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  1. #1
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    Can short people ride 29'ers?

    Is there a such a thing as too short? How short is too short?
    Somewhere else someone implied under 5'7" was too short.
    Short people got no business.........

  2. #2
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    Short people got no reason. Get it right when it come to the shorties!

  3. #3
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    Only the ones who are fast.


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  4. #4
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    Don't short change them!

  5. #5
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    They don't sell Small, Med. 29er frames for tall guys, or do they?

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    We can, but I choose not to. I hate them.

  7. #7
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    yes, but you have to lower the seat, pedal with your hands, and steer with your feet

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by tungsten View Post
    Is there a such a thing as too short? How short is too short?
    Somewhere else someone implied under 5'7" was too short.
    Short people got no business.........
    No such things! If you fit on a small, then you fit!

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  9. #9
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    This threat is short.

  10. #10
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    5'6", normal build.

    Been mountain biking since 1990 and have owned more than a couple bikes. The small 2008 Vassago Jabberwocky I rode for 8 years, fit great. The medium Kona Unit I ride now is also spot on for size.

    Can short people ride 29'ers?-img_0351.jpg

  11. #11
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    Their new bike, the Jabbergood, is for women. Itís a 29er that would be good for all short people.

  12. #12
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    I'm 5'6" and ride a 29er. A lot of companies have figured out 29ers and shorter riders up to mid travel (130-140mm) a lot of the long travel bikes will fit like a medium even though they have a small size code.

  13. #13
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    I ride a small frame 29er. Iím getting shorter with every decade.





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  14. #14
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    Yes, just find your prefered reach and other relevant geo numbers.


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    Pushing a larger diameter wheel requires more watts than a smaller wheel. You will still see the benefits of rolling over obstacles and larger contact patch etc.. and the detriments of the longer wheel base, heavier etc... A wheel should be fit to the rider. People who generate less power (newbies and smaller riders) typically prefer a 27.5" wheel. Its just easier for them to push. Of course this is assuming all things equal. Rarely the case. I would say ride all the bikes you can before making a decision. Look for demo days, and maybe your shop has demo bikes or even rentals.
    Last edited by dkharris111; 06-09-2018 at 03:05 PM. Reason: More specific

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkharris111 View Post
    Pushing a larger diameter wheel requires more watts than a smaller wheel. You will still see the benefits of rolling over obstacles and larger contact patch etc.. and the detriments of the longer wheel base, heavier etc... A wheel should be fit to the rider. People who generate less power (newbies and smaller riders) typically prefer a 27.5" wheel. Its just easier for them to push. Of course this is assuming all things equal. Rarely the case. I would say ride all the bikes you can before making a decision. Look for demo days, and maybe your shop has demo bikes or even rentals.
    Donít the heavier wheels carry momentum better? I do agree, a person should test out wheel sizes before making a decision. It should be a short and easy decision process.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn View Post
    Donít the heavier wheels carry momentum better? I do agree, a person should test out wheel sizes before making a decision. It should be a short and easy decision process.
    In a perfect scenario yes. you could add that to the attributes. Depending on your riding style and area you may see that's not the case though. Imagine a person living in an area with a trail system with elevation and tight switchbacks. The would need to slow for the switchback and then accelerate, Just one scenario off the top of my head. It would be interesting to see some data on this. someone who rides multiple sections of trail with different wheel sizes and maintains the same watts. Personally when the 29er came out I was all in because power was never my issue. It benefited me greatly but others found the larger wheels harder to turn over while climbing and accelerating. That was 2001ish??? A lot of technology has gone into wheels since.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkharris111 View Post
    In a perfect scenario yes. you could add that to the attributes. Depending on your riding style and area you may see that's not the case though. Imagine a person living in an area with a trail system with elevation and tight switchbacks. The would need to slow for the switchback and then accelerate, Just one scenario off the top of my head. It would be interesting to see some data on this. someone who rides multiple sections of trail with different wheel sizes and maintains the same watts. Personally when the 29er came out I was all in because power was never my issue. It benefited me greatly but others found the larger wheels harder to turn over while climbing and acceleratin. That was 2001ish??? A lot of technology has gone into wheels since.
    Thanks for the short lesson!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn View Post
    Thanks for the short lesson!
    Probably more my opinion and personal experiences than fact. Everyone is different. Happy trails.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkharris111 View Post
    Probably more my opinion and personal experiences than fact. Everyone is different. Happy trails.
    Donít be so short-sighted!

