Is it crazy to use a 29er for road riding?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Is it crazy to use a 29er for road riding?

    So here's the situation: I currently have a Yeti 575 and a Specialized Roubaix road bike. I'm thinking of selling both of my bikes (because money is an issue), getting a 29er hardtail with a lockout fork, light fast rolling tires (or possibly two sets of wheels, one with slicks and one with knobbies), and using it for both road and off-road. Budget would be about $2500.

    On my local trails and for the length of my rides, I think a 29er might be great, but not sure about road riding. Most of my riding is solo and usually an hour or less, due to busy schedule, daddy duty, etc. Roads around here are typically pretty bad (chip and seal, lots of potholes) with lots of short steep hills. Trails are typical New England singletrack (rocky, rooty). I like the Yeti but its feels slow and heavy on the climbs. How would a 29er be for each of these scenarios?

  2. #2
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    I'm thinking about doing the same thing , only with a 26er.

  3. #3
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    It would be so crazy that you'd be insane!



    Do it.

  4. #4
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    ask your lbs for a quick test ride on the road. see how the handling is on the road where you've got cars passing you. is the handling stable? twitchy? floppy? can you keep a straight line. depending on the geometry and your style, there will be different results.

  5. #5
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    I don't think it's crazy. Then again, I'm crazy. If it's just for exercise, then why not? The only real downside I see to any of this is weight, but if you're trying to get a work out then a couple extra pounds on your bike is not going to kill you (you're not in a competitive race). To me, the benefits outweigh (excuse my phrasing) the weight issue in that you'd have a more durable bike to handle the crappy roads, you'd have more tire to soak up rougher areas, and you'd have that little bit of squish that you still get even from a locked-out fork that will make bigger potholes and hits more comfortable. Plus you'll have consistent, reliable disc brakes in case you encounter rain up in NE there.

    Personally, I'm the opposite of a weight weenie, so keep that in mind, but if your main goals are enjoyment of the ride, exercise, and consistency/low-maintenance (as opposed to speed and weight reduction) then I think it would work just fine.

  6. #6
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    It would work just fine. Two wheelsets is a good idea. A Specialized Roubaix sure is a nice bike though.

    Also bear in mind that depending upon how much you ride, you're going to be putting all your eggs in one basket in terms of maintenance. If that bike breaks, you can't ride anywhere at all. I'm in the 10-15 hour range weekly and, despite my best intentions, it's hard to keep rolling with two, think I need a third.

  7. #7
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    I have a HT SS 29er and a 6" FS 26er, and the bike I ride 95% of the time is the 29er hardtail (Boston area and Southern NH). As for riding it in on the road, I'd buy a bike in the $2000 range, and then spend $500 on a second, light wheelset with road tires. Semi-slick tires on on wet roots would suck. And Panaracer Rampages on the road are like riding through sand.

    And a 29er rim with road tires on it is essentially a 700c road bike.

    PS I'd also recommend a handlebar mounted lockout for New England style riding (Poploc if you go Rockshox).

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puzman
    So here's the situation: I currently have a Yeti 575 and a Specialized Roubaix road bike. I'm thinking of selling both of my bikes (because money is an issue), getting a 29er hardtail with a lockout fork, light fast rolling tires (or possibly two sets of wheels, one with slicks and one with knobbies), and using it for both road and off-road. Budget would be about $2500.

    On my local trails and for the length of my rides, I think a 29er might be great, but not sure about road riding. Most of my riding is solo and usually an hour or less, due to busy schedule, daddy duty, etc. Roads around here are typically pretty bad (chip and seal, lots of potholes) with lots of short steep hills. Trails are typical New England singletrack (rocky, rooty). I like the Yeti but its feels slow and heavy on the climbs. How would a 29er be for each of these scenarios?
    My main ride is a Kona King Kahuna. I am having Stan's lace me up a pair of road rims on mountain hubs for the very reason you have described.

