Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    25

    29er frame recommendations

    My AL 29er hardtale frame broke, but everything else about the frame is solid. I can not afford a new bike but I do have 500ish bucks for a new frame.

    I am 6'4 220 if that helps.

    Any recommendations?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fairbanks007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    369
    Take a look at Canfield Bikes. You can get spacers if your current rear hub is non-boost.
    SHOP NIMBLE 9 BOOST | Canfield Brothers Online Store

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    25
    I was thinking steel was the way to go, I do not care about weight.

    Can you explain non boost, my last bike is 2010, so I am not up to the current specs yet

    Old bike is 9 speed cassette.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    66
    I'd go to your lbs and get some advice their. If you have an old, inexpensive bike you're going to run into a lot of compatibility issues with modern frames. One way to avoid some of the compatibility issues is to find a used or nos, older frame.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    25
    It's mostly xt components but from 2010

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fairbanks007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    369
    Quote Originally Posted by mattlreese View Post
    I was thinking steel was the way to go, I do not care about weight.

    Can you explain non boost, my last bike is 2010, so I am not up to the current specs yet

    Old bike is 9 speed cassette.
    Boost and non-boost refer to the width of the dropouts in the rear triangle or fork. As 29'ers became more popular, someone figured out one way to make the taller wheels stiffer and stronger than the sometimes flexy early 29'ers was to increase the space between the hub flanges. This is a boost hub, and rear triangles and forks have to be wide enough to accept the hub. You can put spacers on a non-boost hub to make it fit a boost frame, but not the other way around.

    https://enve.com/journal/what-the-boost/

    Since you're a bigger guy, and you've already broken a frame, you might want to look into boost hubs/forks as your budget allows. Canfield makes nice stuff and this might be a way to get you into a frame that's worth upgrading your other parts on as you need to.

    FWIW, I'm not a big dude but I am ~ 220 lbs ready to roll. I don't use boost hubs, don't notice wheel flex on my 29'er and regularly hit 4-6' drops. Wheels are still true, but I also insist on 32 spokes/wheel.

    Good luck whichever way you go.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by Fairbanks007 View Post
    Boost and non-boost refer to the width of the dropouts in the rear triangle or fork. As 29'ers became more popular, someone figured out one way to make the taller wheels stiffer and stronger than the sometimes flexy early 29'ers was to increase the space between the hub flanges. This is a boost hub, and rear triangles and forks have to be wide enough to accept the hub. You can put spacers on a non-boost hub to make it fit a boost frame, but not the other way around.

    Since you're a bigger guy, and you've already broken a frame, you might want to look into boost hubs/forks as your budget allows. Canfield makes nice stuff and this might be a way to get you into a frame that's worth upgrading your other parts on as you need to.

    FWIW, I'm not a big dude but I am ~ 220 lbs ready to roll. I don't use boost hubs, don't notice wheel flex on my 29'er and regularly hit 4-6' drops. Wheels are still true, but I also insist on 32 spokes/wheel.

    Good luck whichever way you go.
    Thanks for the info, mine is most likly, non boost but I am also willing to buy a frame and build a bike little by little.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fairbanks007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    369
    Quote Originally Posted by mattlreese View Post
    Thanks for the info, mine is most likly, non boost but I am also willing to buy a frame and build a bike little by little.
    Your 2010 frame won't be boost, I don't think that came out for another 4 or 5 years. All your other stuff should swap over to the new frame without too much hassle. Might be the quickest way to get you back on the trails.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,286
    Shop pink bike for a steel frame with your headset and rear drop out.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    4,277
    Not sure if this vintage is boost but probably? To me asking price is too high, too, but you get the idea...find a used frame that is sturdy, e.g., Canfield Yelli, Nimble Nine, or Kona Honzo, or others...those are just examples.

    https://youtu.be/5vvH-mUaPEY


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    4,277
    Oops, my old youtube video copied instead, hopefully this links to pinkbike?

    https://www.pinkbike.com/buysell/2357587/




    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    4,277
    Here is a Large non-boost for $350?

    https://www.pinkbike.com/buysell/2211133/


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    66
    You have to know what rear drop-outs, headset, and bottom bracket you have.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: foresterLV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    147
    numerous chinese carbon frames are about ~300 plus shipping on ebay.

    Sent from my SM-G955F using Tapatalk

  15. #15
    WillWorkForTrail
    Reputation: Cotharyus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    4,248
    Soma has a good selection of versatile steel frames if you want to look that direction. The Juice is a 29er frame with sliders so it can be set up single speed, but it also has a hanger and routing for front and rear derailleurs etc etc. I bought my Juice as a replacement for my first single speed frame. XXL frame with a 120mm fork on it, the ride is excellent, and if memory serves, it was right in the $500 range, which is good for a steel bike.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: azjonboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,630
    I second the Soma Juice. My son likes his.
    If you're lucky enough to be in the mountains,
    you're lucky enough.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sissypants's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    467
    I'd second the guy who recommended taking a look at Chinese carbon frames. They really work, they really honor warranty, and they really are cheap. Look at Aliexpress, and in particular Tideace or SmileTeam. You can get these frames for <$250. If you're really into it, you can check out import/export companies on Alibaba.

    Brand-name is always an option, you just won't be getting carbon and it will be a very basic frame. Buy used.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-17-2016, 07:40 PM
  2. XC 29er Aluminum Frame Recommendations?
    By bobsaget in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-07-2015, 07:14 AM
  3. Replies: 14
    Last Post: 08-30-2013, 07:15 AM
  4. Steel 29er frame recommendations.
    By kikoraa in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 08-29-2012, 09:31 AM
  5. Looking for 29er frame recommendations
    By C Booty in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-05-2012, 11:22 AM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2018 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.