Expensive Niner never ridden. Hate when that happens- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    The Hutch
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    Expensive Niner never ridden. Hate when that happens

    So Last year at interbike, I ordered me a Niner RIP9, frame. I finished the build around December. But due to cold weather, mud and rain, I only rode it once. Then Christmas came along, My Boo bought me a Jabberwocky, I got it built up in a week or so.
    Anyway I've only rode my High $ Niner 4 times total. I can't stay off my budget Jabber.
    Should I just sell the Niner ?
    Last edited by rob1208lv; 03-25-2011 at 11:17 AM.

  2. #2
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    What the heck is a Boo?

    I don't think you spent enough time on the RIP to enjoy it...thats all. I like my SS, but I love my Tallboy! Spend about 2 weeks on the RIP, then switch back to the Jabber and get on some good gnarly trails..get a good 30mi. on some good rooty, rocky off-camber terrain, and then see if you don't miss the RIP. If you don't, sell it!
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  3. #3
    The Hutch
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubdryver
    What the heck is a Boo?

    I don't think you spent enough time on the RIP to enjoy it...thats all. I like my SS, but I love my Tallboy! Spend about 2 weeks on the RIP, then switch back to the Jabber and get on some good gnarly trails..get a good 30mi. on some good rooty, rocky off-camber terrain, and then see if you don't miss the RIP. If you don't, sell it!
    Maybe your right about not enough time on it. But I am thinking its the 10spd drive train with the 36t front ring or something, I just feel slow and fat on it. Not sure I'll try riding it some more and if i still feel the same maybe I'll sell the frame and buy me a geared Hard tail or something...

  4. #4
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    pass the niner along to some one who will use it!

  5. #5
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    Hmm..I never rode a 36 w/ 11-36 on the rear. I have a 38,and most use a 39. Many of the pros running 1x10 use 36T but they are on HTs. I think going to a 38/39T 2x10 would add some life to that bike.

    My friend's Spech came with 33T and he had to change that out quick. He is on a 36T now but thinks a 38 or 39 would be better suited.

    I think it is all psycological though, because if I was constantly riding in a low gear, I would sit and spin, and it would feel slow. I like getting out of the saddle and play a little bit so it might just be a different riding style. To ride a FS 29er requires a different riding style than a HT or HT SS for that matter. You just may be use to riding a different way. That bike is tons of fun if you take some time and play with it!
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  6. #6
    The Hutch
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubdryver
    Hmm..I never rode a 36 w/ 11-36 on the rear. I have a 38,and most use a 39. Many of the pros running 1x10 use 36T but they are on HTs. I think going to a 38/39T 2x10 would add some life to that bike.

    My friend's Spech came with 33T and he had to change that out quick. He is on a 36T now but thinks a 38 or 39 would be better suited.

    I think it is all psycological though, because if I was constantly riding in a low gear, I would sit and spin, and it would feel slow. I like getting out of the saddle and play a little bit so it might just be a different riding style. To ride a FS 29er requires a different riding style than a HT or HT SS for that matter. You just may be use to riding a different way. That bike is tons of fun if you take some time and play with it!
    Exactly I like to stand up on hills I'm not used to sitting and spinning. I was thinking of just switching back to 9spd 2x9 w/ 11-34 & 22t,32t. That's what I use to ride way back 3 bikes ago when I had a Heckler... (been on a hard tail every since)

  7. #7
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    I say ditch the niner if your enjoying the hell out of the vassago. I have a pricey full suspension bike as well and ever since switching to the ss vassago that fs bike has never felt right. feels slow and porky.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubdryver
    What the heck is a Boo?!
    That is also referred as "ya shorty" or in other words your girlfriend and/or boyfriend.

  9. #9
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    If your trails just don't suit an FS bike, but do suit a HT or rigid, then yes, an FS will feel portly because you're not getting the benefits of it or need what it offers and having to push around extra weight for links, shocks etc, plus no matter you'll not get the acceleration when you stand of a HT frame. If you're enjoying the Jabber, then by all means once you don't think you'll miss it, sell the bike before you either chip the paint, scratch components etc and loose resale value. Not everyone lives where a FS is needed, you may not, only you know what you want and need for sure.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob1208lv
    Exactly I like to stand up on hills I'm not used to sitting and spinning. I was thinking of just switching back to 9spd 2x9 w/ 11-34 & 22t,32t. That's what I use to ride way back 3 bikes ago when I had a Heckler... (been on a hard tail every since)
    Changing to the drivetrain you mentioned will do the opposite of what you are attempting. You are simply giving yourself more gears to sit and spin in, with fewer gears to mash in.

