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  1. #1
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    First Post - New Bike!

    I'm new here and purchased my first "real" mountain bike recently as our new neighborhood has 5 miles of trails right from my driveway. There's also a few parks around here with some more serious trails I am sure we will hit. I'm a lean 225-230 and do not like running so figured this is a much more fun way to get some cardio in with the wife.

    I have had several cheaper "mountain" bikes in the past and wanted something nice without spending $1,500 per bike. I did a TON of research and picked up a Breezer 29er Storm Comp. I think for the money, it cannot be beat. $700 and you get a quality small company with great history, 34mm 120 travel forks (110mm 15mm), hydraulic brakes and decent components. Also, one of the main qualities I liked in this bike is the tapered head as the forks will probably be the first thing I upgrade.

    I did already buy some Forte platform pedals which are really nice!

    Here's a link - Breezer Bikes - STORM COMP - Bike Overview

    I know I probably do not need to upgrade them, but I like changing and tinkering with things. What would be the best recommended fork for around $300 I can get? Or is this one pretty decent actually?

    Anyway, let me know your thoughts, opinions, things I could change on the bike, etc.

    Thanks!

    Here's a pic!First Post - New Bike!-breezer.jpg

  2. #2
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    Welcome! You can do the suntour upgrade to a Raidon aur fork for $200 there is a thread here about it. Google upgrade suntour fork mtbr and you should find it.

    The rest, ride a lot to figure out what you will really need/want.

    Have fun!

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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    Welcome! You can do the suntour upgrade to a Raidon aur fork for $200 there is a thread here about it. Google upgrade suntour fork mtbr and you should find it.

    The rest, ride a lot to figure out what you will really need/want.

    Have fun!

    Sent from my LGMS210 using Tapatalk
    Appreciate that, I looked into it a bit. Couple questions:

    1. I'd like to keep at least 120mm of travel and I'd like to keep the 34mm size forks.
    2. Would that be a worth-while upgrade over what I have now? I'd be OK with spending a little more for something a good bit better....
    3. Or is the fork on my bike actually pretty decent and I'd have to spend $500 or more for it to be worth it?

  4. #4
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    I have the Raidon on my Giant Fathom and itís pretty good for its price point. It canít compete with my Fox 34 Factory, but it works very well on the trail. You can internally upgrade it from 100mm to 120mm without it turning into a huge mess.

    Out of curiosity, why do you want the additional travel range?


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  5. #5
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    I'm thinking that at 230 lb, you're likely too heavy for the spring in the stock fork.
    Do the math.

  6. #6
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    Suntour still has some good forks - I don't think the Radon upgrade is the answer for you though, as that's a 32mm stanchion if I recall correctly. But they certainly have other air sprung forks that have 34mm stanchions and will be more than suitable for you. My first concern, being about the same weight as you when I'm kitted up to ride, is that if you have any significant hills, you'll quickly find the 160mm rotors aren't quite enough. Larger rotors are an inexpensive upgrade, just remember you'll need the right adaptors for the larger rotors as well, so your calipers mate up to the rotor correctly.

  7. #7
    jcd's best friend
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    I'm 265 lbs and I had no issues with the Raidon fork.
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  8. #8
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    Good stuff, thanks guys! I'll call Suntour to be sure of what all options they have. I def want 34mm stanchions and at least 120mm of travel.

    I guess I learned too that the 110mm and 15mm fork/axle combo with a thru-axle is a pretty nice seruo so am glad it came like that!

    Question - should I only be looking at air Forks or are there coil Forks that would be a huge upgrade?

  9. #9
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    Air forks! They have so much more you can adjust and dial in to suit your riding preferences. An adjusted air fork will smooth out your ride while you are on the trail.

