Fanny Pack?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 28 of 28

Thread: Fanny Pack?

  1. #1
    agu
    agu is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,099
    Check out Wingnut Gear!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kfb66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    527

    Fanny Pack?

    I recently picked up a 29er (Jet9) which is also my first tubeless bike. With my 26" bikes I used a basic seat bag to carry a spare tube, tool, etc ... but spare tubes for 29" tires really take up a LOT of space! Anyway I was thinking a fanny pack or hydration pack might be a more convenient means of carrying supplies while riding, which would also be convenient from the standpoint that I'd always have it with me regardless of which bike I ride (instead of swapping seat bags between bikes). I have a small hydration pack now, but no room for tools, etc so I either need a bigger hydration pack to include typical riding supplies or some type of fanny pack? The Jet is not ideal for carrying water bottles due to tight frame space, so will likely use hydro pack more frequently anyway.

    So with that said, any recommendations on bike-specific fanny packs or hydration packs best suited to carry water and/or supplies? If I go the hydro pack I'm thinking the Mule seems ideal, but curious if any good fanny pack solutions out there to get weight lower and off back?

    Thanks

  3. #3
    turtles make me hot
    Reputation: NYrr496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    10,892
    I ride with a Mule or a Hawg, depending on the duration of my ride. I also have a 29er tube folded tightly in a seat pack with the presta valve sicking out so it doesn't weat a hole in the tube. You can use a 26" tube in a 29" wheel and carry that in your seatpack. I think there's a 26" tube in my front tire now.
    Only problem I have with Hydration packs is they hold so much stuff, they start getting heavy in a hurry.
    I like turtles

  4. #4
    I don't huck.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    2,543
    Carry 26" tubes.
    Blog Ramblings
    West Coast writer for twentynineinches.com

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kfb66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    527
    Quote Originally Posted by mtroy
    Carry 26" tubes.
    Just saw the post below about 26" tubes in 29" wheels. I'll definitely look into that option for future ...

    Also heard some good feedback on Wingnut hydro packs from LBS, but I've been very happy with my Camelbak ... just no room for supplies.

  6. #6
    Professional Crastinator
    Reputation: Fleas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    5,727
    Unless I'm going for a 3+ hour ride, I can get by with a couple water bottles, a small seat bag for a tube and levers (which is always on the bike so I can't forget it), and my good ol' fanny pack. It's cooler, lighter, and keeps my C.O.G. lower.
    If it's an all-day epic group ride, I need more food, water, etc. so I bring a backpack with bladder (I have a Coleman MAX something - the suspension on it is wayyy cooler than the CamelBak).

    -F

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    7,099
    I have an old Camelbak Bandido fanny pack. It is hands down the best way to tote gear and water. Much more stable than a back pack, no wet sweaty back, small "holster" pockets on each side that can be accessed without removing the pack, etc.

    But the Fashion Police really frown on it. I just does not have that "core" look. And it's red.
    Whining is not a strategy.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kfb66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    527
    Quote Originally Posted by agu
    Check out Wingnut Gear!
    http://www.wingnutgear.com/product_d...3&image_id=307

    Took a closer look at the Wingnut gear and I have to admit they look VERY nice. Convenient storage and very nice how it sits lower on back. I can see that making a difference during longer endurance races or all-day rides. I don't think anyone sells this brand locally, but I'll definitely check into it. Thanks!

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kfb66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    527
    Quote Originally Posted by Fleas
    Unless I'm going for a 3+ hour ride, I can get by with a couple water bottles, a small seat bag for a tube and levers (which is always on the bike so I can't forget it), and my good ol' fanny pack. It's cooler, lighter, and keeps my C.O.G. lower.
    If it's an all-day epic group ride, I need more food, water, etc. so I bring a backpack with bladder (I have a Coleman MAX something - the suspension on it is wayyy cooler than the CamelBak).

    -F
    This is pretty much what I've always done in the past, but with the Jet, two water bottles no longer an option, I can only fit one stubby bottle "if" I decide to put a cage on. With multiple bikes I have forgotten to swap seat bags a few times so I was thinking a bag on ME might be better idea!

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kfb66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    527
    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo
    I have an old Camelbak Bandido fanny pack. It is hands down the best way to tote gear and water. Much more stable than a back pack, no wet sweaty back, small "holster" pockets on each side that can be accessed without removing the pack, etc.

