Is a 29er safer than a 26"- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Is a 29er safer than a 26"

    Perhaps I should know the answer to this question since I have both, and in the last two years the injuries I suffered were on the 26". Well the first one caused me to buy a 29," then when the 29" was in the shop I rode the 26". I love the 26" bc it's FS, and the 29 is HT (and more modern).

    So, I wrote what happen to me in the "Rider Down" forum. when I was on my 26" I was coming down some single-track grade, listening to my audio-book which i almost always do, missed a good sized rock, hit it wrong and catapulted off my bike. So now I am asking myself, if I was on the 29" would that not have happened? Wouldn't I have just rolled over the rock, and maybe just had a more mild spill? Now I have a shoulder injury that I am hoping will resolve sooner than later.

    cheers.

  2. #2
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    Would you be listening to a 29er specific audio book?

  3. #3
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    Too many variables involved to make a proper "guess". If you are comparing wheel size alone a 29" wheel has better roll-over characteristics but again you would have to compare the bikes / geometry more thoroughly and perform the same test, exactly, on your 29er - probably don't wan to do that.

  4. #4
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    29ers are better, so the answer as always is yes. Audible. com is for road rides, real mtb is better paired with the mars volta. Sorry about your biff.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Back2MTB View Post
    29ers are better, so the answer as always is yes. Audible. com is for road rides, real mtb is better paired with the mars volta. Sorry about your biff.
    "better" is a broad word. 29ers are not better at hugging tight corners, for example.
    So are you saying they are safer?

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    30mm inside wide rims are safer on your 29er. They give more sidewall support to your tires and you get more traction and a much higher washout threshold= safer.

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    Does it speak to this forum that I can't tell if this is a joke?

  8. #8
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    A few small traits that tend to mean stability, grip, and keeping rider mass aft of the handlebars are common to 29ers - longer wheelbase, slightly longer trail measurements, slightly larger contact patch, and a bit more rollover for square/other edges that can bring the bike to a halt under you. They're pretty minor, and in that instance being on a different bike would probably have changed how you crashed more than if you'd have crashed - being more modern tends to mean better brakes, slightly slacker geometry (not always, especially from a 29" HT to a 26" bike), so there really are tons more variable.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluidworks View Post
    Does it speak to this forum that I can't tell if this is a joke?
    LOL, ditto.

    OP, I think it's a wash. Or maybe 26" bikes are safer.

    I was talking about this with my teammate the other day - he wanted to do some MTB on a fully rigid 26" hardtail to help with his 'cross skills, and thought everyone should learn on 26" rigid bikes.

    I don't necessarily agree with the idea that people learn to be better riders by learning on rigid bikes. One needs all the same skills to ride a full-suspension bike well. I think what bigger bikes really do is increase the size of things that can be ridden a certain way and raise the speed limit.

    In other words, at the same level of skill, a rider can do a descent faster on a more capable bike. But he's the same rider. And people will still overreach from time to time, regardless of what bikes they're on. I think we tend to overreach relative to our comfort levels, not some absolute level of difficulty of the trail.

    So on a more capable bike, I think the biggest difference is that a rider's likely to be going faster for each mistake, which can make them higher-consequence.

    I've been riding my 26" hardtail lately myself. I'm waiting on a warranty part to get my fast bike back in action. I notice that I have more trouble holding a line on rocky, rooty trails. My times haven't been hugely effected (but I am slower) on the way up. I'm a fair amount slower by time, and I feel like I'm having more trouble, on the way down. Though I haven't had a fall, or at least not a significant one. The carvy feeling was a lot of what sold me on my 29" FS, so no surprise to have the 26" bike feel really harsh.

    Holding a line less well has caused me to have more stupid pratfall kinds of things, but that just means I dab more. I haven't gotten hurt, and I think that's somewhat general.

    For me, avoiding getting hurt is more about approaching the trail with a sense of respect for the danger inherent in what I'm doing. I try to ride smooth and in control, and I (usually) respect the size of things I might ride off or try to jump, and use some judgement.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  10. #10
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    Paying attention to what you are doing is safer. All things being equal (and they usually aren't) a 29er wheel will be slightly less likely to get hung up on an obstacle and will have slightly more momentum. But if you plan on running into things without paying attention, suspension travel and a slack front end will count way more than wheel size. So if you insist on being an idiot, get a downhill bike with 200mm of travel and wear all the protective gear.

