Results 1 to 35 of 35
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    199

    New bike time, but identity crisis

    Another boring "help me pick a bike" post, but I am interested to hear opinions from people who have ridden a bunch of different bikes. Wedding season has totally consumed demo season for me this year, and I don't think I can hang on another 12 months... the upgradeitis might put me into a coma. Plan is to keep the Camber as a backup and XC-specific bike.

    Here's the deal:

    I've got a 2013 Specialized Camber Comp. 110mm travel front and rear, XC geometry, 29er. I love it on smooth stuff, climbing, and DH flow trails, but it runs out of suspension real quick when the going gets gnarly.

    I want the new bike to be 27.5" wheels, pedal friendly enough to haul around for 20-30 miles, but burly enough to withstand 3-5 days of lift served every year (places like Highland and Thunder mountain). My price range is up to about $3.5K. A good build kit is more important to me than a carbon frame.

    Here's what I've demoed:

    1. Transition scout. Funnest bike I've ever ridden, but it was only on pristine flow trails (kingdom trails, VT), and its numbers seem under-gunned for bike park riding.

    2. Scott Genius (2016 model, I think). Most complicated bike I've ever ridden. Way too many doo dads in the cockpit, and honestly the scout was a much more stable and confident ride. Very disappointing bike.

    3. 2016 Kona Process 153. The 2'-3' rock drops that nearly destroy my camber every time didn't even make this beast flinch. Pretty heavy though, but the mid-firm lockout setting on the shock made it pedal pretty well. Price is right, too. It wasn't a revelation the way the scout was, but then again I was riding some pretty middling trails. And it could definitely handle bike park riding.

    Other interesting bikes:

    1. Kona Process 134. Probably more appropriate as a daily driver compared to the 153 (most rides are XC/trail riding), but I'm worried it wouldn't work for the park.

    2. Trek Remedy. Price is great, LBS is a trek dealer, and I really want to buy from them. Also the 150mm travel front and rear seems right in the sweet spot for me. But... Trek did that stupid, straight-as-an-arrow downtube thing with the disposable "knock block" and frame guard. I don't want to drop thousands of dollars for a bike designed to break itself. Am I being overly critical/pessimistic here?

    3. Stumpjumper? Compared to other companies though, you don't get a great build kit for your $.

    4. Transition Patrol - if it's as fun as the Scout I'm sold. But the model in my price range comes with a Yari fork, where I could get a pike for just a couple hundred more from the likes of Kona or Trek.

    Any feedback on these? Other suggestions of bikes I should consider?

    Thanks in advance.
    My MTB themed graphic tees:
    https://www.mteeb.com

  2. #2
    one sick puppy
    Reputation: YetiBear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    345
    An ambitious search for the Holy grail. The ultimate quiver killer! Perhaps a Knolly Endorphin? The Scout may be more hardy than the numbers suggest? (from what I've read) I met a guy with a scout that was built up like a tank but it made me wonder how much climbing and trailing was stolen in that build.
    Saddle up, Effendi. We ride.

  3. #3
    Keep on Rockin...
    Reputation: Miker J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,725
    Mach 6.

    Mine does all you are looking at and more.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: brent701's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    2,359
    Intense Tracer 275

    Remedy knock block isn't bad., You don't even notice it

    The 2017 Remedy 9 is 160/150 travel
    Too Many .

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    456
    I don't understand your skepticism of the knock block system. Trek designed a straight down tube to increase stiffness and the knock block allows for that to be possible by keeping the fork from banging into the frame.

    Trek gives you a great spec package for the money along with a lifetime frame warranty. I'm looking for a new Remedy 9.8 to demo as I'm loving what I see so far.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: David R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,128
    Quote Originally Posted by YetiBear View Post
    An ambitious search for the Holy grail. The ultimate quiver killer! Perhaps a Knolly Endorphin?
    +1, similar geo to the scout but lighter and [possibly] better suspension design. Carbon Scout might be better again, but then again the carbon Endo might not be far away...

    Also look at the Santa Cruz 5010 or the new Turner Flux when it comes out.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by jgdblue View Post
    I don't understand your skepticism of the knock block system. Trek designed a straight down tube to increase stiffness and the knock block allows for that to be possible by keeping the fork from banging into the frame.