    The drivetrain setup isn't your problem, it sounds like it is the energy lost in the suspension. That lost energy is making you feel old. It also sounds like you are riding trails on which the RIP is overkill.
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  11. #11
    Is it Friday yet?
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    Just give me your Rip. You'll be MUCH happier!

  12. #12
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    That RIP is a pig. Pigs aren't fun to ride unless you really push them to the limits on what they like. It's like my Kona Dawg (it pedals like a dog, at least compared to XC bikes). I enjoyed it just today, since it took it out to web canyon for some shuttle runs, but the only other time I really ride it is when I want to slow myself down in consideration of my slower buddies or if I want to really hammer a pig around in masochistic fashion, "for a workout".

    My 29er HT zooms in comparison. Feels like a road bike when I switch off. My 29er FS feels a bit slow too, making all the hype about it having responsive pedaling feel like lies, but compared to all other FS bikes I've ridden, it feels that way.

    Is the RIP your first AM FS rig? Do you ride AM level stuff? Fast and aggressively?

  13. #13
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    sell it too me.

  14. #14
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    The RIP really does need to be ridden fast and/or aggressively. Its not a "stop and smell the flowers" type of bike at all. Heck, it even says "Pedal Damnit!" right on the top-tube. If that isn't an indication and constant reminder to get on with the gettin' on, I don't know what is. The idea behind it is "Hard work yields great reward" You push it hard, and the grin grows, but you have to have that mindset to avoid taking it slow and easy. If you are the "slow and easy" type of guy, you probably won't get out of the RIP what you want. Sure it can do the "slow and easy" pop it into granny gear and spin a retarded cadence, but it is at home when being launched off a dip in the ground that throws you a five feet, and nice techy rock gardens that make you chip teeth on a rigid. You have to have the mindset and the know-how to ride that bike.

    As Varaxis said AM FS RIG....Fast and Aggresive.
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  15. #15
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    Yea. I reserve stuff I wouldn't do on my XC bikes to do on my Kona, since I know it's built to survive stuff like that. I look at terrain features and go, I think I could huck/fly over this part and skip all these obstacles, which I would roll through somewhat carefully with my XC bikes, and therefore be able maintain a ton of speed. Basically, I rip through stuff, like the name of the bike implies.

    While my Kona is built to be able to handle being ridden hard, I'm finding all sorts of other stuff being "the weakest link". I busted the rear derailleur hangar landing a drop today. I wish I had thru axles and a bigger stanchioned fork up front too. Better brakes too.

    I used to be simply happy with being able to ride through a number of things, no matter how slow--it was just cool to stay on the bike and not walk. I think I'm finally past that stage and now I'm trying to find ways to get air, skim or fly over stuff, leave knobby tire marks in the hardpack to show my tires are really biting in and getting traction, ride down steeper taller stuff, etc.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob1208lv
    So Last year at interbike, I ordered me a Niner RIP9, frame. I finished the build around December. But due to cold weather, mud and rain, I only rode it once. Then Christmas came along, My Boo bought me a Jabberwocky, I got it built up in a week or so.
    Anyway I've only rode my High $ Niner 4 times total. I can't stay off my budget Jabber.
    Should I just sell the Niner ?
    This is an interesting thread - at least for me. What are the rules? Do the rules state you can only own 1 bike and ride it? Do the rules state you can own 2 bikes and swap between them? Do the rules say you can own a bunch of bikes and choose whatever you want for a particular ride?

    I ride all the bikes I own. In terms of 29"ers, I started with a Karate Monkey in 2003. I still ride it - SS and rigid these days. I added a Sugar 293 in 2004. I still ride it for the 4" front and rear. I added a Dos Niner in 2005. I still ride it. I added a Jet 9 in 2009. I still ride it for the 4" up front and 3" in the rear. I added a RIP 9 in late 2009 due to the JET being recalled and the generous offer from Niner. I still ride it for the 120mm up front and in the rear. I guess I should add the Dos is now a new crash replacement frame I got last year and the JET is a new frame I got last year as well due to the recall in the fall of 2009.