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn View Post
    Donít be so short-sighted!
    Hey MCS, you're not running short on comments for this thread, are you?
    =sParty
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  22. #22
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    Depends on what you mean by short. My partner is 168cm, and she use a small 29er full sus mtb. She would be on a medium 29er if there was anyone who made the seat tube and standover short enough for dropper posts back when she bought the bike.
    You should not buy bikes based on what wheel size fits who, but what frame fits you. On a side note 168cm (5`6") is not really short. My partner is taller than the average height for women in this country.

  23. #23
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    I'll bet many do.
    It's still pertinent to find the right bike and size. Fit is really critical.
    Get it right and you'll be happy and comfortable - if you are in the market and that's' why you are asking.
    Ride smalls and med's, 27.5 and 29 then figure it out.

    I've seen short people ride red bikes too.
    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

  24. #24
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    My wife is 5'6". Not exactly short but she has a Salsa Spearfish and a Medium 9 Zero 7 and right now, the 907 has 29+ wheels on it.
    I like turtles

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    Hey MCS, you're not running short on comments for this thread, are you?
    =sParty
    Life is short, make the best of it!

  26. #26
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    Things to consider. When manualling a bike chainstay length and axle height come into play. My inseam is 29" maualing my bike with 16.3 (414.mm) stays is easy. Over 17" sucks. But it's easier on 27.5 wheels.

  27. #27
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    I'm 5'5" with a 28" inseam. I ride a Rockhopper 29'er. Not a big fan of it, but based on a thread I started here not long ago I'm giving it a bit more time. The geo is likely all wrong for my riding style.

    That said, after riding a few 27.5's at a demo day this weekend..I won't buy another 29er.

  28. #28
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    agreed, 29ers roll better, but tougher in the turns and accelerating

  29. #29
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    Iím getting shorter with every decade.
    My memory's getting shorter with every decade. Otherwise I'd remember the short retort to this I thought of short moments ago..........

    Pushing a larger diameter wheel requires more watts than a smaller wheel.
    I'm thinking 4 extra teeth at the back will make short work of the difference.
    amishortimeanright?

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by tungsten View Post
    I'm thinking 4 extra teeth at the back will make short work of the difference.
    amishortimeanright?
    No amount of gearing gives a person more power.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
    No amount of gearing gives a person more power.
    If this were true we'd all be singlespeeding up the mountain in a 53x12 gear.
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  32. #32
    NedwannaB
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    What a stupid thread. I ride mine all the time. Both of them.
    Wait whuuut, who did he tell you that!?!?....

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    If this were true we'd all be singlespeeding up the mountain in a 53x12 gear.
    =sParty
    We would? Please explain. While you're at it, define "power."

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
    We would? Please explain. While you're at it, define "power."
    Power is the time-rate of doing work. In your reply to tungsten after (s)he said:
    Quote Originally Posted by tungsten View Post
    I'm thinking 4 extra teeth at the back will make short work of the difference.
    ...you implied that a lower gear won't make turning a larger wheel easier because it doesn't increase power. tungsten didn't say that power would be increased. Lower gearing doesn't increase power and tungsten didn't say it does.