    Trek gives you a great spec package for the money along with a lifetime frame warranty. I'm looking for a new Remedy 9.8 to demo as I'm loving what I see so far.
    From what I've read, the keyed headset that Trek calls the knock block is made to break on big impacts (kind of like a good helmet). If/when that happens, the fork is going to impact the frame. Seems to me like that's very likely to cause damage.

    I didn't know about the lifetime frame warranty. That definitely mitigates some of the risk there, and makes the remedy much more appealing.
    My MTB themed graphic tees:
    https://www.mteeb.com

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: armii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    734
    I know two bikes I would love to try are the Foes Mixer, and Foes F275.

    A friend went with the Stumpjumper, They basic FRS comp for $2900 looks pretty good, but to get what he wanted he just bought the frame and built if from scratch,, truly great bike but it ended up being around $8000.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    1,062
    At your price point you are so close to the current special build special blend ibis. this bike is a revelation of sorts that you get a CC DB rear shock, Fox 36 kashima, Stans flow wheels nx 1x, deore brakes. It pedals amazing, bombs the DH amazing and could/should easily withstand some park days. $3750. I don't own one, but after demoing one recently, I'm having a hard time not pulling the trigger at that price. yes - it has NX - works well, but heavier. a quick and ez upgrade would be xt1x rr der and shifter... if you are concerned about it.

    Ive ridden the Scout and its a pretty overlooked and underestimated bike. like you - had a blast on it, and i ran some gnarly rocky terrain on a low end "rental" build. A bike that covers way more capability and fun than travel would imply.

    Kona Process line - you may really want to ride and look at the 134 - don't let the travel fool ya - its a mini 153 of sorts that is likely better rounded for going up better. Updates to the line are spot on.

    If the new Intense bikes were more cost effective, the JS tune VPP is brilliant. Spider 275 is an amazing bike - i rode it back to back against the longer travel Ibis and the differences were minimal at best. light, climbs with the best of em and turn it down it far out kicks its coverage!! Rumor of a more all mt (possible tracer replacement) to be announced shortly on the heels of the Primer 29 and ACV.

    New Norco Sights and Ranges to be announced soon and like current models should have a carbon entry in the sub-$4k range in both. Alloys are less. I have a sight -and its been the real deal for 95% of everything i could likely ride or want to ride. New model updates should anticipate geo, and sus tweaks which will only make them more versatile, capable and fun.

    value for $ right now - - current Ibis special blend all day every day - don't know how you get more bike or a better bike with great warranty and service for the money. shoot - now i want to buy one just typing this out and thinking about em again.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    456
    Quote Originally Posted by Dangur View Post
    From what I've read, the keyed headset that Trek calls the knock block is made to break on big impacts (kind of like a good helmet). If/when that happens, the fork is going to impact the frame. Seems to me like that's very likely to cause damage.

    I didn't know about the lifetime frame warranty. That definitely mitigates some of the risk there, and makes the remedy much more appealing.
    I haven't heard that the keyed headset is supposed to break on big impacts, but if it does there shouldn't be a problem as there is a little rubber bumper built into the frame where the fork crown would hit in the event that it does hit.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    77
    You could consider the Commencal Meta SX V3. Only $2199!
    Watch: Commencal Announces New 2017 Meta SX V3 for just $2,199 | Singletracks Mountain Bike News

    Might be sold out though.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    212
    Devinci Troy Carbon RS. Comes with 150mm Pike, Monarch RT3 Debonair, GX drivetrain, deore brakes. $3499. Green paint job is amazing!

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by gibsonlespaulspecial View Post
    Devinci Troy Carbon RS. Comes with 150mm Pike, Monarch RT3 Debonair, GX drivetrain, deore brakes. $3499. Green paint job is amazing!
    Have you ridden it? I heard that the latest Troys are much more downhill oriented, and don't pedal as well as other bikes in the same class.
    My MTB themed graphic tees:
    https://www.mteeb.com

  14. #14
    Anytime. Anywhere.
    Reputation: Travis Bickle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,303
    My friend replaced his old Trance with an aluminum Troy and it transformed him. Faster up and down overnight. I think it's pretty comparable to my Endorphin.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,227
    I am on an Intense Spider 275A and really like it. Climbs great and descends very well for 130mm. I have a 150mm Mattoc up front and that bike gets it.
    I demo'd a Commencal Meta AM V4 at Northstar and that bike really impressed me. I pedaled it up half the mountain without much issue and it railed down double black diamond trails very well. For the price I think they are pretty amazing.