    Don't forget to pick up a shock pump! I use this one but I am at odds whether I like it or not. I picked it up when it was on sale 2 years ago: https://www.jensonusa.com/Foundation...k-Pump-w-Gauge
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  10. #10
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    I have a 2016 RockShox Reba that I only rode 6 times before replacing it with a RockShox Pike. 120mm travel, 110x15mm axle, tapered steerer cut to 7.5". I was getting ready to list it, along with a bunch of other stuff in the classifieds. It would make a nice upgrade compared to the SunTour fork. PM if you're interested.
    The glass is twice as large as it needs to be

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by andy f View Post
    I have a 2016 RockShox Reba that I only rode 6 times before replacing it with a RockShox Pike. 120mm travel, 110x15mm axle, tapered steerer cut to 7.5". I was getting ready to list it, along with a bunch of other stuff in the classifieds. It would make a nice upgrade compared to the SunTour fork. PM if you're interested.
    Great - I will!

  12. #12
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    Noticed my wheels say "tubeless ready." Can I go tubeless with current tires?

  13. #13
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    Your current tires are wire bead tires. I wouldn't go tubeless with them. A good low cost option is the Forte Pisgah 2 at Performance Bike. If you watch carefully you can pick them up for $30 each on sale.
    Change begins by doing something different.

  14. #14
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    So I ordered the next little upgrade, I liked the idea and simplicity of a 1x drivetrain. Ordered a 32T front chainring.

    Will I need spacers/shims to get it in the correct placement (left to right)? My stock setup was a 2x - how do I know where to place it basically?

  15. #15
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    I would slow down with the upgrades and ride. Did you do the fork upgrade?


    At this point, your upgrades are all "theoretical" and based on what other people say or recommend. An air fork will be a clear upgrade, regardless of what people say because it offers adjustments to spring rate and compression damping that aren't available in lower cost coil forks.

    Tubeless is a worthwhile upgrade because it typically lowers the weight of your wheels and provides better flat protection. But, you could ride on your existing tires and tubes, play with pressure, see if pinch or puncture flats are really a problem for you, and save some money. Go tubeless when you need new tires or these things become a problem.

    1x may be an upgrade, depending on your riding preferences, but a 1x by just disabling the front derailleur and swapping your 36T or 22T ring for 32T is more compromising of your gear range than a dedicated 1x10, 11, or 12. I would belay that 32T ring and probably even send it back.

    Ride your bike. Figure out how much of those 18 gears you've got you use and whether the disadvantages of 2x mean anything to you in real life. 2x is actually less of an annoyance than 3x from the shifting and chain slack perspective.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwiceHorn View Post
    I would slow down with the upgrades and ride. Did you do the fork upgrade?


    At this point, your upgrades are all "theoretical" and based on what other people say or recommend. An air fork will be a clear upgrade, regardless of what people say. 1x may be an upgrade, depending on your riding preferences, and a 1x by just disabling the front derailleur is more compromising of your gear range than a dedicated 1x10, 11, or 12. I would belay that 32T ring and probably even send it back.

    Ride your bike. Figure out how much of those 18 gears you've got you use and whether the disadvantages of 2x mean anything to you in real life.
    I appreciate the reply, but I really like the 1x. I wanted to go ahead and get that done, learn those gears and learn to ride based on it vs the 2x. I like simple. Based on the 2x setup and the size chainrings, I really wont be losing anything besides VERY "high" (by high I mean harder to pedal - higher speed) gears which I never use anyway. I am waiting on the fork upgrade, I think what I have now is fine for the riding I do. I already removed everything, just need it to get here and install and want to do it properly. Do I just space it the best in terms of being in the "middle" between the small and large gears in the rear?

    This is also a test, as teaching my wife to properly shift will be MUCH more simplified is she has only one ring upfront to choose from haha. So if I like it, I'll do it to hers as well. I figured better to do now while new instead of a year down the road once we were accustomed to how they came.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kustrud View Post
    I appreciate the reply, but I really like the 1x. I wanted to go ahead and get that done, learn those gears and learn to ride based on it vs the 2x. I like simple. Based on the 2x setup and the size chainrings, I really wont be losing anything besides VERY "high" (by high I mean harder to pedal - higher speed) gears which I never use anyway. I am waiting on the fork upgrade, I think what I have now is fine for the riding I do. I already removed everything, just need it to get here and install and want to do it properly. Do I just space it the best in terms of being in the "middle" between the small and large gears in the rear?
    Assuming you are just replacing one of the existing chain rings, just replace it, it's already lined up. To do a true 1x, you pretty much need at least a new crankset. I assume it's a narrow-wide ring, or you may need to replace your FD with a chain guide and without a clutched derailleur, this may give you some problems, even if you shorten your chain.

