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  1. #1
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    Calling owners of ti 29ers

    I’m a 120-something lb. female looking for a comfy ti frame. I was about to order an El Mariachi, but I just read a bunch of conflicting reviews about it being very/not at all stiff. With my relatively low weight, do I have to go custom to get the compliance I’m looking for, or are there makers out there known for their supple/springy frames?
    FWIW, I’m currently riding a Sir9 and I’m a long-time fan of steel frames.
    Advice much appreciated.

  2. #2
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    I own the Salsa Ti El Mariachi and love it. I have been riding it since July 2010. The welds are beautiful and the geometry seems perfect for me but I am 6' and weigh 180lbs. I find it comfortable but still stiff in the bottom bracket area which is what I wanted.

    I would not hesitate to give Salsa a call if I were you and talke with them. I did before I bought mine and they were very honest and helpful.

    Good luck.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ranger Pride
    I would not hesitate to give Salsa a call if I were you
    I would definitely call Salsa. You didn't say which frame size you would need - I'll assume that it is the Small. Just remember that a lot of times the small frames will be stiffer than there larger counterparts because each of the tubes are shorter and don't have as much length to flex over.

    Will you be running this rigid or with a suspension fork? Also, I'm using a ti seatpost, which also adds a little bit of comfort (don't expect too much though) to my ti hardtail.

  4. #4
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    Small indeed, suspension fork, and I do have a nice Eriksen post to put on.
    Thanks to both of you. I will call Salsa.

  5. #5
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    Check out Carver Bikes. They can build you a frame to suit your needs starting around $1200.

  6. #6
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    +1.
    A custom would be a good solution for you (imo)!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by DFYFZX
    Check out Carver Bikes. They can build you a frame to suit your needs starting around $1200.
    I had forgotten about Carver. Definitely worth looking into. Do they do custom options on the tubing that is used, or is it just geometry and bottom bracket type?

    Update: here's a link to the custom options that Carver offers: http://www.carverbikes.com/Custom/custom-ti.html

    I'd definitely at least talk with someone there and see if you feel they could help you get what you want.
    Last edited by TurnerConvert; 01-06-2011 at 06:19 AM.

  8. #8
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    I owned a MCR and still have a Lynskey Ridgeline. I feel that they were virtually equal in every aspect except weight and chipping paint.

    If I could not afford the Lynskey I would have been perfectly happy with the MCR.

  9. #9
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    Smile

    Why not a Moots YBB? I've been riding one for over ten years and it rides as nice as the day I got it.

  10. #10
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    Thanks for your reply. I used to own a Litespeed Unicoi and don't feel like going into YBB again as you have to stay seated to benefit from this design (or at least that's what I felt).
    Looks like Carver has some custom tubing options. I'll look into them.
    I think what I need are thin(ner) seat stays and I was just wondering if there was a brand out there whose stock ti frames weren't too beefy. (At 5-8 I'm tall enough for a stock frame).
    I would of course also appreciate any bits of comparative experience you guys have. (Moots vs. Salsa vs. IF vs. Carver vs. a quality steel frame, etc.). Ideally, I would like to stay around 2K, which seems to exclude custom.

  11. #11
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    I weigh 155lb`s.

    I owned a Small sir9 for 3 years before trading it for a Ti- el.mar.

    I found the el mar too stiff for my liking. I used all the same parts off the sir.

    The Salsa has better steering respons but after 3 years on the sir it felt pretty much like an older overbuilt alu bike. I raced both bikes on edurance type events but sold the salsa because it beat me up, even with a springy Kent eriksen ti post.

    I now have an air9 carbon, which is stiff to pedal bu doesn`t punish me the same as the El Mar ti did.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by nounours
    Thanks for your reply. I used to own a Litespeed Unicoi and don't feel like going into YBB again as you have to stay seated to benefit from this design (or at least that's what I felt).
    Looks like Carver has some custom tubing options. I'll look into them.
    I think what I need are thin(ner) seat stays and I was just wondering if there was a brand out there whose stock ti frames weren't too beefy. (At 5-8 I'm tall enough for a stock frame).
    I would of course also appreciate any bits of comparative experience you guys have. (Moots vs. Salsa vs. IF vs. Carver vs. a quality steel frame, etc.). Ideally, I would like to stay around 2K, which seems to exclude custom.
    Give Scott a call @ Quiring Cycles, pretty sure he could get you want you wanted in Ti and that budget We have sold 3 or 4 of his bikes and all have been very nicely crafted.

