Hi all, New here. Looking for advice- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Hi all, New here. Looking for advice

    Hello everyone,

    I am new to these forums and looking for advice. I want to get into trail and indoor riding as I am looking to get more physically active and there are a ton of trails/areas to ride not only in my home town but within an hour drive. Right now I have a cheapo bike I got from target many years ago. It's still in great shape as I always take very good care and maintain my stuff and it works great for crusing the city streets and getting to work.

    I'm looking into doing some trail riding so I'd like to buy a better quality bike, but I'm not looking to break the bank on a 1000$ bike just yet because I want to make sure it's something I'm going to stick with.

    There are 5 things I've got my mind set on.... 27.5 inch wheels, aluminum frame, disk breaks, hardtail, front suspension. Obviously quality components are what I'm looking for. I have my mind on 3 bikes. A GT aggressor (dicks sporting goods exclusive 399$). A gravity basecamp (from bikes direct 299$). And a fuji nevada 1.9 (400-500$ online). Can any one give me their opinion on these bikes? Is there something else you might recommend that fits in with what I'm looking for that's within my budget... $500 or lower?

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance and I look forward to being a part of these forums!!!!

  2. #2
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    Look at Diamondback. They have hardtails in the "Hook" for $699 and the "Line" for $799. These are part of the hook, line & sync'r series. I also see that they have a Mason 1 for sale for $639 which is a 27.5+ bike. I realize these are a couple 100 more than you want to spend, but it would be way worth it. All of these are solid platforms and arguably best value bang for buck. They provide a good base that you can swap components on as you realize you like the sport. The GT is not worth upgrading anything on and do not believe that "was $599" price on Dicks trying to make it look like a good deal. You get a 1X drivetrain on the diamondbacks and much better components. If you can swing the 799 for the Line, then you will also get hydraulic disc brakes. This would be awesome for not much more than you want so if possible....try to save the extra and it will be so worth it. You may be even able to find one on sale through online retailers or get a discount. I would really go for the Line.

    https://www.diamondback.com/hook-d42

    https://www.diamondback.com/line-d42

    https://www.diamondback.com/mason-1-d41

  3. #3
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    There's a YouTuber, DailyMTB, that recommends the Nishiki Colorado Comp from Dicks.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kFgoXN9WyRg

    My first bike was a little over 500, and it wasn't anywhere as nice.

  4. #4
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    27.5 wheel is a great starter size and now what I ride most of the time.

    You can pick up a quality $500-$700 bike from brands such as Trek, Giant, Specialized, Cannondale, Scott and more. Stay clear of Walmart, Target, Acadamy, Dicks, etc... bikes and go to a real bike shop. Go for a good quality hardtail because a dual suspension bike will be junk at that price range.

    Ride several, talk to the bike shop folks, and you will find one that best fits you at your current experience level.

    If you can spend $1k, you can pick up a really nice hardtail with nice componets. Or, you can get a quality bike for less, ride it, figure out if this is your thing, and in a few years think about stepping up.

    I spent my first 8 years in the saddle on a bottom of the line Trek hardtail and it took me all kinds of places.
    '18 Scott Spark 730, 27.5+
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  5. #5
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    Ride 'em if possible. FIT is the most important. The quality of your choices is about equal. Go with the one that fits best.
    I was gonna stop by and see you, but the Jehovas witnesses came by. When they left I started drinking. Voicemail from Paul

  6. #6
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    Thanks for all the input so far guys. I'm still trying to stick around 500$. 1k is definitely out of the question. I may be able to go a little over 500$ but it would have to be really justifiable. I'm looking into all suggestions given so far. It's really something I'd like to make the move on in the next few weeks as opposed to waiting until spring and then supper sneaks by us. Thanks for the advice guys.

  7. #7
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    Understand that you give up perks like "tubeless-ready" wheels and tires at that price, and to upgrade would cost quite a bit. I know I am so spoiled by tubeless that I can't really accept going back to tubes, considering how well it minimizes the risk of flats.