  11. #11
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    Thanks, yes this was a serious question. I am not an extreme rider, and I do so more for the cardio and sheer enjoyment. And as I stated I was listening to an audiobook, which I think fits into the equation of not noticing the object that caught my wheel.

    So, the assessment is posed something like this: All things equal the more capable bike will be more forgiving. A 29" should be more forgiving to a rock sticking in the trail. But is it so much more forgiving that there is a substantial difference to the extent I won't ride the 26" whenever the 29" is available? That's all. My career is a very physical one; I am middle-aged, and I cannot afford injury like I could when I was in my 20's (like all you guys here)...

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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    Thanks, yes this was a serious question. I am not an extreme rider, and I do so more for the cardio and sheer enjoyment. And as I stated I was listening to an audiobook, which I think fits into the equation of not noticing the object that caught my wheel.

    So, the assessment is posed something like this: All things equal the more capable bike will be more forgiving. A 29" should be more forgiving to a rock sticking in the trail. But is it so much more forgiving that there is a substantial difference to the extent I won't ride the 26" whenever the 29" is available? That's all. My career is a very physical one; I am middle-aged, and I cannot afford injury like I could when I was in my 20's (like all you guys here)...

    Most important would be paying attention to trail features. To answer your question wheel size *only* the bigger wheel will have slightly better roll-over but you have to look @ frame geometry, suspension, tires etc. Making this strictly a wheel size debate will not help you.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    "better" is a broad word. 29ers are not better at hugging tight corners, for example.
    So are you saying they are safer?
    Hahaha. Im saying they are better, so safer is part of it. Unless you're a small fellow, then it's not better or safer but the bit about the mars volta still applies.

  14. #14
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    I would suggest that it's all about geometry...taller folks with longer legs might feel safer on a 29er and the shorter folks might feel safer on a 26" bike...but isn't all about perception? If a shorter person is intimidated by the big wheels, then they no doubt will not feel as safe as on a 26" bike.
    2014 Nail Trail 29...

  15. #15
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    I think paying attention is safer.

    People tend to ride faster on more forgiving or stable-feeling equipment until they reach the level of their tolerance to risk based on feel. If that's faster, I think in reality it's more dangerous.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by time229er View Post
    I would suggest that it's all about geometry...taller folks with longer legs might safer on a 29er and the shorter folks might feel safer on a 26" bike...but isn't all about perception? If a shorter person is intimidated by the big wheels, then they no doubt will not feel as safe as on a 26" bike.
    Well intimidation wasn't part of my recent injury. I was rolling along happy go lucky on the 26."

    But I agree intimidation is a factor in all of life's challenges. I used not be able to get laid bc I was intimidated by hot chics... But when I would booze it up a bit, I could wake up next to a supermodel, or a horse....

  17. #17
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    Is a 29er safer than a 26"

    The bike that fits you best and you are comfortable with is the safest bike

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jovian View Post
    The bike that fits you best and you are comfortable with is the safest bike
    agreed...that was my suggestion also
    2014 Nail Trail 29...

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    Well intimidation wasn't part of my recent injury. I was rolling along happy go lucky on the 26."

    But I agree intimidation is a factor in all of life's challenges. I used not be able to get laid bc I was intimidated by hot chics... But when I would booze it up a bit, I could wake up next to a supermodel, or a horse....
    not quite sure I follow your drift, but okay...
    2014 Nail Trail 29...

  20. #20
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    Paying attention to the trail and riding within your limits on the bike you're riding is the safest. Wheel size doesn't matter. Like others have said, you might roll easier on a 29er, but that can get you in trouble quicker.
    Last edited by mountainbiker24; 12-20-2014 at 08:08 PM.

  21. #21
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    This is much safer than both 29er and a 26er. Read it a few times and practice the techniques/skills. It will raise your level of riding, make you a safer rider and make riding more fun.

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    Mastering Mountain Bike Skills - 2nd Edition: Brian Lopes, Lee McCormack: 9780736083713: Amazon.com: Books

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jovian View Post
    The bike that fits you best and you are comfortable with is the safest bike
    Well said! It doesn't matter if it's a 29er or a 26'' as long as it fits you.
    Last edited by Max24; 03-02-2015 at 05:44 PM.

  23. #23
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    As you know now, mtb'ing is nothing to take with a grain of salt. Leave the MP3 at home and listen to your books on your commute in your car. I have to think without the distraction you may not have crashed.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    .... if I was on the 29" would that not have happened? Wouldn't I have just rolled over the rock,
    You can never be sure.