  9. #9
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    I don't think it's crazy, but I have to wonder about the cost of the extra wheels vs. a cheap used road bike.

    I ride on the road once or twice a week now for fitness on my steel road bike ('01 Lemond). Not sure how much it's worth now, but it's light and fun. My MTB is a Big Kauna, and as much as I like it off-road, I think on-road would be a chore.

  10. #10
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    I ride to the trails and recently I converted my drop-bar rigid into a 1X9 - completely changed the bike (in a good way) from a single-speed - I actually have flat speed now! I have the fast rolling Sagauros on there, and even with the 28psi tubeless set-up I have, they roll excellent - I could only imagine some nice, fat urban commuters would feel much better than a 700 X 23 road tires. I have Schwalbe Big Apples on my 26" utility bike and this board is always raving about how they feel on 29'ers. They are truly beautiful tires... even better that they are offered in the 29" size.

    I have a Surly Pacer with 700 X 32, and although comfortable for century rides and whatnot, I have a wild hair to ride my 29'er on a long road ride, just inflate the tires to 40psi. Look at the Salsa Fargo... that should be your example of what the possibilities are!

    In fact, I would definetely consider doing the same tires-and-wheels swap idea for some road centuries next year just because I get enough wierd stares when I roll my CX bike on these rides... I'm sure the drop-bar rigid 29'er would make people's heads explode. I think the key here is, though, is to have lock-out or go rigid.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by too boku
    I'm thinking about doing the same thing , only with a 26er.
    I did it with a 26er, changed to a rigid fork and a woodchipper setup on my WTB. Worked great. If traffic gets tense, I can just jump off onto the shoulder of the road, sidewalk, or someone's front yard. Opened up a lot of gravel road riding for me too.

    Now thinking about putting the woodchipper on my Spot, the only holdup is buying new shifters for the 9-speed, or switching it over to 8s since I have 8s barcons to use.
    Chasing bears through the woods drunk with a dull hatchet is strongly not advised

  12. #12
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    I also have an old 853 Steel LeMond that I wont let go of - possibly consider letting the Roubaix go and looking for a used Lemond with Ultegra or maybe an Allez with 105 - it could be done im sure but i like the option of having a road bike allot more than I thought I would

    http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/...8&menuItemId=0

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    My Salsa Fargo is my primary bike. I'm a daily commuter, but also ride trails and do group rode rides. With WTB Vulpines at 65psi on I don't have much difficulty at the "B group" level. If theres a lot of climbing its hard, but I don't fall back. If I throw lighter/thinner touring tires on its easier. If I had a lighter wheelset...even better.

    But yea, I'm looking at a 2nd bike because the cost isn't that much different (2nd wheelset PLUS: tires, cassette, rotors OR time to change those between wheelsets), and the maintenance issues noted above.

  14. #14
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    Mark me down... I have two sets of wheels for my 29er. One set has knobbies. Other set has Big Apples. It's normally what I ride to work and on the trails.

    Still have the same 26er I've had since 1999. It's setup with IRD 2.25 road tires. I road ride that too.

    steel rigid forks on both.

  15. #15
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    I think the biggest drawback to any MTB on the road is the lack of different hand positions. The few times that I've gone on road rides on a MTB, I found myself really uncomfortable with hand placements after an hour or so. Of course there are various "non-standard" bars that you can use to get around that a bit, and bar-ends too. If most of your road rides will be short too, then this may be a non-issue as well.

  16. #16
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    I'm wondering whether you can really sell your two current rigs for enough to buy a decent 29'er and have enough money left over to improve your financial situation enough to make it all make sense.

  17. #17
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    You could also consider a (steel) cyclocross bike, depending on how much cush you need on your local trails. Having not gotten around to buying a proper MTB after a long stint in road racing, I've been using my Lemond Poprad with big/aggressive 'cross tires, carbon fork and upgraded brakes. It actually works really well for the stuff I ride, from central VA to northern CA trails. It doubles as my road bike for trips, just swap wheels.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by topmounter
    I'm wondering whether you can really sell your two current rigs for enough to buy a decent 29'er and have enough money left over to improve your financial situation enough to make it all make sense.
    +1

    Plus, IMO, if you're at all serious about your road riding you'll be frustrated.

