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  1. #1
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    26 inch tubes in 29er tires.

    Well I took some of your guy's advice and I think it is a bad idea.

    Standard 26 inch shraeder valve tubes.

    1. Very tough to get to fit. I did the air up thing until they were as big as monster truck tires. I thought, "oh I stretched them out too much"! Aired them down and they were hardly any bigger than what I started with. I had to wrap tape around the tires to keep things from popping out.

    2. Finally got them on and aired up. Bad part was the tube snuck past the bead and out of the rim when I aired it up. Take it out and try it again. Finally got it in, but wasn't looking forward to flats out in the field. Put over 20 miles on them in rough terrain with no problem.

    3. Rode into town and was at the local coffee shop and then I heard a boom. Went outside to my bike and the tire was half off exposing a tube with a huge rip in it.

    Geez, am I missing something or should I have just gotten the right size tube to start off with???

  2. #2
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    I've been using 26" tubes in my 29er for a couple of years with zero problems. You must not have seated the tube properly.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by zyzbot
    I've been using 26" tubes in my 29er for a couple of years with zero problems. You must not have seated the tube properly.
    I am not denying that, but to get the tube to seat into the tire properly and not sneak under the bead is a pain in the butt. Please explain how you do it quickly with a minumum of fuss and not have the tube try to crawl out on you as you install it?

    I am a little slow but willing to take advice.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf
    I am not denying that, but to get the tube to seat into the tire properly and not sneak under the bead is a pain in the butt. Please explain how you do it quickly with a minumum of fuss and not have the tube try to crawl out on you as you install it?

    I am a little slow but willing to take advice.
    I run 26 inch tubes also, but I carry a 29 inch tube spare when out riding. Its faster and easier when you're out on the trail and your buddies won't get pissed waiting for you as you try to wedge that smaller tube on that bigger rim. I put the smaller tubes on at home where I can take my time. Coat the tube with baby powder, inflate them enough to get the shape right, but not too much, and work it around the rim inside the tire, 1 bead being out. Once its around the rim, deflate it some, then seat the other bead, check for pinches, then inflate.
    "Veni, vedi, pulsus" "I came, I saw, I pushed"

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf
    I am not denying that, but to get the tube to seat into the tire properly and not sneak under the bead is a pain in the butt. Please explain how you do it quickly with a minumum of fuss and not have the tube try to crawl out on you as you install it?

    I am a little slow but willing to take advice.
    How long did you leave the tube aired up? I have sucessfully used Specialized Turbo 26" tubes (their expensive, lightest weight butyl tubes) in my Fast Trak tires. I air them up and leave them overnight. This seems to work with a spare, too. Just air it back down and roll it up carefully and put it in your hydro pack, etc.
    I wouldn't think the valve type should make a difference unless the schrader tubes are a thicker, less resilient (thus less likely to stretch) rubber.
    I do use a regular Bonti 29er tubes on my already heavy everyday wheelset. I have luck both ways- hope this is of some help.

    OGG
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  6. #6
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    I'm 1 for 2
    One went BOOM!, the other is still working.
    Not much help I know, Just carrying two 29" tubes incase.
    But if you ever need one, it is good practice, so that if you have to take a 26" tube from little wheeled buddies you will know how to repair it.

    -Dan
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  7. #7
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    What width tube did you use?
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    What width tube did you use?
    26 inch by 1.9/2.125 schrader valve maxxis welter weight (their mid weight tube).

    It all sounds a little complicated to me. Sounds like getting the right size tube for the job is the way to go. You guys left out all 20 steps in the initial posts I read!

  9. #9
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    Well I went out to the shed to fix my tire. A little better luck this time. Added air in the tube till it was about the right diameter and put it in. Kept letting air out as I worked the last half of the tire on. Not too tough this time around and I think I could do it in the field pretty easily.

  10. #10
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    Start mounting the 2nd tire bead opposite to the valve, and work over 2 sides simulataniously towards the valve.

    Your Maxxis tubes are too thin. Get bigger ones. You over-stretching yours by at least 10%. One rubber type works better for over-inflating that the other. Surface tension and stuff.

