how can i make my hardtail feel "slacker"?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    how can i make my hardtail feel "slacker"?

    so my hardtail isn't quite xc, not quite enduro/trail, but i want ot make it feel more slack, so that its easier to jump around.
    it weighs 30 pounds, not light, but its all i could afford. i bought a shorter stem and that helped a little. tips?

  2. #2
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    You have to increase the fork travel if you want to slacken the HT angle. What kind of bike is it?


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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sickmak90 View Post
    You have to increase the fork travel if you want to slacken the HT angle. What kind of bike is it?


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    its a rei drt 1.1, with 100 mm of coil sprung stanchion

  4. #4
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    That bike is fully in the XC category (light XC, really). Nothing wrong with that, but if you try to make it something it's not it won't end well. If you wanted a jump bike, someone sold you the wrong thing.
    :nono: :thumbsup:

  5. #5
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    Slack won't do anything for "jumping around". Putting a longer fork will alter the geometry in other ways apart from slacking the head angle out, like seat tube angle, increase bb height. These changes may affect the handling in less desirable ways.

    A bigger front tyre will raise the front a little and probably give you more grip/control, it's also one of the cheapest and most vital upgrades on a mtb.

    The best way to "slack out" a bike is the use of an angleset, but to be honest, I wouldn't bother. Your bike's geometry is decent for an entry level allround/XC hardtail. Ride it as it is, build your skills/fitness, take it to as many different trails as possible and when the time comes that you feel it's holding you back, get a bike that will suit your needs.

  6. #6
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    What is it you're trying to accomplish? I feel like maybe you're asking the wrong question.

    In general, people seem too quick to blame their bikes instead of focusing on developing on the bike they have. There will almost always be a better bike out there, but it's not yours at the moment, so go out and enjoy your bike.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    if you try to make it something it's not it won't end well
    This happens far too much in all honesty. New rider with a limited budget focuses on the budget part too much and winds up with a bike that doesn't suit what they WANT to do exactly. So then they want to make changes so the bike suits the kind of riding they want to do. It doesn't work that way.

    It's unfortunate that bikes with more specialized uses (as well as those designed to hold up to higher volumes of riding and more advanced riding) wind up costing more, but that's how it is. Best way to get one on a budget is to save your money and look on the used market.

  8. #8
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    i want it to feel more playful, it just feels lame to ride compared to hardtails that are smaller

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Granny_Gear View Post
    i want it to feel more playful, it just feels lame to ride compared to hardtails that are smaller
    making the front end slacker (and therefore making the whole bike longer) will NOT make it feel playful. Among other things, it will make the bike LESS playful and more stable. Keep in mind, this is a lower priced, entry level bike. A playful bike requires handling skills to be able to deal with the lack of stability. This bike is NOT designed for that. It's designed for the opposite of that...to give beginner riders and more casual riders a more stable platform from which to be comfortable and have a safer ride.

    There are a LOT of aspects of a frame's design and geometry that affect the bike's "playfulness" that you will never be able to change with component swaps or adjustments. This is a perfect example of the frame making the bike what it is, and if you don't like that, you should be riding a different bike.

    Why did you buy it if you don't like the way it handles? Did you not take it for a test ride in the parking lot, even?

  10. #10
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    well when i bought it i didn't know i'd be doing what im doing now, when i rode it around the parking lot i didn't know that i'd be freeriding this bike hard

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Granny_Gear View Post
    well when i bought it i didn't know i'd be doing what im doing now, when i rode it around the parking lot i didn't know that i'd be freeriding this bike hard
    people do grow as riders. skills develop, preferences change, and so on. sounds like it's time to accept that the bike is not meant for the riding you want to do on it, and find something that is. and for the meantime, try to keep your riding (on this bike) within the bounds of what it's meant for. At minimum, going beyond its design parameter risks expensive repairs that will get in your way of buying something more appropriate for the riding you want to do. But more importantly, you're risking injury in doing so, with those increased risks of breaking the frame or components.

    But, I do question your use of the word "freeriding" though. It's not really a word people use to describe riding nowadays. It was a thing that was popular in some places for a time, but a fairly short-lived time. And it's not something you would do on that particular bike.

  12. #12
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    I have both a 30lb, co-op DRT1.2, 27.5", suspension fork bike, with 68deg head angle, and a 24lb, Klein Fervor, 26", rigid fork bike, with 72 deg head angle.

    I rode the Klein for 24.5 years and I rode the DRT1.2 for 4 months. Honestly, at this point, I would never go back to the Klein. Actually I'm thinking of selling it. Is the Klein more nimble and easier to throw around? Yes. Is it more fun? No.

    To make my DRT1.2 handle more like my Klein, I think it needs a stiffer fork spring, lighter tires and wheels, a longer stem to lean me forward, rear offset seat post to move my butt backwards, and really just less weight in general. After 24 years of Klein ownership, I don't ever plan on doing these things.

    I have been happy with my co-op bike, but I think REI builds them for different usage than what you have grown into. It's not an advanced performance bike, it is a solid and robust 80th percentile bike, and it performs well for the typical REI customer base. IE trail riding and family fun and camping and bike packing type stuff. It can be used for the more aggressive activities, but it's not really going to excel in those activities. If you want to go more aggressive, I think you are better off finding something more in tune with those activities.

  13. #13
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    what i mean by free ride is jumps/drops or other technical feature

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by nobody special View Post
    I have both a 30lb, co-op DRT1.2, 27.5", suspension fork bike, with 68deg head angle, and a 24lb, Klein Fervor, 26", rigid fork bike, with 72 deg head angle.

    I rode the Klein for 24.5 years and I rode the DRT1.2 for 4 months. Honestly, at this point, I would never go back to the Klein. Actually I'm thinking of selling it. Is the Klein more nimble and easier to throw around? Yes. Is it more fun? No.

