Can anything beat a Ripley?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Can anything beat a Ripley?

    I'm looking for a FS trail rig that's a world-class climber but capable enough to take on any trail. Cleaning tough climbs is my favorite thing to do on a bike, and I don't mind slowing down and picking my lines a bit on the DH (up to now I've only ever ridden hardtails).

    I've looked at the new Neuron, Tallboy, Trail 429, Smuggler, and Optic, but they all seem to either not have the most modern geo (Neuron), or give up too much on the climbing front.

    The aluminum Tallboy R is tempting at $1K less than the Ripley NX build, but it's gotta be several pounds heavier and, from what I hear, isn't nearly as agile a climber.

    Considering my needs/wants, is there anything that can touch the Ripley? Am I wrong about the Tallboy?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    I'm looking for a FS trail rig that's a world-class climber but capable enough to take on any trail. Cleaning tough climbs is my favorite thing to do on a bike, and I don't mind slowing down and picking my lines a bit on the DH (up to now I've only ever ridden hardtails).

    I've looked at the new Neuron, Tallboy, Trail 429, Smuggler, and Optic, but they all seem to either not have the most modern geo (Neuron), or give up too much on the climbing front.

    The aluminum Tallboy R is tempting at $1K less than the Ripley NX build, but it's gotta be several pounds heavier and, from what I hear, isn't nearly as agile a climber.

    Considering my needs/wants, is there anything that can touch the Ripley? Am I wrong about the Tallboy?
    Maybe the new Orbea Occam?

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  3. #3
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    i would say it will be quite difficult to find such balanced climbing/descending package as ripley v4 is. there are bikes in the category that climb better or descend better but v4 does both so well that i have not been able to find bike that beats it. i have not demoed any 2020 bikes so cant speak of those but did demo extensively in 2018/2019 before pulling trigger on v4.

  4. #4
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    I wouldnít call the Ripley a World Class climber.

    Good for its intended usage? Sure. The other bikes on your list will be even worse, though, so maybe that shifts the scale a bit.


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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    I wouldnít call the Ripley a World Class climber.

    Good for its intended usage? Sure. The other bikes on your list will be even worse, though, so maybe that shifts the scale a bit.


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    Really? I guess I should clarify that I'm talking technical climbing, not like fastest time up a fire road. One reviewer (can't remember which) said it was the best technical climber he's ever ridden. Are you saying you don't think it's world-class as a technical climber, or do you mean purely from an XC/race efficiency standpoint?

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    Trance 29 is in the ballpark.

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    2020 Top Fuel

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    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    Really? I guess I should clarify that I'm talking technical climbing, not like fastest time up a fire road. One reviewer (can't remember which) said it was the best technical climber he's ever ridden. Are you saying you don't think it's world-class as a technical climber, or do you mean purely from an XC/race efficiency standpoint?
    it does climb tech like no other bike i have ridden for sure. in its travel category is one of the top climber in general.

    orbea occam not really in same category, fun bike but doesnt climb even close. top fuel is a rocket but would argue it does tech better, plus it feels like xc bike, and descends, well, like xc bike.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    Really? I guess I should clarify that I'm talking technical climbing, not like fastest time up a fire road. One reviewer (can't remember which) said it was the best technical climber he's ever ridden. Are you saying you don't think it's world-class as a technical climber, or do you mean purely from an XC/race efficiency standpoint?
    Technical climbing ability and XC/race efficiency are part of the same thing, to me. Not sure where you ride, but in the areas Iíve lived or ridden, speed helps get you up technical climbs. OR, VA, CO, NC, GA, etc. Producing speed and maintaining momentum are essential components of climbing ability.

    The Ripley is a good climber for a trail bike, but the demo bike I rode had tires that sucked the life out of the bike and it wasnít particularly fast up a rocky climb. Unless you are talking about straight up trials, hopping around on one wheel sort of stuff, there are other bikes that will allow a rider to get up
    a technical climb faster or with less effort.




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  10. #10
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    Yeah. Current Rippley is too long/low/slack for my riding. '20 Top Fuel is looking good, though I hate the knockblock.
    Do the math.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    Technical climbing ability and XC/race efficiency are part of the same thing, to me. Not sure where you ride, but in the areas Iíve lived or ridden, speed helps get you up technical climbs. OR, VA, CO, NC, GA, etc. Producing speed and maintaining momentum are essential components of climbing ability.

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    most of the time ,not always, steep techy climbs that you basically crawl without keeping any momentum, i like those, on co fron range we have plenty of those around and V4 is great for those.

    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    The Ripley is a good climber for a trail bike, but the demo bike I rode had tires that sucked the life out of the bike and it wasnít particularly fast up a rocky climb. Unless you are talking about straight up trials, hopping around on one wheel sort of stuff, there are other bikes that will allow a rider to get up
    a technical climb faster or with less effort.

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    tires make huge difference. for some reason ibis thinks 2.6 tires are great on this bike. wrong. it does not need them. mine came with 2.6 schwalbe rubber, i replaced them for bonty xr4s 2.4, big improvement.
    would be interested in what other bikes you have in mind, i demoed tons of them over past year and a half, still think in its travel category V4 its hard to beat.

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    He said he wants a "FS trail rig" that climbs well, not some XC whippet. The Ripley is widely regarded as the best climbing "trail" bike out there, making it in effect "world class". My Mach 4SL might climb faster, but my Ripley climbs almost as fast and more comfortably, and with better traction. XC race bikes aren't always the answer, regardless of what the stopwatch might say.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by BmanInTheD View Post
    He said he wants a "FS trail rig" that climbs well, not some XC whippet. The Ripley is widely regarded as the best climbing "trail" bike out there, making it in effect "world class". My Mach 4SL might climb faster, but my Ripley climbs almost as fast and more comfortably, and with better traction. XC race bikes aren't always the answer, regardless of what the stopwatch might say.
    By who? Some shitty YouTube reviewers?

    I have no clue what the hell a "trail rig" is, or how anyone would define that. I've seen "trail" bikes being used as a descriptor by people and companies as anything from 115-170mm. That gamut runs from WC XC bikes with a spacer removed from the shock and a 120mm Fox 34 to EWS-capable bikes.

    I mean, some people think that an XC bike cannot be ridden on mountain bike trails. Not kidding. They think they need a "trail" bike to ride on...trails. Other people don't think a "trail" bike starts until 140mm. Or more. It's a bullshit descriptor that doesn't tell me anything about what that person is describing. I saw a review describing the new S-Works Enduro as the best climbing trail bike they'd ever ridden.

    So, let's be very specific, OP.

    Are you talking about bikes with 120mm+ in the rear, and 130mm+ in the front?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    By who? Some shitty YouTube reviewers??
    Lol, there are plenty of them, right?
    Best to demo as many as possible on local trails. I made a mistake of pirchasing mayhem based on reviews when it got on sale. I regreted it short after and sold after few months. My ripley v4 is the product of extensive demo rides.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cavo View Post
    Lol, there are plenty of them, right?
    Best to demo as many as possible on local trails. I made a mistake of pirchasing mayhem based on reviews when it got on sale. I regreted it short after and sold after few months. My ripley v4 is the product of extensive demo rides.
    This.

    I don't give a shit about Pinkbike, Loam Wolf, MTBYumYum or Bike Magazine's Bible of Bikes* reviews.

    *Where, in their Ripley review, they also refer to the Ripmo as a trail bike.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    Yeah. Current Rippley is too long/low/slack for my riding. '20 Top Fuel is looking good, though I hate the knockblock.
    Just curious if you've ridden it or are saying that purely based on specs. If you've ridden it, what was it you didn't like about the long/low/slack nature of it? Did it suffer on twisty singletrack, technical climbs...?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    So, let's be very specific, OP.

    Are you talking about bikes with 120mm+ in the rear, and 130mm+ in the front?
    To be honest, I don't think the descriptor is all that vague. I'm using "trail bike" to refer to something between XC and Enduro. Not necessarily the lightest, most precise, most efficient bike possible, but also not something that's made for fire road climbs + all-out descents. Obviously there's some variation within that range, from closer-to-XC to closer-to-Enduro, but a wide range of travels can meet the general definition. I'm generally talking 110-120 in the rear and 120-140 in the front (only because I think higher than that is unnecessary for my needs and would sacrifice too much in the climbing department).

    And I'm definitely not one that doesn't think XC bikes can be ridden on any trail. I've exclusively owned hardtails up to now and ride Downieville every year on mine. My buddies are all on XC hardtails and a lot of them can outride 90% of guys with enduro rigs on gravity trails. It's just that the trails I'm riding since I moved recently are more chattery, rooty, and rocky, and it's just plain not as comfortable on my hardtail after a couple hours.
    Last edited by mpcremata; 12-29-2019 at 09:44 AM.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by BmanInTheD View Post
    He said he wants a "FS trail rig" that climbs well, not some XC whippet. The Ripley is widely regarded as the best climbing "trail" bike out there, making it in effect "world class". My Mach 4SL might climb faster, but my Ripley climbs almost as fast and more comfortably, and with better traction. XC race bikes aren't always the answer, regardless of what the stopwatch might say.
    That is a drool-worthy collection of bikes you have, sir. Just out of curiosity, how would you compare the Ripley to your Ripmo? I'm 98% sure the Ripmo is more bike than I want, but everyone says it climbs so amazingly. There's gotta be a significant dropoff in climbing prowess from the Ripley, though, right? Which one do you reach for more often when you ride?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xlr8n View Post
    Trance 29 is in the ballpark.
    Yup, love mine

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    Yeah. Current Rippley is too long/low/slack for my riding. '20 Top Fuel is looking good, though I hate the knockblock.
    There isn't a whole lot of daylight between a Ripley and the new Top Fuel.

