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  1. #1
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    Evil Offering: rookie review

    There has been discussion about the Evil Offering. I recently purchased one, and rode it for a bit, so I thought Iíd give a quick review.

    And now the disclaimer: This is my first review. I donít race. I donít huck big drops. I barely know how to set up a suspension . If youíre looking for a technically proficient review that gets into the nitty gritty ins and outs of how this thing behaves at Cat1-pace, sorry.

    About me: 6í 1Ē 180 lbs.
    About the bike: basically stock GX package Evil Offering except with dtswiss 350 hubs to rf arc wheels and xt 8020 brakes. One up composite flats and 510 freeriders.

    Trails ridden w/ Bike:
    Spencer gap, Trace Ridge & Black mountain @ pisgah.
    Cedar Rock, Big Rock, Burnt mountain, Ridgeline @ dupont.
    Kessel run and Spearfinger @ firemountain

    The only bike I can compare this to is my last bike which was a first gen SC tallboy LtC. Iíll be using that as a benchmark, even if thatís a little unfair to SC as itís a few years old.

    Anyway about the Offering...

    Build wise, no defects I noticed. Didn't creak or anything like that. Pretty quiet overall.

    The rear shock is very plush. By comparison, the SC could take really big (or at least big for me) one-off hits, but when you were going over successive bumps (think the foot or high so log step downs on Black Mountain) it felt a bit chatter-y, in the sense that there were these sharp quick vibrations. It never felt like it was being overwhelmed by the trail, but over time when things got ďbam-bam-bamĒ successive with the bumps, you would get jarred around a bit.

    The Evil on the other hand seems to be able to take those hits in stride without ever really punishing you. This might be a shock adjustment thing, but it just doesnít seem to get thrown off as badly by successive hits. It stays plush and allows you to concentrate on picking your line.

    Speaking of picking your line, one other area where the bike pulled away from the SC was in slower stuff. The SC was always at home at speed, just monster trucking over rock gardens and such. The faster I pushed it, the more in control you felt. But in slower-tighter sections where you would have to really pick and choose your line, it felt like it required more muscle. The Evil feels more at home with these situations, particularly when youíre pointing it downhill and need to pick a line through some roots or something like that. Itís still happier at speed, but itís not uncomfortable going slow.

    Going into berms, long drawn out turns and wall rides the evil was great. It had this little shove at the end when the suspension uncompressed that just popped you out of those things like nobodyís business. Best part of the bike for me.

    It climbs efficiently on fire roads and single track. But I didnít feel it was any better here than the tallboy here. I.e. the overall effort needed to move up the hill was about the same. Itís sort of hard comparing an old 3X set up to modern 1x, but I remember the Tallboy in the middle ring really felt good on climbs, FWIW.

    When things got waaaay steep, the front did wander slightly, but less than the TB. I would attribute this to the seat position (angle), which felt better for climbing. I could have eliminated this with better weighting. Iím also wondering about a 40-50 mil stem.

    One are where I felt the SC was a little better was occasionally during regular riding, when I was really hammering on flat sections, the evilís suspension felt like it was sucking up some of my energy, where the SC seemed (from memory) to feel more responsive. It wasnít a persistent issue, and it really only occurred when I was out of the saddle in the flat sections, but it was enough that I noticed it. Iím not entirely sure, it just felt like the suspension was compressing with my pedal strokes and I was losing a bit of power. Best I can define it.

    The suspension never came close to bottoming out. Maybe 80% of travel. That said the biggest drop I took it off was probably about 3 feet high. So I would have been surprised if I had managed to bottom it out.

    Handling wise, itís a lot more agile and darty at speed than the SC. They feel very different when things get cooking. The Tallboy had this super steady, nothing unsettles it, smoothness. The Evil feels like it wants to turn a lot easier. It lacks a little bit of that go-out and charge feel but it makes it up with a nimble character that puts the rider more in control.

    I also feel like Iím more ďinĒ this bike than ďonĒ it. Probably doesnít affect the actual riding experience, but itís confidence inspiring.