    And, you are mistaken about gear ranges. Your cassette, according to the link, is 11-36. Most 1x cassettes are 10 or 11 x 40, 42, or even 50, so your range will be truncated at the lower end, not the higher, at least compared to a designed-for 1x. You will be about equally truncated on both ends compared to your existing setup, not to mention losing a bunch of intermediate ratios and less-optimal
    intervals between gears compared to a purpose-built 1x cassette.

    I get it, I dig my 1x, but it came that way, with single-ring cranks, an 11-speed cassette, and a matching derailleur. All that said, though, I'm not sure it's a big enough deal for me to have "upgraded" to it, considering the expense and fiddliness of the whole thing.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwiceHorn View Post
    Assuming you are just replacing one of the existing chain rings, just replace it, it's already lined up. To do a true 1x, you pretty much need at least a new crankset. I assume it's a narrow-wide ring, or you may need to replace your FD with a chain guide and without a clutched derailleur, this may give you some problems, even if you shorten your chain.

    And, you are mistaken about gear ranges. Your cassette, according to the link, is 11-36. Most 1x cassettes are 10 or 11 x 40, 42, or even 50, so your range will be truncated at the lower end, not the higher, at least compared to a designed-for 1x. You will be about equally truncated on both ends compared to your existing setup, not to mention losing a bunch of intermediate ratios and less-optimal
    intervals between gears compared to a purpose-built 1x cassette.

    I get it, I dig my 1x, but it came that way, with single-ring cranks, an 11-speed cassette, and a matching derailleur. All that said, though, I'm not sure it's a big enough deal for me to have "upgraded" to it, considering the expense and fiddliness of the whole thing.
    Understood - I see what you're saying too which is correct. I basically mean that I tried my rear "big" gear on both front gears and have no problem climbing. The 32t will be smaller than my current big front gear too so I should be OK. The total cost in all of this is $25 and hopefully a much simpler, cleaner setup. I'll report back tomorrow as we're supposed to go ride after it comes in. If this works out, I'd probably try a 30t on my wife's. We'll see how it goes!

  19. #19
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    Also, a very cost-effective upgrade that is skill-related is a dropper post. Brand-X Ascend II Dropper Seatpost | Chain Reaction Cycles

  20. #20
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    Does that bike use a threaded or press fit bottom bracket? For future reference, if you have to use spacers to align the drivetrain, you may need to remove the bottom bracket and install the spacer ring on the drive side of the bottom bracket. The spacer will be dependent on your bottom bracket size. This is all based on my experience with Shimano components on both of my hardtails.

    For example, a 92mm bottom bracket may not need a spacer, but if your bottom bracket measures 89.5mm, it would need the Shimano 2.5mm spacer. Typically if you replace your bottom bracket with a Shimano version, they will include the spacers.

    If you buy a full 1x drivetrain kit such as a Shimano XT, the dealer's manual will have all of the details.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Battery View Post
    I'm 265 lbs and I had no issues with the Raidon fork.
    I'm 205 lbs and mine lasted 10 months before I killed the cartridge and Suntour replaced the entire thing. I was doing stuff that fork isn't designed for though. I'm not sure how long it would last for normal trail riding.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    I'm 205 lbs and mine lasted 10 months before I killed the cartridge and Suntour replaced the entire thing. I was doing stuff that fork isn't designed for though. I'm not sure how long it would last for normal trail riding.
    Good point.
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  23. #23
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    I think he's just talking about changing one of the chainrings to 32T and removing? the other, along with the FD, or maybe just disabling it.

    Also, which chainring you replace, OP, will depend on the spider diameter of the 32T ring. Shimano says that crank is 104/64 PCD, so whichever PCD the new ring is dictates where he will put it.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwiceHorn View Post
    I think he's just talking about changing one of the chainrings to 32T and removing? the other, along with the FD, or maybe just disabling it.