  21. #21
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    IMO...the V3 climbs better than the V4. The V4 goes down better.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    By who? Some shitty YouTube reviewers?

    I have no clue what the hell a "trail rig" is, or how anyone would define that. I've seen "trail" bikes being used as a descriptor by people and companies as anything from 115-170mm. That gamut runs from WC XC bikes with a spacer removed from the shock and a 120mm Fox 34 to EWS-capable bikes.

    I mean, some people think that an XC bike cannot be ridden on mountain bike trails. Not kidding. They think they need a "trail" bike to ride on...trails. Other people don't think a "trail" bike starts until 140mm. Or more. It's a bullshit descriptor that doesn't tell me anything about what that person is describing. I saw a review describing the new S-Works Enduro as the best climbing trail bike they'd ever ridden.

    So, let's be very specific, OP.

    Are you talking about bikes with 120mm+ in the rear, and 130mm+ in the front?
    If youíd quit being so damn disagreeable, for once, youíd be able to tell what he was talking about by the bikes he listed.
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    Quote Originally Posted by RS VR6 View Post
    IMO...the V3 climbs better than the V4. The V4 goes down better.
    Could you expound on that please? I almost pulled the trigger on a v3 because I figured it must a better climber, but then a lot of people are saying that with the steeper seat angle the v4 is actually better on the ups as well as the downs.

    Is it pure efficiency where you think the v3 is better? Technical climbing? Tight switchbacks? All of the above? And how much better?

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by RS VR6 View Post
    IMO...the V3 climbs better than the V4. The V4 goes down better.
    I'd agree with the V3 being an excellent climber but the caveat is in technical terrain. The sub 13" bottom bracket and pedal strikes are a momentum killer. Nice to see on the V4 that it's now 13.2 which is still a tad low IMO.

    The point being I'll take a slightly less efficient V4 strictly based on bb ht.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    By who? Some shitty YouTube reviewers?

    I have no clue what the hell a "trail rig" is. I saw a review describing the new S-Works Enduro as the best climbing trail bike they'd ever ridden.
    I'd love to get a new Enduro to complement my Ripley V4.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RS VR6 View Post
    IMO...the V3 climbs better than the V4. The V4 goes down better.
    not for me for sure

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    I absolutely hated that low bottom bracket on the V3. That bike did fly uphill but I found the rear suspension to lose its composure when going FAST on the downs. I am sure the the issue for me on the downhills was the garbage rear shock (DPS, they all suck IMHO). I wish I had tried a better shock on the V3 before I sold it.

    I was looking at picking up a V4 but ended up with the Arktos ST instead. It does not climb as well as the V3 (but itís actually very close) but it is a million times better on the downhills.

    I would love to ride a V4. I am sure it will be a little more efficient going up but I doubt it would be better going down. The Arktos is smoooooth in all situations.

    Quote Originally Posted by rockman View Post
    I'd agree with the V3 being an excellent climber but the caveat is in technical terrain. The sub 13" bottom bracket and pedal strikes are a momentum killer. Nice to see on the V4 that it's now 13.2 which is still a tad low IMO.

    The point being I'll take a slightly less efficient V4 strictly based on bb ht.

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    Bike bible considered Arktos ST to be the best climber in the rough and technical terrain. I love mine.

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    A lot of this bike or that bike opinions are based on setup and terrain. One bike will be great in some geographic places and not so great in other places. Demo the bikes for days, especially if you favor technical climbing over everything else. Also, we donít know what you think tech climbing is - steep rocks, loose, or stuff that requires some level of trials moves to even clear. Stuff Iíd consider tech, others would probably laugh at and then others would rather walk. You want another random suggestion from the interweb - drop your cash on an Evil Offering. Itís a trail bike and itís badass, and Iím an Ibis fanboy. Whatever you buy over anything else youíd buy isnít gonna make much difference these days.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    I'm looking for a FS trail rig that's a world-class climber but capable enough to take on any trail. Cleaning tough climbs is my favorite thing to do on a bike, and I don't mind slowing down and picking my lines a bit on the DH (up to now I've only ever ridden hardtails).

    I've looked at the new Neuron, Tallboy, Trail 429, Smuggler, and Optic, but they all seem to either not have the most modern geo (Neuron), or give up too much on the climbing front.

    The aluminum Tallboy R is tempting at $1K less than the Ripley NX build, but it's gotta be several pounds heavier and, from what I hear, isn't nearly as agile a climber.

    Considering my needs/wants, is there anything that can touch the Ripley? Am I wrong about the Tallboy?
    The Ripley is a great bike (have one) that can tackle almost any trail. But it is a light trail bike and you have to keep that in mind. Those other bikes are also in the same class.

    I think if you want a really capable bike that can tackle the climbs almost as well but is much more capable, go big. For example, the Ripmo in my mind is everything the Ripley is on the climbs and can honestly take anything you throw at it.

    The only other thing I will say is that if you are heavy, the stock shock on the Ripley sucks.
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    This! Kind of what I was getting at in my post above. I am probably 205 with my pack and have hated every single DPS I have owned. They suck.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus View Post
    The only other thing I will say is that if you are heavy, the stock shock on the Ripley sucks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    This.



    *they also refer to the Ripmo as a trail bike.
    I consider my Ripmo a trail bike and not an enduro bike.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexTrekbek View Post
    Evil Offering
    I'm on an Evil Offering as well. A very fun bike that is a bit more burly but it doesn't climb nearly as well as the Ripley. Not even close.

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    The OP wants a "world class climber", and the Offering is NOT that. I own a Ripley V4 (which I would not classify as a world class climber) and put a total of 2 weeks on a highend spec Offering. Fantastic bike, much better than a Ripley or Ripmo on the downs, but it is not in the same league on ascents.
    I also put a few weeks on a Pivot 429 Trail. Not as good on ascents as the Ripley, but it's equal if not better on the descents.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    Could you expound on that please? I almost pulled the trigger on a v3 because I figured it must a better climber, but then a lot of people are saying that with the steeper seat angle the v4 is actually better on the ups as well as the downs.

    Is it pure efficiency where you think the v3 is better? Technical climbing? Tight switchbacks? All of the above? And how much better?
    It wasnít a huge deal. The V3 felt easier to steer going up. Long bikes to me makes it feel like I have to put more pressure on my bar when going up a steep climb. When it comes to seat tube angle...my saddle position does not really change just because the manufacturer made it steeper. As long as I can get my saddle position where I want it...the STA donít matter that much. The steep STA is a byproduct of the long reach and slack head angles.

    I ended up getting a V3 LS since I found a good deal in it. If the V4 felt that much better...I would have dropped the extra cash to get...but I didnít.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RS VR6 View Post
    It wasnít a huge deal. The V3 felt easier to steer going up. Long bikes to me makes it feel like I have to put more pressure on my bar when going up a steep climb. When it comes to seat tube angle...my saddle position does not really change just because the manufacturer made it steeper. As long as I can get my saddle position where I want it...the STA donít matter that much. The steep STA is a byproduct of the long reach and slack head angles.

    I ended up getting a V3 LS since I found a good deal in it. If the V4 felt that much better...I would have dropped the extra cash to get...but I didnít.
    If you put your saddle in the same position relative to the bottom bracket then you didn't ride it as it was designed to be ridden. So it's not going to climb like it could if you set it up the way it was designed.
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  38. #38
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    I have a V3, and I would say it is and it isn't a great technical climber. I've definitely out-climbed much fitter riders on bigger bikes on tech climbs, and I'm regularly clearing sections that I could ride maybe 1 out of 10 times on my old 26" hardtail. Traction is great. The suspension does a great job of keeping you stable and planted. But the suspension sucks a lot of power, in my experience, and so you really have to have the strength to overcome this and keep moving forward. And forget about tight switchbacks on such a long bike.

    Quote Originally Posted by bigdrunk View Post
    This! Kind of what I was getting at in my post above. I am probably 205 with my pack and have hated every single DPS I have owned. They suck.
    Little caveat to my above statement is that I am 200 pounds at the moment. Bigdrunk, and others, are you saying that if I can lighten up, the suspension won't bob so damn much?
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  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by BmanInTheD View Post
    If you put your saddle in the same position relative to the bottom bracket then you didn't ride it as it was designed to be ridden. So it's not going to climb like it could if you set it up the way it was designed.
    There is effectively 'one true position' where you are biomechanically best able to put the power down to the pedals. Back in the days of rigid posts and hardtails, I would keep my saddle a lot further back and a bit lower than this one true position to get my body in a better place further back from the front wheel on descents and generally in a better spot to be able to move my body around on the bike. Dropper posts have allowed me to move my seat forward and up, closer to the one true position, and that is why bike makers are moving to steeper seat angles. But I'm thinking they are starting to go to far.

