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  1. #1
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    650B Velocity P35 users.. a little tubeless help please

    Having some real trouble getting my 2.35 nevegals to seat and stay seated. Using the Velocity tubeless conversion kit and I can get the tire to seat and "pop" on the rim. Pump it to 45psi, but when I get the pressure down to ~30psi the tire loses all air and fast.

    Any help is much appreciated. I know the tires are not tubeless compatable, but I run similar Nevegals on my 29er without any issue on a Bontrager Duster rim.

    Going to try "ghetto" tubeless tonight hoping that the extra rubber between the tire / rim will help here.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by Blind Dog; 03-01-2012 at 05:34 AM. Reason: added info

  2. #2
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    Trying ghetto sounds like a good idea, or extra layers of tape to build up the bed a little. Sounds like you may have gotten a tire that's a bit oversized. I always (well, OK, not always) set them up with a tube first and leave them for a day at a high pressure with the tube installed before going tubeless.

  3. #3
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    First off, what sealant are you using? Is it leaking air at the bead or the tire itself? I have had to double up the tape at times to seal the bead on some rims (Flows have been flawless). Also have dipped a toothbrush in the sealant and brushed sealant around the rim where it beads up. Ghetto is also an option.

  4. #4
    TNC
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    I've been using the plain, simple ghetto system for a long time now with my P35 with total reliability. I use a 24" schrader valve tube with Stan's sealant. When I need to check my sealant, I don't want to break the bead, but others do break the bead seal and seem to reseal with no real issues. I like leaving that original bead seal integrity in place. I remove the valve core and use a skinny zip tie as a dipstick. The serrated side of the zip tie gives you a precise sealant level indicator that you can rely on. When you originally install your tire and desired amount of sealant, air it up with the tire hanging off the ground. Now let the air out and measure the sealant level with your zip tie. This is your "full" sealant level from then on, so write it down permanently somewhere. Now you can check whenever you want without disturbing the bead seal, and you add sealant when needed with a simple, homemade squeeze bottle and clear plastic tube...like the method for adding Slime from a store bought Slime bottle. There are also removable core presta tubes you can use for ghetto if you prefer, and install sealant with a homemade bottle or the neat Stan's injector device. A skinny zip tie will fit into the throat of these presta valves too. Using anything other than a serrated zip tie doesn't give a very reliable reading.

  5. #5
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    I've had 100% reliability with all the ghetto setups I've done too. I love your method though...Great system... very pro!

  6. #6
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    The Nevegals have a serrated edge racing the rim to the bead (maybe someone has a close up picture), which may be designed for improved rim lock traction. That may be the problem holding air until much sealant has closed the many little gaps.

    A ghetto rim strip makes a rubber bead to pliable rubber interface, and should make sealing much faster. And easier to mount the bead without layering rim tape inside the rim channel. And ghetto rim strips don't burp.

  7. #7
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    True dat.
    I have a friend who makes homebrew sealant, and he keeps some extra latex mold builder on hand and uses a syringe to lay a little bead of straight latex in the rim hook before inflating the tire. He swears by it.
    I tried it once, and maybe my technique just needed polishing, but I found it to be too messy to be worth the trouble... and I wasted a lot of that precious latex. Plus, I've had pretty good luck without it anyway.

  8. #8
    dwt
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    Quote Originally Posted by doismellbacon View Post
    I have a friend who makes homebrew sealant, and he keeps some extra latex mold builder on hand and uses a syringe to lay a little bead of straight latex in the rim hook before inflating the tire. He swears by it.
    I tried it once, and maybe my technique just needed polishing, but I found it to be too messy to be worth the trouble... and I wasted a lot of that precious latex. Plus, I've had pretty good luck without it anyway.
    I have the the old Blunt rims and had a problem getting Nev 2.1s to seat until I used the above method, which I learned from Meltingfeather in the Wheeel and Tires Forum. I use gorilla tape only no rim strip no ghetto tube. Instead of pure latex, I shirt a generous line of sealant onto the outside of the beads on both sides of the wheel after I mount the tire with the regular amount of sealant inside. The key is to let the stuff on the outside dry for at least 24 hours, and it will create enough of a seal to be able to pump up the tire and hold air. Sponging thick soapy water when you air up helps seal any remaining leaks. Using a compressor is recommended.


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  9. #9
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    Thanks for the help. Should be rolling ghetto by tomorrow am if all goes as planned tonight.

    Next question - Are there any tubeless / tubeless ready fat 650B tires?

  10. #10
    www.derbyrims.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blind Dog View Post
    ....

    Next question - Are there any tubeless / tubeless ready fat 650B tires?
    No. Not yet.

    Tubeless Ready beads must cost a lot more to produce, otherwise I don't understand why all off road tires are not TR already.

  11. #11
    dwt
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    Quote Originally Posted by derby View Post
    No. Not yet.

    Tubeless Ready beads must cost a lot more to produce, otherwise I don't understand why all off road tires are not TR already.
    Cost makes sense. The other reason is weight. But most tires ARE TR if you put in the elbow grease to get them to seat and as Shiggy says are willing to throw the dice.
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

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