    To make my DRT1.2 handle more like my Klein, I think it needs a stiffer fork spring, lighter tires and wheels, a longer stem to lean me forward, rear offset seat post to move my butt backwards, and really just less weight in general. After 24 years of Klein ownership, I don't ever plan on doing these things.

    I have been happy with my co-op bike, but I think REI builds them for different usage than what you have grown into. It's not an advanced performance bike, it is a solid and robust 80th percentile bike, and it performs well for the typical REI customer base. IE trail riding and family fun and camping and bike packing type stuff. It can be used for the more aggressive activities, but it's not really going to excel in those activities. If you want to go more aggressive, I think you are better off finding something more in tune with those activities.
    for me though the rei drt 1.1 weighs a signifigant portion of me, im tiny. when i bought it i just wanted to get out on the trails.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Granny_Gear View Post
    what i mean by free ride is jumps/drops or other technical feature
    This isn't really the bike for that, not that you can't do smaller drops and jumps on it, but it's just not made for that. You're better off riding this bike until you can get one that's better suited for what you want to do.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by s0ckeyeus View Post
    This isn't really the bike for that, not that you can't do smaller drops and jumps on it, but it's just not made for that. You're better off riding this bike until you can get one that's better suited for what you want to do.
    i probably will, a friend is selling his raleigh tokul 2, and i really like the feel of it on flow/jumps. he replaced it with 120mm airfork and a 1x11 drivetrain, would it be a good idea? i'll be racing enduro/ xc later this year.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Granny_Gear View Post
    i probably will, a friend is selling his raleigh tokul 2, and i really like the feel of it on flow/jumps. he replaced it with 120mm airfork and a 1x11 drivetrain, would it be a good idea? i'll be racing enduro/ xc later this year.
    You'd still be firmly in entry level territory, but the Tokul frame is probably more of what you're looking for.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by s0ckeyeus View Post
    You'd still be firmly in entry level territory, but the Tokul frame is probably more of what you're looking for.
    it might, it felt good while doing endos/ bunny hops.

  19. #19
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    Geometry wise a Works Angleset will slacken it out, Longer reach is what really effects stability and there's no way to add more reach.

    Wider bars are always a plus, shorter stem can help as well though.
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  20. #20
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    Dropped post?

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by grubetown View Post
    Dropped post?
    what do you mean?

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Granny_Gear View Post
    what do you mean?
    Sorry, should have said "dropper post." IMHO a dropper post can make a bike feel more playful/easier to jump around.
    However, your current bike and even the Tokul are not in the free ride/enduro/jumps and drops genre.

  23. #23
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    Get a new bike, you'll be alot happier. I went from a $500 hardtail to a $1100 hardtail and now a $1600 full suspension in less then 2 years and I'm on a budget. I made many mistakes but I never regret buying a hardtail, i actually miss it.

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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Granny_Gear View Post
    ... it felt good while doing endos...
    You didn't quit riding because you're old, you're old because you quit riding.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Granny_Gear View Post
    what i mean by free ride is jumps/drops or other technical feature
    that's not freeride. you're better off just not using that word to describe what you're doing.

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Granny_Gear View Post
    for me though the rei drt 1.1 weighs a signifigant portion of me, im tiny. when i bought it i just wanted to get out on the trails.
    if you're small, EVERY bike is going to weigh more relative your body weight compared to someone heavier. There's honestly not much you're going to do about it. Buy a bike that's super light because it's a lower proportion of your body weight, and it still won't be suited to riding aggressively.

    I have a steel hardtail that's built for riding technical trails and drops and some jumps that weighs the same as your bike, if not a little more. It can honestly handle more than I'm willing to ride. It also cost a lot more but the operative difference is that it's designed to be ridden that way and the components are designed and built to be ridden that way.

    This is the one drawback to buying a lower priced entry level bike as a beginner. If you stick with riding and get passionate about it, you'll find scenarios where that bike is not well suited to what you want to ride. I encountered the same thing when I started riding. Still, at least you didn't spend thousands on a bike only to learn that it is too specialized and also doesn't suit your needs.

  26. #26
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    Put some higher rise bars on it, maybe wider too depending on the current width.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Granny_Gear View Post
    so my hardtail isn't quite xc, not quite enduro/trail, but i want ot make it feel more slack, so that its easier to jump around.
    it weighs 30 pounds, not light, but its all i could afford. i bought a shorter stem and that helped a little. tips?

    I looked up your bike, it's very similar to one of mine. If you don't want to spend $1200+ on a better bike, you can make it a lot better with a Suntour Raidon 120mm air fork trade-in for $250, and $100 more in wider tires, probably 2.4 or 2.5, whatever can fit in the back. That will really help out your bike. Don't be shy about putting a wider tire in front than what you have in the back, a lot of bikes can fit a 2.6 or 2.8 in front and only a 2.3 or 2.4 in back and that's fine. Just keep in mind that if you go over 2.5 in the front on a skinny rim it can start to create other problems at speeds over 10 mph, maybe minor, maybe not. The wider tires are going to make a huge difference at your bike's level. Although sometimes the handling is weird if the tire sizes are vastly different, but it's doable.
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  28. #28
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    I've just looked on amazon, nothing to see for a 27.5 raidon with 120mm of travel. they have it in 26 and 29, not in the 27.5 config sadly.

    at the moment i have a 2.15 kenda kadre in the back, and a 2.25 wtb trail boss in the front, but i will probably upgrade to maxis minions, or something thats skin wall.

    thanks for the insights, i'll look around for other air forks as well. i thin rock shox might have on in their renegade line up iirc.
    Last edited by The_Granny_Gear; 1 Week Ago at 08:47 PM. Reason: tried to put a quote in

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