    If I were buying a "1 bike" it would be a Canfield Balance or the Commencal Meta V4...If i was getting a trail specific bike then I definitely would stick with my Spider 275 as it has a great balance of climbing and descending.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Bikeventures's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    208
    Learn from me. There is no such thing as a do-it-all-bike. There will be compromises. I recently added a Canfield Balance. I thought I could use it as my only bike for local trails and chairlift riding. In terms of bike park and descents on rocky local trails, it has been amazing. It and like many other long travel slack bikes, gives you the confidence to smash through terrains you might have avoided before. I expected to be slower on the climbs but on trails where gravity is not a factor, it lacks the "scoot" that my shorter travel Trance has. So due to this revelation, I'm keeping my Trance because it is more fun on certain types of trails and the Balance is more fun on others.

    If I could only own one bike, I would want a trail bike with 120-140 rear travel paired up with a fork with a little more travel. Trances, SC 5010s, Bronsons, Yeti S5Bc, and Rocky Mountain Thunderbolts would be considered. And for park days, rent a downhill bike.

    You have an XC bike and any AM 160 bike will feel sluggish compared to it when you have to pedal but will crush any terrain that you dont feel comfortable on your XC bike. If those two bikes cover your spectrum of riding, then you are set.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    514
    I don't think its possible to have a bike that can handle fast XC riding and some trips to the downhill park. I have a 15' GT Sensor and bent a rim last weekend a the downhill park. I feel like any good XC bike needs a light set of wheels which just can't handle downhill punishment. The 130mm suspension is enough to blast down any intermediate or flow trail but it can't handle most of the diamond runs around here. I think you need at least 150mm travel to have at some fun on a world cup style course but you'll still get the crap beat out of you.

    I can't afford another bike so I have to make my GT Sensor work. Since I need a new wheel I'm going to build up an XC set with some good XC tires on them and a seperat downhill set.

    I think the best compromise would be to keep a dedicated XC bike and an enduro bike that can climb (slowly) but be excellent on downhill.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by Fajita Dave View Post
    I think the best compromise would be to keep a dedicated XC bike and an enduro bike that can climb (slowly) but be excellent on downhill.
    That's why I'll be keeping the camber. Having said that, a lot of my flatter local (read: drive-to-able after work) trails have features that push the camber to its limits, and I'd like to bring the bigger bike there, too. So I will probably err on the pedal friendly side of things, given that I'll ride the bike park 3-5 times a year, and the local trails 3-5 times a week.

    Remedy, Troy, and Process are probably at the top of the list right now, based on feedback I've received here. I may be able to get a Pivot Mach 6 at a decent price... Decisions decisions!

    At any rate, I'll probably wait until Specialized drops their 2017 product line, just in case they surprise me with something affordable. (Tangent - what's up with the stumpjumper FSR line??? There's a huge gap in the $3K range with nothing in it. They go from a 2900$ alloy frame with a 32mm stanchion fork, up to the carbon frame and a pike at 4somethingK. Give me alloy with a pike and some Deore brakes at a mid-level price point, and I'd be all over it. I don't get it).

    Thanks for the tips, all. Feel free to keep them coming.
    My MTB themed graphic tees:
    https://www.mteeb.com

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    514
    Quote Originally Posted by Dangur View Post
    There's a huge gap in the $3K range with nothing in it. They go from a 2900$ alloy frame with a 32mm stanchion fork, up to the carbon frame and a pike at 4somethingK. Give me alloy with a pike and some Deore brakes at a mid-level price point, and I'd be all over it. I don't get it).

    Thanks for the tips, all. Feel free to keep them coming.
    Diamondback Bikes - Mountain Bikes - Release 2

    I know..... its a Diamondback. I went to a Diamondback demo a few months ago just for fun and I was totally caught off guard by this bike. It pedals really well, the pike was heavenly through rock gardens, the short chain stays made it very lively in the best possible way and the 130mm rear travel felt a whole lot longer than 130mm. It also comes with a nice dropper post and I had a blast on it. The only thing I would replace is the brakes but they were decent, just not my Shimano XTs.