    I will mention again why this thread "interested" me. Several have stated the RIP is portly, a pig, slow and porky, an all mountain aggressive machine, etc... . I simply consider it an XC full suspension bike that happens to have 120mm of travel up front and in the rear. Mine weighs 28.02 pounds for the XL and is the heaviest bike I own.

    I've done quite a bit of testing on four separate timed rides with all of these bikes. An 8 mile very hilly dirt loop (doubletrack and singletrack). A 4.2 miles singletrack twisty loop on a local race course. An uphill 20 minute (20 minutes on average) TT measured pavement bike path, and a 28.6 mile out and back ride where wind is always a major factor. Testing is for finish line timed results only, no HR comparison, no power comparison - just the clock. Same 4 tests - no changes. I started logging the data early last year, and have continued this year as trail conditions allowed. No recovery rides or active recovery rides data recorded. Just the days that are prescribed effort training days. (Training for XC racing that is.)

    Using the clock removes all items such as "feel", "tires", "suspension vs. non suspension", "heart rate", "perceived effort", "standing vs. sitting", "gearing", "trail conditions", "bike weight", "acceleration out of corners perception/feel", etc... - and just shows me what gets me from start to finish the quickest. In spite of what I might feel during the ride or on a particular bike - only the clock has the answer, not how I feel or perceive I feel. I've actually been very surprised with how the results have been unfolding as I now have at least 20 rides in each timed discipline with each bike I ride with the data collected between last year and this year. The RIP is faster in two of those critical tests which totally surprised me - the 4.2 singletrack loop and the 8 mile loop. And it holds its own in the 20 minute TT with just a few seconds off my all time record time on a different bike. Frankly, I remain shocked with times I am recording on it, but it is what it is for me. The only caveat being that I have not logged as many tests on the SS because I just converted it to SS last fall. But I will continue to log data all throughout this year on these 4 regular rides with all bikes.

    My test results are telling me why my 2 best race finishes last year were aboard the RIP - even though it is the heaviest bike I own with the heaviest wheels and may give the perception it is porky, portly, a pig, etc... - but at least for what the clock has been showing me: it ain't slow. It simply allowed me to hammer through and muscle my way through quicker than my other bikes allow (even if perceived effort on my part didn't match the timed result).

    Now that's not a concern the OP, rob1208lv, mentioned. He mentioned he is enjoying his budget Jabber. And I would concur - I really enjoy my budget Karate Monkey. But others chimed in with the other comments which prompted my response. If somebody posting in this thread or reading this thread owns a RIP, they may want to collect some data to see if the clock confirms what the "feel" is or not while on the bike. I just know I'm not selling mine.

    BB

  17. #17
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    Give me your RIP. It will go to a loving home with appropriate trails to make sweet Niner love with.

    You would be doing a good deed, saving a poor student many potential financial tribulations: I can't afford the RIP I will be building in a month or two... but I'm still buying it, budget long forgotten

  18. #18
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    Yea. It's definitely the feel and how you ride it. It can explain why riding fully rigid is in and why people like steel still. Not everyone is looking for the best time around the track or are looking to "kill themselves". You get rewarded for going hard on the RIP. Other bikes feel like they give "instant gratification" by just feeling good simply pedaling it.

    My FS 29er is definitely faster around the track, but my 29er HT just gives me the feeling that I'm going fast since it pedals so well. It just scoots, which is fun. On my HT, I'm happy just getting up the hill first, but I'll follow the rest of the guys down without much shame. I also become happy when I'm able to do something better on my HT than riders on FS bikes. On my FS, I'm sometimes "fighting" to "earn" lead--it just makes me feel more competitive, especially if others are competitive. I couldn't do the same on my HT and my buddies would be less competitive then or just flaunt that I can't do a thing when the trail points down or gets rough enough that I start to really struggle to maintain control.