  8. #8
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    Here is the little I've learned, at $500.00 I would give up on the front suspension, as those less expensive forks are pogo-sticks. Go rigid, and maybe Plus.

    Again, these bikes don't get a lot of appreciation around here, and in some respects correctly so. Personally, I rather go new the only thing is you will have to make sure is properly tuned. Also there maybe some necessary but inexpensive upgrades like pedals, saddle. (If you prefer wider handlebar, that's a cheap upgrade as well)

    Save Up to 60% Off 29Plus, 27Plus Fat Bikes, Mountain Save Up to 60% Off New Bikes

    Right at your budget, no tax, free shipping.
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  9. #9
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    I've never really considered a rigid fork. Maybe it's something I need to look into. Whats the deal with the fat bikes though? I've seen them around but I don't know much about them. Aren't the tires heavy as hell?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsspang View Post
    I've never really considered a rigid fork. Maybe it's something I need to look into. What the fat with the far bikes though? I've seen them around but I don't know much about them. Aren't the tires heavy as hell?
    These are not fat tires, they are plus tires. Those cheap sus forks weigh a ton! I have a 29er plus, and regular 29er both rigid, yes the plus is not as fast but neither am I lol.

    With bikes, you have to compromise something, unless your budget is unlimited and can build from the ground up.
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  11. #11
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    My first bike was rigid. I rode it mostly on the road and on a few local hills, exploring the trails I found coming off the fireroads and whatnot. When I went to upgrade, wanting to ride more rough stuff, I went to the same price point and got a Raleigh with front suspension, it just wasn't as nice riding as my original. I wish I could've returned it--I didn't feel like the suspension did much for me besides pogo, but that was over a decade ago...

    Seeing that Nishiki Colorado Comp really made me envious; I wish I had that as a first bike. I heard that Dicks has a 20% off coupon that you can possibly use on it.

  12. #12
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    Ok, gotcha. I'm thinking a 29er might be big for me? I'm about 5'9 -5'10. Thats why ibwas leaning towards a 27.5. I've read they roll better than 26 but are for people a little smaller than 29s. I'm not looking to burn up trails at 25mph. I'm just looking to cruise some trails with maybe a small jump here or there and rougher rooty terrain. So does bikes direct really sell quality bikes? I've read nothing but good about them. But don't know anyone wi th person experience dealing with them.

  13. #13
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    That nishiki Colorado really piqued my interest. But Idk where all these people are from that got it for 379? It's on their site right now for 599$ even with 20% off it's no where near 400$

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsspang View Post
    Ok, gotcha. I'm thinking a 29er might be big for me? I'm about 5'9 -5'10. Thats why ibwas leaning towards a 27.5. I've read they roll better than 26 but are for people a little smaller than 29s. I'm not looking to burn up trails at 25mph. I'm just looking to cruise some trails with maybe a small jump here or there and rougher rooty terrain. So does bikes direct really sell quality bikes? I've read nothing but good about them. But don't know anyone wi th person experience dealing with them.
    Wheel size doesn't matter, frame size does.(a lot)

    I started on one of their 26er with a crappy fork. It got me going, but not a lot of fun. I also currently have their SS 29er.

    They are totally fine bikes, like I said make sure its all tuned up properly, other than that, slightly older tech, and the few minor upgrades I mentioned.

    At least it will get you going, as long as you are riding a bike, you won't care what label is on the down tube. Also, if you stick to it, you will eventually upgrade.
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  15. #15
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    Also the link was for a 27.5plus
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  16. #16
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    I got back in the game with a giant talon2 a few years ago. Decent price entry level components. But very functional bike.

    Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsspang View Post
    Ok, gotcha. I'm thinking a 29er might be big for me? I'm about 5'9 -5'10. Thats why ibwas leaning towards a 27.5. I've read they roll better than 26 but are for people a little smaller than 29s. I'm not looking to burn up trails at 25mph. I'm just looking to cruise some trails with maybe a small jump here or there and rougher rooty terrain. So does bikes direct really sell quality bikes? I've read nothing but good about them. But don't know anyone wi th person experience dealing with them.
    Rigid Fork: "I'd rather drink turpentine and piss on a brush fire." To each is own but frack riding anything rough with a rigid, lol. But, some are made of tougher stuff than me for sure.

    29er: I am 5'-7" and rode a 29er for 8 years and liked it. 29ers roll and roll, but I struggled with the handling and washing out. I rode two 27.5+ (hard tail and dual) and was instantly hooked because of the handling. Go fast = 29er. F-around and tight stuff = 27.5. This is all in my humble and possibly worthless opinion.

    However, I put together a new riding group and three didn't have good bikes. I did not want to sway them so had them ride all kinds within their budget and let "the feel" decide for them. Guess what. They all ended up choosing 27.5+ bikes.
    '18 Scott Spark 730, 27.5+
    '10 Scott Scale 29er

  18. #18
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    So I hear you guys on basically these cheaper bikes have real shitty forks. What if I were to buy one of the 27.5s off of bikes direct. Or the gt aggressor or nishiki Colorado and replace the fork with a rock shox silver 30? Would that be a nice upgrade fork or is basically just replacing junk with junk? I placed a link to the rock shox fork...its about $160 online.



    https://www.sram.com/rockshox/family/30

  19. #19
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    Buy used. $500 will get you a bike that cost a grand a few years ago. And if biking isnít for you, you can re sell it without losing much money. A set of new brake rotors, pads and shift cables and you should be ok. If the bike is couple years old the shock might be ok still depending on use but could possibly need a service.

    Youíll need to really spend closer to $1000 if you want something new that isnít garbage after a few heavy rides.

  20. #20
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    I'm definetly not opposed to buying used. I live in a smaller city with out a lot of options. However, I live less than 2 hours away from 3 major cities. Cleveland, Ohio buffalo,NY. And pittsburgh, PA. I'm willing to travel. I've been searchi ng Craig's list for about a month. I've only found one bike I was interested and they did not respond to my emails. Is there a better site to check for used bikes?

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsspang View Post
    I'm definetly not opposed to buying used. I live in a smaller city with out a lot of options. However, I live less than 2 hours away from 3 major cities. Cleveland, Ohio buffalo,NY. And pittsburgh, PA. I'm willing to travel. I've been searchi ng Craig's list for about a month. I've only found one bike I was interested and they did not respond to my emails. Is there a better site to check for used bikes?
    Pinkbike is good.

    If you find something interesting on CL post the links, and you will get some advice.
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  22. #22
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  23. #23
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    This maybe slightly better? But I would offer $450.00 and he is moving. Can't tell what fork it has. Its a Trail 4 (I had the Trail 3 my first real MTB after my BD bike had a XC30 fork).

    https://pittsburgh.craigslist.org/bi...845659472.html
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  24. #24
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    https://www.pinkbike.com/buysell/ for used.
    BikeFlights ships for about $79.

  25. #25
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    Oh man, I went to pinkbike and jeez there is so much on there it's absurd. I've pretty much decided I'm not gonna buy online, sight unseen. I went to a local bike shop, not big box store. A shop that's been in business for over 35 years. Times have really changed. I bought a few bikes off him when I was a young kid riding bmx bikes. Back then it was dyno, schwinn, haro, gt, and Robinson bikes. Now times have changed. In mountain bikes he's selling haro, Fuji, gt, mainly and a few schwinn s. He's got 2018 and 2019 models. All at least 50-100$ below msrp. I have my eyes on 4 or 5 different bikes that meet my criteria. Hardtail, aluminum frame, front suspension, disk breaks, trigger shifts. 27.5" wheels. They're all ranging from 350-550$. The main differences I've seen are lock out forks and hydraulic vs mechanical breaks and tourney vs acera rerailures. Is the difference between derailures that big a deal? Is there a huge advantage of hydraulic vs mechanical disk breaks. The guy tells me hydraulics are overkill. And if be fine with mechanical disks and probably even rim breaks from that matter. Thoughts Or ideas? Is he trying to bs me into a sale?