    Relevance to the topic: My V3 allows me to put my saddle in the right position for pedal power, but looking at the V4 specs, I worry I would start to have to shop for a dropper post with some set-back, even though I'd be going from a large to a medium frame.
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  40. #40
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    Ripley v4 is too long if you want to do XC type climbing. Orbea OIZ in 120/120 config is just right and can handle going down as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crillz View Post
    A lot of this bike or that bike opinions are based on setup and terrain. One bike will be great in some geographic places and not so great in other places. Demo the bikes for days, especially if you favor technical climbing over everything else. Also, we donít know what you think tech climbing is - steep rocks, loose, or stuff that requires some level of trials moves to even clear. Stuff Iíd consider tech, others would probably laugh at and then others would rather walk. You want another random suggestion from the interweb - drop your cash on an Evil Offering. Itís a trail bike and itís badass, and Iím an Ibis fanboy. Whatever you buy over anything else youíd buy isnít gonna make much difference these days.
    Good points. I'm using technical to basically just mean toughórocky, rooty, tight, twisty, loose, punchyóIME a bike that's a good technical climber will generally be good in all those situations. I know you're right about pretty much everything being great these days, but still when I'm dropping $5K, I wanna be really sure the bike I'm getting is the absolute best bike for my riding (or at least that I've done enough research to believe it is).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus View Post
    The Ripley is a great bike (have one) that can tackle almost any trail. But it is a light trail bike and you have to keep that in mind. Those other bikes are also in the same class.

    I think if you want a really capable bike that can tackle the climbs almost as well but is much more capable, go big. For example, the Ripmo in my mind is everything the Ripley is on the climbs and can honestly take anything you throw at it.

    The only other thing I will say is that if you are heavy, the stock shock on the Ripley sucks.
    I know everyone says the Ripmo is a great climber but can it really be "close" to the Ripley with so much more travel? I guess I should demo both and find out.

    Interesting what you're saying about the shock. I am fairly heavy (205) but I also have only owned hardtails so probably not going to know the difference between "good" and "bad" shock performance for a while. I could probably get my shop to swap out the shock for me. If so, which would you recommend?

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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    I have a V3, and I would say it is and it isn't a great technical climber. I've definitely out-climbed much fitter riders on bigger bikes on tech climbs, and I'm regularly clearing sections that I could ride maybe 1 out of 10 times on my old 26" hardtail. Traction is great. The suspension does a great job of keeping you stable and planted. But the suspension sucks a lot of power, in my experience, and so you really have to have the strength to overcome this and keep moving forward. And forget about tight switchbacks on such a long bike.



    Little caveat to my above statement is that I am 200 pounds at the moment. Bigdrunk, and others, are you saying that if I can lighten up, the suspension won't bob so damn much?
    I'm 210 , how soft do you have that LS set up that you're getting a ton of bob? Something seems off.
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    There is effectively 'one true position' where you are biomechanically best able to put the power down to the pedals.......
    That's what I used to think until I put in some time to research the subject. From all I've gathered, from university studies as well as anecdotal evidence from coaching/time trial/other forums, is that the pedal position relative to the bottom bracket is not nearly as much of a determining effect in determining maximum power as hip and ankle angles. If you keep those angles the same/close, it doesn't really matter where your pedals are. I could be talked out of this cuz I'm no expert in the field, but I DID stay at a Holiday Inn last night.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    I know everyone says the Ripmo is a great climber but can it really be "close" to the Ripley with so much more travel? I guess I should demo both and find out.

    Interesting what you're saying about the shock. I am fairly heavy (205) but I also have only owned hardtails so probably not going to know the difference between "good" and "bad" shock performance for a while. I could probably get my shop to swap out the shock for me. If so, which would you recommend?
    I'm getting a V4 Ripley for wifey and putting a DVO Topaz on it. I'm not a fan of Fox shocks and have an CC Inline IL on my V2 Ripley. I had the Fox CTD shock on my original V1 modded by Avalanche with mixed results. I do like the INline now that Cane Creek sorted out the seal issues and the bigger can helps in dialing in the air spring. Another option might be to pick up a Rock Shox and send it to Vorsprung for their tractive tune. I'm not sure on fit on the latter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    I'm 210 , how soft do you have that LS set up that you're getting a ton of bob? Something seems off.
    When I was a couple pounds lighter this fall (~193) I was running the rear shock at 225, which provided an acceptable amount of bob, but I was only using 30-35mm of stoke out of 44mm, so probably only using 90mm of travel.


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    FWIW, the Trail 429 climbs quite well. The SB100 climbs even better, but gives up a little to the Trail 429 in terms of descending capability.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    I know everyone says the Ripmo is a great climber but can it really be "close" to the Ripley with so much more travel? I guess I should demo both and find out.

    Interesting what you're saying about the shock. I am fairly heavy (205) but I also have only owned hardtails so probably not going to know the difference between "good" and "bad" shock performance for a while. I could probably get my shop to swap out the shock for me. If so, which would you recommend?
    I have an XX1 XL Ripmo and set up a friend with an GX XL ripley build. He upgraded the brakes and wheels. Both bikes felt very similar and are the same weight. I was able to time the climb on both bikes with the same wheels/tire combo and was within 3 seconds of each other.

    Ripley V4 is a best in class climber and is better than V3 is every way IMO. It can be built very light or it can be built burley. It would not make a great XC bike, but would be perfect for marathon races.

    I personally prefer the extra comfort from my Ripmo and tend to run heavy slow tires. If I was going to run lighter tires I would pick the ripley and drop that extra 1/2 a pound.

    Climbing is about weight and suspension support. The Ripley excels at both of these.
    Making shit harder than it needs to be isn't awesome, it's just...harder.

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    Check out the Spot Ryve 115. The suspension is really active so it will do well on rocky, root stuff, but it's also very efficient.
    Geometry is totally shredable to get down what you climbed into, but it's still a short travel bike.
    See if you can demo one. They also offer 30 day returns if you need to go that route.

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    Revel bikes seems to be making a fuss. Havent ridden either but the videos of the revel bikes look very good. Anyone been on one?

    What about the jamis portal?

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    Quote Originally Posted by BmanInTheD View Post
    That's what I used to think until I put in some time to research the subject. From all I've gathered, from university studies as well as anecdotal evidence from coaching/time trial/other forums, is that the pedal position relative to the bottom bracket is not nearly as much of a determining effect in determining maximum power as hip and ankle angles. If you keep those angles the same/close, it doesn't really matter where your pedals are. I could be talked out of this cuz I'm no expert in the field, but I DID stay at a Holiday Inn last night.
    I know there are some newer studies I haven't read much about yet, but there are some older studies that definitively find that if you move your saddle too far forward you can cause knee injury. I think these 75-76-degree seat tube angles are going to start pushing peoples knees too far forward, causing injury for some.
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    You can demo bikes, and it'll help, but probably not on the trails you want. At some point you need to narrow it down to a couple of bikes then make your choice, and when you hit the techy parts make your own adjustments (body english) to find what works best for you.
    IOW, Run what you brung.
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    Quote Originally Posted by YamaLink View Post
    The OP wants a "world class climber", and the Offering is NOT that. I own a Ripley V4 (which I would not classify as a world class climber) and put a total of 2 weeks on a highend spec Offering. Fantastic bike, much better than a Ripley or Ripmo on the downs, but it is not in the same league on ascents.
    I also put a few weeks on a Pivot 429 Trail. Not as good on ascents as the Ripley, but it's equal if not better on the descents.
    Downhill > Uphill

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    Alright, Iím gonna throw a curveball at you all: Evo has an aluminum Tallboy 3 R spec for $2300 right now. Sure itís a few pounds heavier and I know itís not gonna be as good on the descents, but at $2K less than a new Ripley, itís pretty tempting. My buddy has a TB3 and itís what made me realize I needed a FSóabsolutely loved it. The HTA was a bit steep for my liking, but then that probably had something to do with why I loved it so much on the twisty climbs.

    So....has anyone ridden a TB3 and Ripley v4 and want to tell me whether you think the Ibis is $2K better?

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexTrekbek View Post
    Downhill > Uphill

    OP is going the wrong direction and needs to turn around.
    Real mountain bikers strive to conquer any challenge. Up or down.


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    Quote Originally Posted by gus6464 View Post
    Ripley v4 is too long if you want to do XC type climbing. Orbea OIZ in 120/120 config is just right and can handle going down as well.
    Ripley wheelbase isn't that long at 47.5" (1207mm) on a Large compared to other 29r's in the 120-140mm travel range.

    What exactly is XC type climbing?

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    Quote Originally Posted by rockman View Post
    What exactly is XC type climbing?
    You wear lycra while riding uphill

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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    I know there are some newer studies I haven't read much about yet, but there are some older studies that definitively find that if you move your saddle too far forward you can cause knee injury. I think these 75-76-degree seat tube angles are going to start pushing peoples knees too far forward, causing injury for some.
    I know this is a ripley post, But i can confirm the above.

    Am currently suffering from patella tendonitis. Came on at the end of my bike season. Cause i suspect was strengthening of my quads after the season on my forward sitting sj (for me), seat a bit too low, and putting out big power standing with big gears and too long of cranks.

    https://www.bicycling.com/training/a...my-knees-hurt/

    Been two months already and hasnt settled down. Next season i will be going to shorter cranks and possibly do some more flexibility exercises. I suspect im more prone to this injury than others due to age etc

    Ripley is awesome. Whish i had an xxl one

    Had no such problems on the fuse which has a top tube 40mm longer. Same cranks. Same stack, same reach.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    Alright, Iím gonna throw a curveball at you all: Evo has an aluminum Tallboy 3 R spec for $2300 right now. Sure itís a few pounds heavier and I know itís not gonna be as good on the descents, but at $2K less than a new Ripley, itís pretty tempting. My buddy has a TB3 and itís what made me realize I needed a FSóabsolutely loved it. The HTA was a bit steep for my liking, but then that probably had something to do with why I loved it so much on the twisty climbs.