    Some mainly ride with buddies, some people just ride alone a majority of the time (out of embarrassment or convenience), some people ride the same trails/routes every time, some want something they can ride around time and commute with at the same time, some want a bike they can tour with, being able to ride any trail decently, from Grafton Mesa or Champery, to a local multi-user park. Most bikes can "do it all" in some regard, but none are technically a "do all" bike, when you compare them to purpose built bikes. Some think it's better to have a purpose built bike for each style they like to ride, while others seem to keep only 1-3 bikes trying to find the ultimate "do all" bike that will handle a majority of their riding.

    Something tells me that the OP simply succumbed to [viral] marketing and was sold on something rather than buying something he really needed since his current ride wasn't his style.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob1208lv
    ...My Boo...
    a boo?
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  20. #20
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    Sorry I'm replying to everyone's comments so late, I was out riding all weekend.
    Anyway I did a few changes to my RIP this weekend.
    1. Changed the tires put sb8 in rear lowered the rotational weight.
    2. Put a chain guide/ bash guard on ( broke my other one)
    3. Adjusted the rear sag ( was a little stiff
    4. Swapped out stems shorten the cockpit

    I rode Friday and Saturday about 44 miles total. Adjusted as I needed.
    Taught my self how to sit while climbing and blasted down.

    I think I'm going to spend more time on it and learn the bike more.

    Although It's easier for me to leave the jabber at home after this weekend. I have a new problem now.
    Picked up a roubaix pro.

  21. #21
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    Isn't the Roubaix designed for cobblestone roads? I heard their Tarmac model was meant for typical US roads.

  22. #22
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    I own a lot of bikes. I sell the ones I don't ride very often because I want to get a bike I feel like I'll ride more. I have a Singular Peregrine. I just don't ride it. I have it for sale (check the classifieds) because I feel like I would ride a full on cross bike more. We just don't have the conditions for a monstercross. If you feel like you don't have the conditions for a RIP9, then get rid of it. Get a bike you think will complement your arsenal better.

  23. #23
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    I have found the same thing with my Rip9 & Jet9,I have done lots of back to back & the Rip9 can foot it with the Jet9 on XC rides but the Rip9 is faster when it gets ruffer.

    I do get why an average rider my feel slower but it is not slower as they often claim.

    Doing the same lap time on the Jet9 as the Rip9 the Jet9 does feel faster & some will like it that way if they are happy with the speed that they are going.

    However for me the Rip9 has lifted my out right speed that I can take corners & ride hard track to a level that the Jet9 may well not have got me to on its own.

    IMHO just like a SS can lift your riding by making you stronger & teaching you to hold speed,A bike that makes you think you are going slower than your are can make you push harder & try more things than you ever would on a bike that you already felt you were at the Limit.

    I did a couple of hour riding on a Niner Air9 Carbon 1x10 XX ( 20 lb ) in Feb & yes it felt faster on long hard climbs but for me it ran out of everything on the way back down so each to there own but tell it as it is.



    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown
    This is an interesting thread - at least for me. What are the rules? Do the rules state you can only own 1 bike and ride it? Do the rules state you can own 2 bikes and swap between them? Do the rules say you can own a bunch of bikes and choose whatever you want for a particular ride?

    I ride all the bikes I own. In terms of 29"ers, I started with a Karate Monkey in 2003. I still ride it - SS and rigid these days. I added a Sugar 293 in 2004. I still ride it for the 4" front and rear. I added a Dos Niner in 2005. I still ride it. I added a Jet 9 in 2009. I still ride it for the 4" up front and 3" in the rear. I added a RIP 9 in late 2009 due to the JET being recalled and the generous offer from Niner. I still ride it for the 120mm up front and in the rear. I guess I should add the Dos is now a new crash replacement frame I got last year and the JET is a new frame I got last year as well due to the recall in the fall of 2009.

    I will mention again why this thread "interested" me. Several have stated the RIP is portly, a pig, slow and porky, an all mountain aggressive machine, etc... . I simply consider it an XC full suspension bike that happens to have 120mm of travel up front and in the rear. Mine weighs 28.02 pounds for the XL and is the heaviest bike I own.