  11. #11
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    Cloxxki, I understand you use Michelin latex 26'' tubes. I wanted to try them but the only one I could find in the shop are labelled 1.75-2.10 width: are these the one you run?

  12. #12
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    I think they are yes. But latex requires very little pressure to expand. If you inflate the tube by itself, the thinnest part will soon pop "open" (bulge?).
    Actually the uninflated size of the latex tubes is much bigger than similar butyl ones.
    Klok - XC - Skate - Ski

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloxxki
    I think they are yes. But latex requires very little pressure to expand. If you inflate the tube by itself, the thinnest part will soon pop "open" (bulge?).
    Actually the uninflated size of the latex tubes is much bigger than similar butyl ones.
    Ok, thanks. I'll try them and share a report later.

  14. #14
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    Specialized makes (or at least used to make) a thorn resistant racing tube that came in under 165 g. I use those 26 tubes in 29ers without a problem
    Thorn resistant made it a bit thicker but at a minimal weight penalty

  15. #15
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    good tip Toddre! I will have to try some of those soon!

    I have used 26" tubes. I like them and have never pinched a 26" tube in my 29'er. I run ultra low pressure for my size. I am 195 now(that is right I have lost 5 more lbs) and run mid 20's in my tires, with excellent results. This is using the Exiwolf Kevlar tire. I now run 29" Bonty tubes self slimed w/ Stans(I remove the valve core and by using a suringe put stans in the tube) , and get the same results at low pressure. I pulled the front tire off because the front was loosing a bit of air, it was funny, my self sliming method is working great, the tube had up to 14 thorns in it and still could make it through a whole ride before loosing air hahahahaa.
    On one gear fixed or free is where I want to be.....

  16. #16
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    My self-slimed tubes on the grocerie better are doing fine also. One has had a big nail in it for months now, I can't be bothered to take it out :-)

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf
    I am not denying that, but to get the tube to seat into the tire properly and not sneak under the bead is a pain in the butt. Please explain how you do it quickly with a minumum of fuss and not have the tube try to crawl out on you as you install it?

    I am a little slow but willing to take advice.
    Use your feet, too.


    I'm only half kidding, I've done it before.

  18. #18
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    I've used Specy turbo's all over the place.

    Had good luck w/ the Maxxis flyweights too.

    Whoever is having them blow off is not seating the bead correctly.

    I can do this in the garage, on the trail, anywhere.

    Not to make anyone feel bad, but my wife can easily swap a 26" tube into her 29" set-up unassisted and rather quickly.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Padre
    I've used Specy turbo's all over the place.

    Had good luck w/ the Maxxis flyweights too.

    Whoever is having them blow off is not seating the bead correctly.

    I can do this in the garage, on the trail, anywhere.

    Not to make anyone feel bad, but my wife can easily swap a 26" tube into her 29" set-up unassisted and rather quickly.

    Your wife sounds like a freak so it doesn't make me feel bad. I think I finally figured out the routine last night. Want to have a 26er into a 29er tube race??

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf
    Your wife sounds like a freak so it doesn't make me feel bad. I think I finally figured out the routine last night. Want to have a 26er into a 29er tube race??
    Sure....never said it was faster...but it's not a hassle for us at all.

  21. #21
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    tube tips

    I had a lot better luck when I stopped trying to get the tube on first, then the second tire bead. Now I just put first bead on, put tube's valve stem through rim, then pull BOTH the second bead and the tube up onto the rim at the valve and work them on around with my two hands. Works great. Also helpful to find just the right amount of pressure so the tube slips onto the rim without a lot of effort but not so much air that it wants to pop right off again. and I use lots of powder...

  22. #22
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    I have come in late on this topic (on most topics) and have input. The assumption I have to make and upon which my input is based is that the reason to use a 26" tube is to save weight in the wheels. Good idea.