    There is a gt aggressor there I really like. I compared it to the aggressor that is "exclusive" to dicks sporting goods. The one at dicks is 399$. The one at the bike store is 525. Only difference i can see is the bike shop has hydraulic vs mechanical disc breaks, a different fork(upgraded?) And I think different rims. The guy at the bike store said he's pissed they didn't change the name of the model bike at dicks because people don't understand they are actually 2 similar but different bikes with the same name. Confusing buyers... what do you think?

  26. #26
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    Sounds like you have a good bike shop! Hydros are better but mech brakes work fine, especially for easy riding. Pick one and get out there.

    Its nice to have a reliable bike shop.
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  27. #27
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    Yup, mech brakes will do you just fine for this level of bike. The money is usually in the fork, which does matter, but probably not so much for what you are looking for. I don't think you can get into an air type fork at that price range anyway.

    Does the bike shop offer free tune-ups or some type of credits? A good bike shop you know is worth a few extra green backs. You will need to have a new bike tuned after you put a dozen rides in or so...things stretch and such.

    Step 1: Buy
    Step 2: Ride
    Step 3: Ride
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    Step 237: Upgrade as needed
    '18 Scott Spark 730, 27.5+
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  28. #28
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    Free tune ups for a year. I asked if I should come in after 30 days to get a new tune up. He said I can but I don't have to. He said pretty much any time something doesn't seem or feel right bring it in. I could bring it in once in the hear or 10 times. Doesn't matter it's free. If parts break (barring an obvious accident) they are covered. 10% off all accessories.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsspang View Post
    Free tune ups for a year. I asked if I should come in after 30 days to get a new tune up. He said I can but I don't have to. He said pretty much any time something doesn't seem or feel right bring it in. I could bring it in once in the hear or 10 times. Doesn't matter it's free. If parts break (barring an obvious accident) they are covered. 10% off all accessories.
    Cool, within a year you will know how to do basics. I still use my shop often. I have limited time, and lousy mechanical skills. But have learned some basics.

    Few things to ponder: Pedals, find out what comes with the bike, usually none or super cheap plastic pedals. RaceFace Chesters are very affordable and with any shoe with a stiff sole will work great.

    Carry a tube, mini pump, tire levers, since your wheels and tires won't be tubeless ready.

    Hydration, obvious but important. Same with a Helemet which hopefully you already have.

    Chamois will be very helpful, but those can wait, and like a helmet don't go cheapo.

    Which bike are you going for? GT makes great bikes.

    My 92 GT Karakoram/Grocery getter, townie.
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  30. #30
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    Nice bike. I'm leaning towards the GT. There is a haro I like in the same price range (I've always had a soft spot for haro going back to my bmx days in the 90s). But the frame doesn't seem as beefy as the gt. And there are a couple fujis I had my eye on. Not my favorite colors but I could live with them.

    The reason I'm leaning towards the gt is I've always liked gt bikes. It's the only one one looking at with hydraulic breaks. I like the color. And it falls right in the middle. The fujis are the cheapest and the most expensive. The gt falls right in the middle with the haro. Price wise.

  31. #31
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    Hi, Check out the Jamis Trail X series, they are in the higher end of your budget, 499 to 599 but are a great bike. My wife has the womans version ( Helix ) and loves it, has been very reliable and handles great, was her first real MTB, now on her 3rd season with it. wanted to get her a higher end bike and she doesnt want it, she wants to keep this one. The frame is aluminum, pretty light weight. Easy to upgrade as needed too.

    https://www.jamisbikes.com/usa/trailxa2.html

  32. #32
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    ...just a friendly bit of advice. If you get a 27.5+ or 29+ bike, those little pumps you can carry only take about 1,700 strokes to refill the tire. Unless you have been working out your 'stroking muscles' extensively, it is quite a task to refill a flat on the trail. You will be ahead to pick up a CO2 valve and 25g canisters.
    '18 Scott Spark 730, 27.5+
    '10 Scott Scale 29er