    Also, which chainring you replace, OP, will depend on the spider diameter of the 32T ring. Shimano says that crank is 104/64 PCD, so whichever PCD the new ring is dictates where he will put it.

    Correct, I will remove both front chainrings and then replace with the single 32t chainring. I already removed front DR as well. I guess I'll put it where the large chainring is now and see how everything lines up and works. My goal would be to get it in the middle of the rear gears, correct? Basically so it's even angles both while while shifting?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kustrud View Post
    Correct, I will remove both front chainrings and then replace with the single 32t chainring. I already removed front DR as well. I guess I'll put it where the large chainring is now and see how everything lines up and works. My goal would be to get it in the middle of the rear gears, correct? Basically so it's even angles both while while shifting?

    I checked, the one I ordered is a 104, so basically it'll go where my previous "big" gear was. Will this be OK for all rear gears or do you think I'll need a shim?

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kustrud View Post
    I checked, the one I ordered is a 104, so basically it'll go where my previous "big" gear was. Will this be OK for all rear gears or do you think I'll need a shim?
    Assuming the old and new one are both flat rings, which is what one would expect, they will be in exactly the same place and the chainline will remain precisely the same.

    You only have to worry about that when you change cranks or rear derailleurs/hubs/cassettes. Because you aren't changing any of that, it should be fine.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwiceHorn View Post
    Assuming the old and new one are both flat rings, which is what one would expect, they will be in exactly the same place and the chainline will remain precisely the same.

    You only have to worry about that when you change cranks or rear derailleurs. Because you aren't changing any of that, it should be fine.

    Cool, I guess my main worry was I read a few places where it's hard on things to go "big-to-big" as the chain is at the steepest angle that way.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kustrud View Post
    Cool, I guess my main worry was I read a few places where it's hard on things to go "big-to-big" as the chain is at the steepest angle that way.
    That typically isn't an issue with 2x. And it isn't big to big, it's big to small, or better still left to right or right to left.

    The chainline on a 2x is between the two front rings. On a 3x, it's the middle ring, so you're going quite a ways "off-center" in the big and small ring and the combination with the small and large cog, respectively, can overstress the chain.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwiceHorn View Post
    That typically isn't an issue with 2x. And it isn't big to big, it's big to small, or better still left to right or right to left.

    The chainline on a 2x is between the two front rings. On a 3x, it's the middle ring, so you're going quite a ways "off-center" in the big and small ring and the combination with the small and large cog, respectivelym can overstress the chain.
    Gotcha - thanks for all the help! I'll hopefully get it on tomorrow and report back.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kustrud View Post
    Gotcha - thanks for all the help! I'll hopefully get it on tomorrow and report back.
    Are the cranks pressed on??? I have everything apart but cannot seem to get the crank off.....!! Supposed to ride tonight too!

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kustrud View Post
    Are the cranks pressed on??? I have everything apart but cannot seem to get the crank off.....!! Supposed to ride tonight too!
    Yes you will need a crank puller to get it off like this one. https://www.performancebike.com/shop...puller-40-3761
    Change begins by doing something different.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by huckleberry hound View Post
    Yes you will need a crank puller to get it off like this one. https://www.performancebike.com/shop...puller-40-3761
    Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrreat. Haha thanks!

  33. #33
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    Also just to be sure, you did buy a narrow-wide chainring for your conversion?
    Change begins by doing something different.

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    Quote Originally Posted by huckleberry hound View Post
    Also just to be sure, you did buy a narrow-wide chainring for your conversion?
    Correct!

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    Here it is! Doing a 5 mile ride tonight on trails but just riding around the street real quick I think I'll like it!

    Nice to be able to take all that stuff off the bike too! Much cleaner/more simple!

    I'll eventually upgrade the rear casette and RD and stuff I'm sure the more I ride. But this is it for now!

    First Post - New Bike!-ncr.jpg[ATTACH=CONFIG]1217930[/ATTACH

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    Just rode - love it! Works perfect for me!