    Some weights I just took, not claimed, but indeed weighed by me: CST (garden variety) 26x1.50-1.75 <174gr> QBP 700x40-45c <187gr> Pyramid 700x35-40c <142gr> Ritchey (marked 124gr) 700x32-40c <132gr>

    I have been using the "hybrid" tubes (700x35-40c or so). since I got my first 29er in 1999. I haven't experienced any trouble with this ser-up. At the shop, here that's a pretty common practice and has been workable, so far.

    Chuey

  23. #23
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    Yup,

    Put some 26" presta tubes in my new Jones ACx 2.2s this morning. Works like a champ.

    Thanks for the tip, all.

  24. #24
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    Seems to me the guy is right about using 29er cross tubes. I would rather stretch out a tube sideways than trying to stretch it out to make the diameter bigger. Seems like a lot less chance of pinches during install, easier install and a nice way of keeping the weight. down.

  25. #25
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    You may be right, but I do a fair amount of crossing and 28-32mm tubes are already pretty thin. Inflating them to 54mm is going to lead to pretty thin walls.

    You're right about risking pinches with the 26" tubes. You have to take extra care.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Padre
    Not to make anyone feel bad, but my wife can easily swap a 26" tube into her 29" set-up unassisted and rather quickly.
    Sounds like a thinly disguised "girls can do this" comment to me. You sexist.



  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf
    Seems to me the guy is right about using 29er cross tubes. I would rather stretch out a tube sideways than trying to stretch it out to make the diameter bigger. Seems like a lot less chance of pinches during install, easier install and a nice way of keeping the weight. down.
    This topic has been gone over a number of times on this board, though not recently: If you stretch a 26" tube lengthwise, you're only stretching it by 10%. If you stretch a 'cross tube sideways, you're stretching it by 20-40%, depending on the tube.

    I've been using Performance lightweight 26" tubes in my 29" tires for some time now, without problems. Prior to that I had used Bontrager/Cheng Shin cross-plus tubes (rated 40-45mm or so) with few problems, but I still figure that was pushing my luck harder. Plus the 26" tubes are lighter and cheaper.
    "People like GloyBoy are deaf. They are partisan, intellectually lazy & usually very angry." -Jaybo

  28. #28
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    The first 40-45mm tube I tried blew up on the first night. Of course the one night the bike in question was parked like 2m away from my pillow, bedroom door open. NOT fun.
    My favorite 26" tube for non-race bikes (I always got them cheap) is the Geax 26x1.5x2.125. 140g. I don't recommend it to others, but it works fine for me. It does flat from time to time, but it's cheap and light, so no reason to complain. Not much good stores here, and lazy, so I stuck to those most of the time.

    It seems like wider rims make use of a 26" tube more practical, though getting a wide one slightly more important.
    I can't help but think that a cross tube or thin 26" tube inflated to 29" creates more rolling resistance than a nicely fitting 29" tube. If I'm wrong, let's all use 700x23 tubes, they comes as light as 60g! (not serious there)

  29. #29
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    I didn't say that

    I didn't say anything about 28-32 tubes. My post mentioned 35-40s and 32-40s. Again, most of my customers use them and no trouble yet. (6 years)

    Years ago, in the time before 29s I used to ride 26" wheels. In my 2.0 tires, I used 1.75 tubes. Never any problems with that set up either. I didn't and still don't try to talk customers into that practice. Too much time 'splainin' why it's OK and of course, every flat they would get would be my fault.

    Your mileage may vary. Use what works for you.

    Chuey

  30. #30
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    Obviously, I don't know how to tie a reply to a specific post. Will seek help.

    Chuey

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuey
    Obviously, I don't know how to tie a reply to a specific post. Will seek help.

    Chuey
    Chuey -

    To tie your reply to a specific post or reply, just click the "Quote" button at the bottom right hand of the post in question. This "Quote" button is at the bottom of every response. (This will give you the little quote like in this reply so your response will be more obviously tied to a previous poster's comment)

    The other way to post just a general reply in a thread is to click the "Post Reply" link at the bottom of the thread. This link appears only at the very bottom left hand portion of the overall thread and allows you to just add a general reply to the original poster's (that being the person that started the whole thread) question or comment.

    Ask if that does not make sense. The little intricacies of MTBR take a little while to figure out.