    So....has anyone ridden a TB3 and Ripley v4 and want to tell me whether you think the Ibis is $2K better?
    My old bike was a tallboy 3 CC XX1. It was a great bike, but the Ripley is better up, down, weighs less and looks better. Santa Cruz has lost their way in innovations since they were bought out. They used to push the limits of what was possible with frame design and weight. Now they are making boring extremely robust frames with little thought of weight or the small details like shock fitment. Still very good bikes, great warranty and free bearings for life!
    Making shit harder than it needs to be isn't awesome, it's just...harder.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fuse6F View Post
    Revel bikes seems to be making a fuss. Havent ridden either but the videos of the revel bikes look very good. Anyone been on one?
    I've ridden both the 29er Rascal and the 27.5 Rail. Both are fantastic descending bikes with a really solid but resilient ride quality. The quality of the carbon layup gave the front end of the bike a particularly accurate and precise feel. Though I am by no means a great descender, the Revel bikes (especially the Rail) gave me exceptional confidence that I could drift the front tire and have it end up exactly where I intended it to go. The Revel bikes are one of the few bikes on which I've had this feeling of being able to have precise control of where the front wheel is going at all times. At the same time, both bikes felt not at all harsh in the vertical direction.

    In terms of climbing ability, the Revel Rascal feels slightly less efficient than a dw-link bike, but on par with the Yeti SB130 and the Santa Cruz Tallboy. The CBF suspension provides clear separation between suspension movement and pedaling action.That characteristic might be very helpful for climbs that are particularly laden with rocks and roots though I did not get to experience the bike on any particularly difficult climbs that might prove or disprove that thought. On more typical climbs, the CBF suspension seems to offer less control of the rear wheel than a dw-link design. The Ripley will be more likely to be a better climbing bike than the Revel Rascal on most climbs.
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    I always find it baffling and hilarious at the same time that Dave Weagle has other suspension designs than DW-link but because Ibis uses it, it must be the best one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spectre View Post
    I've ridden both the 29er Rascal and the 27.5 Rail. Both are fantastic descending bikes with a really solid but resilient ride quality. The quality of the carbon layup gave the front end of the bike a particularly accurate and precise feel. Though I am by no means a great descender, the Revel bikes (especially the Rail) gave me exceptional confidence that I could drift the front tire and have it end up exactly where I intended it to go. The Revel bikes are one of the few bikes on which I've had this feeling of being able to have precise control of where the front wheel is going at all times. At the same time, both bikes felt not at all harsh in the vertical direction.

    In terms of climbing ability, the Revel Rascal feels slightly less efficient than a dw-link bike, but on par with the Yeti SB130 and the Santa Cruz Tallboy. The CBF suspension provides clear separation between suspension movement and pedaling action.That characteristic might be very helpful for climbs that are particularly laden with rocks and roots though I did not get to experience the bike on any particularly difficult climbs that might prove or disprove that thought. On more typical climbs, the CBF suspension seems to offer less control of the rear wheel than a dw-link design. The Ripley will be more likely to be a better climbing bike than the Revel Rascal on most climbs.
    Did you get that "hover bike" experience from the Rascal? I don't know if that's important to anyone other than old folks who want least impact.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gus6464 View Post
    I always find it baffling and hilarious at the same time that Dave Weagle has other suspension designs than DW-link but because Ibis uses it, it must be the best one.
    Ibis has a very long running relationship with Dave and extensive in house engineering experience that know the characteristics they want to prioritize. Climbing performance has always been the cornerstone of there suspension and frame design. They have garnered a hard earned reputation for climbing efficiency from over a decade of prioritizing it.

    There is a reason Ibis = climbing and other brands are more down hill focused
    Making shit harder than it needs to be isn't awesome, it's just...harder.

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    Quote Originally Posted by alexbn921 View Post
    Ibis has a very long running relationship with Dave and extensive in house engineering experience that know the characteristics they want to prioritize. Climbing performance has always been the cornerstone of there suspension and frame design. They have garnered a hard earned reputation for climbing efficiency from over a decade of prioritizing it.

    There is a reason Ibis = climbing and other brands are more down hill focused
    Except the part where Ibis is not the only one using dw-link.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gus6464 View Post
    Except the part where Ibis is not the only one using dw-link.

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    DW-Link Does Not Equal DW-link. They are all different and highly tunable. It's like saying VPP=vpp2=vpp3=vpp4. It does not. Even blur vpp2 /= nomad vpp2.
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    Quote Originally Posted by gus6464 View Post
    Except the part where Ibis is not the only one using dw-link.

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    Except the part where you don't understand each brand using it is giving Dave feedback on what they want prioritized.

    It amounts to you saying a Specialized should ride just like a Gravity Gorilla bike cause Horst or Intense ride exactly the same as Santa Cruz cause VPP.
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    I read an interview with Chuck Ibis where he said, when asked why Pivot bikes ride differently than Ibis bikes (both having DW-Links), that if he lived in Arizona where Pivot is, he would ask Dave Weagle to design them to ride more like Pivots. There's a difference, I've had several of both.
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    Quote Originally Posted by gus6464 View Post
    I always find it baffling and hilarious at the same time that Dave Weagle has other suspension designs than DW-link but because Ibis uses it, it must be the best one.
    Maybe take one for a test ride.

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    I am excited for a 120-130mm 29er with Orion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gus6464 View Post
    I always find it baffling and hilarious at the same time that Dave Weagle has other suspension designs than DW-link but because Ibis uses it, it must be the best one.
    I've had DW Link dating back to the Iron Horse MKIII, and while each was different based on manufacturer (as others have posted below), each DW Link bike has performed better than my Split Pivot in every situation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dale-Calgary View Post
    Maybe take one for a test ride.
    Rode a Ripmo carbon for a weekend at a bike festival in the mountains and AF for a whole day at a local bike shop demo event. Bought an Evil Wreckoning in the end. While it was slightly better going up the Evil is just tons better going down. Nothing about it screamed this is just the best climbing bike ever. Also the Evil is heavier so that could be the slight difference in climbing that I felt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gus6464 View Post
    I always find it baffling and hilarious at the same time that Dave Weagle has other suspension designs than DW-link but because Ibis uses it, it must be the best one.
    Either I'm reading this wrong or many seem to be missing that you're pointing out that Dave Weagle has designed suspension systems other than DW Link ( like Delta on Evil bikes).

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    Quote Originally Posted by thesingletrakmind View Post
    Either I'm reading this wrong or many seem to be missing that you're pointing out that Dave Weagle has designed suspension systems other than DW Link ( like Delta on Evil bikes).

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    Quote Originally Posted by JMac47 View Post
    And Pivot. And Salsa. And Devinci?
    Everybody just jumped on the other iterations of DW Link as if that was the only thing he designed. I was just throwing out Delta to get the idea across.

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    So what characteristics define a Ripley's dw-link vs a 429 Trail's, for instance?
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    DW link is just two links moving in the same direction.
    VPP is two links moving in opposite directions.

    Leverage ratio curve and shape, progrestion, stoke are all tunable.

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    The OP is looking for a technical climbing bike that is adequate for any downhill trail.

    The Ripley may be a great climber, but itís not adequate for anything that requires serious downhill chops ... itís just an XC bike.

    Any bike will climb well if the rider knows how to climb. Personally, I choose my bikes for the down cuz climbing is just the thing you do in order to get to the downs.

    My fav suspension now is the Orion, got a chance to demo an Elkat at Outerbike and it was amazing.

    If I were looking for a 29er for climbing and descending, Iíd wait for the Esker long travel 29er and pop a Shout on the front.
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    Or wait and see what the new following is going to look like. Good climber but will outplow a Ripley on the down.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    The OP is looking for a technical climbing bike that is adequate for any downhill trail.

    The Ripley may be a great climber, but itís not adequate for anything that requires serious downhill chops ... itís just an XC bike.

    Any bike will climb well if the rider knows how to climb. Personally, I choose my bikes for the down cuz climbing is just the thing you do in order to get to the downs.

    My fav suspension now is the Orion, got a chance to demo an Elkat at Outerbike and it was amazing.

    If I were looking for a 29er for climbing and descending, Iíd wait for the Esker long travel 29er and pop a Shout on the front.
    Itís not an XC bike, lol. Come on, man. It might not like to huck from 4 feet to flat, but it ainít no XC whippet.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    If I were looking for a 29er for climbing and descending, Iíd wait for the Esker long travel 29er and pop a Shout on the front.
    Really looking forward to seeing this bike. My only reservation is whether they can elegantly and robustly execute the "around the BB" lower pivot.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo View Post
    Really looking forward to seeing this bike. My only reservation is whether they can elegantly and robustly execute the "around the BB" lower pivot.
    Plenty of dual link bikes have issues with rocks getting places you don't want them. When I watch this video, I just don't see how they are going to keep crap out from between the BB area and rear triangle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BmanInTheD View Post
    Itís not an XC bike, lol. Come on, man. It might not like to huck from 4 feet to flat, but it ainít no XC whippet.
    I concur with BmanInTheD... All these trail bikes, especially with the relax geos are more than capable of hitting serious downhill trails. Line selection becomes more important with less travel and you haveto keep up your maintenance and/or replace parts sooner if you are pushing the bike to it is limit.

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by BmanInTheD View Post
    Itís not an XC bike, lol. Come on, man. It might not like to huck from 4 feet to flat, but it ainít no XC whippet.
    I'd be inclined to agree with you. That'd be like calling a Trance 29 or any bike in that class an XC bike. Can the Ripley and Trance 29 be used for XC racing? Sure. But they can also handle so much more than an XC bike.