  13. #13
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    For your budget, you could easily get a Lynskey Ridgeline frame and you might try a 27.2 titanium seat post for added complianace and comfort. A female friend of mine just bought a new Ridgeline and I've been helping her with the build spec. She's is looking for some added comfort as well. Personally, I want my bike to be stiff and solid when out-of-the-saddle but comfy when seated. A compliant seat post will give you that. The Cane Creek ST (short travel) seat post works quite well and gives about 1" of comfort when slamming into stuff on the trail.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by nounours
    Ideally, I would like to stay around 2K, which seems to exclude custom.
    Did you look at the Carver pricing??? They start around $1300 for a custom frame and that's picking your own geo. Options are added from there. You could probably get exactly what you want for around $1600 if just stuck to the custom tubing and didn't add a bunch of other options.

  15. #15
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    custom ti for around $2000....
    quiring
    kish

    both build bad ass bikes.

    with quiring, you have a choice of bb30 or standard bb and reg or slider dropouts. he builds nice bikes!!!!

    i think scott quiring is also building frames with the lefty headtubes and also the 44mm standard for use with 1 1/8", 1.5 and tapered steerers!!!
    "forget kings...forget hadleys......they all have crap engagement. just run your bike fixed gear." - FoShizzle

  16. #16
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    As an 135lb, smooth rider, I can not stress enough the benefits of getting a true custom bike. Now also keep in mind that there is 'custom' and then there is custom. A true custom bike is built entirely around the rider and their needs. In other words, every tube on the bike is built around you, each aspect of the geometry will meet you needs. You'd be suprised how many 'custom' bikes are just the same tubset cut to fit differing lengths.
    The lack of 'springness' in you SIR, while not custom, is directly related to this issue.

    That said, I do have to ask why you want Ti. I understand the rust benefit, but a fully custom Steel rig will blow your mind and weigh in at no more than .5lbs heavier. A good builder can build you a super 'springy' steel bike (like mine : ) )

    Also, my guess is (and I don't know that much about this) that a custom Ti bike that costs will be straight gage ti, which, in my slightly uninformed opinion, would negate a lot of the benefits of going custom.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by olapiquena
    You'd be suprised how many 'custom' bikes are just the same tubset cut to fit differing lengths.
    The lack of 'springness' in you SIR, while not custom, is directly related to this issue.

    Where does she say her Sir isn`t springy?
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schultz29
    For your budget, you could easily get a Lynskey Ridgeline frame and you might try a 27.2 titanium seat post for added complianace and comfort. A female friend of mine just bought a new Ridgeline and I've been helping her with the build spec. She's is looking for some added comfort as well. Personally, I want my bike to be stiff and solid when out-of-the-saddle but comfy when seated. A compliant seat post will give you that. The Cane Creek ST (short travel) seat post works quite well and gives about 1" of comfort when slamming into stuff on the trail.
    Do you think that a ridgeline would be more compliant than the lynskey made salsa?

    Here was my set up, and it beat the hell out of me compared to my sir.

    Calling owners of ti 29ers-tisex01.jpg

    I imagine the stifness to be a size issue. Niner use different tubesetts on different sized bikes. My guess lynskey don`t on thier standard modells?
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  19. #19
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    I'm 5'2" , roughly 110lbs and very much like my Voodoo Zaka. Stock, Ti and 29"

    I scrubbed all the decals off and buffed up the frame last year but this is a Voodoo Zaka

    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/to1x1ui1Q1fuUR9BAM_5GA?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="https://lh6.ggpht.com/_jV9bjnlfU0k/TSYJZPX3xbI/AAAAAAAAKCY/eXISFHzzYNE/s640/IMG_3404.JPG" height="480" width="640" /></a>

  20. #20
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    The Voodoo Zaka in that size uses the same tubing spec cut to different lengths as the large frame - and the large frame rides pretty stiff for a ti frame. Also, the Zaka frame is pretty heavy for Ti - an 18 I weighed was a hair over 4 pounds. You could have a nice custom steel bike that would weigh the same or less and have a lot smoother ride than the Zaka for about the same price (or a hair more)

    LyndaW is an animal on the bike and used to race Aluminum 29ers in 24 hour races - check out her coaching and racing blogs - SUPER impressive!!!