    Overall itís a good bike. Feels happier downhill than up. Puts a smile on my face. I donít ride hard enough to really test its limits, but I tried my best to give a noviceís impressions. If you have questions Iíll do my best to answer them.
    Evil Offering: rookie review-bike2.jpeg
    Evil Offering: rookie review-bike1.jpg
    Evil Offering: rookie review-roots.jpeg
    Evil Offering: rookie review-wall.jpeg

  2. #2
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    I think you did a great job with the review. Quite frankly, reviews from somebody like yourself are 10X more valuable that from the "pros" in my opinion as they are more relatable. I've never ridden an Evil and to be honest, I originally disliked their look so much that I would have never considered one. However, they're growing on me and are very well liked by most people who own them. In general, I actually hear many similarities in what you wrote vs what's I've been told by other Evil owners in that "they climb just fine but they really come alive going downhill". I also owned the original TBLT and it seems like you've picked a great bike for the area you live in. Someday I hope to get back there to ride but it's a long haul from SoCal.
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  3. #3
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    Cool review. Iíve owned a TBLTc since 2013 and bought an Evil Wreckoning in 2017. Mostly ride the Wreckoning but for some tamer trails I still enjoy the TBLTc. Most of the time the Wreckoning is more poppy and fun despite being 6-7 lbs heavier. Would love to try an Offering!


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  4. #4
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    I ride a 140/140 bike similar to your bike in geo. I travel to WNC and ride the same trails you're riding. I think its the perfect set up. I wish my bike was lighter and stiffer and it sounds like a good fit. Great review.

  5. #5
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    I agree, you did a nice job on the review, very meaningful.

    I also ride WNC and make trips down there. I loved my Following on those trails set up 120/ 140 but I think the Offering is the perfect bike for your riding. On longer flatter stretches I do use the pedal mode on the shock to add some compression damping and I also use it with stretches of bigger hits like on a Laurel Pilot to mange the 120mm travel better and not blow through it as quickly.


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  6. #6
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    great looking ride, i also ride wnc and have been wondering how the offering would do around here. thank you for your review

  7. #7
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    This bike hits all the good numbers/specs. I recently bought a Ripmo but this easily would be my 2nd choice.

  8. #8
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    Thanks very much for your review. Really appreciate it as I live in CLT and am building a custom offering to ride the exact set of trails you just reviewed. As my frame is not due to arrive till 11/16 Iíve had lots of time to think about it and itís great to hear some real world affirmation of my guesswork. Curious if you rode the bike in the low or extra low setting. If in the low mode Iíd love to hear your thoughts as to if the extra low would have helped in the very steep sections. If not Iím curious as to if you had many pedal strikes you had and what length cranks you are running. Either way thanks for sharing. Your bike is beautiful and I hope you get to enjoy this fall weather while it lasts. The photos are pretty awesome!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by manitou2200 View Post
    I agree, you did a nice job on the review, very meaningful.

    I also ride WNC and make trips down there. I loved my Following on those trails set up 120/ 140 but I think the Offering is the perfect bike for your riding. On longer flatter stretches I do use the pedal mode on the shock to add some compression damping and I also use it with stretches of bigger hits like on a Laurel Pilot to mange the 120mm travel better and not blow through it as quickly.


    Function in disaster, finish in style!
    This really does help. The extra 40mm helps so you dont need the extra compression on the trails you mentioned 😊 i thought the following was just slightly under gunned but better than the smuggler. Which is why i went for the Riot. The offering is a close contender if CB dont update the Riot soon.

  10. #10
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    Thanks for all the kind comments, everyone.

    If I'm being honest, the Evil felt like a little bit overkill for those trails... at least at the speed I was riding, YMMV. I wonder if I would have been better served with a 120 or so mm bike. Maybe even something like a Yeti SB100. That said, when things did get a bit rowdy, it was nice to have the extra buffer that the Offering's suspension provides.

    NC Kingsting, I had the bike in Low as opposed to extra low. I had the odd strike here and there, but for the most part, the BB felt at a good level. One of the biggest obstacles I encountered on these trails were the off-camber roots, and I suspect a lower bb would have led to some strange moments hitting pedals on the trail. Sorry not sure what my crank arm length is. Just the regular standard issue SRAM size I guess.

    On that note, I don't think slackening the front end would have helped my descending time, and it probably would have harmed my climbing ability.