    I think the industry needs to move to 32", nay, 36"(!) inch wheels just to be sure! They're safer than anything we have now! and with the coming of wider hubs, it'll be just as stiff, and bikes will only be $15,000!

    You should get a penny-farthing if you get so distracted by audiobooks that you miss trail hazards.

  25. #25
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    Ha! How did they ride those things?

    PennyFarthing.jpg
    Greg

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    1980 Red Line Pro-Line old-school cool :cool:

  26. #26
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    Really all very solid advise.

  27. #27
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    I always roll a 29 inch moto raptor over a strange looking root sticking up in the middle of the trail. One day on a 26er with the same moto raptors, same head tube angle, etc. I crashed. Front wheel got caught on the root, I hit the ground, ouch.

    Is the 29er safer?
    Was I ill advised and unaware?

    I think the squirl was laughing at me

    Quote Originally Posted by In2falling View Post
    This is much safer than both 29er and a 26er. Read it a few times and practice the techniques/skills. It will raise your level of riding, make you a safer rider and make riding more fun.

    Mastering Mountain Bike Skills - 2nd Edition

    Mastering Mountain Bike Skills - 2nd Edition: Brian Lopes, Lee McCormack: 9780736083713: Amazon.com: Books

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisx View Post
    I always roll a 29 inch moto raptor over a strange looking root sticking up in the middle of the trail. One day on a 26er with the same moto raptors, same head tube angle, etc. I crashed. Front wheel got caught on the root, I hit the ground, ouch.

    Is the 29er safer?
    Was I ill advised and unaware?

    I think the squirl was laughing at me


    See that's the thing about it, no doubt skill and awareness trump everything else. But: after something bad happens one cannot but say "If only I had (turned right instead of left, or xxxxx ) In this case after the accident I just asked, "what if I had been on my 29"? I have two great bikes, but if the 29" all things being the same is a safer bike, doesn't it behoove me to use it all the time? Well I am going to answer my question myself: Skills and awareness trump everything else. When I am on the 26," I will be more careful though...

    Because at the end of the day, a 29" rolls over objects with more ease. how much:

    a 29" has 659 sq inches of surface area (not counting the width) versus 26" is 510.
    thats a considerable difference:

    29" = 14.5x14.5 x 3.14 = 659 sq inches
    26" = 13 x 13 x 3.14 = 510 sq inches

    That means a 29er has 23% more circular surface area than the 26."

    That may have saves my shoulder this last time.

    Just sayen..

  29. #29
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    The 29er wheel's higher axle height, in relation to the bump's height and the rider's center of gravity, will safely roll over more obstacles. Less endo risk, in other words.

    That's only assuming everything else was equal. I'd say the more capable bike and the one that suits you best would be safer, if you were to compare any old 29er (could be a poorly designed one), to a 26er (could be a classic tried and true one). A crappy 29er isn't going to be significantly safer than a crappy 26, if at all. A 26 with a nice suspension fork and good tires, found at a good sale price, might have done much better than the latest 29er at the same price. It might be worth spending more on a nicer bike, especially if you consider the cost of failure like your injury. I believe it's worth spending up to $2500 or so (min of about $750 msrp), before the ratio of capability/performance gained per dollar starts to drop off. If you can't afford it... well, know your limits and ride responsibly. You can also learn to deal with bumps yourself, rather than let the bike handle it, with a bit of skills training.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    Because at the end of the day, a 29" rolls over objects with more ease. how much:

    a 29" has 659 sq inches of surface area (not counting the width) versus 26" is 510.
    thats a considerable difference:

    29" = 14.5x14.5 x 3.14 = 659 sq inches
    26" = 13 x 13 x 3.14 = 510 sq inches

    That means a 29er has 23% more circular surface area than the 26."

    That may have saves my shoulder this last time.

    Just sayen..
    I was looking for you to make some kind of argument about the surface of the tire tread so hard that I missed the surface area you do calculate for a while.

    Now I know, but I'm not sure how it's relevant. You could say the same about a square wheel.

    I do think there's something to the angle of attack and contact patch arguments, though.
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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    I was looking for you to make some kind of argument about the surface of the tire tread so hard that I missed the surface area you do calculate for a while.

    Now I know, but I'm not sure how it's relevant. You could say the same about a square wheel.