    But the Fashion Police really frown on it. I just does not have that "core" look. And it's red.
    I'm not a real "fashion conscious" person so no worries there, but I don't see any full-fanny pack hydro packs listed anymore. The Wingnut might be the ideal compromise, it's a backpack, but site very low.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,412
    I use fanny pack exclusively now that I dont FR /DH any more and dont have to carry all the extra gear around.

    On long rides, I found that my back aches with camelbak. The fanny pack with 2 bottle carrier are better than the singles. I have both. The single bottle one from Access (brought at REI) and the dual is REI's in house brand.

    The access is better in that the bottle is in a diagonal position on the waist while the REI version just sit 90 degree down. The diagonal feels better, too bad it can't carry as much as the REI fanny pack.

    I tend to climb better as well with the fanny pack than camelbak even though I loose the convenience of drinking from a tube.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LyNx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    24,078
    Uh, not really, the Topeak medium saddelbags easily hold 2 tubes, patch kit, multi tool and more. They come in Small, Medium and Large - that's a Medium on my bike in the photo. Weight on the biek is much easier to lug around than weight on you, or at least for me, especialy if it's around the waiste/lower back.
    Quote Originally Posted by kfb66
    .. but spare tubes for 29" tires really take up a LOT of space!
    Or, have a saddle bag on a each bike with the essentials in them, along with a pump on frame, that way no matter if you pick the bike up for a quick ride with one bottle or go for a long haul you have all you need to get back home should you encounter a flat or two.

    Quote Originally Posted by kfb66
    . which would also be convenient from the standpoint that I'd always have it with me regardless of which bike I ride (instead of swapping seat bags between bikes). I have a small hydration pack now, but no room for tools, etc so I either need a bigger hydration pack to include typical riding supplies or some type of fanny pack? The Jet is not ideal for carrying water bottles due to tight frame space, so will likely use hydro pack more frequently anyway.

    Thanks
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Fanny Pack?-p1060341_crop.jpg  

    Quote Originally Posted by Harold
    You're doing mtbr wrong, you're supposed to get increasingly offended by the implications that you're doing ANYTHING wrong.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kfb66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    527
    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx
    Uh, not really, the Topeak medium saddelbags easily hold 2 tubes, patch kit, multi tool and more. They come in Small, Medium and Large - that's a Medium on my bike in the photo. Weight on the biek is much easier to lug around than weight on you, or at least for me, especialy if it's around the waiste/lower back.


    Or, have a saddle bag on a each bike with the essentials in them, along with a pump on frame, that way no matter if you pick the bike up for a quick ride with one bottle or go for a long haul you have all you need to get back home should you encounter a flat or two.
    I've already got a seat bag bigger than the one you use, but that doesn't help with carrying water. As I said the Jet frame allows one stubby bottle at most, so I will definitely need to use a hydro pak more often now. Can't say I've ever been bothered by the weight of a camelbak before (even during 24 hr races), but I can see the benefit of carrying a pak as low as possible on the body.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikewrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    442
    Wingnut Hyper 2.5 hands down! I just recently got the 2.5 and 3.0 to demo/use. I like the 3.0 for a fall/winter bag, but the 2.5 is phenominal! It sits low and is so stable. It will be used for not only riding, but trail runs/hikes/day trips and more. I have been a Camelback guy for years and I highly doubt I will ever go back.
    I turn a wrench @ Simplicity Cycles
    http://www.simplicity-cycles.com

  15. #15
    Old Punk
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    530
    I have a mule that is at least 10 years old and going strong. Holds 100oz, plenty of room for tools, spare tube, food and a jacket. I replaced the bite valve twice, but the bladder and hose have held hundreds of gallons of water or mix. Now that I think about it, it's the single best piece of outdoor equipment I have.
    '09 Specialized Rockhopper expert 29
    Born 26" trials
    '07 Specialized Allez

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikewrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    442
    I have a MULE, but it is big and heavy! On hot days it really doesn't do much for airflow. And for day to day 2hr rides it is way over kill. Still have the MULE, but think that it will be relegated to winter rides when I need to to carry alot of extra warm gear.

    Another great feature of the Wingnut bags is the wing pockets that can be reached w/o taking the pack off. I keep my multi-tool in there or my phone and it is always w/in reach.
    I turn a wrench @ Simplicity Cycles
    http://www.simplicity-cycles.com

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BIGfatED's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    922
    I love the 29ers version Wingnut.....it sits lower, has a bigger contact patch and is way cooler than the 26er version.....

