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  1. #1
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    Evil Offerng vs. Ibis Ripmo Questions

    Hi all!

    I am planning on some test rides soon, but it is difficult because Ibis and Evil dealers are 2 and 4 hours away respectively and in opposite directions.

    That said, I have done a great deal of research on both bikes, but have seen very little in the way of head to head comparisons. Both bikes are said to do the things that are important to me well. But I would like to know which of these things each bike does better and worse than the other, as well as the same questions regarding the DW and Delta suspension systems.

    I have a combination of motocross and xc racing background. I am fairly strong climbing, but since I no longer race xc, I am more worried about not burning excess energy on climbs than setting KOMs going up the mountain.

    I love descending, both flowy, pumpy, jump trails, as well as rough, side/off trail technical descents. While I want to go fast, I also want a bike that feels fun and playful "popping" off of features, not like I am just rolling through terrain on a monster truck.

    I also really enjoy picking my way through tight, technical, almost trialsy terrain both up and downhill.

    Finally, I still want a bike that is comfortable and fairly efficient at climbing. I like all day and half a day rides that go upwards of 30 miles and several thousand feet of climbing, so I just don't want a bike that sucks too much energy.

    For what it's worth, I am 6'1, roughly 175-180lb. I am coming off of riding a very race-oriented hardtail with an 80mm fork, so I am used to holding pretty high speed in technical terrain on a bike that is suboptimal for it.

    I also tested a size large Santa Cruz Hightower, which got nixed from my shortlist. I just felt that the seat tube put me SO far back that I had a great deal of difficulty once the climbing got steep.


    Any feedback that you can give is greatly appreciated!

  2. #2
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    Both DW and Delta are designed by Dave Weagle. You'll be happy you drove the distance to demo on trails. Make sure you get a good setup tune.
    These bikes are going to be a different end of the riding spectrum from what you've been using for fun.
    Make sure you have the terrain to make them fun.
    Your profile says Anniston. I might pick a Scott Spark 900 with 2.6 tires for that area.

  3. #3
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    My two cents: Pick the one that turns you on the most and don't look back. I'm sure both are great bikes and you'll learn to love whichever you choose. I can only vouch for the Ripmo, which I ordered the first day it was announced and never test rode it. I did have a Ripley LS prior to the Ripmo, so I put my faith in Ibis and just went for it.

    A thing I've found over the years demoing and buying bikes is your (my) perception of the bike will change after you ride it for a while and you get comfortable with it. Coming from an 80mm hardtail is going to be a huge change vs a Ripmo/Offering. The bikes may feel too slacked out and big, but over time you'll adapt. I went from a hardtail to Tallboy v1 to Ripley LS v2 to Ripmo; so small steps in geometry change. I recall when I was shopping for the Tallboy I also tried the Tallboy LT and it felt way too slacked out and big. I bet if I jumped on the TBLT today it would seem tiny and too steep in the HA.

    The Ripmo even took me a few months to dial in and get really comfortable on. After 2 yrs on the Ripley LS I was really dialed with that bike. Now with the Ripmo I'm getting that comfortable feeling again.

    The Ripmo is a fantastic do it all bike. I have fun riding it on all kinds of rides, from flat and flowy to chunky and steep, as it is my only bike now. I've done 30 mi / 5000 ft backcountry rides with it a few times and I'm amazed how good I feel at the end. It climbs so good. My typical ride is 15 mi / 2000 ft of mixed flow, tech, and jumps. The Ripmo is perfect for where I ride. The Ripley LS was good too, but my jumping is progressing and I was using full travel multiple times throughout my rides. The Ripmo allows me more room for progressing and is more forgiving when I screw up.

    I consider the Ripmo a playful, poppy feeling bike. I have no issues popping off little hits or flicking the bike around. I've read The Offering feels like this too. I've never heard either described as a monster truck.

    Possibly a bigger issue for you is going to be sizing. I'm 6'-0" on a Large Ripmo w/50mm stem. You at 6'-1" could consider a L or XL Ripmo.

    Good luck with your search / decision. It's a great time to be a mountain biker.

  4. #4
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    And to echo what eb1888 said, make sure you have the terrain for a bike this big. If you can get away with a 120mm bike, then it'll be lighter, climb better, and be more nimble. Horses for courses.

  5. #5
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    I dunno man, that's a big step in a completely different direction from what you're accustomed to and what you describe riding wise. Are you sure you wouldn't be better off with something more along the lines of a bike like the Fuel, FuelEX, Anthem29, Trance 29, Phantom, Process111, Mach 429SL, 429Trail, SB100, Sniper 120? Since this would be a major departure for you in terms of the bike, I'd highly suggest that you definitely demo anything like these bikes before committing to buying and make sure you get on with the new geo and amount of travel and DH bias.
    Last edited by LyNx; 3 Weeks Ago at 07:24 AM. Reason: to add the Anthem to the list
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  6. #6
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    ^^^ agree.
    Do the math.

