$70 29er suspension fork- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Big Wheel Homer !!
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    $70 29er suspension fork


  2. #2
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    Actually that fork has been around for 4 years, we first found it going around Interbike to all the fork booths with a wheel and "tire" trying it in anything and everything. I bought one off eBay last year for 20 bucks for my fork collection. You will get what you pay for as it is the same thing as a 26" fork that costs the same.
    A bike by any other name is still a bike.

  3. #3
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    I have not seen a 76mm fork from them before, but have not really been following them either. RST weights are often less steerer. Sometimes even the price is, like this one.
    Rockshox has a Metro, Manitou a South, Sountour a whole range of numbered forks. They move up and down and hold the front wheel.
    If you don't care much for weight or riding "serious" trails, a nice affordable way to try if you could ever like front suspension on your 29"er.
    Klok - XC - Skate - Ski

  4. #4
    Big Wheel Homer !!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloxxki
    I have not seen a 76mm fork from them before, but have not really been following them either. RST weights are often less steerer. Sometimes even the price is, like this one.
    Rockshox has a Metro, Manitou a South, Sountour a whole range of numbered forks. They move up and down and hold the front wheel.
    If you don't care much for weight or riding "serious" trails, a nice affordable way to try if you could ever like front suspension on your 29"er.
    Its not that I would want one, I've got a WB .8 ordered, I just thought it was strange not to have a steerer tube, thats all.

  5. #5
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    RST's lower end models still have the option, in the shop, to be used wih a threadless (steel or alu) or treaded steerer of your desired length. You just whack one in, and probably bolt it down as well.
    Klok - XC - Skate - Ski

  6. #6
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    New question here.

    Cloxxki (or others),

    I have a question. I have this 'fake' 29" bike (an old Gazelle Playa with 42mm ZED tyres) which rides just fine in the woods.

    The fork is rigid.

    I have a lead on a very cheap Rockshox Metro.

    Would you recommend this fork over a rigid fork, for my use? My bike use is: 20% asfalt, 30% sand/mud tracks, 50% offroad woods-riding: small hills, tree trunks, you know it.

    I would like some comfort, yes, but I would also like the bike to steer very precisely and sharp, and I don't want to loose too much energy. So: rigid or suspension fork for me?

    Thanks !! Pieter

  7. #7
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    Hey Pieter, I don't know the Playa very well, but do remember having some contact with Gazelle regarding that offering.

    Essential for fork fit and how it will affect your bike's handling, is the axle-to-crown length. To be measured from the centre of the front axle to the op of the fork's crown, on which the bottom ring of the headset is press-fitted.
    Let's say you want your bike to handle at least as quick as it does now, you don't want the Metro to be more than 10/15mm longer. The Metro, I recall, only has 50 or 55mm of travel, so you won't be riding it with a whole lot of sag.

    For the trails you ride (I don't come there very often, dus do ride de Hondrug Classic and did the DMT 3-day stage race), I would rather advise to first see if you bike will take a bigger tire up front in that rigid fork. The new Bontrager XR will be over 10mm wider than what you have now, close to double the volume. You WILL notice a huge difference in comfort, grip and control. And if the rear triangle has some room to spare, a Continental Vapor might just fit in there and add a bit or comfort right there. Should your present rigid fork be around 430mm or longer, you may even decide to get a shorter replacement rigid fork, that will still take a fat tire, to get both the comfort, and some quicker handling. Many, as have I, have already tried the Dimension 26" disc-only fork (if you like disc brakes), which is only 410mm long but still accepts the biggest 29" knobbies. I had it on a 26" bike that "needed" a bigger front wheel, and the geometry didn't even change.

    In short, the Metro might not be a fork that's an unlogical choice in the pricelevel of your bike, and if it's really cheap well worth a try, but to get a really responsive and precise front end, it's about the last choice in the world. Also, a rigid fork is a full kg lighter, better "invest" that weight in a top class tire.

    Hope any of this helps, otherwise fele free to PM me.

    Jan Gerrit
    Klok - XC - Skate - Ski

  8. #8
    tl1
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigwheel
    Actually that fork has been around for 4 years, we first found it going around Interbike to all the fork booths with a wheel and "tire" trying it in anything and everything. I bought one off eBay last year for 20 bucks for my fork collection. You will get what you pay for as it is the same thing as a 26" fork that costs the same.
    How good does it work?

  9. #9
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    PM sent.

    Thanks.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by tl1
    How good does it work?
    It is like a hooker. A cheap one may be ugly and overweight and not have the same, uh, features and action as the more expensive model, but eventually it will get you where you want to go.

    Don't ask me why I am hung up on hookers this week, must be the Detroit hotel room air.
    A bike by any other name is still a bike.

  11. #11
    tl1
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigwheel
    It is like a hooker. A cheap one may be ugly and overweight and not have the same, uh, features and action as the more expensive model, but eventually it will get you where you want to go.

    Don't ask me why I am hung up on hookers this week, must be the Detroit hotel room air.
    I see! The reason I asked is that I have had two RST 26" forks that were surprising likeable in their day. First one was an oil damped Delta TL and the second an air damped dual crown Delta HL. What they lacked in plush and sexy sophisticated action they made up in torsional stiffness and bushing life and since I really kinda like rigid forks a lot for the torsional stiffness anything more in the "action" dept. was just gravy. And I paid around $30 less than this high-falutin' $70 one for each one of those.

    In Detroit huh? It's always especially pleasant here this time of year with quite a fine selection of grey slushes available for sampling, especially after the foot of snow we got Saturday. Did you know that ultra-endurance racer legend and 29 incher fanatic Mike C. (and former Detroit area guy) will be here soon as the main speaker of the MMBA Annual Expo? Sweeet!

    http://www.mmba.org/

  12. #12
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    Guess I didn't have the idea you were in Detroit, the grey slush was kind of alluring and I liked tracking the salt pellets all over the hotel. I was there interviewing for a job that may or may not turn out but if it does I will for sure be looking you up!

    Mike had mentioned he was coming back there for that function. He is a great speaker and you and all attending are in for a treat!

    Transfered to Maine today via the nations captiol, where they had 2 fer deals on inauguration crap, then to Boston and up the pike. Cold here too! Can't seem to shake winter although it would probably work better to head south than north.
    A bike by any other name is still a bike.

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