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    Seems Ibis bikes get classed different all the time. This is how I would class them.

    Ripley - downcountry (hate that name) bike before downcountry was a common term.
    Ripmo - long travel trail bike, its not a full on enduro bike in comparison to others in 2019/2020.
    HD5 - its a 27.5" free ride bike.

    Yes Ibis runs the Ripmo and HD5 on EWS but that doesn't mean they are optimized for that type of competition.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Xlr8n View Post
    I'd be inclined to agree with you. That'd be like calling a Trance 29 or any bike in that class an XC bike. Can the Ripley and Trance 29 be used for XC racing? Sure. But they can also handle so much more than an XC bike.
    You can say that about any bike, but that doesnít make the Ripley capable of technical downhill riding.
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    Nurse Ben has demo'd a bike. Now he sings the praises over and over of a bike that doesn't exist. You should just buy whatever he suggests; he's obviously an expert.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    You can say that about any bike, but that doesnít make the Ripley capable of technical downhill riding.
    My old 26Ē hardtail is capable of technical downhill riding. Develop some skills. Choose good lines. The Ripley is more than capable going downhill. A ďbiggerĒ bike can do it faster, with a more sloppy line choice and more playfully but any bike will get you down the mountain.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    You can say that about any bike, but that doesnít make the Ripley capable of technical downhill riding.
    If you have the skill, any bike possible and capable... current trail bikes are more than capable of technical downhill riding.

    Link/video of Walmart bike at Mt Creek. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hkl3H7tKrFA Go to 11:30 or 15:10 start hitting drops/hits.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    I know everyone says the Ripmo is a great climber but can it really be "close" to the Ripley with so much more travel? I guess I should demo both and find out.

    Interesting what you're saying about the shock. I am fairly heavy (205) but I also have only owned hardtails so probably not going to know the difference between "good" and "bad" shock performance for a while. I could probably get my shop to swap out the shock for me. If so, which would you recommend?
    Honestly, yes. The Ripo will be about 2-4 lbs heavier than a comparably priced Ripley but if the Ripley is built as a trail bike, the Ripo will climb in a very similar manner. The Ripo going down just feels stiffer, deeper and ready to take abuse.

    I bought the Ripley because I thought the Ripmo was a bike I needed only 6-10 times a year and I could just live with the Ripley as an everyday bike. In hindsight, I should have bought the Ripmo and a Turner Czar for my XC needs.

    And as bigdrunk said above, the DPS shock sucks. You will need mega pressure to get a sag value that works and the bike won't be that plush on repeated hits.
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexbn921 View Post
    DW-Link Does Not Equal DW-link. They are all different and highly tunable. It's like saying VPP=vpp2=vpp3=vpp4. It does not. Even blur vpp2 /= nomad vpp2.
    This 100%. Honestly, I found the dw link on Turner's to be much better than on Ibis. If you want a climber, get a Czar. Talk about a fast bike. Old school bike but fast as crap.
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  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    You can say that about any bike, but that doesnít make the Ripley capable of technical downhill riding.
    I will admit my Ripley LS feels under-gunned on steep technical trails like HiLine or Hangover in Sedona. Or, Razor's Edge in Alberta. But for most everything else it descends just fine. I just run out of travel at times. But for something more contouring like Mack's Ridge in Fruita with some uphill moves it's a fine tool for the job. With a 140mm fork it's quite capable.

    If the changes on the V4 makes it a better descender and from the sounds of it they do, then personally giving up a little efficiency on the climb isn't a game-changer. The V2 is now relegated to long backcountry rides in my stable where I'm racking up 5000' of climbing and am not as much concerned about dh performance. For my 2 - 4 hour rides my Evil Offering is considerably more fun. For the burly stuff I still ride my 6" travel 27.5 Turner RFX.

    If there can only be one then it's hard to choose. V4 Ripley would still be a great bike. Especially for those that are not that concerned about cleaning committing high risk moves and are going to walk those sections anyway. That said, I think I agree for me I would personally go Ripmo but I still enjoy technical downhill riding and indeed that's usually the goal. I gave up a long time ago on holding my HR at 160 bpm for an hour to see how fast I can climb.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus View Post
    This 100%. Honestly, I found the dw link on Turner's to be much better than on Ibis. If you want a climber, get a Czar. Talk about a fast bike. Old school bike but fast as crap.
    I concur. I much preferred the Turner version of the DW-link on my 2010 5spot and my 2016 RFX compared to the HD3 and Ripley. HD3 was a great all round bike though.

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus View Post
    Honestly, yes. The Ripo will be about 2-4 lbs heavier than a comparably priced Ripley but if the Ripley is built as a trail bike, the Ripo will climb in a very similar manner. The Ripo going down just feels stiffer, deeper and ready to take abuse.

    I bought the Ripley because I thought the Ripmo was a bike I needed only 6-10 times a year and I could just live with the Ripley as an everyday bike. In hindsight, I should have bought the Ripmo and a Turner Czar for my XC needs.

    And as bigdrunk said above, the DPS shock sucks. You will need mega pressure to get a sag value that works and the bike won't be that plush on repeated hits.
    That's fine if you can afford two bikes, but for someone that's looking for one- I think the Ripley is an excellent choice. But again, all of this discussion doesn't matter in a vacuum because where you live has a huge impact on your choices. I wouldn't choose the same bike if I lived out west as I do living in MD.
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  94. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    Nurse Ben has demo'd a bike. Now he sings the praises over and over of a bike that doesn't exist. You should just buy whatever he suggests; he's obviously an expert.
    You guys are stoopid, the Ripley is what it is, donít make it some mystical beast, cuz it ainít.

    Friggin Walmart bikes and 26Ē hardtail, thatís completely off the rails, maybe cut back on the New Years libations?

    I call the Ripley an XC bike cuz itís short travel, lightweight, not that slack or long, it just ainít an all mountain bike for where I ride.

    Maybe all you flow boys dig it, but the Ripley is the last bike Iíd bring along for technical riding, esp with drops and consequences.

    You all been drinking waaay to much koolaid and getting a little too liberal with the lipstick.

    Put this discussion on PB and youíd be heckled.

    At this rate someone is gonna throw out the hardtail single speed card, then itís game over.

    This thread should have read: Is there any bike that can beat the Ripley at being undergunned for technical riding.

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  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    You guys are stoopid, the Ripley is what it is, donít make it some mystical beast, cuz it ainít.

    Friggin Walmart bikes and 26Ē hardtail, thatís completely off the rails, maybe cut back on the New Years libations?

    I call the Ripley an XC bike cuz itís short travel, lightweight, not that slack or long, it just ainít an all mountain bike for where I ride.

    Maybe all you flow boys dig it, but the Ripley is the last bike Iíd bring along for technical riding, esp with drops and consequences.

    You all been drinking waaay to much koolaid and getting a little too liberal with the lipstick.

    Put this discussion on PB and youíd be heckled.

    At this rate someone is gonna throw out the hardtail single speed card, then itís game over.

    This thread should have read: Is there any bike that can beat the Ripley at being undergunned for technical riding.

    Happy New Years!
    It all depends, the Ripley can do most trails - as can a hard tail! - but I am leery to hit big drops and jumps on mine. Even with a boost rear end, there is more flex than my old 5-spot with king fun bolts. It is a great bike for most trails but I agree, it is no do-everything trail bike. That is the Ripmo.
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    ^^^^Once you mentioned PB you lost all credibility. Nothing's ever slack enough, enough travel, enough reach, yada, yada, for the wannabe endurbro-clowns over there. The Ripley is what it is like you say. But what it ain't is an XC bike, like you said and were totally wrong about.
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  97. #97
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    Orange Stage 4.

    Mine weighs around 24 lbs and I can hang with all the XC guys. It's fast and efficient.

    On technical seated climbs it doesn't get hung up, and you can stand and pedal if that is your thing.

    Frame is around $2k
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  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post

    not that slack or long, it just ainít an all mountain bike for where I ride.
    You realize current geo was considered all-mountain 5 yrs ago. Most individuals, don't even push their bikes to their full limits. Limitation is just the rear shock, as long you are smooth and not hitting large drops... 120mm rear should be fine.

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    So much depends on what type of rider you are what you like and prefer. I have ridden mine all over Maryland and Virginia. From flow trails to super rocky and rooty stuff. Drops up to 4 feet or so. I have cleared tech and made tech climbs on this bike more so than any. And I have owned many. From the Frederick Watershed to Big Bear WV and Patapsco. It is fine in all. I can find it's edges, but it definitely isn't cross country. No way. We don't have huge drops, big gaps, etc. No doubt the Ripmo would be better in some cases, but would struggle in others where the Ripley excels. It's get tiring reading input from so many that haven't ridden the bike or crap on it because it isn't the bike for certain tracts. Too many fan boys too pushing there favs with no backup. I do like Ibis and also many other brands.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    You can say that about any bike, but that doesnít make the Ripley capable of technical downhill riding.
    I guess that depends on the operator. I've done some pretty technical descents on my Trance 29. Seemed pretty capable at the time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    You guys are stoopid, the Ripley is what it is, donít make it some mystical beast, cuz it ainít.

    Friggin Walmart bikes and 26Ē hardtail, thatís completely off the rails, maybe cut back on the New Years libations?