    Take this advice for what it's worth, but if I could do it again, I would have built the bike with a slightly more concentrated focus on going up as opposed to down (40 or 50 MM stem, 30T instead of 32 in the front). I feel like it's super dialed in the DH department, so emphasizing the climbing abilities with the group spec might have made more sense in retrospect.

    Hope that helps.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by CPS1 View Post

    Take this advice for what it's worth, but if I could do it again, I would have built the bike with a slightly more concentrated focus on going up as opposed to down (40 or 50 MM stem, 30T instead of 32 in the front). I feel like it's super dialed in the DH department, so emphasizing the climbing abilities with the group spec might have made more sense in retrospect.

    Hope that helps.
    There's certainly no reason why you can't do things to improve the climbing ability. As you mentioned, a 30 tooth is cheap. New, lighter, faster rolling tires would go a LONG way as well in improving climbing, depending on conditions. Even changing out the rear tire would help, I'd guess. My climb times are consistently 10-12% slower on the DHF/DHR II combo and though I think those are good tires, they are overkill for my conditions and riding style.

  12. #12
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    Nothing wrong with a little bit of overkill. It just means you are over prepared!
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by CPS1 View Post
    Thanks for all the kind comments, everyone.

    If I'm being honest, the Evil felt like a little bit overkill for those trails... at least at the speed I was riding, YMMV. I wonder if I would have been better served with a 120 or so mm bike. Maybe even something like a Yeti SB100. That said, when things did get a bit rowdy, it was nice to have the extra buffer that the Offering's suspension provides.

    NC Kingsting, I had the bike in Low as opposed to extra low. I had the odd strike here and there, but for the most part, the BB felt at a good level. One of the biggest obstacles I encountered on these trails were the off-camber roots, and I suspect a lower bb would have led to some strange moments hitting pedals on the trail. Sorry not sure what my crank arm length is. Just the regular standard issue SRAM size I guess.

    On that note, I don't think slackening the front end would have helped my descending time, and it probably would have harmed my climbing ability.

    Take this advice for what it's worth, but if I could do it again, I would have built the bike with a slightly more concentrated focus on going up as opposed to down (40 or 50 MM stem, 30T instead of 32 in the front). I feel like it's super dialed in the DH department, so emphasizing the climbing abilities with the group spec might have made more sense in retrospect.

    Hope that helps.
    Its a little overkill for Cedar/big and stuff in Dupont. I did the downhill 30sec faster on Cedar this year on my Riot compared to my Atlas without trying.
    But now you can choose the hard lines and use less brakes on black/farlow/daniels and such. I definitely dont think you need a bigger bike there.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by CPS1 View Post
    Thanks for all the kind comments, everyone.

    If I'm being honest, the Evil felt like a little bit overkill for those trails... at least at the speed I was riding, YMMV. I wonder if I would have been better served with a 120 or so mm bike. Maybe even something like a Yeti SB100. That said, when things did get a bit rowdy, it was nice to have the extra buffer that the Offering's suspension provides.

    NC Kingsting, I had the bike in Low as opposed to extra low. I had the odd strike here and there, but for the most part, the BB felt at a good level. One of the biggest obstacles I encountered on these trails were the off-camber roots, and I suspect a lower bb would have led to some strange moments hitting pedals on the trail. Sorry not sure what my crank arm length is. Just the regular standard issue SRAM size I guess.

    On that note, I don't think slackening the front end would have helped my descending time, and it probably would have harmed my climbing ability.

    Take this advice for what it's worth, but if I could do it again, I would have built the bike with a slightly more concentrated focus on going up as opposed to down (40 or 50 MM stem, 30T instead of 32 in the front). I feel like it's super dialed in the DH department, so emphasizing the climbing abilities with the group spec might have made more sense in retrospect.

    Hope that helps.
    Off camber Pisgah roots certainly make it difficult to gain headway at times. Especially if they're wet. Doesn't really matter which bike you're on.

    You can still tweak the bike to improve some of its climbing abilities. None of the things you mention is all that expensive.