  18. #18
    tl1
    tl1 is offline
    Bicyclist
    Reputation: tl1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    2,849

    Mine slid off my hips with water bottles

    Quote Originally Posted by kfb66
    I've already got a seat bag bigger than the one you use, but that doesn't help with carrying water. As I said the Jet frame allows one stubby bottle at most, so I will definitely need to use a hydro pak more often now. Can't say I've ever been bothered by the weight of a camelbak before (even during 24 hr races), but I can see the benefit of carrying a pak as low as possible on the body.
    I have an old (like from 1992) Jandd fanny pack that was designed to hold 2 water bottles. It's a well constructed super durable piece like all Jannd products I've owned but if I try to carry two full water bottles, a camera, a tube and some tools etc. with it the weight will cause it to slide down and off my hips unless I cinch it up uncomfortably tight. I still use it occasionally on bikes that hold water bottles because it's a great pack, I just don't carry bottles with it. It is pretty nice to carry a few things that way because it generally doesn't rattle stuff around like a seat bag and it's very comfortable.

    So I gave up on carrying water that way and then bought a suspension bike that only had provision to carry a bottle on the front of the downtube where the front tire continually sprayed it with mud and dirt. I went with a Camelbak at that point and I'm still happiest with that simple cheap *Cloudwalker pack after trying a bunch of other Camelbaks and other brand packs like Vaude, and Deuter. At one point I thought I'd try a Jannd lumbar pack with a harness system that goes up and over your shoulders to hold the pack stable but I didn't like it. Once you're doing that (with that system anyway) you're carrying around as much material as a Camelbak but with less storage space. Without the harness this lumbar pack carried weight much better than my old fanny pack but still slipped down when carrying a lot of weight. Carrying the weight low on your back does have merit though I think for most people and a lot of people really like the Wing Nut packs that do just that, using a harness system. I haven't tried these yet or known anyone using them but they look cool though.

    * Not the same as the current Cloudwalker which is a different bag without a waist strap.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LyNx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    24,078
    You asked about carrying supplies and complained that 29er tubes were too big - they're not - was just pointing out that 2 tubes can fit in that bag with a patch kit, multi tool and few other things. How you hydrate yourself is your business, my advice would be bottle in the cage with mix and then hydration pack with water. If you\'ve already got the major tools on the bike you won't have to carry them on you - lower weight=better handling.
    Quote Originally Posted by kfb66
    I've already got a seat bag bigger than the one you use, but that doesn't help with carrying water. As I said the Jet frame allows one stubby bottle at most, so I will definitely need to use a hydro pak more often now. Can't say I've ever been bothered by the weight of a camelbak before (even during 24 hr races), but I can see the benefit of carrying a pak as low as possible on the body.
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold
    You're doing mtbr wrong, you're supposed to get increasingly offended by the implications that you're doing ANYTHING wrong.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kfb66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    527
    So for you Wingnut Gear fans. I'm thinking the Hyper 2.5 might be the ideal fit for me, but I see none of their packs come with a bladder ... do most of you simply buy Camelbak bladders to go with it? Seems odd Wingnut doesn't have an option to buy their packs with bladder???

  21. #21
    up n over
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    407
    only thing that belongs in a fanny pack on a dude is a .45
    "my cat's breath smells like catfood."
    -ralph wiggum

  22. #22
    Category Winner
    Reputation: teamdicky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,071
    Pretty big jump to go from a saddle bag to a hydration pack. Good packs are nice, but if you don't like wearing a pack on shorter rides here's a couple ideas:

    Try a Specialized Z-cage on the frame.



    It's super easy to get your bottle in and out of this cage as it's a side loader. The above picture is on a Santa Cruz Tallboy, but here's a set on my small hardtail:



    I've been super stoked on these things. I could hardly get a bottle out of a normal cage on the Tallboy, but the Z-cage is quick in and out. One of the best purchases I've made in awhile. You should be able to get a larger bottle on your Jet using one of these.

    Also, I am anti-saddle bags. I have my reasons, but cramming gear into them is one. Take a look at an Awesome Strap. You can mount a tube, inflation device, CO2, tools almost where ever you want. The Race model allows you to put it under the seat, or the other models will let you put it anywhere on the frame/seatpost you can fit your bundle. Any really small tools I just put in a small pouch and toss in my jersey pocket.