    I call the Ripley an XC bike cuz itís short travel, lightweight, not that slack or long, it just ainít an all mountain bike for where I ride.

    Maybe all you flow boys dig it, but the Ripley is the last bike Iíd bring along for technical riding, esp with drops and consequences.

    You all been drinking waaay to much koolaid and getting a little too liberal with the lipstick.

    Put this discussion on PB and youíd be heckled.

    At this rate someone is gonna throw out the hardtail single speed card, then itís game over.

    This thread should have read: Is there any bike that can beat the Ripley at being undergunned for technical riding.

    Happy New Years!
    No need to get all twisted out of sorts. You made a claim that not everyone agrees with. No biggie. You can't always be right, (especially when you're not.)

    And referencing Pinkbike? Yeah, that place is the epicenter of rational discussion. lol. Just sayin'.

  102. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by BmanInTheD View Post
    I read an interview with Chuck Ibis where he said, when asked why Pivot bikes ride differently than Ibis bikes (both having DW-Links), that if he lived in Arizona where Pivot is, he would ask Dave Weagle to design them to ride more like Pivots. There's a difference, I've had several of both.
    Since you have both the Ripley and the Mach 4 you have a unique perspective. I'm curious how the Ripley pedals on flat sections, fire roads, or maybe two track that connects loops, etc. Basically everything in between pure technical climbing and descending. I'm considering the Ripley, but concerned the STA would put me too far over the pedals for seated, sustained outputs. How does it behave? Compared to the Mach 4? Thanks!

  103. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by dc40 View Post
    You realize current geo was considered all-mountain 5 yrs ago. Most individuals, don't even push their bikes to their full limits. Limitation is just the rear shock, as long you are smooth and not hitting large drops... 120mm rear should be fine.
    You realize this is 2020 and not five years ago?

    Pretty funny how defensive folks are about their bike.

    You'd think I was commenting on your girlfriend and the size of her "eyes", it's crazy what people will go to the wall for these days...
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    Meh call it what you want.

    Lots of people don't or shouldn't do crazy drops, take crazy lines down uber steep chunky stuff. For those people it seems to me a bike like shorter travel bikes with modern geo makes lots of sense, bikes like (in rough order of aggressiveness) Ripley, tallboy, Optic, Rascal maybe etc etc. Those people are better served with bikes like the ripley imo.

  105. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    You realize this is 2020 and not five years ago?

    Pretty funny how defensive folks are about their bike.

    You'd think I was commenting on your girlfriend and the size of her "eyes", it's crazy what people will go to the wall for these days...
    Trail progression hasn't really changed in 5 yrs. Most people are probably riding the same trails as with their current 2020 bikes as they did with their 5+ yrs old bikes.

  106. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by G-Choro View Post
    Since you have both the Ripley and the Mach 4 you have a unique perspective. I'm curious how the Ripley pedals on flat sections, fire roads, or maybe two track that connects loops, etc. Basically everything in between pure technical climbing and descending. I'm considering the Ripley, but concerned the STA would put me too far over the pedals for seated, sustained outputs. How does it behave? Compared to the Mach 4? Thanks!
    It took me a while to get used to the STA of the Ripley/Ripmo, but now I definitely prefer them for more mountainous terrain. i.e. going up a long way then down a long way. For flatter terrain, where I ride mostly (Dallas), the steeper STA is fine but just puts a bit more pressure on your hands over long periods. The power output is a non-issue. As I've said elsewhere, I've researched long and hard about saddle position and found that it doesn't really matter where your saddle is in relation to setback from BB for producing power. Your hip and ankle angle are much more important to getting optimum power. All that said, if I'm going out for a long (several hours) MTB ride around here, I prefer the less steep STA of the Mach 4SL. But anytime I travel, I always take a steeper STA bike cuz I only go to mountainous places and it's just better there IMO. The seated position going up is just so much more comfortable and then bam, drop that sucker out of the way. Message me if you want more details, glad to help if I can.
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    What about something like a Forbidden Druid? You can still get a discounted Push 11-6 for it and have them tune it for the climbs and then plowing on the down.

  108. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by dc40 View Post
    Trail progression hasn't really changed in 5 yrs. Most people are probably riding the same trails as with their current 2020 bikes as they did with their 5+ yrs old bikes.
    Right, which is why he's asking for recommendations for new bikes vs five year old bikes.

    Not sure why I bother, slow day at work ...
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelandk2 View Post
    Meh call it what you want.

    Lots of people don't or shouldn't do crazy drops, take crazy lines down uber steep chunky stuff. For those people it seems to me a bike like shorter travel bikes with modern geo makes lots of sense, bikes like (in rough order of aggressiveness) Ripley, tallboy, Optic, Rascal maybe etc etc. Those people are better served with bikes like the ripley imo.
    Totally agree, but some of these same folks are also looking to "eat their cake too" by having a bike that climbs well and descends well.

    Personally, I'd rather ride a good bike on the ups, work a little bit extra cuz it's "good for me", and have a great bike for ripping the downs. This is why I'm selling my Signal Peak and building a Trail Pistol.

    I don't think a bike like the Ripmo climbs poorly, but it's not a Ripley. I'm not a huge fan of longer travel 29ers, they feel too tall and ungainly.

    If the OP really wants a short travel all mountain 29" ripper, I'd lean toward a Trail Pistol, Smuggler, Fugitive, etc... maybe an Optic (ain't ridden one).
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  110. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Totally agree, but some of these same folks are also looking to "eat their cake too" by having a bike that climbs well and descends well.

    Personally, I'd rather ride a good bike on the ups, work a little bit extra cuz it's "good for me", and have a great bike for ripping the downs. This is why I'm selling my Signal Peak and building a Trail Pistol.

    I don't think a bike like the Ripmo climbs poorly, but it's not a Ripley. I'm not a huge fan of longer travel 29ers, they feel too tall and ungainly.

    If the OP really wants a short travel all mountain 29" ripper, I'd lean toward a Trail Pistol, Smuggler, Fugitive, etc... maybe an Optic (ain't ridden one).
    Wait, weren't you just saying how he should look at some Eskar or something? lol But don't worry he's not paying attention to anything you say at this point...
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  111. #111
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    The Knolly Fugitive gives the Ripley a run for its money...

  112. #112
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    Why the hell is the Smuggler mentioned in this thread? Plenty of much bigger bikes that suck far less at climbing.


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  113. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Right, which is why he's asking for recommendations for new bikes vs five year old bikes.

    Not sure why I bother, slow day at work ...
    not sure why you bother either... As stated before, most don't even push their bikes to limits... Newer biker are more capable than ever. If you have skills, these short travel bikes are more than capable of handling downhill trails.

    It seems like you hurt your [email protected], is primary reason you need more travel to cushion it or is it like you are compensating with your travel due to lack luster capability in riding... please let us know because as you stated it's crazy what people will go to the wall for these days.

    this discussion is over.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dc40 View Post

    this discussion is over.
    Yup, thread's gone to shit

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    Quote Originally Posted by BmanInTheD View Post
    It took me a while to get used to the STA of the Ripley/Ripmo, but now I definitely prefer them for more mountainous terrain. i.e. going up a long way then down a long way. For flatter terrain, where I ride mostly (Dallas), the steeper STA is fine but just puts a bit more pressure on your hands over long periods. The power output is a non-issue. As I've said elsewhere, I've researched long and hard about saddle position and found that it doesn't really matter where your saddle is in relation to setback from BB for producing power. Your hip and ankle angle are much more important to getting optimum power. All that said, if I'm going out for a long (several hours) MTB ride around here, I prefer the less steep STA of the Mach 4SL. But anytime I travel, I always take a steeper STA bike cuz I only go to mountainous places and it's just better there IMO. The seated position going up is just so much more comfortable and then bam, drop that sucker out of the way. Message me if you want more details, glad to help if I can.
    Thanks. I appreciate the response. I have a Giant Anthem 29 for XC and shorter marathon. But I'd like something for longer NUE stuff, as well as light trail riding with more descending capability. So mostly 120 travel bikes. The Ripley is on the list, as well as Sniper T, Oiz, Tallboy, Trance. I wish I could demo these, as I'm having a hell of a time deciding. So good to hear your feedback on the Ripley.

  116. #116
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    I guess some people have moved on from the wheel size debate. Now it's pick a bike category and be a dick about it.
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    Pretty much any thread that Nurse Ben posts in becomes a turd in the punchbowl.
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    If I were paying retail for a bike, and could have only one, the Ripley, Fuel EX and Primer would be my short list.

    I know they aren't in the exact same travel categories.
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    Haha definitely a few turds dropped into the punch bowl of this thread, but nonetheless I appreciate all the feedback (most of the feedback anyway ). I did check out all the bikes mentioned but I think I am probably going to go with the Ripley.

    One question I have is with regard to the Fox Float DPS that comes on the NX build. A lot of people say they're no good on small bump compliance, especially for bigger guys (I'm 200#). Any recommendations on what to swap it for? I'm not into big jumps or going warp speed downhill. So priorities are traction, small bump compliance, and efficient pedaling.

  120. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    Haha definitely a few turds dropped into the punch bowl of this thread, but nonetheless I appreciate all the feedback (most of the feedback anyway ). I did check out all the bikes mentioned but I think I am probably going to go with the Ripley.