    I do think there's something to the angle of attack and contact patch arguments, though.
    well the tire tread and angle could be the same or different on different size tires so I am not sure about your point here. 23% more surface area is considerable.

    As for the post right before yours, yeah my 29" is a 2013 model and was fitted for me at the LBS. While my 26" is a 1998 GT LTS I got from CL. It was when I crashed the 26" the first time that I decided to invest in the full measure of geometry. I spent like $1400 for a HT bike and it was much more than I ever intended to spend but the LBS fit me into it, and you know when the geometry is just right, so I had to buy that 29". Still, the 26" is a hoot in its own way and I have invested almost as much into that bike as the 29" to get that geometry feel the way I like it; so it's a pleasure to ride when my ass is not falling off of it.

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    I seem to be able to crash both my 26 and 29er bike just as effectively. So I don't know if any one is safer. I haven't crashed a 650b yet so maybe that's the safest..

  33. #33
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    Total surface area doesn't matter, as it's not doing much but touching the air. The contact patch, the part that is touching the ground, is determined by how much pressure is in the tire. 30 psi on a 26" and 30 psi on a 29er would have the same contact area, though it's shape is different and 30 psi in a 29er would be rock hard compared to 30 psi in a 26. To get a similar amount of compliance in a 29er, as the 26", a lower pressure is needed, and the lower pressure results in more contact area. Compliance can be the same for small bumps at low psi compared to a 26" tire with higher psi, but force to bottom out the 29er with lower psi would be less... basically boyle's law regarding high pressure and low volume, vs low pressure and high volume.

  34. #34
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    Too many variables as stated earlier.
    One thing I will add is that most people I know on bikes are faster on their 29" than 26" on the same trail.
    It's not universal or constant but quite regular and consistent.

    If you were traveling at this accident faster would you have cleared it due to angle of attack, of crashed harder as you were going faster?

    I've found it's often geometry, suspension, brakes, tyre choice & pressures, my attention and skill level that determine if I make it around the trail in one piece.

    All I'd say is concentrate on the trail, be present / in the moment and enjoy your riding safely.

  35. #35
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    The answer goes a little something like this.....ANY BIKE is dangerous when the tool riding it is not paying attention listening to a fvcking audio book! Bad TROLL BTW, think you deserve a dink or two.

    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    Thanks, yes this was a serious question. I am not an extreme rider, and I do so more for the cardio and sheer enjoyment. And as I stated I was listening to an audiobook, which I think fits into the equation of not noticing the object that caught my wheel.

    So, the assessment is posed something like this: All things equal the more capable bike will be more forgiving. A 29" should be more forgiving to a rock sticking in the trail. But is it so much more forgiving that there is a substantial difference to the extent I won't ride the 26" whenever the 29" is available? That's all. My career is a very physical one; I am middle-aged, and I cannot afford injury like I could when I was in my 20's (like all you guys here)...
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  36. #36
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    Just in case this is a real question. IMHO....A 26" wheeled bike requires more focus and skill to negotiate technical terrain then a bike with 29" wheels. They are both fun though.

  37. #37
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    Re: Is a 29er safer than a 26"

    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    Perhaps I should know the answer to this question since I have both, and in the last two years the injuries I suffered were on the 26". Well the first one caused me to buy a 29," then when the 29" was in the shop I rode the 26". I love the 26" bc it's FS, and the 29 is HT (and more modern).

    So, I wrote what happen to me in the "Rider Down" forum. when I was on my 26" I was coming down some single-track grade, listening to my audio-book which i almost always do, missed a good sized rock, hit it wrong and catapulted off my bike. So now I am asking myself, if I was on the 29" would that not have happened? Wouldn't I have just rolled over the rock, and maybe just had a more mild spill? Now I have a shoulder injury that I am hoping will resolve sooner than later.

    cheers.
    Pay attention.

    It wasn't the bike. It wasn't the wheel size.

    It was you. Your fault. Your mistake that caused you injury. All things being equal, you did this to yourself.

    The bikes you are riding are more capable than you. Increase your skill level and pay attention.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by iscariot View Post
    Pay attention.

    It wasn't the bike. It wasn't the wheel size.

    It was you. Your fault. Your mistake that caused you injury. All things being equal, you did this to yourself.