    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    There's certainly no reason why you can't do things to improve the climbing ability. As you mentioned, a 30 tooth is cheap. New, lighter, faster rolling tires would go a LONG way as well in improving climbing, depending on conditions. Even changing out the rear tire would help, I'd guess. My climb times are consistently 10-12% slower on the DHF/DHR II combo and though I think those are good tires, they are overkill for my conditions and riding style.
    The problem with lightening up the tires too much is that on the rougher trails in Pisgah, you still do want fairly aggressive knobs. Sure, you can do fine with less aggressive than a DHRII on the back, but I still wouldn't want to drop too much in aggressiveness back there. Maybe a Rekon at the low end. DHF up front is pretty standard equipment in this area. Pisgah is problematic in some respects. There aren't a whole lot of rides around where you won't be doing significant gravel road climbing. You certainly don't need aggressive tires for any of that. But things often change fast once you get onto the singletrack. Especially the most desirable singletrack.

    Those long gravel climbs are really the only place that I bother with adjusting my suspension. I'll dial up the compression damping on my shock for that stuff. It does make a notable improvement there. But if I'm doing a comparable climb on singletrack (like if I'm climbing Squirrel or Laurel Mtn), I keep the suspension open. Maybe if I had a bike with more travel, I'd use some middle level of damping even on climbs like that and only run it open on rowdier downhills. I've demoed a few longer travel bikes and I did tend to use those settings more, but that could very well have also been related to the suspension being relatively poorly set up for me. I usually spend weeks or months setting up the suspension on a new bike - not 30sec, which is usually how it's done in bike demo/rental situations.

  15. #15
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    What do you guys think of the Hans Dampf for DuPont and Pisgah? Looks to save some significant rolling weight and itís still an aggressive tread for the roots etc.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by NC Kingsting View Post
    What do you guys think of the Hans Dampf for DuPont and Pisgah? Looks to save some significant rolling weight and itís still an aggressive tread for the roots etc.
    Fine for Dupont but shwable tire,rocks and I haven't been able to agree. They never last more thank about a month.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerberus75 View Post
    Fine for Dupont but shwable tire,rocks and I haven't been able to agree. They never last more thank about a month.
    I have never ridden schwalbe tires, but know many who have. Too many cut sidewalls to give me the confidence to spend money on them.

    I used to ride conti tires on my old 26er, but conti doesn't make fatbike sizes so I have been using Surly and 45Nrth tires (innova) on my fatbike. My wife's 2 mtb's are running Maxxis tires and have been extremely reliable.

    Not sure yet what I will be running on my 29er. I only just ordered the fork today. I want to find something fairly aggressive with better intermediate cornering knobs, as I hear the 2.6 dhf has a pronounced vague spot there.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I have never ridden schwalbe tires, but know many who have. Too many cut sidewalls to give me the confidence to spend money on them.

    I used to ride conti tires on my old 26er, but conti doesn't make fatbike sizes so I have been using Surly and 45Nrth tires (innova) on my fatbike. My wife's 2 mtb's are running Maxxis tires and have been extremely reliable.

    Not sure yet what I will be running on my 29er. I only just ordered the fork today. I want to find something fairly aggressive with better intermediate cornering knobs, as I hear the 2.6 dhf has a pronounced vague spot there.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
    I don't like the wide DHF for damp forest trails. They require a commited lean over that trees get in the way. And the slip zone sucks on roots. This year i road DHR front and Agressor rear. I really like the transition of the Assegai but its just too draggy for a trail bike IMHO if the new trail version comes out soon ill get it though. Or ill try the new Spec Eliminatior wich looks like a trail copy.

  19. #19
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    great review! Evil makes some real rad bikes, what size offering are you on?

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    Oh I should have mentioned that. Size L.



    Also I should have mentioned... Before this bike I had never ridden DHF/DHR2 tires.

    I am 100% converted. They are the truth.

    Previously, I had tried Ardents (front and rear) and later a Trail Boss / Bronson combo.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerberus75 View Post
    This really does help. The extra 40mm helps so you dont need the extra compression on the trails you mentioned i thought the following was just slightly under gunned but better than the smuggler. Which is why i went for the Riot. The offering is a close contender if CB dont update the Riot soon.
    Extra 40mm? The Following is not under gunned. You just didnít have it set up optimally. Thatís what happens when you donít take time to evaluate things properly. Quick demos donít do justice in most cases.

    Also minions grip very well you just have to learn to commit.


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