    I've done quite a bit of testing on four separate timed rides with all of these bikes. An 8 mile very hilly dirt loop (doubletrack and singletrack). A 4.2 miles singletrack twisty loop on a local race course. An uphill 20 minute (20 minutes on average) TT measured pavement bike path, and a 28.6 mile out and back ride where wind is always a major factor. Testing is for finish line timed results only, no HR comparison, no power comparison - just the clock. Same 4 tests - no changes. I started logging the data early last year, and have continued this year as trail conditions allowed. No recovery rides or active recovery rides data recorded. Just the days that are prescribed effort training days. (Training for XC racing that is.)

    Using the clock removes all items such as "feel", "tires", "suspension vs. non suspension", "heart rate", "perceived effort", "standing vs. sitting", "gearing", "trail conditions", "bike weight", "acceleration out of corners perception/feel", etc... - and just shows me what gets me from start to finish the quickest. In spite of what I might feel during the ride or on a particular bike - only the clock has the answer, not how I feel or perceive I feel. I've actually been very surprised with how the results have been unfolding as I now have at least 20 rides in each timed discipline with each bike I ride with the data collected between last year and this year. The RIP is faster in two of those critical tests which totally surprised me - the 4.2 singletrack loop and the 8 mile loop. And it holds its own in the 20 minute TT with just a few seconds off my all time record time on a different bike. Frankly, I remain shocked with times I am recording on it, but it is what it is for me. The only caveat being that I have not logged as many tests on the SS because I just converted it to SS last fall. But I will continue to log data all throughout this year on these 4 regular rides with all bikes.

    My test results are telling me why my 2 best race finishes last year were aboard the RIP - even though it is the heaviest bike I own with the heaviest wheels and may give the perception it is porky, portly, a pig, etc... - but at least for what the clock has been showing me: it ain't slow. It simply allowed me to hammer through and muscle my way through quicker than my other bikes allow (even if perceived effort on my part didn't match the timed result).

    Now that's not a concern the OP, rob1208lv, mentioned. He mentioned he is enjoying his budget Jabber. And I would concur - I really enjoy my budget Karate Monkey. But others chimed in with the other comments which prompted my response. If somebody posting in this thread or reading this thread owns a RIP, they may want to collect some data to see if the clock confirms what the "feel" is or not while on the bike. I just know I'm not selling mine.

    BB
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis
    Isn't the Roubaix designed for cobblestone roads? I heard their Tarmac model was meant for typical US roads.
    Over the years the roubaix has started slanting more toward the Tarmac. The Roubaix is a bit slacker and better fit for the average rider who wants to get long hours in the saddle without racing. On large group or charity rides I usually see more of the Roubaix than Tarmac.

  25. #25
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    Have to chime in, I race and own a Jet 9 and a Rip 9.

    Jet 9 - 100mm front 24lbs, is .5 to .75 mph faster on every course I have used them both on (but have yet to take it on some of the terrain I have used the Rip on)

    Rip 9 - 140mm front 31.5lbs, had it down to 28lbs with 120mm fork, but found myself wanting to keep pushing this bike over bigger obstacles. Now with 2.4 Ardents, Marzocchi 140 front.

    All in all I ride the Rip 75% of the time (and I also have a SS and HT) and have had more fun on that bike then anything I have ever owned. Yesterday hit a 6ft drop at 25mph and just ate it up. Also climbed for 3800 feet on the same bike. I could see dropping the weight down and be faster on technical trails then the Jet, but the real beauty of the Rip is hammering through baby sized rock gardens without picking a line and launching it, lol.

  26. #26
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    I say go with an AM hardtail Canfied or Banshee,Put a large tire on back 120mm fork on front = smooth and efficient at the same time.

  27. #27
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    Best. Family Guy. Scene. Ever.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by YellaLab
    That is also referred as "ya shorty" or in other words your girlfriend and/or boyfriend.
    Wife!

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob1208lv
    Picked up a roubaix pro.
    A boobaix ?

  30. #30
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    I found similar results to what Bruce Brown described. The difference was 2 bikes, both SS and fewer timed events. But, while the HT Karate Monkey felt faster, it wasn't. I was shocked that the Canzo was faster. It was faster every time over a 17 to 18 mike course.

    I can't wait to see the results once my Milk Money arrives.