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    SB130. Perfect bike for SE USA

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoCal-Rider View Post
    My two cents: Pick the one that turns you on the most and don't look back. I'm sure both are great bikes and you'll learn to love whichever you choose. I can only vouch for the Ripmo, which I ordered the first day it was announced and never test rode it. I did have a Ripley LS prior to the Ripmo, so I put my faith in Ibis and just went for it.

    A thing I've found over the years demoing and buying bikes is your (my) perception of the bike will change after you ride it for a while and you get comfortable with it. Coming from an 80mm hardtail is going to be a huge change vs a Ripmo/Offering. The bikes may feel too slacked out and big, but over time you'll adapt. I went from a hardtail to Tallboy v1 to Ripley LS v2 to Ripmo; so small steps in geometry change. I recall when I was shopping for the Tallboy I also tried the Tallboy LT and it felt way too slacked out and big. I bet if I jumped on the TBLT today it would seem tiny and too steep in the HA.

    The Ripmo even took me a few months to dial in and get really comfortable on. After 2 yrs on the Ripley LS I was really dialed with that bike. Now with the Ripmo I'm getting that comfortable feeling again.

    The Ripmo is a fantastic do it all bike. I have fun riding it on all kinds of rides, from flat and flowy to chunky and steep, as it is my only bike now. I've done 30 mi / 5000 ft backcountry rides with it a few times and I'm amazed how good I feel at the end. It climbs so good. My typical ride is 15 mi / 2000 ft of mixed flow, tech, and jumps. The Ripmo is perfect for where I ride. The Ripley LS was good too, but my jumping is progressing and I was using full travel multiple times throughout my rides. The Ripmo allows me more room for progressing and is more forgiving when I screw up.

    I consider the Ripmo a playful, poppy feeling bike. I have no issues popping off little hits or flicking the bike around. I've read The Offering feels like this too. I've never heard either described as a monster truck.

    Possibly a bigger issue for you is going to be sizing. I'm 6'-0" on a Large Ripmo w/50mm stem. You at 6'-1" could consider a L or XL Ripmo.

    Good luck with your search / decision. It's a great time to be a mountain biker.
    Thanks for the info! Luckily, I will be able to test them to dial in sizes, but I think that I will be able to get away with a L. I have a long torso, but shorter legs and arms.

    I definitly anticipate a bit of a steep learning curve making the switch, but it is high time. The style of riding I am doing just does not match the bike that I'm doing it on.

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    Thanks for the input! And yea, I know the importance of testing, although I hate driving just at as much as I love riding.

    As far as terrain, my wife and I travel more or less full time, so Anniston is really my hometown more than anything, but I am looking for a bike that will be at home in the Sierras, SoCal, and Western NC.

    I also plan to add another hardtail or maybe a full suspension xc bike to my repertoire as well, so I will use that when the terrain doesn't live up to the trail bike.

  10. #10
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    Whichever bike look carefully at your fork options. The Grip2 in the Fox 36 has received good damper reviews but maintenance can be a reoccurring problem. A Ribbon or the coming DVO Onyx SC or an extra fork for when you are waiting for the return of your Fox.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    Whichever bike look carefully at your fork options. The Grip2 in the Fox 36 has received good damper reviews but maintenance can be a reoccurring problem. A Ribbon or the coming DVO Onyx SC or an extra fork for when you are waiting for the return of your Fox.
    Ahh, I did not know that abut the Fox 36. I don't know too much about the components on the bikes, other than the fact that I hate the Sram guides. I will have to do a bit of research to decide if it owuld be worth putting a custom kit on the bike or buying one as it comes.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lgmoto356 View Post
    Ahh, I did not know that abut the Fox 36. I don't know too much about the components on the bikes, other than the fact that I hate the Sram guides. I will have to do a bit of research to decide if it owuld be worth putting a custom kit on the bike or buying one as it comes.
    If you can marshal the info you'll want to do a custom. You spend a little more to end up spending less.

  13. #13
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    If this is the case, then either of those bikes might work for you, again, only way to know is to test ride - some love DW link, others find it too harsh/stiff or biased towards climbing, not great on square edge hits. Either way, neither of these are going to climb anywhere near like an XC FS or HT, not close.