    The bikes you are riding are more capable than you. Increase your skill level and pay attention.
    ^ this. For a six inch rock, a 29 inch wheel is about 10% more efficient at rolling over than a 26er (4% more than a 650B). How big was the rock you hit? Would that 10% have made the difference? If you had been paying attention, you could also have lifted your front wheel up about an inch and achieved the same rollover.
    It's just a flesh wound!

  39. #39
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    Is a 29er safer than a 26"

    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    30mm inside wide rims are safer on your 29er. They give more sidewall support to your tires and you get more traction and a much higher washout threshold= safer.
    I disagree. Also depends on the tire, and too wide a rim does not respond to input easily.
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  40. #40
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    I ride 20", 24 and 26" really it depends on what you are doing. I would kill myself riding a 26" bike in a half pipe, on the other hand on rocky terrain my 26" works better. I do not have a 29" dirt bike but the extra weight and intertia of the bigger wheel will definetly affect response time. Big wheels just have more gyroscopic effect and slower response but roll over objects somewhat easier. Really it comes down to terrain and riding style is all.

  41. #41
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    I think it was the audio-book more than anything else. Focus. Concentration. Awareness.

    Seriously . . . .

  42. #42
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    Wait....you mean people don't crash on 29ers?
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  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMac47 View Post
    Wait....you mean people don't crash on 29ers?
    Apparently they may when the extra 23% circular surface area of the 29er wheel encounters a strong cross-wind, but that shouldn't harm a shoulder according to the data presented earlier in this thread.

  44. #44
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    Yes.
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  45. #45
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    26er is safer.

    29" wheels are taller, thus the rider is further from the ground, giving gravity more time to pull when you fall.

    it's science.

    J.
    are you a bike shop owner? or a custom builder? I want to talk to you about your website

  46. #46
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    So if my 26er HT has a 13.5" BB height and my 29er HT has a 13.5" BB height which bike will have you standing taller? Hint this is a trick question.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayson44 View Post
    26er is safer.

    29" wheels are taller, thus the rider is further from the ground, giving gravity more time to pull when you fall.

    it's science.

    J.
    I am not sure the seat on my 26" is high then on my 29." Will have to measure. Anyways, if the fall is worse on the 29," one could argue that is offset by fewer falls.
    Like I said before, after every trauma, the victim asks, "if I did this or that differently, would I not have the same trauma" I cannot but help to think that hitting that rock with my 29" would not have had the same results. But I will never know.

    Just wondering, how many of you guys, when you are going down-grade, have your ass off the seat? I did not. That could have made a big difference.

  48. #48
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    J.
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  49. #49
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    Just wondering, how many of you guys, when you are going down-grade, have your ass off the seat? I did not. That could have made a big difference.
    Usually. Also no ear buds.

    Are you seriously riding down trails with your ass planted? My back hurts just thinking about it...
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  50. #50
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    Is a 29er safer than a 26"

    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    Just wondering, how many of you guys, when you are going down-grade, have your ass off the seat? I did not. That could have made a big difference.
    Wat?

    For the most part, unless I'm grinding up a climb, I'm out of the saddle. Even on level trails, get up. You can't pump or flow when you're on your butt.

  51. #51
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    Re: Is a 29er safer than a 26"

    Hu
    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    I am not sure the seat on my 26" is high then on my 29." Will have to measure. Anyways, if the fall is worse on the 29," one could argue that is offset by fewer falls.
    Like I said before, after every trauma, the victim asks, "if I did this or that differently, would I not have the same trauma" I cannot but help to think that hitting that rock with my 29" would not have had the same results. But I will never know.

    Just wondering, how many of you guys, when you are going down-grade, have your ass off the seat? I did not. That could have made a big difference.
    Last time.

    Pay attention.

    The problem is you and other trolls like you.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    I love the 26" bc it's FS, and the 29 is HT (and more modern).
    .
    I didn't see anyone address the fact that hard tails and full suspension bikes don't ride the same and do require different riding styles/skills. You can't just be sitting on the saddle of some bikes not paying attention while hitting stuff.

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTR-33 View Post
    You can't just be sitting on the saddle of some bikes not paying attention while hitting stuff.
    Well, you can, just ask Mantrain. Whether you would want to or not depends on your tolerance and/or enjoyment of the resulting outcomes.

  54. #54
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    I stupidly crashed a small jump at my most-local trail about 10 years ago on my FS 26er and broke my pelvis. About a month ago I crashed a different small jump at the same trail on my FS 29er, same exact issue: i tried to jump a little higher and a little farther then i should have and didn't land it clean.
    No fractured pelvis this time but i had a 5"X7" black and blue mark on my upper thigh and a pretty bad concussion that i'm still sort of feeling the effects of.