    It is good to see you on the boards. Your expertise is definitely welcomed! I am going to tackle that 287-V re-cable job tomorrow. Wish me luck

    Lance

    PS - I sent you a Private Message (PM) through this site a few minutes ago.

  32. #32
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    So some of you are leaving your 26" tubes overinflated overnight and they don't eventually shrink back down to too small again?

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoelM
    So some of you are leaving your 26" tubes overinflated overnight and they don't eventually shrink back down to too small again?
    Pre-stretching lets the tube expand more easily when you are installing the tube. It does not change the un-inflated size much, if any.

    The tire is the Spec Fast Trac 29 x 2.00
    Tube is a standard weight Conti 26 x 1.9-2.5 The tube still fits in a 26" tire just fine.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=114427
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  34. #34
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    36" unicyclists are often using similar Schwalbe 28x2.35" innertubes for their 36x2.25 tire, rather than the Coker units that weight double or more.
    From Shiggy's pic you can see it's not all that unnatural, the tube reaches can that size on a bit of air alone.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf View Post
    Well I took some of your guy's advice and I think it is a bad idea.

    Standard 26 inch shraeder valve tubes.

    1. Very tough to get to fit. I did the air up thing until they were as big as monster truck tires. I thought, "oh I stretched them out too much"! Aired them down and they were hardly any bigger than what I started with. I had to wrap tape around the tires to keep things from popping out.

    2. Finally got them on and aired up. Bad part was the tube snuck past the bead and out of the rim when I aired it up. Take it out and try it again. Finally got it in, but wasn't looking forward to flats out in the field. Put over 20 miles on them in rough terrain with no problem.

    3. Rode into town and was at the local coffee shop and then I heard a boom. Went outside to my bike and the tire was half off exposing a tube with a huge rip in it.

    Geez, am I missing something or should I have just gotten the right size tube to start off with???
    And that`s why I will not chance it, I mean, the bike was just sitting and boom, imagine, 35 miles an hour and boom, there goes my teeth.
    Too me not worth the risk! I`m a weight weenie, but there`s a limit.

  36. #36
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    I don't see the benefits outweighing the costs, especially in my riding environment. I use heavy duty 29er tubes with removable presta valve cores. This is so I can pour in a bunch of Homebrew sealant. I have goat head thorns to contend with EVERYWHERE! The thorns are monsters. With HD tubes and sealant, sometimes I'll even resort to using Mr. Tuffy liners too. That's how bad I hate flats from thorns. Having the additional weight is totally worth it for me, else I'll be changing tubes after every ride.

    And yes, I've tried Tubeless both a Stan's kit and ghetto. It works for a while, then the sealant starts to dry and clump up and makes a sticky, gooey mess of sealant in different stages of hardness. Trying to get it reseated after loosing air on the trail was impossible with a hand pump, so I had to stick a tube in there anyway, which made a real mess.

    And yes, I know I probably wouldn't have had any problems had I changed the sealant out every year....but I simply don't have to do that with tubes. I'm not willing to spend the time and money when I can simply hit the trail after every winter on the same set of tubes for years on end.

    I guess the only thing that I can agree on with this thread is to use generous amounts of talcum powder. Another tip is to inflate halfway after you get the beads on, then let all the air out, then inflate all the way to make sure the beads pop into the rims correctly, then again deflate all the way and start over. This ensures that everything is properly aligned and the tube is evenly stretched everywhere within the tire with no pinches or creases, which the talcum powder helps with as well. There is a lot of friction between the tube and tire once inflated. Minor misalignments cause extra stress on the tube in localized spots otherwise. I've been doing this for near 30 years now on mountain bike tires, and it's always worked and been worth the extra effort.

  37. #37
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    Did I miss it but why 26 vs 29? Just stock 29ers and be done with it.

  38. #38
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    Seeing that this thread is already created : anyone used 26" tubes on 700c tires/wheelset? Suppose i have a hybrid with 700 x 32c tires would a thinner (1.2-1.5") or thicker (1.75-2.25") 26" tube work better? I have heaps of 26" tubes lying around haha

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