32h or 36h for a Single Speed 29er?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    32h or 36h for a Single Speed 29er?

    I am new to 29" single speed biking, but long time BMXer. I am currently building up 29" wheels for a single speed project that will see some light trail, and occasionally romp on the BMX track. My question is what rims/hubs hole # do I go with- 32h or 36h?

    Since they are both the same prices, which would be my best bet? I know the 32h would be less rolling weight, but does this may that much of a difference?

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  3. #3
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    Wow, that is a lot of reading.

    It seems like the jury is split evenly. However, in looking for low to mid level 29" riding rims (read inexpensive vs. the serious off roaders), it seems like 32h is the norm.

  4. #4
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    Reputation: Davidcopperfield's Avatar
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    If you are after every gram wheelset maybe 32 but 4 spokes are worth another 25 grams and aproximately 12% more stiffness per wheel especially on 29ers.

  5. #5
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    32h is the accepted "norm" for most wheels these days. On the larger radius 29'er wheel, the extra small bit of weight will give the wheel more lateral rigidity, more strength, it will tend to stay truer if it is well built and if one spoke breaks the wheel will be less affected to ride home on. If you are building the wheels to see some air time and have the option, unless you are building race wheels - go 36h - my opinion after 30+ years building wheels and working on bikes. The only disadvantage to more spokes is a bit of weight, and at high speed some air drag - MTB's don't usually go fast enough to make that an issue.
    R.I.P. Corky 10/97-4/09
    Disclaimer: I sell and repair bikes for a living


  6. #6
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    For me the issue is wheel dish. If the rear wheel is based on a 9-speed freehub, it would make sense to use 36 and maybe even use different spokes on drive vs. nondrive side.

    If not, 32 is plenny.

  7. #7
    Chronic 1st-timer
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    Being a big fat hog myself, 36h is the minimum number I go, non-dished.
    Trailwrecker at large

  8. #8
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    It seems that 40h option for the rear is mouthwatering.

  9. #9
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    Depends on how hard you're going to beat on it. I'm 185lbs and ride a 32h Flow rim dishless and have no issues. I hit logs and curbs kinda hard with the rear. The only time it's been out of true is after the first few rides after being built. It's one of the few wheelsets I ride I haven't built, which is why it did that.

  10. #10
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    I agree with Scmucker. I'm 190# and ride lots of rocks. Also on a Flow, 32h, dishless and no issues.
    If you're lucky enough to be in the mountains,
    you're lucky enough.

  11. #11
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    If 32 works it does not nullify the advantages of 36h at the 25 grams penalty. Same I was told about Egde carbon they kept telling me that 28 is enough and I replied many times 36 would rock 4 crossed by the penalty of the weight of 6 aerolite spokes.
    Is there any disadvantage to 36h other than small weight gain?

  12. #12
    dru
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    Go 36

    Go 36, the weight penalty is minimal compared to the extra strength provided. I'm 180, and crash a lot (yeah, yeah, stfu!!). I've had to do minor tweaks on the front wheel twice. This is running rigid and a really light rim (440 g). Dish matters big time too. The rear (also 440 g) is on an Alfine with huge flanges and almost no dish. The rim is as true as the day it was built.

    Drew
    occasional cyclist

  13. #13
    Beware the Blackbuck!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davidcopperfield
    Is there any disadvantage to 36h other than small weight gain?
    You are the disadvantage to 36h.

  14. #14
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    I am 187lbs and run race x lite 24 and 28 spoke wheels on my superfly ss. Had these wheels for 3 years now and never trued, never broke a spoke and still on my original freehub body.

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