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  1. #1
    Err
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    BMC Trailfox TF01 Trailcrew build

    Just about finished getting my BMC 29'er together for the season and thought I'd share. The Trailfox is hardly unknown, there still aren't many around and fewer yet configured similar to mine so I figured I'd share. I have a 3 bike quiver right now with a V10 for bike park shenanigans and a P-Slope for pure DJ days and the Trailfox covering everything else in between. It'll see everything from glorified XC to full on DH and even the occasional roll through the dirt jumps with most of my rides falling towards the all-mountain side of things. I really dig longer rides that mix jumps and DH with big mileage and usually try to knock out a few 60-70+ mile rides a season like that, the Trailfox kills it for those days. I'm also fortunate enough to spend time in Whistler most every year where it'll see time on a solid sampling of the harder village trails and a bit of time in the bike park. I'm running the Enve's for general trail debauchery and will keep heavier rubber on alloy wheels for the sharper side of things. So yeah, slack'd out coil shocked carbon bike for big days in the saddle on the hardest terrain I can find. Not everyone's cup 'o tea but it sure makes me smile.

    PS. Not trying to be a tough guy with the hard trail comments, I crash a lot, heh.


    Build spec -
    Frame: 2016 BMC Trailfox TF01 Trailcrew
    Shock: Push 11.6, 475 lb spring
    Heaset: Works -1 for now, have a -2 to try
    Fork: Fox Float 36 RC2 160 mm
    Stem: Race Face Atlas 35, 35 mm
    Bars: Race Face SIXC, cut to 785 mm
    Grips: Race Face Sniper Slide-ons
    Saddle: Fizik Tundra M1
    Post: Reverb, 150 mm
    Brakes: XTR at the moment (soon to swap for Saint) 203 Fr & Rr
    Shifter: XX1
    Der: XX1
    Cassette: XX1
    Chain: XX1
    Chainring: Race Face n/w, 30t
    Guide: One-up
    Cranks: Race Face SIXC
    Pedals: XTR Trail, Race Face Atlas, Straitline AMP depending on the ride
    Wheels: Enve M60 HV laced to DT 240's & DT EX 1501
    Tires: Dampf & Rock Razor for trail, Magic Mary & Dampf for AM/DH
    Bottle holder: Arundel carbon side loader
    Fender: Mucky Nutz

    Forgot to snag a scale shot but it measured roughly 28.75 lbs


  2. #2
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    Damn... that thing looks like a mini DH sled. Will have to give us some ride reports on it once you get out a few times. Looks like it would be tons of fun in Downieville or Mammoth.

    What made you go with the Eleven?

  3. #3
    Err
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregnash View Post
    What made you go with the Eleven?
    The bike came with a CCDB-A Inline which feels great for general trail riding but I wanted something that would perform a little better on the hardest DH tracks. I looked at a DHX2 or Float X2 and even the EXT Storia but after a couple reports from folks I trust around the 11.6, I figured I'd give it a shot. It's a beast of a shock for sure with 2 very different personalities. I have mine setup with one circuit for efficient climbing and one for descending / maximum traction. In the climb setting it's as snappy as the CCDB-A Inline but in descend mode it's in another league. Of course, I'm paying a significant weight penalty at just north of 800g but it's not the sort of weight that you really feel like going to heavier tires. I still have the CCDB-A around for long XC days or even a Monarch RT3 if I want to go full weight weenie.

  4. #4
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    203/203 Saints sounds like overkill. Unless you are terible heavy, I would suggest to stick to the current brakes.

  5. #5
    Err
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    Quote Originally Posted by BEEB View Post
    203/203 Saints sounds like overkill. Unless you are terible heavy, I would suggest to stick to the current brakes.
    Ah yeah brakes, always a good discussion. Right up there with tire thoughts. I've ridden both XTR and Saint extensively and the XTRs are great brakes, especially on 29er's where that initial grabby feeling is a bit muted. That said, the Saints still solidly out perform them in terms of power and modulation during both initial bite and ramp up. Possibly more important to me is on big, fast descents the XTRs heat, fade, and smoke brake pads where the Saints shrug off the speeds that I can generate without a care. I particularly like how much easier it is to ride loose fall line terrain at the ragged edge of traction with the Saints. So, I'm not particularly heavy at 170-175 ready-to-ride but I do have terrain and tendencies to ride in ways that bring out the worst on the XTRs. Saints are not quite a perfect solution, they are heavy and a complete pain in the arse to get a perfect bleed (super picky) and that's probably why the XTRs are still on there. Guide Utimates would be another great option but I have Saints on hand.