    One question I have is with regard to the Fox Float DPS that comes on the NX build. A lot of people say they're no good on small bump compliance, especially for bigger guys (I'm 200#). Any recommendations on what to swap it for? I'm not into big jumps or going warp speed downhill. So priorities are traction, small bump compliance, and efficient pedaling.
    I'm over 200# and I am running a Manitou McLeod on mine. It seems to suit the bike very well. I previously had one on my Smuggler and it worked well, too. There are several other guys on the Ibis forum using them and I think everyone has reported being quite pleased. Another bonus is that the McLeod is very reasonably priced in addition to being easy to service and it's even user tuneable if you felt the need.

  121. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velodonata View Post
    I'm over 200# and I am running a Manitou McLeod on mine. It seems to suit the bike very well. I previously had one on my Smuggler and it worked well, too. There are several other guys on the Ibis forum using them and I think everyone has reported being quite pleased. Another bonus is that the McLeod is very reasonably priced in addition to being easy to service and it's even user tuneable if you felt the need.
    Another vote for mcleod. I am 180lbs.
    Great shock. I felt like dps was decent but mcleod is improvement, i really like how it does in fast chunk. Plus, like already mentioned , good price, relatively light, easily tunable and rebuildable at home.

  122. #122
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    DVO will make a custom stroked Topaz for the Ripley.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  123. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    Haha definitely a few turds dropped into the punch bowl of this thread, but nonetheless I appreciate all the feedback (most of the feedback anyway ). I did check out all the bikes mentioned but I think I am probably going to go with the Ripley.

    One question I have is with regard to the Fox Float DPS that comes on the NX build. A lot of people say they're no good on small bump compliance, especially for bigger guys (I'm 200#). Any recommendations on what to swap it for? I'm not into big jumps or going warp speed downhill. So priorities are traction, small bump compliance, and efficient pedaling.
    The cheapest thing to do is first see whether Ibis will swap for a DPX2 at time of purchase.

    If so -- and it will fit -- it's hard to argue with that, if budget counts.
    Whining is not a strategy.

  124. #124
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    ... ahhh, the kettle speaks 🙄

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  125. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    Haha definitely a few turds dropped into the punch bowl of this thread, but nonetheless I appreciate all the feedback (most of the feedback anyway ). I did check out all the bikes mentioned but I think I am probably going to go with the Ripley.

    One question I have is with regard to the Fox Float DPS that comes on the NX build. A lot of people say they're no good on small bump compliance, especially for bigger guys (I'm 200#). Any recommendations on what to swap it for? I'm not into big jumps or going warp speed downhill. So priorities are traction, small bump compliance, and efficient pedaling.
    The DPS is a fine shock, you might want to play with volume spacers to get compliance without bottom out. Going to a reservoir shock like the DPX2 wouldnít change the ride, but it would reduce fade on long descents.

    I have one of each and Iím your size.
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    Thanks for the suggestions. I'll see about a DPX2 but, otherwise, might as well try out the DPS since it comes with the frame. Good to know the McLeod is a good budget-friendly option to try if I don't like the DPS.

  127. #127
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    My suggestion first is to demo all you can. Top three for me, (in regards to your question) this my personal opinion: Ripley, Rascal, and Tallboy.

    The Rascal seems to be a good balance between the Tallboy and Ripley in that it climbs very good, almost as good as the Ripley and it descends as well as the Tallboy and has great small bump compliance.

    The Ripley didn't seem to have that small bump sensitivity and I'm about 220 with pack and couldn't get it to soften up. I just think the DPS shock is not that great for that bike.

    The Tallboy climbs very good but not like the Ripley or Rascal, but on descents... Impressive. That lower link suspension makes the 120mm feel like its 130mm. It is so good on descents and eats most everything up while not feeling overwhelmed. But, it is much heavier than the Ripley and the Rascal. Seems Santa Cruz has elected to make their lower link bikes much heavier in each category over their competitors.

    If you want light, the Ripley frame is much lighter indeed, which will also help with climbing. The Ripley in person is such a bad ass looking bike astheically too. I just felt the Ripley gets a little overwhelmed in descents where its about rocky and rooty sectional descents.

    I tested all of these in Colorado, if I was living back in the east coast again, I would say any of these would do perfect there. Let's be honest, many of these have their pro's and cons, you just have to get the one that suits you best (where you ride and how your ride) and looks the best to you.

    Ripley looks best, Rascal has coolest colors, the Tallboy frame looks cool but the yellow and dark purple are not very appealing.

  128. #128
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    By the way, not trying to slander the Tallboy by any means, it is good bike, I just think its more oriented to the downhill side of rowdiness. The Ripley feels more oriented to the very fun poppy and lively bmx side and the Rascal is very balanced, not too this and not too that.

  129. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmo View Post
    Maybe the new Orbea Occam?

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    If you mean "beat a Ripley" in terms of descending capability, it seems like you got the best answer in the first post. I don't know if it will outclimb a Ripley, but reviewers for both the Bible of Bikes and Pinkbike's Field Test seemed to put it as a better climber than the Optic and Tallboy (which are both more efficient than the Smuggler. Haven't seen any comparisons to the Trail 429).

  130. #130
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    Definitely agree. I think it comes down to splitting hairs. I absolutely love my Rascal. That does not mean that I would have been unhappy if I ended up with a Ripley or one of my other close second choices.

    I have been riding long enough, and owned so many different bikes over the years, that I can dial in exactly what I like.

    Test ride, test ride, test ride is my recommendation.

  131. #131
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    What about the Alchemy ArktosST. People seem to like it. Anyone with input?

  132. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fuse6F View Post
    Revel bikes seems to be making a fuss. Havent ridden either but the videos of the revel bikes look very good. Anyone been on one?

    What about the jamis portal?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7SqqI8NMqIs

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=md9RPPKHcsE

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JE8H3Q5pthk

  133. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rev. 14 View Post
    My suggestion first is to demo all you can. Top three for me, (in regards to your question) this my personal opinion: Ripley, Rascal, and Tallboy.

    The Rascal seems to be a good balance between the Tallboy and Ripley in that it climbs very good, almost as good as the Ripley and it descends as well as the Tallboy and has great small bump compliance.

    The Ripley didn't seem to have that small bump sensitivity and I'm about 220 with pack and couldn't get it to soften up. I just think the DPS shock is not that great for that bike.

    The Tallboy climbs very good but not like the Ripley or Rascal, but on descents... Impressive. That lower link suspension makes the 120mm feel like its 130mm. It is so good on descents and eats most everything up while not feeling overwhelmed. But, it is much heavier than the Ripley and the Rascal. Seems Santa Cruz has elected to make their lower link bikes much heavier in each category over their competitors.

    If you want light, the Ripley frame is much lighter indeed, which will also help with climbing. The Ripley in person is such a bad ass looking bike astheically too. I just felt the Ripley gets a little overwhelmed in descents where its about rocky and rooty sectional descents.

    I tested all of these in Colorado, if I was living back in the east coast again, I would say any of these would do perfect there. Let's be honest, many of these have their pro's and cons, you just have to get the one that suits you best (where you ride and how your ride) and looks the best to you.

    Ripley looks best, Rascal has coolest colors, the Tallboy frame looks cool but the yellow and dark purple are not very appealing.
    This is really good feedback, thanks! Your impressions pretty much match what I've been able to gather from reviews. Tallboy is the best for DH, Ripley for climbing. Since my priority is climbing, seems Ripley is the clear choice.

    Rascal and Arktos ST seem like they'd also be good options, but neither seems appreciably better for my needs, and both are a fair bit more expensive than the Ripley NX build at $4,200 (minus the ~5% discount Jenson and CC have both offered).

    I'd love to demo any and all of the bikes in this class, but unfortunately none of them have demo days coming to my area any time soon, and my local shops charge $150/day. Just can't bring myself to spend $500+ bucks demoing a bunch of bikes when I know that I can do a bunch of research and be pretty confident I'm gonna end up with a pretty bitchin' bike for what I want.

  134. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post

    Rascal and Arktos ST seem like they'd also be good options, but neither seems appreciably better for my needs, and both are a fair bit more expensive than the Ripley NX build at $4,200 (minus the ~5% discount Jenson and CC have both offered).
    Alchemy has sale on the Arktos ST for only $3899 for NX or XT-11 speed and bike is spec w/ Fox DPX2 Factory Kashima.

    Special Offers: Free ENVE M6 or M7 Wheels with XT 12-Speed and X01 Builds!
    NX Eagle & XT 11 speed $1000 Off!

    In-addition, they have 2-weeks risk free trial.

  135. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by dc40 View Post
    Alchemy has sale on the Arktos ST for only $3899 for NX or XT-11 speed and bike is spec w/ Fox DPX2 Factory Kashima.

    Special Offers: Free ENVE M6 or M7 Wheels with XT 12-Speed and X01 Builds!
    NX Eagle & XT 11 speed $1000 Off!

    In-addition, they have 2-weeks risk free trial.
    Oh man, thanks for the heads-up on that! Arktos ST was the one I had been thinking would be really close if price were the same. At less than the Ripley, with a better spec, I'm thinking I need to think hard about...

    Anyone ridden both the Ripley and Arktos ST and can compare the two? I know the Ripley has gotta be a smidge better at climbing but all the reviewers said the Arktos was awesome too, and that extra travel could even give it the edge on really chunky, technical climbing (which is really the part I love about climbing, as opposed to being the first one to the top of the fire road).

    Also, being a bigger guy at 200#, the burlier 36 and DPX2 are appealing. And just look at the spec on that Shimano XT build: factory suspension and dropper, DT Swiss wheels...that is an amazing kit for $3,900. I am used to running Eagle but if I need a little more low end I'll just drop a 30t chainring on the front.