  19. #19
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    Not Crazy.

    Do it.

    I have cx bike w/ 23c tires and a 29'er mountain bike. I choose my 29'er 80% of the time for road rides. Even with the 2.25" Racing Ralphs for hammerfest group road rides. It's just a more fun bike. The cx bike is good for about 2 mph extra, at most.

    Convenient lockout, or firm threshold, is key though. Be sure to have a pretty tall gear up top. 44/12 is just enough for me w/ mountain tires on, 44/11 would be necessary w/ road tires (smaller cicrumference).

  20. #20
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    Why not?

    Roadies do it.

  21. #21
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    my 29r is my every bike road mountain and what not
    Quote Originally Posted by craftworks750
    Riding a mtb is like a reset button, 10 mins in and there is nothing else in the world that matters.
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  22. #22
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    You are crazy! But then again, we all are in one way or another or we would not be here discussing bikes.

    Just a word of caution about selling all bikes for one. A rigid 29er set up is a great "jack of all trades" but master of none kind of bike. You will sacrifice some fun/safety/performance on road and more difficult mtb rides. I have three for this reason. Steel road bike, 29er softtail mtb and a Niner MCR dropbar w/Arch wheelset/CX tires. Each has its own purpose, strengths and weaknesses.

    The Niner is the most versatile. Fun to ride, comfortable position, durable and efficient. I pile up the miles on MUT's to fireroads to singletrack and back home quite frequently. Also a great winter bike here in CO. I prefer my 29er when riding singletrack or rougher trails. Suspension, mtb handling and control work better for me on the mtb. A dedicated road bike is lighter ( Niner-25lbs), shorter wheelbase, better (quicker) handling, noticable better sustained (2-3hr) efficiency (+3-5mph flat road compared to Niner) and noticably better efficiency when climbing.

    If I went with only one bike, I could adjust equipment to close the gaps of performance and riding style. Bottom line though, I would have to make compromises choosing one bike.

    I do have to admit that the custom bike I build in my head on the long rides is pretty much what you are asking about. I dream about a custom Ti softail CX/road frame with interchangable disc road/mtb wheelsets. That is just my craziness though!

    Just my two cents worth. Hope it helps. Have fun choosing what works best for you.

    Tim

  23. #23
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    Is it "crazy"? Nope. It'll work - but...
    I'd have to agree that I don't think it would "save" that much $.
    Riding a mtb on pavement is a different experience ... a road or even cross bike is more fun on the pavement... for me. If I had to switch wheels/tires I'd eventually end up just getting a road bike...

    Just sell the kiddie wheels, get a 29er HT (I'll suggest the Singular Swift), and keep the Roubaix for the road... problem solved with less hassles... it should be no problem selling the Yeti... they make nice bikes - for 26" (he he he ;-D).

    ...or if you're die hard on selling it... as others have suggested - get an inexpensive steel roadie/cross bike. I've got a Salsa Vaya that I LOVE. It'll take 700x45s, cross tires or slicks, I use a Bonty Rhythm wheelset on it... it is great on dirt roads/bike paths and of course touring... I went on a road ride with a few friends this week - it did fine...

    Let us know what you decide...

    S
    "You know how they make aluminum bike frames? They take steel and suck out all the soul..."

  24. #24
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    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...TI_29_2010.htm

    That leaves $500 left in the budget for a tubeless wheelset and a set of Schwalbe Big Apples. As others have said, this is going to be a slower rolling bike on the road for sure just due to riding position and bigger tires.

    But really, if it were me I'd buy a $1,000-1,2000 hard tail 29er and a very nice vintage steel frame road bike for $300-500. I'd take the spare cash and buy some extra bits and goodies for both bikes, or just put it in the bank.
    "Got everything you need?"