  20. #20
    I'm with stupid
    Reputation: hitechredneck's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    5,847
    Sounds like you a candidate for the stumpjumper. There are some good deals to be had on those right now.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I537 using Tapatalk

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    26
    My 2015 Remedy has taken some pretty solid hits and is taking them in stride. I feel like you might prefer a Slash though. I went from a Fuel EX to the Remedy and I am equally happy with both its climbing and descending capabilities. That being said, I still find that in some of the gnarlier trails around me eat through all my travel. If I were pedaling to the top sometimes but also doing lift access I would have gotten the slash instead.

    Have fun with the hard choices!

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    27
    i come from a xc race background and always have fought the longer travel bikes but each time i got a new bike, i wished i had more travel. just bit the bullet and went with YT Capra and it is amazing. floats thru the rough stuff but still good on winding single track. if i were riding a lot more smooth xc trails, i would get another set of lighter weight wheels/tires.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    269
    I ride the 153-I think it's a great all around bike. A bit heavy, but man it rips.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    35
    I think if I wanted a one bike that comes close to doing it all I would look at a Santa Cruz Bronson. The new aluminum frames would fit into your budget.

    I ride mostly technical XC and see lots of people on Bronsons and they seem to climb really well and they descend really well. Easily could handle a few bike park days.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    199
    I've got a bead on a really good deal for a Yeti SB6 Enduro... I haven't made the decision yet, but that and the Remedy seem to be the top contenders at the moment.

    I'm concerned that the Yeti might be too DH-focused. Any thoughts?
    My MTB themed graphic tees:
    https://www.mteeb.com

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: k2rider1964's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    3,208
    Quote Originally Posted by Dangur View Post
    I've got a bead on a really good deal for a Yeti SB6 Enduro... I haven't made the decision yet, but that and the Remedy seem to be the top contenders at the moment.

    I'm concerned that the Yeti might be too DH-focused. Any thoughts?
    I haven't ridden most of those bikes on your list but I scour the MTB related internet sites almost daily and subscribe to almost every MTB related magazine. Consequently, I read a lot of reviews and that Remedy is VERY WELL REVIEWED across the board...and that's the aluminum model, not the high end carbon one.

    I currently own a Pivot Mach 6 and a Santa Cruz 5010 and I think the Mach 6 absolutely meet all of your criteria. It climbs well and the only thing holding it back going down is my ability. If I had to pick one do it all bike that will hold it's own in the park as well, I'd definitely get the Mach 6 again. I have demo'd the Yeti SB6 and while the demo wasn't set up to my preferences, I wouldn't hesitate to buy one if I was in your shoes. IF you can get a "great" deal on on, that might be a great choice. Even if it doesn't work out, that bike will have great re-sale value with the Yeti riders ruling the Endure series on that bike.
    2019 Yeti SB5C
    2018 Intense Tracer
    2017 Intense Primer

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    I haven't ridden most of those bikes on your list but I scour the MTB related internet sites almost daily and subscribe to almost every MTB related magazine. Consequently, I read a lot of reviews and that Remedy is VERY WELL REVIEWED across the board...and that's the aluminum model, not the high end carbon one.

    I currently own a Pivot Mach 6 and a Santa Cruz 5010 and I think the Mach 6 absolutely meet all of your criteria. It climbs well and the only thing holding it back going down is my ability. If I had to pick one do it all bike that will hold it's own in the park as well, I'd definitely get the Mach 6 again. I have demo'd the Yeti SB6 and while the demo wasn't set up to my preferences, I wouldn't hesitate to buy one if I was in your shoes. IF you can get a "great" deal on on, that might be a great choice. Even if it doesn't work out, that bike will have great re-sale value with the Yeti riders ruling the Endure series on that bike.
    Thanks for the perspective. The rub with the yeti is I can't test ride it.

