cheap, and ubertastically functional.

    Ride on!

    FS: Everything

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by ncj01
    OP, take heart, glad you're considering trying biking.

    I also fight weight a lot. Nothing better than a great sport like mtb'ing to get you going.

    Here's August 1st to Dec 1st 2010 for me. I'm down another 10 from there and pushing hard, although I'm now to where muscle mass is really starting to offset fat loss.

    I've been through a lot of bikes, and my double-large riding buddy has been too.
    I strongly recommend a XL Karate Monkey, rigid monkey fork, 130mm or so stem with positive rise, a lot of spacers under the stem, 2" riser bar, some cheaper hubs, like shimano XT, and some Salsa Gordo rims.
    For cranks, LX or XT. Post, Thomson Elite.
    Rest of parts per your spec, but I'd go sram X9 - comparatively cheap, and ubertastically functional.

    Ride on!

    Again the guy is 6'10". 360 pounds at that height does not mean he is over weight or obese. He never said he had a weight problem or that he is trying to lose weight.

  33. #33
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    at 6'10" 360 is hardly obese. BMI is crap once you get over 6'

    i'm 6'3" and bout 220 and i'm of average build with a 36" waist. people refer to me as "skinny" for my height, and i don't really have much muscle, which would make me weigh more. if i was in great shape, at my height, i'd probably weight around 240 or 245. this guy is 7 inches taller than me so i can safely assume that he's really probably not "fat"

    that other guy is just a putz. plus weight is lost rapidly mountain biking (after a long hiatus, i lost about 10 lbs in 2 weeks doing about 6 hard rides)

    it's too bad too, MOST of the people on this forum are nothing but helpful.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4x4runner
    at 6'10" 360 is hardly obese. BMI is crap once you get over 6'

    i'm 6'3" and bout 220 and i'm of average build with a 36" waist. people refer to me as "skinny" for my height, and i don't really have much muscle, which would make me weigh more. if i was in great shape, at my height, i'd probably weight around 240 or 245. this guy is 7 inches taller than me so i can safely assume that he's really probably not "fat"

    that other guy is just a putz. plus weight is lost rapidly mountain biking (after a long hiatus, i lost about 10 lbs in 2 weeks doing about 6 hard rides)

    it's too bad too, MOST of the people on this forum are nothing but helpful.
    Most people are very helpful here. But this forum, it seems more then others, has a lot of ******bags. I belong to a watch forum and a Ferrari forum and it's totally different there. I think there are a lot of young kids here who think they know it all. And some older people who just can't seem to comprehend what they read.

  35. #35
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    At 6'10", an XL Karate monkey is going to be too small. I am not quite 6'3" and ride one that size with a 110 or 120 stem. I ride 21" in specialized bikes, and have not seen their 23", but I assume that would be small at 6'10". You best bet if cost is an issue would be looking for a used custom frame, built for someone your height.

    You could run WTB DDFR rims, as they are inexpensive and plenty strong. I don't think they still produce them, but I know there are some floating around. I would be comfortable putting a 300lb guy on any of the through axle forks, but just remember that anyone over 200lbs goes through more parts. You are probably going to need to just take the plunge, and buy something. Then you will see which parts need to be beefed up in your situation.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by schnee

    For a custom frame, I'd say go Gunnar.
    Don't lose sight of this advice. Gunnar is an arm of Waterford, which make outstanding steel frame bikes. I think Gunnar has a "custom" shop where you go to your local bike shop that reps gunnar and they'll take your measurements and send them to Gunnar and Gunnar will build you a steel frame. I don't know what the pricing is but I think it's probably the best bet for a person of your height, regardless of weight. If you end up losing weight, and I don't presume that's your intention, your height certainly won't change so the frame will still fit you.

    As for cost, I think that's going to be your major hurdle. I don't know what your budget is, but every time I think I want to assemble an "economical" bike, I end up spending more than if I'd have bought a preassembled bike. Granted, I've made different choices than the manufacturer and I got what I truly wanted, but never at what I budgeted.