  31. #31
    The Hutch
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    So yesterday I rode my SS and timed (GPS) it, Today I plan on riding my RIP and doing the same.. Updates soon to come

  32. #32
    The Hutch
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    Still like my SS more, I'm going to test the waters and put my RIP 9 in the classifieds, if I can cut my loses short, I'll just sell it.
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob1208lv
    Still like my SS more, I'm going to test the waters and put my RIP 9 in the classifieds, if I can cut my loses short, I'll just sell it.
    Commit! Rigid, SS, mechanical brakes. Go for simplicity.

    I sold my Turner Sultan in Feb '10 after picking up my KM in Dec '08. I miss it about 10-20% of the time, but not enough to harbor any regret. I'm probably in the minority here though.....but I am happy with just a rigid SS.
    Happiness depends more on the inward disposition of mind than on outward circumstances. Benjamin Franklin

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenLightGo
    Commit! Rigid, SS, mechanical brakes. Go for simplicity.

    I sold my Turner Sultan in Feb '10 after picking up my KM in Dec '08. I miss it about 10-20% of the time, but not enough to harbor any regret. I'm probably in the minority here though.....but I am happy with just a rigid SS.
    Boy, I love my rigid bike, too. I'm lucky enough to be able to ride ~5 x week during the season. If I rode the rigid bike on every ride in my neck of the woods, I'd be older than I am already, due to the beating a 3 or 4 hour ride delivers!

    Being a slight bike whore, I firmly believe that a 3-bike mtb quiver is necessary: HT/Rigid, short travel racy FS, and longer travel squish-monster FS. I replace one each year, which my wife says is a better obsession than 20-year old blondes (not that they notice me, anyway)!
    Whining is not a strategy.

  35. #35
    The Hutch
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    Kosmo, I hear ya brother. I think I'm going to sell it and buy me a hardtail geared niner. I think hardtail is more my style
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  36. #36
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    boo? ya shorty? first off, what's 'ya'? second, isnt this wannabe language? or is it wishiwas language? you wear a yankee cap with the stickers still on and a flat brim? pants low with your boxers hanging out?
    bags.
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  37. #37
    Its got what plants crave
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    Quote Originally Posted by charliethetuna
    boo? ya shorty? first off, what's 'ya'? second, isnt this wannabe language? or is it wishiwas language? you wear a yankee cap with the stickers still on and a flat brim? pants low with your boxers hanging out?
    bags.
    Don't be such a square.



    You're totally harshin' on my mellow, brah.



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  38. #38
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    No good

    Quote Originally Posted by charliethetuna
    boo? ya shorty? first off, what's 'ya'? second, isnt this wannabe language? or is it wishiwas language? you wear a yankee cap with the stickers still on and a flat brim? pants low with your boxers hanging out?
    bags.
    I really have no idea what your talking about?
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  39. #39
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    I ride a 1x9 EMD and for where I ride its perfect, there is one network of trails where I might really enjoy something like a Jet9 or some kind of shorter travel full squish rig but the other 98% of the time I enjoy the hardtail.

    That said, if I had the funds/budget I would love to have a Jet9 in the garage as well for the times when I want to ride more of the rough stuff fast. My brother rides a Mach 4, 26" rollers, and I follow him often and some of these drops and rides down hill over roots and rocks he just glides while I'm bouncing around a good bit. I have to put more thought into the descent and more strategic in where I point the front wheel while he bombs through it with wreckless abandon, looks like fun. BUT, when we are flying through singletrack he is behind me and can't pass, until I come to trees I can't fit my wideass bars through...
    Hardrock 29er, Niner EMD9, Cannondale F29, Camber Expert, 650b Nickel all gone.
    2014 Giant Anthem 27.5 here.

  40. #40
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    Needs pics

    Too much talk in this thread and not enough pictures.

    Show us:

    1. Your Niner
    2. Your Jabberwocky
    3. Your Roubaix
    4. Your Boo
    [

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob1208lv
    So Last year at interbike, I ordered me a Niner RIP9, frame. I finished the build around December. But due to cold weather, mud and rain, I only rode it once. Then Christmas came along, My Boo bought me a Jabberwocky, I got it built up in a week or so.
    Anyway I've only rode my High $ Niner 4 times total. I can't stay off my budget Jabber.
    Should I just sell the Niner ?
    I know this is just saying what others have been saying but I had a similar experience happen.