    You tell me: was it the fault of the bike size or the rider?
    NTFTC

  55. #55
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    In my experience, 29ers give you feeling of security which can be both good and bad.
    Good thing is that you will probably have more courage and it will be easier to pass some obstacles, however...
    Bad part is that all that extra courage would result in you going faster and be more daring on some parts as you are more isolated on a 29er which can result in a catastrophic accident.

    So, overall on a 29er you will probably crash less, but if you do it would be more dangerous.

  56. #56
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    Crashing is more dangerous; and the ear buds gotta go.

  57. #57
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    I'm 6'2", 225, wide shoulders (high center of gravity). One thing I learned riding a 26er was how to go over the bars and land on my feet. That is a valuable skill to have. Going to 29 made OTB a very rare occurrence.

  58. #58
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    26 means ur lower to the grind than 29.....anyone got a tape measure.... And know how to use it??? Lol

    Seriously though otb more than I care to admit on my old 26" being I only rode it 1 season before going 29. Otb once on 29er, and I blame that on the sapling that jumped in front of me (basically too wide on a log over got just off trail edge...)

    Found I crash just the same but otb is rare now, usually bike goes right or left, my face the opposite way. And hurts alot less now too!!! Being 270 going otb at speed takes a few minutes to get breathing back to normal and peel myself off the dirt.
    Sent from my Nokia Stupid Phone using Tapatalk

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    26 means ur lower to the grind than 29.....anyone got a tape measure.... And know how to use it??? Lol
    Find one and measure some bottom bracket heights.

  60. #60
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    I just read this whole thread and I can only say that I've never crashed a 29er and that I don't have have one either, but I have crashed every other bike I've owned at one point in time. Coincidence?

    Ok, one more thing... we ride mtb to push ourselves past our known limitations, going too far past the skillset is the cause of crashes, not the bike regardless of wheel size.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  61. #61
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    I noticed that my car gets better gas mileage with my 29er inside than my 26" bike. Also, my cell phone signal is stronger while riding my 29er. I have definitive data that indicates the weather is better when I'm on my 29er. My wife tends to want to have sex more often after I've ridden my 29er.

    My college football team averages 0.129 more wins per season in years I ride my 29er more than my 26" bike. Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings movies are better in those years as well.

    My 29er has caused my home internet broadband speeds to increase, my kids grades have gone up, and I think some of my gray hair is going back to brown.

    I don't know why I even ride my 26" bike any more.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by evasive View Post
    Find one and measure some bottom bracket heights.

    I have, 13-19mm difference roughly, and u missed the sarcasm. Was a "ya but not enough to matter".

    I know TECHNICALLY 26" bb is a tad lower on avg but 1/2-3/4" higher isnt going to make a crash any worse or any better lol. Especially when bb height varies between frame spec and manufactures for the same wheel size. XC bike often has lower bb than trail/am for same wheel size for example. Gonna suck regardless and injury level is going to depend on 100 other things. And personally I put 29ers as safer cause otb takes more effort and I'm lazy, too much work to peel myself off the dirt vs keep on rollin.

  63. #63
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    Fair enough, but if you can't be bothered to write clearly, I can't be bothered to tell if you're being sarcastic.

    I'd expect there's more difference in BB drop than in BB height. In the broadest sense, BB heights are more or less the same between the two given the wide range of frame types multiplied by different ideas of what's ideal from each manufacturer. Then factor in however many years of geometry evolution you want to consider on top of that. That 13-19mm difference you mention won't show up if you really expand the dataset.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinGT View Post
    I noticed that my car gets better gas mileage with my 29er inside than my 26" bike. Also, my cell phone signal is stronger while riding my 29er. I have definitive data that indicates the weather is better when I'm on my 29er. My wife tends to want to have sex more often after I've ridden my 29er.

    My college football team averages 0.129 more wins per season in years I ride my 29er more than my 26" bike. Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings movies are better in those years as well.

    My 29er has caused my home internet broadband speeds to increase, my kids grades have gone up, and I think some of my gray hair is going back to brown.

    I don't know why I even ride my 26" bike any more.
    LOL

    I agree except for the part about LOTR movies. Even a 29er can't make a difference, they suck regardless of wheel size.