    Short answer from me is: Custom assemble a bike that fits your stature, spend the money, and enjoy the bike for a lifetime. If you do research and ask plenty of questions from manufacturers and assemblers and take your time, you'll end up with a really good bike!

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by pushinpixels
    The Karate Monkey with a effective top tube of 24.9" is too short for someone who is 6' 10"

    Look at bike frames with ETT of 26" or more. Otherwise your going to be cramped as hell in the cockpit.

    I'm 6' 4" and ride a XL Karate Monkey with a 120mm stem.

    Your best solution is going to a custom frame. They start at about $1,000. Complete for around $2,500. This may be too much to spend right now. But a regular bike will nickel and dime you to death, not to mention leaving you stranded on the trail because of broken parts.

    Waltworks and Curtlo seem to have excellent reputations as custom builders while not charging an absolute fortune.
    I agree, 6'10" is well out of the range of a XL which typically ranges from 6'1" to 6'5". I'm 6'3" and I run a XL Karate Monkey.

    This guy needs steel and the beefiest tubing that the builder can find. Salsa Gordo or Kris Holm rims with a minimum of 36 holes. I would say the 190mm cranks but I don't think the options are cold forged.

    And whatever you do, don't buy ANYTHING from Crank Brothers.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsj3831
    I don't know what your threshold is for "not going into debt" but you can get a 23" Specialized Hardrock Disc 29er for $580. Ask the dealer to swap out the tires for the biggest ones that fit. Replace stuff with DH/Freeride level components as it breaks.

    Ride it as often as possible!
    I've noted that Hardrocks tend to have shorter top tubes. But if it fits, that would be a good start.

  39. #39
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    Go with a custom 4130 frame or possibly aluminum from someone like Ventana. That is the critical part. The rest of the parts have been covered.
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  40. #40
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    Im 6'1" 300 and ride a medium giant xtc 1. I would imagine something in the xl frame.size would be sufficent.
    2010 Giant XTC1 29er - Easton Carbon Bars, Easton Carbon Stem, Straitline Platforms, Cat Eye V3, and one comfy seat.

  41. #41
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    did any of you guys notice that the OP left the building 2 mos ago?

  42. #42
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    they're too busy hearing themselves talk

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by C Dunlop
    and you have platform pedals on an xc hardtail, as well as 'one comfy seat'. enough said.
    Hmm..... I seem to ride better with platforms. My saddle is also very comfy. Why would you want it any other way? I mean, saddle,pedals and grips are the most important components of a bike. They're a major part of "bike fit" that allows you to ride faster and with more confidence, especially in rugged terrain. A good fit will allow you to ride better and have more fun. A sore butt does not allow one to concentrate on the ride,so, much energy is wasted.

    As you gain more experience, you'll learn that there is no such thing as a "standard" bike fit. And what is right for you, may or may not be right for someone else. It does not matter what you read in a book about bike fit. After all, it's just another riders opinion. Because everyone's body is different, their fit will be different. It sometimes takes many months of experimenting to get a good fit.

    Based on your post, I'm assuming that you're new to MTBing or are just thinking about getting in to it. It's a very fun hobby/sport that takes time to be proficient at. You'll also find that many common beliefs that you've held in the beginning, turn out to be very different after only a few years of experience. I'm sure there are many other experienced riders here that can attest to that.

    Good luck

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by C Dunlop
    your bike is too small and you have platform pedals on an xc hardtail, as well as 'one comfy seat'. enough said.
    Does 'enough said' mean you'll shut up and stop posting now?

  45. #45
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    C Dunlop consider this a warning, please stay on topic in this thread. All flaming and flamebait will get you a timeout or a ban at the site's discretion.

    All others please add C Dunlop to your ignore list and use the report post button where applicable.

    I have deleted all off topic posts and responses in this thread. Let's keep it on topic.
    MTBR Posting Guidelines
    calories>electrons

  46. #46
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    I posted that picture of a Gunnar a while back, and I just read a funny rant by Waltworks bikes. He just *trashes* the bike they built for Yao. After reading his piece, I have to agree.

    http://waltworks.blogspot.com/2010/1...t-of-2011.html

    So, yeah. Crow. MMmm. Crow. Nom nom nom.

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