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by nounours
    Small indeed, suspension fork, and I do have a nice Eriksen post to put on.
    Thanks to both of you. I will call Salsa.
    Get a Kent Eriksen frame for that post - It may be a bit difficult for us guys to relate to a females perspective of comfort. Kent's wife is a racer, she may have the insight you need. Best of luck.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by nounours
    Small indeed, suspension fork, and I do have a nice Eriksen post to put on.
    Thanks to both of you. I will call Salsa.
    Maybe a nice Eriksen Frame to match that nice seat post you have. I'm just saying............

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by nounours
    Thanks for your reply. I used to own a Litespeed Unicoi and don't feel like going into YBB again as you have to stay seated to benefit from this design (or at least that's what I felt).
    Looks like Carver has some custom tubing options. I'll look into them.
    I think what I need are thin(ner) seat stays and I was just wondering if there was a brand out there whose stock ti frames weren't too beefy. (At 5-8 I'm tall enough for a stock frame).
    I would of course also appreciate any bits of comparative experience you guys have. (Moots vs. Salsa vs. IF vs. Carver vs. a quality steel frame, etc.). Ideally, I would like to stay around 2K, which seems to exclude custom.
    At 2K You don't have to exclude custom I think Scott Quiring mite be the way to go.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by nounours
    Iím a long-time fan of steel frames.
    .
    Stay with steel. For the price of an imported ti frame from Carver and others, you can get a "custom" custom high quality steel frame from a builder in your region (If you like the no paint look opt for stainless steel, like Reynolds 953). The tubing choices for constructing a lively steel frame are much greater than with ti and your Eriksen post won't seize up in the seat tube. Good luck!

    PS: If you have the budget and want ti, I strongly urge you to do business with a North American builder who actually builds the frames - Ti Cycles, DeKerf, Moots, etc.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by DFYFZX
    Check out Carver Bikes. They can build you a frame to suit your needs starting around $1200.

    I ran across their website and almost punched myself for buying a steel frame that cost about $200 more. I wish I would have remembered Carver too when I was searching. Definitely worth checking out considering what you can get for the price.

    Not saying I would have changed my mind in the end, but Carver completely slipped my mind.
    "You can't discern by calculating in your mind how it will work. You have to feel how it rides differently to understand."

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by nounours
    Thanks for your reply. I used to own a Litespeed Unicoi and don't feel like going into YBB again as you have to stay seated to benefit from this design (or at least that's what I felt).
    Looks like Carver has some custom tubing options. I'll look into them.
    I think what I need are thin(ner) seat stays and I was just wondering if there was a brand out there whose stock ti frames weren't too beefy. (At 5-8 I'm tall enough for a stock frame).
    I would of course also appreciate any bits of comparative experience you guys have. (Moots vs. Salsa vs. IF vs. Carver vs. a quality steel frame, etc.). Ideally, I would like to stay around 2K, which seems to exclude custom.
    You might check out Waltworks, Walt works in steel, but he made me a really comfy steel fork and I've heard his frames are something too.
    I ride with the best dogs.




  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by fux
    Do you think that a ridgeline would be more compliant than the lynskey made salsa?

    Here was my set up, and it beat the hell out of me compared to my sir.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	tisex01.JPG 
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    I imagine the stifness to be a size issue. Niner use different tubesetts on different sized bikes. My guess lynskey don`t on thier standard modells?
    OMG! The reason I bought a ti El Mar is because i thought it'd be more comfortable. The frame is still inside the box, waiting for my parts to arrive. From what I read, it seems I'll get all beat up too, which is want I am avoiding in the first place. Calling on all small-sized ti el mar owners, please share your views and experiences! I may even sell this even before I build it.

    I'd take Fux's experience seriously coz him, coming from a SIR9, would know the diff in ride feel. I'm also coming from a steel 29er.