    I had a turner XCE, a Santa Cruz Bullit and my old Independent Fabrications Deluxe from '96.
    I rode the XCE a lot, 3.5" travel front and rear, light-ish comfortable, then I got my bullit. 6" travel both ends, disc brakes, candy apple red. I scabbed a lot of parts off the XCE then notice a crack in the frame and it was put with the other old bikes.

    My Independent however had been converted to singlespeed ages ago for fun. I rode it whenever I felt like hitting a local easy trail for some high intensity work out stuff. It had a 1x1 surly rigid fork on it, and an old surly tensioner.

    As I got tired of tinkering with the bullit trying to extract some feeling from the 5th element shock I found myself getting larger freewheels to put on the bullseye hub on the independent. This opened up a lot of terrain, and soon I was riding everything I rode the bullit on and enjoying both the ride and the lack of post ride twittering I needed to do.

    Eventually the Santa Cruz took a place next to the turner, the IF was converted to tubeless and it became my only ride. Missing disc brakes and wanting to go further into the rigid singlespeed thing (a dedicated frame for one) I sold the bullit and bought a Salsa El Mariachi.

    Disc brakes, 29er wheels, sweet steel all added up to my independent taking a seat next to the turner, inheriting a kids bike seat and becoming a dad bike as I added in hours on the salsa.

    Am I happy with one bike? Sure. Would I ride a full suspension bike? Sure. Do I wish I had a quiver to pull from? Definitely but something tells me I would find a favorite and the rest would take no solace from sitting next to the XCE for the next couple of years.
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  42. #42
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    [QUOTE= flat brim?
    .[/QUOTE]
    Dewd, Where u ben? It's flatbill'r yo!

    http://flatbiller.com/


  43. #43
    BMW 2002, Dodge A100, etc
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    Sell the bike you don't ride and buy your Boo some flowers and tell her that the bike she got you was the perfect gift, and you want to do the responsible thing and sell what you aren't using... might rack up some some Boo-Points.


  44. #44
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    keep the niner, it does not cost money to sit there, will be nice to take when doing road trips and riding unfamiliar territory.
    I have a KM SS Rigid, Niner EMD 3x9 with 100mm and Stumpy FSR 29 comp 011 and would not get rid of any of them. Its like own a bike a car and truck they all have their purpose in life.

    Congrats on the roubaix I have had one of those for two years an my only regret is not getting a road bike sooner in life. I use to hate on roadies something fierce, I have had to eat a lot of humble pie

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo
    Boy, I love my rigid bike, too. I'm lucky enough to be able to ride ~5 x week during the season. If I rode the rigid bike on every ride in my neck of the woods, I'd be older than I am already, due to the beating a 3 or 4 hour ride delivers!

    Being a slight bike whore, I firmly believe that a 3-bike mtb quiver is necessary: HT/Rigid, short travel racy FS, and longer travel squish-monster FS. I replace one each year, which my wife says is a better obsession than 20-year old blondes (not that they notice me, anyway)!
    I got half your old gear! I don't ride that much, if I did, I would probably split between my roadie and SS.

    Though, I could take a Yelli Screamy or Specy Stumpy Evo R hard tail and not feel guilty....those are the two that catch my eye every now and then.
    Happiness depends more on the inward disposition of mind than on outward circumstances. Benjamin Franklin

  46. #46
    The Hutch
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    Very great suggestions. Thanks everyone for chiming in.
    To Konass:
    Pics coming soon
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  47. #47
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    My AIR9 hardtail was my go to bike, rode it everywhere. It was fast, it climbed great, it spoiled me with it's instant acceleration.

    But my RIP 9 was the bike I always took with me when going on a big road trip, to Sedona, to Prescott, to Durango, to the Arizona Trail.

    But I did take the AIR9 to Blue Diamond, Las Vegas. Never once regretted that. Great place to ride XC.

  48. #48
    The Hutch
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob1208lv
    Very great suggestions. Thanks everyone for chiming in.
    To Konass:
    Pics coming soon
    Pics..
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Expensive Niner never ridden.  Hate when that happens-168660_1720287454526_1458484949_31779406_2871952_n.jpg  

    Expensive Niner never ridden.  Hate when that happens-vassago.jpg  

    Attached Images Attached Images   
    Last edited by rob1208lv; 04-28-2011 at 06:17 AM.
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