  37. #37
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    Nice! Have fun on that bike! It looks like your frame is an open dropout design. I will presume that your fork is open dropout too. It can be challenging to align your wheel and tighten it down enough so the wheel doesnt loosen up. You have to get your rotor aligned perfectly in the caliper at the same time. It can be a balancing act! Make sure your QR pin is tight enough so it doesn't come loose while riding! It happened to me a couple of times in the past.

    I recommend taking your front wheel off and on a few times to get a feel for it. Same goes for the back wheel.
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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Battery View Post
    Nice! Have fun on that bike! It looks like your frame is an open dropout design. I will presume that your fork is open dropout too. It can be challenging to align your wheel and tighten it down enough so the wheel doesn't loosen up. You have to get your rotor aligned perfectly in the caliper at the same time. It can be a balancing act! Make sure your QR pin is tight enough so it doesn't come loose while riding! It happened to me a couple of times in the past.

    I recommend taking your front wheel off and on a few times to get a feel for it. Same goes for the back wheel.

    Are you referring to the front axle? It's a 15mm thru-axle design if so.

    What do you mean by open-drop out? Still learning here...

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kustrud View Post
    Are you referring to the front axle? It's a 15mm thru-axle design if so.

    What do you mean by open-drop out? Still learning here...
    Oh good! That's one less headache when it comes to aligning your front wheel.

    Here is a good thread to understand axle standards: http://forums.mtbr.com/wheels-tires/...ed-873910.html

    My vision isn't as good as it once was but it seems like your frame uses an open dropout for the rear wheel. That means your wheel slides up into the frame and requires your pin to lock it into the slot. Seeing you have a 15mm thru axle on the front, you can see the difference between the two.

    There isn't anything wrong with open drop out frames. It just requires a little bit of extra attention to aligning your brake rotor to the caliper and locking it with the pin. There are YouTube videos that show you how to do it. It's not rocket science or anything. It's just a little different compared to installing a thru-axle.

    I find it to be good practice to mess with aligning your wheels on an open drop out fork and frame. You may have to mess with it while on the trail so it's best to tinker with it now.
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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Battery View Post
    Oh good! That's one less headache when it comes to aligning your front wheel.

    Here is a good thread to understand axle standards: http://forums.mtbr.com/wheels-tires/...ed-873910.html

    My vision isn't as good as it once was but it seems like your frame uses an open dropout for the rear wheel. That means your wheel slides up into the frame and requires your pin to lock it into the slot. Seeing you have a 15mm thru axle on the front, you can see the difference between the two.

    There isn't anything wrong with open drop out frames. It just requires a little bit of extra attention to aligning your brake rotor to the caliper and locking it with the pin. There are YouTube videos that show you how to do it. It's not rocket science or anything. It's just a little different compared to installing a thru-axle.

    I find it to be good practice to mess with aligning your wheels on an open drop out fork and frame. You may have to mess with it while on the trail so it's best to tinker with it now.
    OK,that;s what I thought you meant. Good stuff - got it!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kustrud View Post
    OK,that;s what I thought you meant. Good stuff - got it!
    Curious for opinions on the current fork on my bike, I do not know enough to tell if it is "good or bad," but seems to do the job fairly well! I'm not upgrading this any time soon, just more so curious. Seems to have a lot going for it at least. It's the Suntour XCR 34. 34mm stanchions, 110x15 thru-axle, 120mm travel, tapered instead of 1 1/8 the whole way, etc.

    I also cannot tell if it is coil or air, the Breezer website lists coil but Suntour website only shows an air version of this fork.

  42. #42
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    If it's air there will be a cap that you unscrew on the left leg at the top where you add/adjust air pressure. Coil will have a cap that you turn to adjust preload.
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  43. #43
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    I looked that fork up out of curiosity. It seems to be an air fork. As huckleberry noted, the top of the left stanchion will let you know if it's air or coil. If you can unscrew the cap from the top left stanchion and you see a little air valve, then it's an air fork. Some fork manufacturers will write the words "air" on the valve cap.