    My friend switched to the Ripmo beginning of this year from an original Following with a 130/150 F36 and he is noticeably slower climbing, and he was already snail pace slow before Some of it is the overall build, well really tyres are bigger and stickier, but also angles. Another guy just got a Firebird29 and again, noticeably slower, this coming from a SC Tallboy LT, so much so that he had me swap the stock 11-46 cassette with 30t ring to a 11-50 and the 46-30 combo was the same as the lowest gearing on the TBLT before., said it felt so much harder than the TB LT, even though they both had the same ratio

    Quote Originally Posted by Lgmoto356 View Post
    Thanks for the input! And yea, I know the importance of testing, although I hate driving just at as much as I love riding.

    As far as terrain, my wife and I travel more or less full time, so Anniston is really my hometown more than anything, but I am looking for a bike that will be at home in the Sierras, SoCal, and Western NC.

    I also plan to add another hardtail or maybe a full suspension xc bike to my repertoire as well, so I will use that when the terrain doesn't live up to the trail bike.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  14. #14
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    Evil bikes are always described as fun, poppy, playful yet hoverboard plush. The suspension design being low on the frame helps with that stable, sporty feeling. It's most likely gonna be a slightly heavier build than a comparable Ripmo. I've heard the Evil is a decent climber with a good platform but maybe not quite as efficient as the Ibis. On the descents, you'll feel more of the trail on the dw link Ibis.. from what I understand, it's doesn't give a super plush ride but that's a preference thing. I have an Ibis and personally I'd love to own a delta link bike like the Offering.. looks super fun. Take this all with a grain of salt since I've never ridden either one. Good luck.

  15. #15
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    The grip2 is the easiest fox closed damper to service and does not require a blead. Itís seals are loose fitting and allows fluid into the damper that is expelled threw a port at the top. This loose seal makes the damper almost frition free and it has the least sticktion of any damper Iíve cycled.

    The Ripmo frame is about the same weight as most 100-120mm bikes. You could easily build a light version that will climb all day if you wanted that.
    Making shit harder than it needs to be isn't awesome, it's just...harder.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mannyfnz View Post
    Evil bikes are always described as fun, poppy, playful yet hoverboard plush. The suspension design being low on the frame helps with that stable, sporty feeling. It's most likely gonna be a slightly heavier build than a comparable Ripmo. I've heard the Evil is a decent climber with a good platform but maybe not quite as efficient as the Ibis. On the descents, you'll feel more of the trail on the dw link Ibis.. from what I understand, it's doesn't give a super plush ride but that's a preference thing. I have an Ibis and personally I'd love to own a delta link bike like the Offering.. looks super fun. Take this all with a grain of salt since I've never ridden either one. Good luck.
    Quote Originally Posted by alexbn921 View Post
    The grip2 is the easiest fox closed damper to service and does not require a blead. Itís seals are loose fitting and allows fluid into the damper that is expelled threw a port at the top. This loose seal makes the damper almost frition free and it has the least sticktion of any damper Iíve cycled.

    The Ripmo frame is about the same weight as most 100-120mm bikes. You could easily build a light version that will climb all day if you wanted that.
    I have heard that the Ripmo at ~6lb is lighter than the Offering. However, I haven't been able to nail down an exact weight for the Offering. Does anyone by chance know what that weight is?

  17. #17
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    https://www.fanatikbike.com

    Offering Frame - 2019
    Large no shock
    Weight 2890 grams (6.38 lbs)

    Ripmo Frame - 2018
    Large no Shock
    Weight 2510 grams (5.54 lbs)

    Ripley LS Gen 3 Frame - 2018
    Large no Shock
    Weight 2523 grams (5.57 lbs)

    Following MB Frame - 2018
    Large no Shock
    Weight 3010 grams (6.64 lbs)
    Making shit harder than it needs to be isn't awesome, it's just...harder.

  18. #18
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    One thing no one's mentioned and I'm not sure if it's still an issue with the Evil, but frame clearance with even a 2.3" on the original Followings was pretty much non existent, the slightest bit of mud and it packed up and was un-rideable.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexbn921 View Post
    https://www.fanatikbike.com

    Offering Frame - 2019
    Large no shock
    Weight 2890 grams (6.38 lbs)

    Ripmo Frame - 2018
    Large no Shock
    Weight 2510 grams (5.54 lbs)

    Ripley LS Gen 3 Frame - 2018
    Large no Shock
    Weight 2523 grams (5.57 lbs)

    Following MB Frame - 2018
    Large no Shock
    Weight 3010 grams (6.64 lbs)
    You my friend, are a god!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    One thing no one's mentioned and I'm not sure if it's still an issue with the Evil, but frame clearance with even a 2.3" on the original Followings was pretty much non existent, the slightest bit of mud and it packed up and was un-rideable.
    I think I remmeber reading that the Offering is supposed to be good even with 2.6. But I don't know if that is more true in theory than in practice.

  21. #21
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    Both look great but I am really hoping to demo them this Spring sometime. However, that Yeti SB130 is now in the top three. I have a feeling it will be the best pedaling one.

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