  25. #25
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    I'm a big proponent of having the best tool for the job. If I had a budget of $2,500, I'd buy two bikes (road and MTB) and allocate more to one bike vs the other depending on what I do most.

    I've ridden my 29er(s) HT/rigid on-road, even with 38 semi-slicks on there, and it was a major bore. Getting back on the road bike felt like going from a minivan to a sports car. But I will say on the flip side, I took my SS/Fixed road bike with 38's on a mild singletrack and it was actually pretty fun. But I wouldn't want to do any major trails on it, though.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmccully
    I think the biggest drawback to any MTB on the road is the lack of different hand positions. The few times that I've gone on road rides on a MTB, I found myself really uncomfortable with hand placements after an hour or so.
    Not I, for I use shallow drops. Did a 50 mile ride with my brother-in-law on Tuesday and a 30 mile around a local lake yesterday.

  27. #27
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    I commute every Thursday and Friday with my 29er. Do it!

  28. #28
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    If I were you I would get a 2010 Fisher X-Cal (the 2010 has the Fox fork) which go for about $1500 and pocket the rest. If you are only riding 1 hour on rough roads, no need for and additional road bike right now. When you have more time, you can get an inexpensive road bike as some have suggested.

  29. #29
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    2 wheel sets 1 with nobbles 1 with slicks for perfection, or find 2 tyres which work well for both and slap some extra air pressure in for road use.

    I'd get a cheap expendable road bike though personally, should be able to do both for $2000 easy.

  30. #30
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    Looky here:
    Who uses their 29er for road training ?

    I found that switching to road tires you lose more than a few gear inches, so if you want your MTB to do road duty, you need a high gear on there like a 44T. The thing for me is that commuting on knobbies always allows for the unconventional (= more fun) route to your destination.

    -F

  31. #31
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    i ride my 29er to class everyday..and thats on a 6-lane road thru Gainesville and she treats me fine. Not to mention I can haul [email protected]@ down the hills

  32. #32
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    I take my 29er on 40+ mile road rides.

    It's 1x9, rigid, Big Apple tires, comfy, stable. Just cruises.

    If you're not trying to keep up with a lycra group, then why not?

  33. #33
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    I say screw the road bike. Especially for hour-long road trips on rough roads...that has 29er written all over it. You don't want to be on some skinny tire bike at 100 psi taking all those bumps. So your bike weighs a little more than a "real" road bike. So you lose a few mph vs a "real" road bike. Big deal! You can jump over curbs, fly over railroad tracks and potholes, go off the beaten path and explore! Try doing that with a road bike! 29er on the road all the way!

  34. #34
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    I think the point has been made by several posters that a 29er hardtail can do what you are asking of it. It can be used as a commuter, mtb, road ride etc.

    A thought to consider... Whenever I need to explain to myself, wife or non bike riders the need for multiple bikes. I try to make car analogies. Seems more of a common denominator for many. Your Yeti 575 is a 4X4. A road bike is a sportscar. Your proposed hardtail is a Subaru or Volvo. A Subaru can take you offroad, but with limitations. The Subaru can drive the roads, but not going to "carve the canyons" or perform as a sportscar.
    I am not saying any choice is bad or good. Just consider what is going to work for you. What are you going to enjoy? I too have limited riding opportunities due to work, kids etc. So when I get the chance to ride, I like to maximize my fun factor for the ride I chose for that day.

  35. #35
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    The only bike I ride on the road anymore is my FSR SJ 29er. I bought a Rockhopper for pretty much using only on the road but I ended up liking the comfort of the FS so much it's the only one I use.

  36. #36
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    I use my Fargo on and off road. I've done 30+ miles on pavement and it feels fine. I use it on gravel road cruising and single track and it's good fun. For one bike it really does a lot although it's not particularly GREAT at single track or pavement, but definitely acceptable.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by schnee
    I take my 29er on 40+ mile road rides.