    Do you have a shock pump? I recommend that you purchase one! You can find them on sale through Jenson USA. You can adjust the air pressure to dial in your ride. SR Suntour might have the guide listed on their website.

    Typically you set the air fork pressure based on your body weight and then you add/remove air from that point to dial in how you want it to feel.
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  44. #44
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    Some forks have the specs at the bottom as well, Not sure if the Suntour does.
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    I double checked, it's definitely coil. Suntour doesn't list a coil version but I guess they have one haha! All things considered, seems like one of their better coil forks at least.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kustrud View Post
    I double checked, it's definitely coil. Suntour doesn't list a coil version but I guess they have one haha! All things considered, seems like one of their better coil forks at least.
    It's a good starting point. Learn all you can with that bike. Most of us started on coil forks. I find it to be more rewarding to start out on a coil and then branch into an air fork later on. You will feel the difference and enjoy the trail more.

    Riding on a coil will save you money should you decide mountain biking isn't for you. If you love it too much, then grab yourself an SR Suntour air fork through their upgrade program.
    Trek | Octane One | Transition

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    Just for reference, the reason everybody dumps on coil forks is that the spring rate of the fork is set by the coil spring residing inside it. There is no way to alter it other than by changing the spring. The OEM spring may or may not "match" your weight.

    An air fork uses an air cartridge for a spring. Its spring rate is adjustable by filling/venting the cartridge. The spring rate is the most fundamental characteristic of a suspension component. It is what dictates how much the suspension "sags" under your weight and how it then responds to bumps on the trail: how much it moves for a given applied force in addition to your weight.

    Secondarily, but sometimes more importantly, there are the damper systems that govern how quickly the fork compresses and expands during and after hits. The damper systems on air forks tend to be more sophisticated and adjustable than on lower-end coil forks.

    When you get into more expensive forks, you are getting into more sophisticated dampers and air springs, as well as more robust and light construction. At the higher end, there are also coil forks with different selected spring rates (and some with an air spring as well).

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    Nice bike! It seems that $700 is a sweet spot for 29ers. Not the highest quality components but still leagues ahead of a $500 29er.

    Mine was about $1200 and my friends was about $700. Only difference is weight and geometry. Otherwise, we both go up and down the trails with the same amount of enjoyment.

    Ride safe.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuclearsword View Post
    Nice bike! It seems that $700 is a sweet spot for 29ers. Not the highest quality components but still leagues ahead of a $500 29er.

    Mine was about $1200 and my friends was about $700. Only difference is weight and geometry. Otherwise, we both go up and down the trails with the same amount of enjoyment.

    Ride safe.
    Thanks! I researched every hard tail I could find at $1k and under. What made me choose this one was this, in this order:

    1. Tapered Head/Steer tube - this was a rarity in this price range.
    2. Breezer has some good following and frame designs.
    3. Tubeless ready and boost size hubs/wheels.
    4. I already upgraded the pedals and switched to a single front chainring, so the rest to upgrade is a nice used fork (I'll wait until I find a steal), new cassette, and a 10 or 11 speed shifter and derailer, larger brake rotors.
    5. I paid $630 for the bike new with discounts so for another $300-$400 once I'm done I feel like I'll have a pretty solid bike that I kind of got to build!
    6. Also - two spots for water bottle holders haha!

  50. #50
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    i bought these for $25. with my Vans, i love em

    light, grippy, comfy and they run on bushings so no bearings to deal with. had mine for like 3 years. no problems yet

    https://www.worldwidecyclery.com/pag...=24&q=dmr%20v6


  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by nauc View Post
    i bought these for $25. with my Vans, i love em

    light, grippy, comfy and they run on bushings so no bearings to deal with. had mine for like 3 years. no problems yet

    https://www.worldwidecyclery.com/pag...=24&q=dmr%20v6

    Good price, but none of them match!

  52. #52
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    I actually made the switch from my Race Face Chesters to the One Up Components composite pedals. They are just slightly wider and have a couple extra pins for grip closer to the middle of your foot.
    Trek | Octane One | Transition

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