    Lower gearing doesn't increase power. You're certainly right on this point. Gearing alters the amount of work being done within a given time and on this point tungsten is correct. My reply wasn't intended to imply that your statement was wrong. It was merely intended to point out, in an oblique way, that it was out of line.
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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
    We would? Please explain. While you're at it, define "power."
    Can a semi pull a hill in top gear?
    The short answer is...
    Of short not - peak torque from engine remains the same - needs to be shorted into a lower gear thus its "power" comes from the gearbox.
    Hence the torque my legs produce is used more efficiently going uphill shorting a bigger rear cog.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn View Post
    Their new bike, the Jabbergood, is for women. Itís a 29er that would be good for all short people.
    Agreed, because women are short.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkharris111 View Post
    Pushing a larger diameter wheel requires more watts than a smaller wheel. You will still see the benefits of rolling over obstacles and larger contact patch etc.. and the detriments of the longer wheel base, heavier etc... A wheel should be fit to the rider. People who generate less power (newbies and smaller riders) typically prefer a 27.5" wheel. Its just easier for them to push. Of course this is assuming all things equal. Rarely the case. I would say ride all the bikes you can before making a decision. Look for demo days, and maybe your shop has demo bikes or even rentals.
    These people should spend more time on the bike and less time pushing their bikes.

  38. #38
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    Short people got no reason. Get it right when it come to the shorties!

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by nauc View Post
    agreed, 29ers roll better, but tougher in the turns and accelerating
    I was expecting this when I demoed YT Jeffsy 27.5 and 29, but I found the 29 to accelerate easier. No issues with the bike park banked turns too. I think 29 bikes are closing the gap.

    Background: I'm 5'6" and rode a medium 29. My personal bike is 27.5 medium Trance.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMac47 View Post
    What a stupid thread. I ride mine all the time. Both of them.
    lol

    That sure clears things up !
    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

  41. #41
    NedwannaB
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    Yeah!

    Quote Originally Posted by bachman1961 View Post
    lol

    That sure clears things up !
    Simple and to the point. Really doesn't need to be any new inquiries after all this time does there? 😳
    Wait whuuut, who did he tell you that!?!?....

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMac47 View Post
    Simple and to the point. Really doesn't need to be any new inquiries after all this time does there? 😳


    Are you trying to cut this thread short?

  43. #43
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    I just finished reading this, but

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    I just finished reading this, but
    You have a short attention span?

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMac47 View Post
    Simple and to the point. Really doesn't need to be any new inquiries after all this time does there? 

    I may have misinterpreted the OP.

    It's getting more difficult for this old man to see a post and decipher a true inquiry about getting the right size bike for oneself or starting another debate.

    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

  46. #46
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    I am 5'6" with 29" inseam and I ride a 29er. I may not have the recommended top clearance but I am okay with it. Although the bike isn't the best in tight corner, but I managed.
    Norco Threshold Single Speed
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  47. #47
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    Ever seen a short person drive a big truck? No problems

  48. #48
    turtles make me hot
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    Don't get short with me.
    I like turtles

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by blizzardpapa View Post
    I am 5'6" with 29" inseam and I ride a 29er. I may not have the recommended top clearance but I am okay with it. Although the bike isn't the best in tight corner, but I managed.
    Is the recommended top tube clearance balls or taint?


    I dont usually find it listed on the Geo charts that manufacturers provide.

  50. #50
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    Yes, of course - I do not see any problem here at all, my sister is quite low and normally goes on 29'ers

  51. #51
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    Where's Rexy when you need him???
    Cool heads prevail

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by AidenThomas View Post
    Yes, of course - I do not see any problem here at all, my sister is quite low and normally goes on 29'ers
    You should show your sister more respect.

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    You should show your sister more respect.
    There's a descending trail in our local stash network called Your Sister. Everybody likes to go down on Your Sister.
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  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    Power is the time-rate of doing work. In your reply to tungsten after (s)he said:

    ...you implied that a lower gear won't make turning a larger wheel easier because it doesn't increase power. tungsten didn't say that power would be increased. Lower gearing doesn't increase power and tungsten didn't say it does.

    Lower gearing doesn't increase power. You're certainly right on this point. Gearing alters the amount of work being done within a given time and on this point tungsten is correct. My reply wasn't intended to imply that your statement was wrong. It was merely intended to point out, in an oblique way, that it was out of line.
    =sParty
    Quote Originally Posted by tungsten View Post
    Can a semi pull a hill in top gear?
    The short answer is...
    Of short not - peak torque from engine remains the same - needs to be shorted into a lower gear thus its "power" comes from the gearbox.
    Hence the torque my legs produce is used more efficiently going uphill shorting a bigger rear cog.
    More gearing makes turning any size wheel "easier." I was responding to the point that it takes more power to turn a larger wheel than a smaller one, a point that is probably an oversimplification, but generally true.

