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  1. #1
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    It doesn't get much worse than this...

    I was supposed to now be riding my bike to a beachrace. A good 20 miles/32km, all headwind.
    I thought I was prepared. My Fisher is always set up with fat slicks, gearing I don't care about, it's got a couple semi-working ones and they suffice.
    I picked my clothing carefully, it's 5ÂșC here. Mild rain now and then. No overshoes, I misplaced them somewhere this summer, but I have a nice plastic bag solution and double socks for that.

    All I had to do in the (bike)basement, was to swap pedals (platforms on the bike), lube the chain, swap to a lighter seat+post that I have ready there, and GO.
    So the seatpost swap was 30secs work. Lubing was a breeze, crankset turned better than I expected (busted ISIS BB). First pedal came right off. Second pedal. Shoot, am I turning the worng way? Hmm, no, I'm doing this right. I'll get a better wrench upstairs, 15mm. Hmm, it fits a bit loosely, scary with the force I'm trying to apply. I'll fill it up with a cloth.
    With my full bodyweight on the sub-10" wrench, over the course of a quarter of an hour I managed 2 threads or, it seemed to be working. But then, it stopped moving. I couldn't get the pedal past a difficult angle anymore. The wrench kept popping off the spindle.
    I could have gone upstairs for a longer water pump wrench, and do an all-or-nothing attempt (spindle will be busted for sure afterwards), but time had passed, I missed my window to make it to the race in time.
    This sucks so bad. I had a nice week with quite a bit of mileage. This race would have been the perfect test and wake-up call for the new season!
    Now I'm going to have to spend a couple more hours on that rotten pedal to try and get it off the Turbine LP cranks. Not sure the cranks will even live through it, damnit.
    And now, I didn't lube the spindle. I never do. It's all my own fault. It sucks.

    [/rant]

  2. #2
    College
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    anti seize ??

  3. #3
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    get a length of plastic water piping from Gamma

    Put it on the spanner to make it longer and give more leverage.

  4. #4
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    First I'll have to find a wrench that fits super-tight, or it will slip off. Adjustable wrench is too wide.
    Can plastic take such torque? Doubt it...

  5. #5
    Harmonius Wrench
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    Work it back and forth

    Cloxxki: You may have to use a rust penetrant spray, or heck, Tri Flow actually works best. Put it on the exposed threads and let it soak inwards into the crankarm. Once you feel that has happened then put an appropriate wrench on and tighten the pedal about a half turn, Then back the opposite way, loosening hopefully a bit more than the point where you started. Then tighten again about a half turn. Keep repeating this process, adding a little penetrant/ lube every so often until you finally get the pedal out.

    You are about to pull the threads out of the crankarm where you are at right now. Do not continue trying to unscrew the pedal out of the crank arm! You must work it out as I have described to preserve the threads.

    Good luck!
    Riden' an Smilin'
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  6. #6
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    Thanks, that makes loads of sense.
    I remember the pedal was hard to get on the crank to begin with a couple months ago. I thought I initially didn't even manage to get it all the way in, but later it did appear to be fully inserted.
    I'll go past my dad to fetch some penetrant, he has that fort of thing for his hardwarestore.

  7. #7
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    It worked for me

    Quote Originally Posted by Cloxxki
    First I'll have to find a wrench that fits super-tight, or it will slip off. Adjustable wrench is too wide.
    Can plastic take such torque? Doubt it...
    1m long piece slid over the handle of the spanner. You need a number 15 spanner.

  8. #8
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    The 15 fits suspiciously loose. 4 total layers of t-shirt cloth are required to make it snug. I'm suspecting an imperial size of sorts, or my wrench is really dead :-) It's really cheap platform pedals that once came with a Giant bike or something.
    I'll look for the pastic pipe. With a bit of luck it's also work as SS cassette spacers :-

  9. #9
    Always Learning
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloxxki
    ...I remember the pedal was hard to get on the crank to begin with a couple months ago. I thought I initially didn't even manage to get it all the way in, but later it did appear to be fully inserted.
    Uh oh...

    Sounds like there is a possibility you may have installed it cross-threaded and ended up forcing it in there. Better take it to an LBS and let them see what they can salvage of your threads. It wouldn't surprise me if one or the other (pedal or crankarm threads) might be altered. The LBS will have all the proper tools and leverage to get that pedal off.