    It's 1x9, rigid, Big Apple tires, comfy, stable. Just cruises.

    If you're not trying to keep up with a lycra group, then why not?
    I did a 100K on my cyclocross bike on knobbies (because I was too lazy to swap out road tires). A bike is a bike... what are you going to do... break it because of road riding?

    BUT! Hardcore roadbikes definetely have advantages in geometry. If you're not trying to keep up with the paceline, then there shouldn't be a problem.

    If folks are contemplating whether or not an expensive bicycle can be ridden on the road (via a shell-out of more cash for wheels and tires) then we are officially out of problems!!

  38. #38
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    Start with a niner set up to perform on the trails. An older road or CX bike for the road can be had for the price of a 2nd set of wheels and tires and will perform better, so I'd add one of those. Mountain bike bars, gearing etc. will always be a compromise on the road.

    This way you have a bike that does a great job of trails, and another that can handle fast road rides, is well set up for long rides, and if it's a CX, can serve as a backup bike when the niner is down.

  39. #39
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    I wonder how many people responding to this thread actually own or have owned a road bike of the caliber of your Roubaix.

    As some have said you can "get by" using a 29er on the road but in reality, even with skinny tires on the 29er, there is no comparison between the two. Try them back to back and you'll understand what I'm talking about. Keep in mind I'm talking about a true, pound out the miles, road ride not a mixed gravel grinder, urban, townie cruise.

  40. #40
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    Keep the 575, get a cross bike.

    Morgan

  41. #41
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    dont limit yourself by bike, i ride my FS bike on the road all the time when the trails are too wet, find a roadie group, ride with them, think of it like a rabbit to chase.

  42. #42
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    I have a Roubaix which I haven't ridden in 6 mo since getting a 29HT. I wouldn't be able to keep up with my friends on their road bikes, but riding alone it feels like I'm not far from road bike performance. This with a lockout fork and nanorapters inflated to about 60 (which works out great for rides split between paved/gravel and easy trails). You might be happier in the end keeping a full suspension bike and getting a less expensive 29HT. I'm comparing and contrasting my favorite trails back to back on my 26FSR and the 29er right now. Since I'm an XC rider, it's all doable on the HT but I would miss the FSR on some days...

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by CasualFan
    Especially for hour-long road trips on rough roads...that has 29er written all over it. You don't want to be on some skinny tire bike at 100 psi taking all those bumps. So your bike weighs a little more than a "real" road bike.
    My road bike (which by design, is not as comfy as his Roubaix) is MORE comfortable on the road with tires at 120 psi for 2-4 hours than my rigid 29er is on the trail.

    Also - the typical mid-level roadie is about 17 pounds. The typical mid-level hardtail is 25-27 pounds. That's more than 'a little' heavier, that's 45-60% heavier.

    Someone said it above - if he's serious about road biking, he'll be disappointed with the 29er as a roadie.

    Regarding the money situation - the best I can offer you, based on your ride time, etc. Sell the 575 and get a singlespeed. You'll maximize the workout in that hour-long ride window and have some $$ left over. Plus - get a trainer setup for the basement and ride when you've got some free time or during the winter - to stay fit.
    Happiness depends more on the inward disposition of mind than on outward circumstances. Benjamin Franklin

  44. #44
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    So what I get out of this thread is that it works for some, not for others, and only you will be able to know if it's working for you.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stahr_Nut
    I wonder how many people responding to this thread actually own or have owned a road bike of the caliber of your Roubaix.

    As some have said you can "get by" using a 29er on the road but in reality, even with skinny tires on the 29er, there is no comparison between the two. Try them back to back and you'll understand what I'm talking about. Keep in mind I'm talking about a true, pound out the miles, road ride not a mixed gravel grinder, urban, townie cruise.
    Don't play that 'cast aspersions on everyone's intelligence' card.