    Peak torque also does not tell you anything about the rate of doing work. Peak torque on a truck engine is just the point where the engine is the most volumetrically efficient; that point is meaningless in determining which gear should be used to climb a hill. We need a time constant to discuss that, thus the "power" discussion.

    If it is indeed harder to turn larger wheels than smaller ones, then that means the bike is slower with the same power input.

    I'd always thought the supposed advantage (for appropriately sized riders) was that taller tires have a larger rollover, which means they lose less momentum in rough terrain. After all, a 29" tire doesn't fit in a 28" hole. What I've found, for me, is that the heavy steering is negated by any rollover advantage the larger tires have.

    If the rollover theory is correct, then taller wheels may not be slower for the same power input, because one can match or even increase speed over smaller wheels by reducing losses from bumping up and down versus the smaller tires.

    As a smaller rider, I like smaller wheels and tires, with the caveat that I know I might be giving up something the 29er riders are gaining.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    There's a descending trail in our local stash network called Your Sister. Everybody likes to go down on Your Sister.
    =sParty
    Pain and pleasure.

    Saw a vid the other day of a trail called "handjob". It was short and very rough...not sure what to make of that, but I was amused nonetheless.

  56. #56
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    No short people allowed on the wagon wheels.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
    More gearing makes turning any size wheel "easier." I was responding to the point that it takes more power to turn a larger wheel than a smaller one, a point that is probably an oversimplification, but generally true.

    Peak torque also does not tell you anything about the rate of doing work. Peak torque on a truck engine is just the point where the engine is the most volumetrically efficient; that point is meaningless in determining which gear should be used to climb a hill. We need a time constant to discuss that, thus the "power" discussion.

    If it is indeed harder to turn larger wheels than smaller ones, then that means the bike is slower with the same power input.

    I'd always thought the supposed advantage (for appropriately sized riders) was that taller tires have a larger rollover, which means they lose less momentum in rough terrain. After all, a 29" tire doesn't fit in a 28" hole. What I've found, for me, is that the heavy steering is negated by any rollover advantage the larger tires have.

    If the rollover theory is correct, then taller wheels may not be slower for the same power input, because one can match or even increase speed over smaller wheels by reducing losses from bumping up and down versus the smaller tires.

    As a smaller rider, I like smaller wheels and tires, with the caveat that I know I might be giving up something the 29er riders are gaining.
    In regards to gearing- if all else is equal, a 29Ē wheel will require more force to move because the larger diameter increases the moment of inertia of the wheel. To maintain the same effort required to pedal a 26Ē wheel, you have to gear down the 29er.

    For example- a 26Ē wheel with a 2.3Ē tire running a 34t chainring and a 20t cog has 45.23 gear inches.
    The same combination of gears with a 29Ē wheel and a 2.3Ē tire has 49.45 gear inches.
    To return to your original measurement of 45.23, youíd need to add two teeth to the rear cog, giving you 45.03 gear inches.

    Itís never been about peak torque, itís about the effort required to get the wheel moving.
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  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by FJSnoozer View Post
    Is the recommended top tube clearance balls or taint?


    I don't usually find it listed on the Geo charts that manufacturers provide.
    The recommended top tube clearance is "none".
    Editor In Chief, "Internet Tough Guy Magazine"
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  59. #59
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    Sure, short people can ride 29ers. Depends on the rider and the terrain. At 5'2" I have ridden some that felt too big and some that were fine. Clearance is an issue with some bikes but not all... it depends on the bend of the top tube, and FS will have more clearance than a hardtail in general. The 29ers I have tested all seemed very planted and not too playful though. When you're short and don't weigh much it's really hard to get a big 29er to manual, but if your terrain is all fast, flowing singletrack without much tech then a 29er would be fine. I personally prefer a 27.5 because it's lighter and easier to maneuver, but some people prefer that planted roll-over-everything feel.

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