    BB

  10. #10
    mtbr member
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    similar situation

    I recently shipped a bike in a case, the instructions said remove pedals for shipping. After some grunting and cursing I just removed the cranks. So much easier. My suggestion is to get a second set of (beater) cranks and accept the pedals as semi-permanent.

  11. #11
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    I also feared cross-threading, but it clearly has an R on the pedal.

  12. #12
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    I have english sized tools here

    Quote Originally Posted by Cloxxki
    I also feared cross-threading, but it clearly has an R on the pedal.

    Perhaps you should come round one evening.

  13. #13
    Always Learning
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloxxki
    I also feared cross-threading, but it clearly has an R on the pedal.
    Perhaps I used the wrong term, but I didn't mean installing the wrong pedal on the wrong crankarm. Rather, I meant that perhaps you didn't quite get the threads lined up perfectly and rather than the pedal going in easily, the threads on the pedal "created" their own new route. Or perhaps the pedal threads were already bad before you installed it the last time. Hopefully, if there is any damage, it would be on the pedal threads itself and not the crankarm. Either way, the LBS should have the tools to salvage the crankarm threads.

    I only mention it as a possibility. It could simply be that the metal to metal contact has seized making it difficult for you to remove the pedal.

    Best of luck on it as I know how frustrating damaged components can make us. Not to mention the cost...

    BB

  14. #14
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    Indeed, I suspect both the crank and pedal were less than perfectly smoothly threaded. It got in straight though I think, I rode it a lot and never did it feel mis-aligned.
    My LBS is a bit around the corner, I'll figure something out with my Dad's tools or the English Bob-branded ones. Could it be 9/16"? That's between 14 and 15mm. Anyone know of that size being used for pedals?

  15. #15
    Eric the Red
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloxxki
    Indeed, I suspect both the crank and pedal were less than perfectly smoothly threaded. It got in straight though I think, I rode it a lot and never did it feel mis-aligned.
    My LBS is a bit around the corner, I'll figure something out with my Dad's tools or the English Bob-branded ones. Could it be 9/16"? That's between 14 and 15mm. Anyone know of that size being used for pedals?

    I remember some old Park pedal wrenches with 15mm on one side and 9/16" on the other. I worked at a Schwinn shop and we used it on some older\classic bikes. Also, 9/16" works out to 14.29mm. Good Luck

  16. #16
    When did you get here?!?!
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    Safety First!

    Cloxxki,
    FWIW, if you end up using a breaker bar of any sort make sure you use eye protection.
    I say this because of an incident at my LBS where a mechanic lost an eye.
    Two guys working on a seized BB, one holding the wrench in place, the other at the end of the bar. The wrench shattered and schrapnel became embedded in his eye.
    Safety First!
    ~E
    You can please some people sometimes but you can't please all the people all the time.
    ERIC'S RIDE LOG

  17. #17
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    Good tip, tools and parts tend to go wild with me.

  18. #18
    Klydesdale
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    I've had several pairs of platform pedals that required a 9/16" wrench.

  19. #19
    Harmonius Wrench
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    You're spending too much time here!

    And not enough at the end of a wrench! Probably would work fine with a 9/16ths by the sounds of your description, Cloxxki. Although, it is quite possible that your 15mm is that bad, as I've seen that also.

    Bruce, your suggestion that it may be cross threaded would still require the same removal technique as I described earlier. According to the way Cloxx describes it, I doubt that is the case, however. This sounds like a classic case of what can happen if you do not get enough/ any grease or anti-sieze on the pedal threads. This can also happen if you ride alot in wet conditions and the lube or anti-sieze gets leached out from the pedal spindle/ crankarm interface. (It doesn't rain much in Holland.....does it? )

    Try the technique as I described it, and if there is any hope at all, you should be fine.

    You must be too busy thinking about the repercussions of Specialized coming into the 29"er market!
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  20. #20
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    Man has that bike seen some rain recently... I should also spend time in fixing me a good rear fender for the sukker, man do Big Apple's ever throw up a spray!
    The crappy RaceFace ISIS BB is doing better later after all the rain it's been through. It died after about 1000 dry road miles.
    My last ride on the bike must have been the finishing hit. A combination of wet roads, drying up, and later the day more wet roads and some hail storms. I took the previous pedals off and they were near perfectly clean dry. The platforms went on showroom-dry but with suspiciously looking threads :-)
    If I find some good penetrant I may lay the bike on it's side, I can just apply it to the backside of the pedal spindle and let gravity do it's job?