  65. #65
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    I wish my 26" bike had a higher bb! Though it's amusing to find out just how chewed the teeth on my big ring can be and still work.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    I wish my 26" bike had a higher bb! Though it's amusing to find out just how chewed the teeth on my big ring can be and still work.
    simple fix...29" wheels
    2014 Nail Trail 29...

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by mantrain View Post
    ...Wouldn't I have just rolled over the rock...

    No.

    I got put over the bars on an absolutely pathetically small rock. Could not have been more than 2 inches above the ground. Downhill in a slow, rocky technical section, front wheel touched it and over the bars I went.

    Now my 26" I feel that it, with the shorter wheelbase, picks up and over things MUCH easier than the longer 29er.
    Sorry, the whole "29ers will just roll over things so much better" thing is overrated. Yes they do, but moreso for an overall energy savings, they are not magic carpets that float over chunk and technical things. Certain things I notice it works better, other times, I hate it.

    To be quite honest, so far my favorite handling bike has been my Farley 8. That thing just seems to be unstoppable.

  68. #68
    Jon
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    29" inch tires are a communist conspiracy to give riders a false sense of security.

  69. #69
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    Do you pick up the bike over every 2"+ bump on your 26?

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    Do you pick up the bike over every 2"+ bump on your 26?
    I thought you always had to...
    2014 Nail Trail 29...

  71. #71
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    Is a 29er safer than a 26"

    Quote Originally Posted by time229er View Post
    simple fix...29" wheels
    650B has crossed my mind. One of my teammates did that, and my 26" frame has boatloads of clearance, so I think I might be able to too.

    But it kind of defeats part of the purpose of a 'B' bike to buy something new for it that it doesn't actually need.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  72. #72
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    I've flipped more on 26's, yes. I own both. I take different lines on the 26. 29's a bit faster when I can just monster truck over ****.

  73. #73
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    So i had this thread running through my mind as I peeled my fat ass off the trail. Same damn spot that's laid me over more than once and was my first otb incident.

    I have to say, weighing less and having winter layers on, the sudden stop at the end hurt less and got up much quicker. But FFS otb hurts, especially on frozen dirt. same damn root that has put me on my ass a few times, put my 8yr old on his face on the side of the hill and his bike 20ft down on a tree.
    but I think my front tire burping in the middle of it and the fact my legs caught the bars helped lol.

    Pissed I was stopping 50ft up to turn camera back on, so no video of fat guy otb, thank god I put it on the bars cause a cylinder style on chest mount would have hurt like hell.
    Sent from my Nokia Stupid Phone using Tapatalk

  74. #74
    JCL
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    For a given travel and if the geometry is optimised, then yes, a 29" is significantly safer as you're far less likely to go over the bars.

  75. #75
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    The ratio of miraculous saves to injurious crashes

    There is a little-known quantity that bicycle scientists have only begun to investigate. It is so difficult to quantify due to the nearly infinite number of variables involved, but due to the latest data processing technology available we now know that the ratio of miraculous saves to injurious crashes is completely independent of wheel size (unless you are riding a high-wheeler).

    For example, you might have had a great save on your crash-prone 26er, but you were probably going slower, so that scenario carries the same statistical significance as going very fast on your 29er and making the same great save. The calculations are mind-bogglingly complex.


    As for anecdotal evidence, I have gone really fast and had amazing saves and amazing crashes with equal frequency on both 26ers and 29ers. I still think the best one was on a rigid 26er: I passed the ride leader on a descent where I thought everyone was going too slow ( I was soooo cocky back then). I soon discovered that it was because, in the middle of this downhill, there was a bunch of rock slabs; all sloped downward, but with step-ups and step-downs. I flew off one only to have to immediately go up another one. I bunny hopped for my life and pounded the front wheel into the ledge. It wasn't a square edge, but it was a huge hit and I basically pogo-ed on the front wheel off the next ledge and rode it out. The rear tire never hit the ledge or the slab as I nose-wheelied across it. I think if I hadn't been able to get my a$$ 1-1/2" farther back before it hit the tire I would've been eating slab granite that day. So that one favors the 26er.
    btw - the only thing I learned that day was that I can make amazing saves

    -F

    PS - I have also gone OTB at 5 mph UPhill on my 29er. Don't ask me how.
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  76. #76
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    Audio book? Baahaawaa! That's funny. Be the wheel, you must have total concentration. Dude. Not with an audio book. I can't even imagine. It is a poor craftsman who blame his tools. Maybe listen to what is going on around you, like tires just about to break loose, twigs in the wheel etc.