  6. #6
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    The similarities between your rig and Lewis Buchanan's are unmistakable.
    Pro Bike Check: Lewis Buchanan's BMC Trailfox | ENDURO Mountainbike Magazine

    I'd give yours the nod on parts spec, because that is a serious rig. I'll give the nod to the full factory effort for matching colorways.

  7. #7
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    Nice to see a proper trail slayer to offset all of the weight weenie xc bikes 'round these parts.

  8. #8
    Err
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    @tehllama - I hadn't seen that article on Lewis Buchanan's rig, very nice setup there. I'm betting the Fox DHX2 is a pretty killer option.

    @mikesee - For as incredibly capable as 29'ers are in the gnarliest of terrain, it's surprising how few you see built to do just that.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Err View Post
    @mikesee - For as incredibly capable as 29'ers are in the gnarliest of terrain, it's surprising how few you see built to do just that.
    Agreed completely. You're preaching to the choir, actually!

    It took a long time for enough momentum to build in 29" for us to get a Pike, Fox 36, bash-capable tires and rims, etc... And right about when that bubble was about to explode, 27.5" stepped in and killed the momentum.

    But it hasn't died. It's just currently shifted --away from 27.5" and onto Plus. Give it some more time and I think it'll shift back to 29". No complaints on my end right now -- we've got proper frames, forks, rims, and tires already. It can only get better from here.

  10. #10
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    Yeah totally agree with the 29er thoughts. Only disadvantage I get from the bigger wheels is the occasional loss in maneuverability. Nothing unmanageable, but hairpin turns just take practice. But, with that said, I still smoke the 27.5 riders up an downhill on my 29er. And I'm talking riders of my general skill level. It's the "scientifically" faster wheel size, and for me, it shows. Even when I ride the 27.5's I feel slower compared to my 29er rig.

  11. #11
    Err
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    @miksee - It has been interesting to observe the changing tides of wheel diameter (and width!) over the past few years. I currently own a 26, 27.5, and a 29" MTB so I'm not exactly waving the flag for any one wheel size but if combining mid-travel with true DH lines, I slightly prefer the 29" wheel. I'm hardly in the "early adopter" class but back in 2012 I spent a bunch of time on a Niner WFO and even though the geo of that bike was totally wacky by modern standards, there was no denying the credibility of the big wheels in the terrain I like to ride most. That said, I owned a Nomad 27.5 for the past couple years and it was no slouch and never did send me home with anything less than a big smile.

    @AlexCase - I'm not going to go out on a limb and claim to be smoking anyone based on wheel size, but I sure do have as much fun as anyone. I do find that with the newer crop of ~17" CS 29'ers that maneuverability is largely a non-issue but I get where you're coming from.


    In other news, starting to settle in and get the 11.6 dialed. I can't believe how sensitive that shock is, you hardly have to touch the saddle to actuate it. Even setup firm-ish at about 16 mm / 28% sag with a 475 lb spring traction is very impressive. I might give a 450 a try as an option for the worst of the muddy, low traction days but I think 90% of my riding will be as is. In the climb setting forward motion matches the best of the XC tuned shocks I've tried on this platform (I just try to forget about the extra 4-500g )

  12. #12
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    Yes, well I guess smoke isn't the best description. But out riding yesterday with a group and was definitely surprised at the performance difference between the guys on 29ers and guys on 650's. Especially at speed going downhill, the 650's were always falling behind. Nothing too drastic, but enough to be noticeable.

  13. #13
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    Ha, I totally get what you mean and appreciate your enthusiasm. I'm right there with you. I bet I said a hundred times last year that as good as my Nomad was, it would be better as a 29'er

  14. #14
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    If I could have gotten my hands on one of those to test it there's a decent chance I would have ended up with one. It's one of the few capable 29ers with decent suspension AND geometry, but luckily there is some hope for this genre continuing with the new Evil bike and continued 160mm 29er fork support. The only place DH where I bled more speed on a 29er was medium-radius turns, where if you go too fast the bike simply breaks traction and slides towards the outside, as the wheel-mass is dragging it to the outside. So you had to slow a bit more and pedal a bit more out of the turn, assuming you were right on the edge of traction in the turn. Down rocky chutes or with wheel-catcher holes it was no problem. Jumped pretty well too on some of the bigger 20+ foot stuff (length), although it jumps different and sometimes I wouldn't have the distance or correct arc, a little trickier, but possibly due to the jumps usually being built around other sizes. I thought 26 was going to die years ago, which it has, and I think 29 is really to thank for the 27.5, given how revolutionary it was at the time (to ride anything other than 26" wheels).
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  15. #15
    Err
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    Yeah, the 29's definitely still have their strong and weak points, they're just shifted around a bit. Personally, I really like how they jump but I'm with you that they behave differently and can take a little adjustment when coming from smaller wheels. Cornering, we have a few trails around here that I'm actually a hair slower on the 29 but mostly I feel like I"m getting away with murder on them.