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsspang View Post
    So I hear you guys on basically these cheaper bikes have real shitty forks. What if I were to buy one of the 27.5s off of bikes direct. Or the gt aggressor or nishiki Colorado and replace the fork with a rock shox silver 30? Would that be a nice upgrade fork or is basically just replacing junk with junk? I placed a link to the rock shox fork...its about $160 online.



    https://www.sram.com/rockshox/family/30


    Yes, all bikes under around $700-800, unless they are used or on sale, have 'bad' forks. But I also saw a comment below this one, that said at this bike level it doesn't matter if you have mechanical or hydraulic brakes.

    This is just an opinion, but the terrain you are in, as in how steep the hills and mountains are, has a huge effect on what components you need, as well as how expensive the components need to be to get down the hill without killing yourself. If you are in a relatively flat area, where the inclines/declines are maybe 5-8% at the most, mechanical brakes and a cheap steel coil fork will probably be OK. Even a gravel bike may be fine for light riding like that.

    I have a 4% average decline on my favorite XC trail, and the previous 7 lb cheap coil fork on my 26" bike, that only had one inch of travel left, did just fine on it. Surprisingly fine. I was faster than 1/2 the other riders down the hill. But that's an exception. If it's steeper than that, it's going to be a problem. A cheap heavy fork, leaking oil, would not do fine on something steeper and more treacherous. And the brakes & tires you have on the bike are even more important to upgrade for steeper stuff than the fork. The fork will be annoying but the brakes and tires will be absolutely essential to upgrade for avoiding a nasty crash. At this level of bike, the brakes and tires are done first before even thinking of the fork or anything else. Don't skip them.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    Wheel size doesn't matter

    Put on a 26 x 1.95 tire on some old 26" wheelset collecting dust in your garage (if you have not thrown them out yet) and try to ride your favorite trails, now that you are way better and faster. You will eat those words!!!

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    Put on a 26 x 1.95 tire on some old 26" wheelset collecting dust in your garage (if you have not thrown them out yet) and try to ride your favorite trails, now that you are way better and faster. You will eat those words!!!
    lol, the context of the question was "fit" not wheel size. But yeah, the only 26 I have is my GT and it doesn't see dirt, just grocery store runs.
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    These are not fat tires, they are plus tires. Those cheap sus forks weigh a ton! I have a 29er plus, and regular 29er both rigid, yes the plus is not as fast but neither am I lol.

    With bikes, you have to compromise something, unless your budget is unlimited and can build from the ground up.

    Rigid with plus tires can be fine, right? I have a cheap air fork on one bike, and I swear I can barely feel the fork working at all on the bumps compared with the plus tire absorbing the bumps first. It's not really a plus tire, it's a 2.7, but wide enough that the air pressure really determines how rough or smooth the ride is; the fork feels like it has nothing to do with it. The fork can only work as good as what tire and corresponding air pressure it's mated to. You could put on a $1000 Fox fork but if the tire is pumped up way more than its optimal psi, even that fork is going to feel horrible.

    If I lock out the cheap air fork it's a bit more rough, but nothing compared with pumping up the 2.7 tire a couple more psi. If the tire is firm, the ride is very firm, no matter how soft the fork settings are, so the fork may as well be rigid. If the tire is soft and lower psi, the fork 'starts' to work, as in you start to feel it working a bit. It becomes unmasked from the tire's psi dominating the front cushion (or lack thereof).

    The tire choice you make up front, and its optimal psi, is really important, way more than what entry-level fork you put on a cheaper bike, unless you keep the tire skinny. Just don't put a 2.8 on a 19mm rim, that's pushing it a bit.

  37. #37
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    If you buy a nice used bike you can likely sale it for what you purchased it for. I would drop $500-$800 on a nice used hard tail.

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