    I think I can manage a test ride on the Trek (aluminum) from the local shop. If they let me do that, and if I like the bike, I'll probably go with that. Otherwise I'm thinking I'll gamble on the yeti. Probably a safe bet, but I want to at least give the LBS an opportunity to lose my business before I make the decision to outright turn my back on them.
    My MTB themed graphic tees:
    https://www.mteeb.com

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    8,177
    I'd suggest the Knolly Warden. Doesn't give up too much to the endorphin, is adjustable and reasonably priced with their new build kits!

  29. #29
    Just a flesh wound
    Reputation: Prophet Julio's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    2,219
    The Remedy looks nice. I wouldn't worry about the Knock Block. If you need it, you'll be glad you have it. Also, consider if you had a double crown fork. That is impact. Rubber bumpers work wonders.
    My name is Chris and I ride a Prophet 650b with a Lefty.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    64
    Two bikes I would recommend are Commencal Meta AM V4 and the Whyte G-160. I was between those two bikes and the YT Capra like another member recommended. I ended up with the Whyte G-160. It pedals great, not the fastest bike when pedaling flat or uphills but it seemed easier to pedal than a lot of other bikes I tried. I had a Norco Sight Carbon that I bought at the same time and honestly though the Norco was lighter and had less suspension it didn't feel as good a pedaler or confidence inspiring both up and downhill as the Whyte. Right now Whyte USA has some good deals on this year's closeouts too.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    199
    Thanks for the inputs everybody.

    In case anybody wants to hear how the story ends:

    LBS gave me a good deal on a 2016 Trek Remedy 9. Yeah it's aluminum, and yeah it's a year old, but the component spec is pretty great for what I ended up paying. I'm really happy with the bike. It climbs really well, and take the jumps, drops, and huge rollers like a champ. Plus mention the purple paint job looks killer in person. The pics on the Trek website don't do it justice.

    Thanks to Competitive Edge Ski and Bike in East Longmeadow, Mass. for hooking me up with the bike. They really went out of their way to make sure I found one I was happy with. I would not have gotten that kind of treatment at most other shops I've been in. So if you're in the Springfield MA area and looking for a shop, I highly recommend Comp Edge. Great customer service.
    My MTB themed graphic tees:
    https://www.mteeb.com

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    8,177
    Quote Originally Posted by Dangur View Post
    purple paint job looks killer in person. The pics on the Trek website don't do it justice.
    Good to hear it!

    1. PICS?!!?
    2. your blog is gone...

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by CharacterZero View Post
    Good to hear it!

    1. PICS?!!?
    2. your blog is gone...
    1. Pics to come, after I hose 'er off... she got a little muddy yesterday, and is about to again this afternoon. Finally got some rain up here in NE!

    2. Blog is gone (thanks for clicking it though!). But that's a good thing... However business agreements prohibit me from sharing more details. My signature link will soon be replaced with a link to my latest project (mtb-themed graphic tee shirts). Hopefully that will launch this week, but the new bike promises to be a big distraction.
    My MTB themed graphic tees:
    https://www.mteeb.com

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    199
    New bike time, but identity crisis-donut.jpg

    Took me long enough... sorry to leave you all on the edges of your seats

    The first cider donut of the fall riding season was almost as good as the new bike!
    My MTB themed graphic tees:
    https://www.mteeb.com

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    35
    I have a 2016 Troy. I was shopping the Bronson and Troy and decided on the Troy because it felt more nimble and playful. I couldn't really tell much of a difference in pedaling efficiency, but the Troy certainly felt more active - but not in an energy sucking way.

    I moved to the Troy from a 2012 Specialized Enduro. The Troy is much more efficient, playful, and maneuverable. I certainly got faster in all aspects of my riding.

    If you can find a Troy RS on closeout - it's an absolute steal.

Similar Threads

  1. So we no longer have our own identity.
    By MTBNJMAN in forum New York - New Jersey
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-09-2016, 09:20 PM
  2. Mid-Life Crisis or just another case of Bike Lust?
    By 755872 in forum Riding Passion
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 02-27-2014, 06:35 PM
  3. Budget crisis for a new bike?
    By twistedlizard720 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 10-07-2013, 05:07 AM
  4. marzocchi 888 identity help
    By will3554 in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 11-21-2011, 05:54 PM
  5. 1994-95 K2 Identity Crisis
    By akawags in forum Vintage, Retro, Classic
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-23-2011, 02:46 PM

Members who have read this thread: 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.