    Regrets? Hope not.

  28. #28
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    I would`t take it that drasticly if you are on a medium and weigh more than me.

    I have ridden loads of steel bikes and Sir is boarderline noodly. I loved it, some dont. Iv`e also owned an inbred and that handled like a brick in small.

    I imagine that a small el mar ti is also stiffer than medium because of the shorter tubing and hugely stiff headtube junction which has a different design that the larger frames.

    The type of riding you do can also affect they way you feel about a bike. My local trails are rough and tecky. The first thing that struck me with the El Mar was how well it tracked, compared to the Sir. Its more point and shoot on the Ti but was more tired after the same lap on the ti compared with the sir..

    I have some vids of both, and in the same area...

    <object width="640" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/BLEOcF6rsl4?fs=1&amp;hl=nb_NO"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/BLEOcF6rsl4?fs=1&amp;hl=nb_NO" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="640" height="385"></embed></object>

    <object width="640" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/1Jsz2bNE654?fs=1&amp;hl=nb_NO&amp;color1=0xe1600f& amp;color2=0xfebd01"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/1Jsz2bNE654?fs=1&amp;hl=nb_NO&amp;color1=0xe1600f& amp;color2=0xfebd01" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="640" height="385"></embed></object>
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  29. #29
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    I second a custom if you want to talk specifics of ride. I ordered a quiring, and I was able to tell Scott just what i di and didn't want, and compare to my other frame and tubeset for reference. It's the best way to get a good fit too. He'll get all your dimensions, and being female thy are likely different to stock bikes.

  30. #30
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    I also agree with the others here.

    Its not realy the material of a frame that maters, but how its put together, be it carbon, alluminium, ti, or steel.

    You could also send your sir, or a mcr off to a good custom painter if you already love the fit and feel of your current bike.
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  31. #31
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    I've had the SIR 9 and now have a Lynskey Ridgeline (med.). My thoughts on both...The SIR was way more flexy than the Lynskey but in a fun way. Out of the saddle, descending, it is more compliant for sure. You can spring it in and out of corners and generally act like a hooligan on it. But I always felt like the front end was too flexy (for me anyway). In contrast, the Lynskey front end is way stiffer and tracks better, and the rear is compliant but not flexy. Compliant is a relative term though, and with the Lynskey being a 31.6 post size it can hammer on your back while seated. I tried a 27.2 Moots post and can say without a doubt that it's the way to go. Kinda like a short travel Thudbuster but without the moving parts or weight.

    So, after all that rambling, get a stock Ridgeline, and either a Moots or Ericksen post in a 27.2 with a sizing shim to make it work.

  32. #32
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    FWIW, it has been my experience that curved tubes tend to be more flexible and "springy" than straight. I have a Black Sheep Stellar that is noticeably more comfortable on washboard roads/trails than my FS Titus.

    Disclosure: I am at the opposite end of the spectrum from you weight-wise (like double + 30 lbs., not to mention old ). And I realize that a B/S frame is well outside your budget, but thought I'd bring my curvy-tube experience into the picture.
    Let the market decide!

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  33. #33
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    The thing is, im a Small. Shorter tubes flex less, makes sense. Oh no, goodbye compliance! im only 150lbs.

  34. #34
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    Funk Cycles La Ruta Womens Small

    As an additional idea, you may want to check out Funk Cycles (Funkcycles.com) and look at their new small titanium La Ruta 29er. I believe they have a few women riding this specific model. It's a pretty cool design and utilizes a custom valved rear shock for lighter riders.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by spankye
    So, after all that rambling, get a stock Ridgeline, and either a Moots or Ericksen post in a 27.2 with a sizing shim to make it work.
    The 2011 frames have been updated to use 27.2 seatposts, no shim needed. A change I was happy to see.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiflow_21
    The 2011 frames have been updated to use 27.2 seatposts, no shim needed. A change I was happy to see.
    Nice, wish mine would have come that way...