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarinCRO View Post
    In my experience, 29ers give you feeling of security which can be both good and bad.
    Good thing is that you will probably have more courage and it will be easier to pass some obstacles, however...
    Bad part is that all that extra courage would result in you going faster and be more daring on some parts as you are more isolated on a 29er which can result in a catastrophic accident.

    So, overall on a 29er you will probably crash less, but if you do it would be more dangerous.
    That has been my experience. Far less crashes on a 29er. Hit a rock or a rut and the 29er just kept chugging along. But my crappy HT steers like a boat so I took a corner too fast after some rain and wiped out into a tree dislocating my shoulder. With the 26 I'd hit a small obstacle and usually get pitched to one side mostly just hurting my ego and maybe resulting in a couple scrapes. Rode more cautiously on the 26 than the 29er. In fact I've hit some crap on my 29er that on the 26 would have likely broken my face lol.

    29er can also encourage bad habits. Friend upgraded to one and decided he could just sit in the saddle going downhill. Well, he hit a rut and endo'd hard and broke a lot of bones and had to be airlifted to a hospital.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrfat View Post
    That has been my experience. Far less crashes on a 29er. Hit a rock or a rut and the 29er just kept chugging along. But my crappy HT steers like a boat so I took a corner too fast after some rain and wiped out into a tree dislocating my shoulder. With the 26 I'd hit a small obstacle and usually get pitched to one side mostly just hurting my ego and maybe resulting in a couple scrapes. Rode more cautiously on the 26 than the 29er. In fact I've hit some crap on my 29er that on the 26 would have likely broken my face lol.



    29er can also encourage bad habits. Friend upgraded to one and decided he could just sit in the saddle going downhill. Well, he hit a rut and endo'd hard and broke a lot of bones and had to be airlifted to a hospital.

    Full suspension can cause that feeling of feeling like u can stay in the saddle way more than you would normally but going on a descending section of a trail....sad that was a hard learned lesson, but I wouldn't say that's a 29er thing.

  79. #79
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    I think the main issue is speed especially downhill. The faster you go, the more prone you are to accidents.

    Started on a full rigid 26, went faster with front suspension, faster still on FS, then even quicker on a 29 hardtail. Haven't tried FS 29 yet, don't want to lol

    If the ground isn't giving you a lot of feedback like on a 26 rigid, you get a false sense of security and likely speed up and if you're not used to going that speed and something comes up ahead, you won't be able to react as fast.

  80. #80
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    I've accomplished many more saves on my 29er because of the gyro effect. The bike wants to stay upright longer and moving forward easier. That said, there's stuff that scares me on a 29er that I wouldn't think twice about riding on my 6er, partly because the latter is closer to the ground and has 2" more travel. Ultimately tho I think it's because you feel so much higher on the 9er you don't want to push your luck. The saves have come when I'm committed on a squirrely downhill or loose dinosaur teeth or bashy rock garden and can't dismount or take evasive action. I've ridden 'em out where I was sure I was gonna crash. Totally surprised but sure relieved...
    All bike, all the time

  81. #81
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    I think something we shouldn't forget in these discussions is that most of us who have both 26" and 29"-wheeled bikes probably got our 29ers more recently, with a better idea what we were looking for, and with a higher budget.

    I bet we'd see a lot of the same improvements buying 26" bikes that way.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  82. #82
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    Timeline: 26, 29, 29, 29, 29, 29, 29, 26. Last 3 are still with me.

    The biggest and most obvious improvements on both platforms is the outright performance. First 26 was a 25lb aluminum hardtail. Last 26 is a 32 lb 6" travel bike. I bought it purely to see if the wagon wheel haters were right.

  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by canrock View Post
    Too many variables as stated earlier.
    One thing I will add is that most people I know on bikes are faster on their 29" than 26" on the same trail.
    It's not universal or constant but quite regular and consistent.

    If you were traveling at this accident faster would you have cleared it due to angle of attack, of crashed harder as you were going faster?

    I've found it's often geometry, suspension, brakes, tyre choice & pressures, my attention and skill level that determine if I make it around the trail in one piece.

    All I'd say is concentrate on the trail, be present / in the moment and enjoy your riding safely.
    Umm.. I'm wondering what you planned to add to my post / quote since you included it in your post without any further comment?

    Was this intentional?

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