    So you could still use your smaller pack with one bottle and your gear strapped to the bike. Total cost around $30. If you are really bent on getting a new hydration pack and are already a fan of Camelbak you might wanna consider the Octane LR.



    The bladder sits low on your back and the pack is light with plenty of storage. Cheaper than a Wingnut and it comes with a bladder (a pretty cool bladder too boot).




    MTBR disclaimer: I am sponsored by Backcountry Research.
    Last edited by teamdicky; 05-06-2011 at 05:32 AM.
    WWW.TEAMDICKY.COM

    I get paid 3 every time I post on MTBR.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kfb66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    527
    Quote Originally Posted by teamdic
    Pretty big jump to go from a saddle bag to a hydration pack. Good packs are nice, but if you don't like wearing a pack on shorter rides here's a couple ideas:
    I've never had a problem carrying a pak, just never used to use for shorter rides as I carried 1-2 bottles. I have an older, smaller Camebak (Rev I think), which actually works ok for short rides (70 oz), but I'd like something better suited for endurance races now. Very little storage in my pak.


    Quote Originally Posted by teamdic
    Try a Specialized Z-cage on the frame.



    It's super easy to get your bottle in and out of this cage as it's a side loader. The above picture is on a Santa Cruz Tallboy, but here's a set on my small hardtail:



    I've been super stoked on these things. I could hardly get a bottle out of a normal cage on the Tallboy, but the Z-cage is quick in and out. One of the best purchases I've made in awhile. You should be able to get a larger bottle on your Jet using one of these.
    Now that does look like a great idea for the Jet frame. One bottle is really all I need for most shorter training rides anyway. Definitely look into that set up!

    Quote Originally Posted by teamdic
    Also, I am anti-saddle bags. I have my reasons, but cramming gear into them is one. Take a look at an Awesome Strap. You can mount a tube, inflation device, CO2, tools almost where ever you want. The Race model allows you to put it under the seat, or the other models will let you put it anywhere on the frame/seatpost you can fit your bundle. Any really small tools I just put in a small pouch and toss in my jersey pocket.
    I have to think any tube riding outside like that for any length of time over rough trails is likely to see damage at some point? I guess I'd be more comfortable with a saddle bag or pak pocket in that case.







    Quote Originally Posted by teamdic
    So you could still use your smaller pack with one bottle and your gear strapped to the bike. Total cost around $30. If you are really bent on getting a new hydration pack and are already a fan of Camelbak you might wanna consider the Octane LR.



    The bladder sits low on your back and the pack is light with plenty of storage. Cheaper than a Wingnut and it comes with a bladder (a pretty cool bladder too boot).




    MTBR disclaimer: I am sponsored by Backcountry Research.
    I'll take a look at the Octane, but for now I'm leaning to the Mule or Hyper 2.5 ... really appreciate the feedback though.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikewrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    442
    I've used a Blackhawk gear and a Platypus bladder w/ my Hyper 2.5. Any 95-100oz bladder will work w/ the 2.5. Call Scott @ Wingnut and ask him about a bladder. When we placed our shop order, I thought he said that they were going to try to source some bladders.
    I turn a wrench @ Simplicity Cycles
    http://www.simplicity-cycles.com

  25. #25
    LUW
    LUW is offline
    Ped on BIG wheels
    Reputation: LUW's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    253
    I have a Mule and love it. But after using a couple of Deuter backpacks for trekking I would seriously look at Deuter's Hydro Lite 2.0 and 3.0 and even the Compact EXP 6 SL (if you want to carry LOTS of stuff).
    Cheers!
    Luciano
    Brazil

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    258
    I would choose the MULE over a bum bag any day, though would like to try a Wingnut someday.

    <iframe width="425" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/LDsfzJXGAo8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

  27. #27
    Peace & Love
    Reputation: FoShizzle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    17,281
    i have recently added a fanny pack. while i cant carry a full-fledged boulder to throw at potential hikers below, moderately-sized rocks can be carried in fanny packs that can at least stun hikers and/or climbers below

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kfb66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    527
    Quote Originally Posted by AuntieAPE
    I would choose the MULE over a bum bag any day, though would like to try a Wingnut someday.

    <iframe width="425" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/LDsfzJXGAo8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    I'm gonna have to say I like the sound of "Bum Bag" much better than "Fanny Pack" ... enjoyed the humor!

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.