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by spankye
    Nice, wish mine would have come that way...
    Do you have a pre-production 2011, or a prior year's frame? It seems they didn't make the decision to go to 27.2 until about a month ago when they posted it on the site. The seattube size didn't change, they've just added a permanent insert at the top of the seattube that reduces the diameter. For me it was a win win as I wanted a layback post and thought the 27.2 would be a bit more comfy with the added stiffness of the frame.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiflow_21
    Do you have a pre-production 2011, or a prior year's frame? It seems they didn't make the decision to go to 27.2 until about a month ago when they posted it on the site. The seattube size didn't change, they've just added a permanent insert at the top of the seattube that reduces the diameter. For me it was a win win as I wanted a layback post and thought the 27.2 would be a bit more comfy with the added stiffness of the frame.
    I have a 2010 model with the 31.6. Actually I just got mine back from some warranty service from them. I had the old style down tube which they replaced with the new curved one, and i had a seat tube insert replaced as it wouldn't hold tight. He would have done a 27.2 insert but i had a brand new 31.6 Thomson and couldn't justify buying another one.

  39. #39
    TR
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    If you are going to have a ti bike built you need to discuss the tubing to be used with the builder (or find an off the shelf ti bike with size specific tubing).
    My team mate and I both have Blacksheeps. She is 5'7" tall and weighs about 15kg less than me. Our bikes were both built with our sizes and weights in mind.
    It would not make any sense for both of us to have the same tubing based on our size differences.

  40. #40
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    Ok... I mean no offense...

    I own an early Lynskey Ridgeline-29SL and am 175lb; it is my primary-everything bike. Commute, MTB, gravel-grinding... all.

    If you want "stiffness", do not by and off-the-shelf TI frame. Aluminium or a similar alloy is the way to go. TI's compliance is why people like it. It's a tad bit more forgiving to ride. The trade off is that it is not usually as stiff as AL... and most of the time, not as stiff as FE.

    ?

    Personally I love, love, love the forgiveness of TI. And I am more than willing to deal with the flexiness.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by OmaHaq
    Ok... I mean no offense...

    I own an early Lynskey Ridgeline-29SL and am 175lb; it is my primary-everything bike. Commute, MTB, gravel-grinding... all.

    If you want "stiffness", do not by and off-the-shelf TI frame. Aluminium or a similar alloy is the way to go. TI's compliance is why people like it. It's a tad bit more forgiving to ride. The trade off is that it is not usually as stiff as AL... and most of the time, not as stiff as FE.

    ?

    Personally I love, love, love the forgiveness of TI. And I am more than willing to deal with the flexiness.
    As the owner of Moots Compact and a Blacksheep Highlight I respectfully beg to differ.
    You are absolutely confusing ride quality and stiffness as being the same thing.

  42. #42
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    kent eriksen is the best ti frame company

  43. #43
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  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by ridgeeriksenrider
    kent eriksen is the best ti frame company
    Thank you for the self-aggrandizement of your own bike...

    Notwithstanding who you think is 'best', the OP explicitly requested advise for a frame under 2K, which rules out Eriksen. Here's the quote:
    " Ideally, I would like to stay around 2K, which seems to exclude custom."

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by TR
    As the owner of Moots Compact and a Blacksheep Highlight I respectfully beg to differ.
    You are absolutely confusing ride quality and stiffness as being the same thing.
    Yes, but neither of those are "off-the-shelf TI frame"s, which is what OmaHaq was saying.

  46. #46
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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by Litemike
    Get a Kent Eriksen frame for that post - It may be a bit difficult for us guys to relate to a females perspective of comfort. Kent's wife is a racer, she may have the insight you need. Best of luck.
    Can't go wrong with an Eriksen and Moots (mooto-x rigor) will make you a custom one as well.

  47. #47
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    The OP has a $2000 budget...

    Moots - Out
    Erikson - Out
    IF Ti - Out
    Funk - Out
    Blacksheep - Out

    I would re-evaluate the choice of ti at your price point. A greater number of builders are going to be able to build a bike that suits your weight and riding style AND make your budget.

    It is my experience that a steel frame from a reputable builder can ride every bit as well as a ti frame. Maybe better.

    In other words, at your size, I would choose custom steel over stock ti for ride quality.

    Good luck.

    LP

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by lanpope
    The OP has a $2000 budget...