  21. #21
    Harmonius Wrench
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloxxki
    Man has that bike seen some rain recently... I should also spend time in fixing me a good rear fender for the sukker, man do Big Apple's ever throw up a spray!
    The crappy RaceFace ISIS BB is doing better later after all the rain it's been through. It died after about 1000 dry road miles.
    My last ride on the bike must have been the finishing hit. A combination of wet roads, drying up, and later the day more wet roads and some hail storms. I took the previous pedals off and they were near perfectly clean dry. The platforms went on showroom-dry but with suspiciously looking threads :-)
    If I find some good penetrant I may lay the bike on it's side, I can just apply it to the backside of the pedal spindle and let gravity do it's job?
    Yes, that usually does the trick!
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  22. #22
    AOF
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    I don't know if anyone has mentioned this yet, but if you have access to a small plumbers propane torch, you can just apply the heat to the crank/ pedal for about 45-60 seconds, and it should come right off. This method has never failed me.
    I have found that on old bikes that have lived through some rain, or bikes that see alot of wet rides need this to get the pedals off.
    Good luck!

    -dan
    My LBS

    Take advantage of every opportunity to ride your bicycle!

  23. #23
    Harmonius Wrench
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    Ah! The "Hot wrench"!

    Quote Originally Posted by AOF
    I don't know if anyone has mentioned this yet, but if you have access to a small plumbers propane torch, you can just apply the heat to the crank/ pedal for about 45-60 seconds, and it should come right off. This method has never failed me.
    I have found that on old bikes that have lived through some rain, or bikes that see alot of wet rides need this to get the pedals off.
    Good luck!

    -dan
    Ya gotta have some mighty fine motor skills and alot of common sense to run one of them wrenches! At worst, you could burn the place down, and at best just avoid de-tempering whatever metal you are heating up. My advice: avoid at all costs for bicycle work, unless making parts useless is of no concern!
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  24. #24
    AOF
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guitar Ted
    Ya gotta have some mighty fine motor skills and alot of common sense to run one of them wrenches! At worst, you could burn the place down, and at best just avoid de-tempering whatever metal you are heating up. My advice: avoid at all costs for bicycle work, unless making parts useless is of no concern!
    I wasn't insinuating he take a flame thrower to the crank and pedal, sounds like it may be junk anyways.
    If someone has a small propane torch, and they think they are going to burn their house down, they probably shouldn't have one of these. I'd be willing to say that if they do not have fine motor skills, they shouldn't have a wrench either. Heck, maybe they shouldn't even be on a bike!
    Better to have a pedal stuck on a set of cranks he can't use.
    My LBS

    Take advantage of every opportunity to ride your bicycle!

  25. #25
    Harmonius Wrench
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    Yes, but you do not address the Tempering issue

    Quote Originally Posted by AOF
    I wasn't insinuating he take a flame thrower to the crank and pedal, sounds like it may be junk anyways.
    If someone has a small propane torch, and they think they are going to burn their house down, they probably shouldn't have one of these. I'd be willing to say that if they do not have fine motor skills, they shouldn't have a wrench either. Heck, maybe they shouldn't even be on a bike!
    Better to have a pedal stuck on a set of cranks he can't use.
    Whenever you heat up metal, ( Hot enough to make it expand or loosen corrosion) you are doing other things that you cannot see, or know until it's too late. I'm not real fond of pedals snapping off the ends of crankarms, as I'm sure you are not. Best to leave heat out of the equation if at all possible, and in Cloxxki's case, it isn't necessary at all. Why risk it?
    Riden' an Smilin'
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  26. #26
    Royalston Mass
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    Do the pedals have a hex wrench hole in the back?

  27. #27
    mvi
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    Bankschroef

    Take the crank off the BB. Put the peadal axle in the vice (bankschroef) and use the crank as a lever.
    Now help me take my crank with wasted threads off my BB/

  28. #28
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    @mvi : Maybe you could devise a wedge with a sleeve for the BB to pass through. Very slallow angle wedge, for max leverage. Lube everything mightly well, and smack the wedge with a sledgehammer to push the crank off. Another way might be to create a large hook, so you can directly hammer it off.

    I had my bike on it's side, spindle soaked in some smart stuff my dad gave me. With the help of a coke can shim the 15mm wrench had good grip on the 9/16" spindle, and movement happened. A couple times a 1/4 rotation back and forth, and it came of relatively easy. The pedal's threads were almost non-existent for the bit that goes into the crank last.

    Thanks all for the help!

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