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Thread: Bar ends

  1. #1
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    Bar ends

    Ive always liked bar ends for climbing but even after trimming my length to accomodate the small risers I always always on the first dh clip a tree and bounce from one to the other painfully. Dont understand it when after trimming the bar its the same length as it was before the risers.
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by smokinjoe
    Ive always liked bar ends for climbing but even after trimming my length to accomodate the small risers I always always on the first dh clip a tree and bounce from one to the other painfully. Dont understand it when after trimming the bar its the same length as it was before the risers.
    It's not the bar ends fault. Stop looking at the trees, look down the trail!
    Happiness depends more on the inward disposition of mind than on outward circumstances. Benjamin Franklin

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenLightGo
    It's not the bar ends fault. Stop looking at the trees, look down the trail!
    Hahaha true true.

    Not exactly 29er content, but you will get the jiff.



    Bryan d
    Just keep pedaling, don't stop pedaling.

  4. #4
    is buachail foighneach me
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    Definitely not the barends fault. If you didn't have the barends on there you would have busted your knuckles on the tree. Try riding around them next time.

  5. #5
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    The problem with the bar end is that it hooks the tree and doesn't allow you to slide off it.
    Without the bar end, you would still hit, maybe bash your knuckles, but more likely to slide off without yanking the bar completely back, causing you to crash.

  6. #6
    Terrain Sculptor
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    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve
    The problem with the bar end is that it hooks the tree and doesn't allow you to slide off it.
    Without the bar end, you would still hit, maybe bash your knuckles, but more likely to slide off without yanking the bar completely back, causing you to crash.
    Never happened to me & I've hit lots of trees with and without bar ends.

    Has that actually happened to you steve?

    With bar ends I have the perception that my bars are wider. I think I'm going to hit the tree so I do.

  7. #7
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    Never on a downhill

    In tight single track, sure. When bushwacking, always. Maybe shorter barends are in order?
    germs, needles, milk, death, snakes, mushrooms, heights, crowds, elevators

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Ninja
    Never happened to me & I've hit lots of trees with and without bar ends.

    Has that actually happened to you steve?

    With bar ends I have the perception that my bars are wider. I think I'm going to hit the tree so I do.
    Yes, I've hooked a tree with a bar end. It was more likely when I lived down south where the forests are much denser. I still use bar ends and haven't hooked a tree in a long time. It's much less likely here in CO, and was almost impossible when I lived in Tucson.

    If you have hit lots of trees while using bar ends, then I'm surprised to hear you have never hooked one. It seems inevitable unless you hit the end of the bar end and bounce off. If your bar end gets outside of the tree, you are hooked.
    Now that I think about it, that is more likely to happen with small diameter (young) trees.

  9. #9
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    I'm on the west coast and we don't have many small trees. That may be why I've never hooked one. I use stubby bar ends too.

    They turn in a little bit so if I were to hook a tree with one, that tree would have hit my bars somewhere near my index or middle finger. That would be good for knocking me off my bike, bar ends or not.

  10. #10
    MTB Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve
    The problem with the bar end is that it hooks the tree and doesn't allow you to slide off it.
    Without the bar end, you would still hit, maybe bash your knuckles, but more likely to slide off without yanking the bar completely back, causing you to crash.
    That depends on the type of bar end you're using. Stubby bar ends act as a hook. L-bar ends easily allow you to slide off a tree after taking a bash. If the tree hits within the L-bar, you were going down anyway.

  11. #11
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    Im impressed.
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  12. #12
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    Im sticking without. Good comments tho. When i stop crashing entirely, whether from clipping trees or having my front wash out going too fast and sliding my jersey and shorts to shreds ill quit riding. Dont like to crash but its enevitable when you push it, long, fast and hard. Wounds heal, ROC royal order of the crutch.
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  13. #13
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    I use ergon gx2s, ( cos I like the extra palm support for enduro riding.) the integrated barend is superb IMHO. short enough to be unobtrusive, but plenty to hold on to for hard climbing.
    the barend also curves inwards slightly, so if you mange to hook something with it, you were going to eat **** regardless

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by willtsmith_nwi
    That depends on the type of bar end you're using. Stubby bar ends act as a hook. L-bar ends easily allow you to slide off a tree after taking a bash. If the tree hits within the L-bar, you were going down anyway.
    Exactamundo!!

    Everyone always thinks you want short bar ends, but they are the ones that hook. On an L-bend bar end, you have to hit something about 5 inches in from the end of the bar for it to hook. If you hit a tree that far in without them, you are probably going down anyways.

    Also, if you hit a tree a couple inches in without them, it puts your brake on. If it is on the front brake side, you have just put on the front brake, and turned the bar at the same time. Not good.

    In the same situation, the L-bend deflects off without engaging the brake.

  15. #15
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    I used to ride a set of the stubby ergons, but also abandoned them due to "hooking". We actually have some pretty heavy vines in some of the tight singletrack forests around here, and stubby handle-hook + high speed vine = spectacular ejection. This is the only place I've ever had that problem though.

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