Is 27.5 phasing out?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Is 27.5 phasing out?

    Been looking at lower end full suspension bikes (1500-2000ish) and find that it seems more and more companies are moving away from 27.5 on L and XL size bikes. Not saying I cant find anything, but it seems like there is more of a push for 29. Ive never owned a 29, but have test rode a few and prefer the 27.5. Anyone else feel the industry is starting to push the 29 more and more for certain sizes?

  2. #2
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    Strava made 27.5 obsolete. Slight sarcasm; only slight.
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  3. #3
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    Seems like most people are going for 29er so that's what manufactures are going to supply. I'm 5'9" and ride a medium but prefer 29er wheels even though I'm still on 27.5 at the moment.

    My next bike a few years from now will be 29 unless we're switching to 28.25 by then.

  4. #4
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    NO! I love my 27.5's, I have one 27.5 and a 29er. One kid on 27.5, next year 2 will be.

  5. #5
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    I don't really know if its from the riders or the manufacturers that you are seeing dwindling numbers of 27.5'. I have both but on most occasions, I prefer my 27.5 bikes over my 29ers. Both ride really well but the 27.5ers just feel faster on most terrain and are definitely quicker handling, which requires more skill.
    On the flip side, if you are a manufacturer, its all about sku's, meaning that you have to stock parts for 27.5ers and 29ers, with subcategories within each size. So I believe its really driven more by the manufacturers then the riders, but yes, it does seem that they will be harder to come by in the future.
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  6. #6
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    It won't go away, but it's definitely getting less popular.

  7. #7
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    My 100mm 29er has more overlap with my 140mm 27.5 bike than I expected.

    I think I could have bought a 120mm 29er and it would work better than both my current bikes, and still be fun to ride. I dont think its a conspiracy or some crazy market insider push. The new 29ers really are very good. And fun.

  8. #8
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    I don’t think it will disappear either.

    But for whatever reason (sales, rider preferences, manufacturers, etc), they do seem to be dwindling.

    The same is true in components from what I’ve seen. Ive been lurking for deals on either a new fork, or new wheelset. And new or used, there are better prices on 27.5 forks and wheels than there are for 29’er variants of the same stuff.

    I’ve also been keeping an eye out for a used bike for a buddy getting into the sport. And there are way more deals for 27.5 than 29, at least where I am. Which I think shows to some extent that the 29ers are just more in demand.

  9. #9
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    I need more people to upgrade to 29ers so I can get good deals on gently used 27.5er framesets.

  10. #10
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    275 will hopefully stick around.

    For the type or riding I do I prefer the 275. Just spent a day on my very dialed 29" bike. Its a great bike. Fits me very well. On the straight stuff its faster. But if I had to choose I'd go 275.

    My 275 feels more precise and nimble despite being a heavier build and longer travel. On the tight steep corners the front wheel - well, I feel I'm very connected to it. It goes exactly where I want it. Gets up to speed faster. Seems to handle tighter, techie trails better and that's the stuff I like to ride.

    Almost certain my next bike will be a 275.

    A 275 with the newer, heavier duty 2.6" tires suit my riding conditions very well.

  11. #11
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    Why is it needed???

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo View Post
    Why is it needed???
    Because when you put durable, aggressive tires on a 29er, the bike becomes less fun feeling than a 27.5.

  13. #13
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    27.5 or 650b bikes are naturally/generally more flickable/fun

    YMMV

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  14. #14
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    I did demos of a whole bunch of 120-130 mm travel 29ers over the last two years: https://www.dirtmerchantbikes.com/sp...-45-yeti-sb100

    But I ended up getting an 160mm travel HD4 with 27.5" wheels. The 120-130mm travel 29ers were great overall, but the longer travel 27.5 bikes seemed a little more capable while still feeling nimble enough for all sorts of riding. Longer travel 29ers were more capable but felt like they didn't like to turn.
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  15. #15
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    They need to keep the sales rotations going.
    27.5 is not cool now.... They will push the 29 again for a bit.
    Then back to 26" in about 5 years, then eventually back to 27.5.
    And people will keep on upgrading....

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  16. #16
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    don't worry, 28.375 will be along shortly, it's the new perfect size as it blends the best of 27.5 and 29 together without the downsides of either.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    They need to keep the sales rotations going.
    27.5 is not cool now.... They will push the 29 again for a bit.
    Then back to 26" in about 5 years, then eventually back to 27.5.
    And people will keep on upgrading....

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    27.5 rolled out in 2007, so 13 years later we're still using it and it still accounts for a significant portion of sales.

    29ers came out in 91 but really were shelved for 10 years until they slowly came back as viable mountain bikes. So they've been going steady for 19 years. Just very recently did anyone bother to fix their geometry issues.

    ... you really think that's moving too fast just for the sake of sales?

  18. #18
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    Just because some bike shops carry less 27.5...does not mean that its being "phased out". Less trendy...yes...phased out...nope.

  19. #19
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    27.5 is only being phased out for front wheels.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by TylerVernon View Post
    Because when you put durable, aggressive tires on a 29er, the bike becomes less fun feeling than a 27.5.
    Yes. And in many ways the 275 is not only more fun, but more capable.
    Last edited by Miker J; 04-20-2020 at 04:09 PM.