    Hmm...wonder how much longer they'll be running this deal....

  136. #136
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    Sorry man, but comparing the deal on the Arktos ST with 11sp XT is not a fair comparison with the Ripley with NX. Easy choice.

    I have owned an LS and ridden the V4 for 15 minutes (not a lot, I know), but own an ST.

    Yes, the Ripley climbs a little better (a little), but the Arktos takes the Ripley out to the woodshed on the downs and when things get fast and rough. After owning an LS and having a quick ride on a V4 there is zero chance I would give up the ST for either.

    Parts: For the same price the build on the Ripley NX is really weak. DPX2 shock, Factory 36 fork, Transfer post, XT brakes (Level Tís suck), and full XT drive train should make the comparison a no brainer.

    Other intangibles: The Arktos is a burlier frame that will withstand more abuse. Also the frame could be upgraded to 140mm travel if you wanted.

    The XT kit price makes me sad I spent $3k for frame only.

    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    Oh man, thanks for the heads-up on that! Arktos ST was the one I had been thinking would be really close if price were the same. At less than the Ripley, with a better spec, I'm thinking I need to think hard about...

    Anyone ridden both the Ripley and Arktos ST and can compare the two? I know the Ripley has gotta be a smidge better at climbing but all the reviewers said the Arktos was awesome too, and that extra travel could even give it the edge on really chunky, technical climbing (which is really the part I love about climbing, as opposed to being the first one to the top of the fire road).

    Also, being a bigger guy at 200#, the burlier 36 and DPX2 are appealing. And just look at the spec on that Shimano XT build: factory suspension and dropper, DT Swiss wheels...that is an amazing kit for $3,900. I am used to running Eagle but if I need a little more low end I'll just drop a 30t chainring on the front.

    Hmm...wonder how much longer they'll be running this deal....

  137. #137
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    3800 for an arktos st with fox factory everywhere is a crazy good deal. Sure it's 11sp xt but once you wear the drivetrain down just upgrade to xt 12 speed as it's an easy swap with a new Dt swiss freehub body. You also get the ratchet hubs on the arktos which are basically indestructible.

    Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using Tapatalk

  138. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by gus6464 View Post
    3800 for an arktos st with fox factory everywhere is a crazy good deal. Sure it's 11sp xt but once you wear the drivetrain down just upgrade to xt 12 speed as it's an easy swap with a new Dt swiss freehub body. You also get the ratchet hubs on the arktos which are basically indestructible.

    Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using Tapatalk
    Yea, for sure. There's no comparison build-wise. I don't even think I'd mind the 11sp XT. I'm used to riding Eagle but I'm a pretty strong climber. And if I miss a little bit of the low-end, I'll just drop a 30T on the front. Don't care about top end.

  139. #139
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    For anyone who cares, I ended up buying the Arktos ST. The build specs are just too good for a sub-$4K bike, plus I like that itís a bit burlier given my weight. Surprisingly light too, from what people are reporting in other threads. Might give up a tiny bit to the Ripley on climbing efficiency, but I think itís a worthwhile tradeoff. Appreciate everyoneís advice and input!

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    How much maneuverability and efficiency is lost going to an Arktos 29? It's only 12mm longer with 20mm more travel.

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    Dang I'm pretty tempted.... I'm not a huge fan of the geo... Hard time fitting droppers in there. Also, bit of a short reach for a person that pretty much has to have a large 6ft 32.5 inseam.

    Insanely good deal though for something not from YT or something.

  143. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelandk2 View Post
    Dang I'm pretty tempted.... I'm not a huge fan of the geo... Hard time fitting droppers in there. Also, bit of a short reach for a person that pretty much has to have a large 6ft 32.5 inseam.

    Insanely good deal though for something not from YT or something.
    If you don't think you're a fan of the geo, don't buy it. Or at least try one out before you commit. I guess with Alchemy you can return it if you don't like it.

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  144. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpcremata View Post
    For anyone who cares, I ended up buying the Arktos ST. The build specs are just too good for a sub-$4K bike, plus I like that itís a bit burlier given my weight. Surprisingly light too, from what people are reporting in other threads. Might give up a tiny bit to the Ripley on climbing efficiency, but I think itís a worthwhile tradeoff. Appreciate everyoneís advice and input!
    Wow, just wow, and all this time I thought the Ripley was the best bike ever!

    Tongue in cheek of course, but it's funny how all that ^ turned into all this

    Enjoy the bike, hopefully it makes you smile and folks will admit that there's no such thing as one bike to rule them all.

    FYI, that's a Sine (Yeti) by Dave Earle suspension design, so not DW at all.
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  145. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by scycllerist View Post
    How much maneuverability and efficiency is lost going to an Arktos 29? It's only 12mm longer with 20mm more travel.
    cant say for sure, but when i demoed it a while back, i wasnt quite thrilled as i had expected. sure it was set up quickly on the parking lot but i thought it didnt climb anywhere as good as ripley and same goes for descent, which was weird as it was pretty nice build, fox 36, dpx2, maxis minion tires.

  146. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Wow, just wow, and all this time I thought the Ripley was the best bike ever!

    Tongue in cheek of course, but it's funny how all that ^ turned into all this

    Enjoy the bike, hopefully it makes you smile and folks will admit that there's no such thing as one bike to rule them all.

    FYI, that's a Sine (Yeti) by Dave Earle suspension design, so not DW at all.
    What a smug comment. To be expected, of course. Looks like he liked the value and the burliness of the bike over the Ripley. Obviously, the Ripley's not the best bike for EVERYBODY. In fact, I hope you and people like you NEVER buy an Ibis. But I'm glad he got the bike he thinks is the best for him.
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  147. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by BmanInTheD View Post
    What a smug comment. To be expected, of course. Looks like he liked the value and the burliness of the bike over the Ripley. Obviously, the Ripley's not the best bike for EVERYBODY. In fact, I hope you and people like you NEVER buy an Ibis. But I'm glad he got the bike he thinks is the best for him.
    Thank you If they were the same price with the same build, I might have stuck with the Ripley. But the whole reason I posted here was because I wanted to see if there were other bikes I should be considering and, lo and behold, a couple people turned me on to the Arktos and then dc40 tipped me off to the amazing sale theyíre having. So I changed direction. Which was exactly why I posted here, because I was open to other options. I do really appreciate everyoneís input! Would not have found this bike without you all, and Iím really happy I did.

  148. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by cavo View Post
    cant say for sure, but when i demoed it a while back, i wasnt quite thrilled as i had expected. sure it was set up quickly on the parking lot but i thought it didnt climb anywhere as good as ripley and same goes for descent, which was weird as it was pretty nice build, fox 36, dpx2, maxis minion tires.
    The good thing is Iíve never ridden a Ripley, so Iím sure Iíll love it 😂 Honestly, this will be the first FS bike Iíve actually owned, so Iím sure I would love any bike I bought. The only bikes of recent vintage Iíve spent any real time on are a TB3 and a new Hightower. The TB climbs amazingly but definitely not aggressive enough. The HT felt sluggish (granted it had way too much sag). As long as this thing splits the a middle of those two I think Iím going to be very pleased with it.

  149. #149
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    Have a medium "as new" V4 frame in classified if anyone is interested.
    Ripley V1 XC/Gravel Adventure rig
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  150. #150
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    Nah, that wasnít smug, that was a comment reflecting on all the grief given out in this thread to anyone who didnít drink the koolaid.

    Face it, most folks buy a bike because it is:

    Affordable
    Available
    Recommended
    or simply for appearances

    Value, smalue, there are plenty of bikes that are a good value IF they appeal to your needs.

    Buying a bike without a test ride is a risk, Iíve donít if plenty, doesnít always work out.

    But yeah, pretty much every bike mentioned in this thread is a good bike, go figure.

    Quote Originally Posted by BmanInTheD View Post
    What a smug comment. To be expected, of course. Looks like he liked the value and the burliness of the bike over the Ripley. Obviously, the Ripley's not the best bike for EVERYBODY. In fact, I hope you and people like you NEVER buy an Ibis. But I'm glad he got the bike he thinks is the best for him.
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  151. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Nah, that wasnít smug, that was a comment reflecting on all the grief given out in this thread to anyone who didnít drink the koolaid.

    Face it, most folks buy a bike because it is:

    Affordable
    Available
    Recommended
    or simply for appearances

    Value, smalue, there are plenty of bikes that are a good value IF they appeal to your needs.

    Buying a bike without a test ride is a risk, Iíve donít if plenty, doesnít always work out.

    But yeah, pretty much every bike mentioned in this thread is a good bike, go figure.
    Almost $2k worth of Fox parts on a well regarded frame and suspension for under $4k is good value if a rider likes Fox parts and most do. That's a good foundation. With the savings a rider can target some XTR parts, blingy wheels or some riding vacations.

    FWIW this was an interesting thread with interesting results.

  152. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xlr8n View Post
    Trance 29 is in the ballpark.
    I agree. Love my Giant.
    But the current group of short travel 29ers is so good and personal preferences are so varied that describing the best climbing bike for technical climbing is pretty difficult. Unfortunately, demoing bikes is still the best option. I do agree that the use of 29x2.6 tires on the Ripley (V3 - haven't ridden the V4, so can't comment on it) negatively affected how I felt it climbed. I rode a friend's Tallboy and didn't like it at all, but I think that was partially how he had it set up.....he rode my Giant and had instant buyer's remorse!

  153. #153
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  154. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tinshield View Post
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    😂😂😂

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