    I just rode 60 miles on my Giant OCR Limited with 23mm tires today. Tomorrow I'm doing a 30 mile charity ride on my fat tire 29er. I ride them back to back all the time. I still stand by my point every bit.

    Road bikes are great if you want to hunch over and go really damn fast for a really long time on smooth roads. They are not ideal for knock-around city bikes, where the pace is not terribly important and visibility and comfort are, and you encounter all sorts of obstacles. When 'just getting around', big fat MTB tires don't pinch flat, don't fall into grates, don't get squeezed in cracks. They roll right over railroad tracks. Etc.

    My neighborhood has TONS of locals on bikes. It's San Diego, people ride all year. What I see most of are rigid mountain bikes and cruisers, with townies and vintage road bikes tied for a distant third.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenLightGo
    My road bike (which by design, is not as comfy as his Roubaix) is MORE comfortable on the road with tires at 120 psi for 2-4 hours than my rigid 29er is on the trail.
    Good for you! But the question is about riding a 29er on the road.

  47. #47
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    no

    The Roubaix is a great bike, don't get rid of it!

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by FR hokeypokey
    I think the point has been made by several posters that a 29er hardtail can do what you are asking of it. It can be used as a commuter, mtb, road ride etc.

    A thought to consider... Whenever I need to explain to myself, wife or non bike riders the need for multiple bikes. I try to make car analogies. Seems more of a common denominator for many. Your Yeti 575 is a 4X4. A road bike is a sportscar. Your proposed hardtail is a Subaru or Volvo. A Subaru can take you offroad, but with limitations. The Subaru can drive the roads, but not going to "carve the canyons" or perform as a sportscar.
    I am not saying any choice is bad or good. Just consider what is going to work for you. What are you going to enjoy? I too have limited riding opportunities due to work, kids etc. So when I get the chance to ride, I like to maximize my fun factor for the ride I chose for that day.

    maybe you havnt driven a 300hp sti on canyon roads

  49. #49
    You know my steez...
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    Quote Originally Posted by CasualFan
    I say screw the road bike. Especially for hour-long road trips on rough roads...that has 29er written all over it. You don't want to be on some skinny tire bike at 100 psi taking all those bumps. So your bike weighs a little more than a "real" road bike. So you lose a few mph vs a "real" road bike. Big deal! You can jump over curbs, fly over railroad tracks and potholes, go off the beaten path and explore! Try doing that with a road bike! 29er on the road all the way!

    Right!
    Because no one can " can jump over curbs, fly over railroad tracks and potholes, go off the beaten path" on a ROAD bike!!

    Watch and learn...
    Watch all the way to the end
    "jump curbs" HA!!!!!
    <object width="640" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/3_tDYw9C8Ws&color1=0xb1b1b1&color2=0xd0d0d0&hl=en_ US&feature=player_embedded&fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/3_tDYw9C8Ws&color1=0xb1b1b1&color2=0xd0d0d0&hl=en_ US&feature=player_embedded&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="385"></embed></object>
    I'm unique, just like everyone else....

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puzman
    I'm thinking of selling both of my bikes (because money is an issue), getting a 29er hardtail with a lockout fork, light fast rolling tires (or possibly two sets of wheels, one with slicks and one with knobbies), and using it for both road and off-road.
    I think it's a viable idea. For your second (road) set of wheels, maybe you could get a set of disc specific cyclocross (700c) wheels.

    Then you could run "real" road tires that are much faster than the fatter but lower pressure slicks designed for use on wider MTB wheels.

    You could even use a more street oriented cassette on your road wheels as long as it's not too much different (teeth wise) than your mountain cassette so you don't have to worry about your chain being too long or the derailleur not being compatible.

    In any event, you can certainly make this work if that's what you have to do. Using one bike to replace two different types of bikes will always involve some sort of compromise.
    I'm unique, just like everyone else....