    Moots - Out
    Erikson - Out
    IF Ti - Out
    Funk - Out
    Blacksheep - Out

    I would re-evaluate the choice of ti at your price point. A greater number of builders are going to be able to build a bike that suits your weight and riding style AND make your budget.

    It is my experience that a steel frame from a reputable builder can ride every bit as well as a ti frame. Maybe better.

    In other words, at your size, I would choose custom steel over stock ti for ride quality.

    Good luck.

    LP
    At last, a voice of reason...
    Too many contributers don't trouble themselves to read the OP's requirements and waste her time.

    I concur with the steel direction.
    I love Ti, but to get a tube-set that fits your weigh, size and needs you must go custom.
    Quiring is the least expensive, quality option out there; $2,400. Last time Is spoke with him he didn't deal with butted tubes, so that would be a compromise to begin with.

    There is a slew of great builders that would fabricate for you an outstanding steel frames that would ride like a dream.
    The weight penalty would be minimal, if any. Yes, 40 years from now it would rust, but so we will...

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by lanpope
    The OP has a $2000 budget...

    Moots - Out
    Erikson - Out
    IF Ti - Out
    Funk - Out
    Blacksheep - Out

    I would re-evaluate the choice of ti at your price point. A greater number of builders are going to be able to build a bike that suits your weight and riding style AND make your budget.

    It is my experience that a steel frame from a reputable builder can ride every bit as well as a ti frame. Maybe better.

    In other words, at your size, I would choose custom steel over stock ti for ride quality.

    Good luck.

    LP
    Maybe you could get in a Waltwork steel.

  50. #50
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    its eriksen not erikson

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Climber999
    Thank you for the self-aggrandizement of your own bike...

    Notwithstanding who you think is 'best', the OP explicitly requested advise for a frame under 2K, which rules out Eriksen. Here's the quote:
    " Ideally, I would like to stay around 2K, which seems to exclude custom."


    I understand if you like crap, but if your looking for a piece of art to ride and to last longer then any other frame i would get an eriksen just saying a ti mongoose maybe first in line if you want a cheep ti frame

  52. #52
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    I love my 2010 Lynskey built Vassago Optimus Ti. I'm 5'11 220lbs and ride the 18" med. size frame. The frame feels fantastic. I live on the Gulf cost in a very humid city. Steel around here takes a lot less time than 40 years to rust.

    Im riding the op. Ti as a rigid single speed and it comes in at 18lbs 14oz. The frame flexes in the right places and is stiff in the BB. I just couldnt see what some of the other more expensive Ti makes had to offer other than name bling.

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by ridgeeriksenrider
    its eriksen not erikson
    it's "it's", not "its"...

  54. #54
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    drifting

    Was'nt the original post a female looking for opinions on small TI frames?

  55. #55
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    I should have added:

    You can go with stainless steel, which does not rust and is very light.
    It's becoming more main stream these days.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Climber999
    I should have added:

    You can go with stainless steel, which does not rust and is very light.
    It's becoming more main stream these days.
    Last I checked, at the price most builders charge for stainless steel you might as well go with Ti. Have you seen otherwise?

  57. #57
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    Owch, Lynskey raised their price of the Ridgeline. Not so much a bargin anymore

    Mojo

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiflow_21
    Last I checked, at the price most builders charge for stainless steel you might as well go with Ti. Have you seen otherwise?
    Yes, there have been some new development on this frontier.
    Apparently, a company called KVA produces a tube set that is suitable for cyclocross frames. It is not terribly expensive. I venture to guess that such tube set may work for a small 29er...I maybe wrong, though.

    There is a more detailed discussion here:
    http://waltworks.blogspot.com/2010/1...bandwagon.html

  59. #59
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    First off... I haven't read the previous messages, only a quick skim of the first few.

    I have an IF Ti Deluxe 29'er. It's my 3rd Ti bike and by far the best riding bike I've ever owned (Kona Ti, Black Sheep (don't do it)) and now the IF.

    I am about 185 when I'm thin-ish and this bike is both stiff and comfortable. I honestly can't recommend them enough. Good luck finding what you want.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by spankye
    it's "it's", not "its"...

    Take that ridgeeriksenrider(whatever that's supposed to mean) you just got owned!!! Spankye made words his b*tch

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