    That Evil Wreckoning looks like a beast. I had an Undead a few years back and was fairly impressed with the way the Delta system rode. I'd love to check one out.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexCase View Post
    Yes, well I guess smoke isn't the best description. But out riding yesterday with a group and was definitely surprised at the performance difference between the guys on 29ers and guys on 650's. Especially at speed going downhill, the 650's were always falling behind. Nothing too drastic, but enough to be noticeable.
    I ride lift-served a few times a summer, usually at Winter Park and Crested Butte, sometimes I hit the lottery and spend a week in Whistler.

    There's a crew at Winter Park that really rips -- mostly locals, but also some that come up from Denver/Boulder. I can never hang with them on the steep techy DH tracks, largely because I don't know the lines, but partially because I'm just not that good at that particular niche. Gotta know your limitations.

    I found it fascinating that when we took a breather from the DH track and hit Rainmaker or one of the other less tech/more flow trails, these guys (all on 26" and 27.5" sleds) would insist that I lead (on a 29" 7 x 7" travel bike) because they didn't want me buzzing their rear tires.

    Apparently they had deduced that once the rider is no longer burning down on his brakes for no good reason, the 29" wheels will easily overrun anything smaller. You just have to convince the pilot to lay off the binders.

    And I was as surprised as anyone that when I led they were pedaling where I was coasting, and I was still opening a gap. If they led they'd be pedaling where I was braking, and I'd still be creeping up on them.

  17. #17
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    Hell Err, could you please explain how coil behaves compared to air spring? Your opinion.

    I ve made my float x an evol one and i find it really hard to explore full travel. I find it maybe too progressive.

    Sent from my LG-D855 using Tapatalk

  18. #18
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    New question here. Shock behavior w/frame

    Quote Originally Posted by Err View Post
    Just about finished getting my BMC 29'er together for the season and thought I'd share. The Trailfox is hardly unknown, there still aren't many around and fewer yet configured similar to mine so I figured I'd share. I have a 3 bike quiver right now with a V10 for bike park shenanigans and a P-Slope for pure DJ days and the Trailfox covering everything else in between. It'll see everything from glorified XC to full on DH and even the occasional roll through the dirt jumps with most of my rides falling towards the all-mountain side of things. I really dig longer rides that mix jumps and DH with big mileage and usually try to knock out a few 60-70+ mile rides a season like that, the Trailfox kills it for those days. I'm also fortunate enough to spend time in Whistler most every year where it'll see time on a solid sampling of the harder village trails and a bit of time in the bike park. I'm running the Enve's for general trail debauchery and will keep heavier rubber on alloy wheels for the sharper side of things. So yeah, slack'd out coil shocked carbon bike for big days in the saddle on the hardest terrain I can find. Not everyone's cup 'o tea but it sure makes me smile.

    PS. Not trying to be a tough guy with the hard trail comments, I crash a lot, heh.


    Build spec -
    Frame: 2016 BMC Trailfox TF01 Trailcrew
    Shock: Push 11.6, 475 lb spring
    Heaset: Works -1 for now, have a -2 to try
    Fork: Fox Float 36 RC2 160 mm
    Stem: Race Face Atlas 35, 35 mm
    Bars: Race Face SIXC, cut to 785 mm
    Grips: Race Face Sniper Slide-ons
    Saddle: Fizik Tundra M1
    Post: Reverb, 150 mm
    Brakes: XTR at the moment (soon to swap for Saint) 203 Fr & Rr
    Shifter: XX1
    Der: XX1
    Cassette: XX1
    Chain: XX1
    Chainring: Race Face n/w, 30t
    Guide: One-up
    Cranks: Race Face SIXC
    Pedals: XTR Trail, Race Face Atlas, Straitline AMP depending on the ride
    Wheels: Enve M60 HV laced to DT 240's & DT EX 1501
    Tires: Dampf & Rock Razor for trail, Magic Mary & Dampf for AM/DH
    Bottle holder: Arundel carbon side loader
    Fender: Mucky Nutz

    Forgot to snag a scale shot but it measured roughly 28.75 lbs

    Hey, I have the same bike, and I was wondering how the frame preforms with a coil instead of an air?
    Thanks, Connor

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