  51. #51
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  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by noremedy
    maybe you havnt driven a 300hp sti on canyon roads
    Actually I have. I used to test drive cars in SoCal as part of a test group. WRX STI was one of many I was able to drive on the canyons between Malibu and the San Fernando Valley. Very fun car. But also designed/set up as a sporty road car more than multi purpose offroad that I was responding to OP about.

    To bring us back to topic. It would be like setting up a 29er HT with drops, road wheelset and gearing. Much better attributes for the road but starts losing offroad effectiveness very quickly.

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by schnee
    ...Road bikes are great if you want to hunch over and go really damn fast for a really long time on smooth roads. They are not ideal for knock-around city bikes, where the pace is not terribly important and visibility and comfort are, and you encounter all sorts of obstacles. When 'just getting around', big fat MTB tires don't pinch flat, don't fall into grates, don't get squeezed in cracks. They roll right over railroad tracks. Etc.
    Thank you for backing up my point.

    BTW - I said nothing about anyone's inteligence. Reading a little between the lines of a lot of the responses to this thread coupled with the fact that this is a MTB forum just lead me to question how many of the responders have had the opportunity to spend much time on a high quality road bike.
    Last edited by Stahr_Nut; 08-14-2010 at 08:53 PM.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by schnee
    Don't play that 'cast aspersions on everyone's intelligence' card.

    I just rode 60 miles on my Giant OCR Limited with 23mm tires today. Tomorrow I'm doing a 30 mile charity ride on my fat tire 29er. I ride them back to back all the time. I still stand by my point every bit.

    Road bikes are great if you want to hunch over and go really damn fast for a really long time on smooth roads. They are not ideal for knock-around city bikes, where the pace is not terribly important and visibility and comfort are, and you encounter all sorts of obstacles. When 'just getting around', big fat MTB tires don't pinch flat, don't fall into grates, don't get squeezed in cracks. They roll right over railroad tracks. Etc.

    My neighborhood has TONS of locals on bikes. It's San Diego, people ride all year. What I see most of are rigid mountain bikes and cruisers, with townies and vintage road bikes tied for a distant third.
    Man, all those city bike messengers that spend more time in the saddle than 99% of us in here must have got it wrong!

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by p nut
    Man, all those city bike messengers that spend more time in the saddle than 99% of us in here must have got it wrong!
    Yes, they do!







    You've got it wrong too!
    (Big surprise!)

  56. #56
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    I am thinking very seriously of doing the same thing.
    I mostly ride on the top or the bar or the hoods on my road bike anyway, so whats the difference.

  57. #57
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    I do.


  58. #58
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    maybe not road riding

    but ive got eyes on making my emd a mixed terrain monster. Rigid fork, check just need a 40T big ring and some 1.8-1.9 tires...

  59. #59
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    Yes.

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    Welcome to the asylum.
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    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puzman
    So here's the situation: I currently have a Yeti 575 and a Specialized Roubaix road bike. I'm thinking of selling both of my bikes (because money is an issue), getting a 29er hardtail with a lockout fork, light fast rolling tires (or possibly two sets of wheels, one with slicks and one with knobbies), and using it for both road and off-road. Budget would be about $2500.

    On my local trails and for the length of my rides, I think a 29er might be great, but not sure about road riding. Most of my riding is solo and usually an hour or less, due to busy schedule, daddy duty, etc. Roads around here are typically pretty bad (chip and seal, lots of potholes) with lots of short steep hills. Trails are typical New England singletrack (rocky, rooty). I like the Yeti but its feels slow and heavy on the climbs. How would a 29er be for each of these scenarios?
    I do the same with my haro mary xc 29er. I has wtb laserdiscs with maxxis ardents for trail riding and some handmade skinnies for the road. reba lockout fork does the trick. sure it's bulky(er than a rigid fork) and handling is more cumbersome than a true road bike, but you can keep a good pace on pavement. I was working in the similar budget range too, and in the end i was very pleased. but I definitely keep the laserdiscs on 90% of the time
    GET IT DIRTY

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