  21. #21
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    They all suck (except for MINE haha).

    Marketing pitches change however the song remains the same...

    Act now and throw out whatever you have because the new Pi*Nine wheel set (28.27433388231) is going to take over the WORLD!
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbbr View Post
    don't worry, 28.375 will be along shortly, it's the new perfect size as it blends the best of 27.5 and 29 together without the downsides of either.
    Major brands have taken notice of your comment. lol

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spectre View Post
    I did demos of a whole bunch of 120-130 mm travel 29ers over the last two years: https://www.dirtmerchantbikes.com/sp...-45-yeti-sb100

    But I ended up getting an 160mm travel HD4 with 27.5" wheels. The 120-130mm travel 29ers were great overall, but the longer travel 27.5 bikes seemed a little more capable while still feeling nimble enough for all sorts of riding. Longer travel 29ers were more capable but felt like they didn't like to turn.
    My conclusions as well, and I went with a Mach 6.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by TylerVernon View Post
    Because when you put durable, aggressive tires on a 29er, the bike becomes less fun feeling than a 27.5.
    Agree. That ‘dragging a dead hooker feeling’ is accentuated on the big wheels with big rubber, not to mention the reluctance to pivot off axis quickly..

  25. #25
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    So long as people desire to ride size small bikes, there will be desire for small wheels.

  26. #26
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    As long as they keep making short people like me 27.5 will stick around lol

  27. #27
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    The shortest, cheapest, and only 27.5 bike got the farthest up the "impossible climb".

    https://www.pinkbike.com/news/field-...ideo-2020.html

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by RS VR6 View Post
    The shortest, cheapest, and only 27.5 bike got the farthest up the "impossible climb".

    https://www.pinkbike.com/news/field-...ideo-2020.html
    Not to mention it was the last to go. I’d imagine there was some energy drain that occurred as the number of attempts increased


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  29. #29
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    Since both of my bikes are 27.5, I'm sure that the industry will phase everything out on that size just to spite me.
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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by incubus View Post
    Not to mention it was the last to go. I’d imagine there was some energy drain that occurred as the number of attempts increased


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    Yeah man...i would imagine his legs must have been pretty tired at that point. He looked the smoothest and carried more speed on the Bossnut than the other bikes. He was straight fighting the first two bikes.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by RS VR6 View Post
    Yeah man...i would imagine his legs must have been pretty tired at that point. He looked the smoothest and carried more speed on the Bossnut than the other bikes. He was straight fighting the first two bikes.
    Getting more familiar with the nuances of the trail after consecutive tries helped too I would think. Ftr, not biased, I ride both wheel sizes.
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by RS VR6 View Post
    The shortest, cheapest, and only 27.5 bike got the farthest up the "impossible climb".

    https://www.pinkbike.com/news/field-...ideo-2020.html
    I think it's remarkable that such a cheap bike could perform so well throughout the whole test.
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curveball View Post
    I think it's remarkable that such a cheap bike could perform so well throughout the whole test.
    Had I seen the bike tests earlier on PB I may have got one and thrown my upgraded on it and saved a few hundred and not bought a Norco Fluid...
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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMac47 View Post
    Getting more familiar with the nuances of the trail after consecutive tries helped too I would think. Ftr, not biased, I ride both wheel sizes.
    I don't doubt that at all...at the same time...he pretty much took the same line up with each bike. With the 29r's...it looks like he couldn't keep momentum. The wheels kept getting hung up on the rocks. If the rear wheel didn't slip on the rock...the B'nut would have made it all the way up.

    I also have both wheel sizes. My main ride is a 29r. Gotta give credit where its deserved.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by RS VR6 View Post
    I don't doubt that at all...at the same time...he pretty much took the same line up with each bike. With the 29r's...it looks like he couldn't keep momentum. The wheels kept getting hung up on the rocks. If the rear wheel didn't slip on the rock...the B'nut would have made it all the way up.

    I also have both wheel sizes. My main ride is a 29r. Gotta give credit where its deserved.
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curveball View Post
    I think it's remarkable that such a cheap bike could perform so well throughout the whole test.
    People assume money equals performance. Ya performance for certain things but suck at others.

    Cheaper bikes typically use bit older geo, less travel, harsher ride which actually makes for a better climbing bike in some cases. That's why hardtail is the best for straight fast climbing.

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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curveball View Post
    I think it's remarkable that such a cheap bike could perform so well throughout the whole test.
    How far would it have gone if he rode that one first up the hill?

  38. #38
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    That's exactly the sort of climbing that makes a nimble, short wheelbase bike shine.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveF View Post
    That's exactly the sort of climbing that makes a nimble, short wheelbase bike shine.
    Levy mentioned one of the 29rs being short, think it was the Mythtique?
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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by RS VR6 View Post
    I don't doubt that at all...at the same time...he pretty much took the same line up with each bike. With the 29r's...it looks like he couldn't keep momentum. The wheels kept getting hung up on the rocks. If the rear wheel didn't slip on the rock...the B'nut would have made it all the way up.

    I also have both wheel sizes. My main ride is a 29r. Gotta give credit where its deserved.
    I would have assumed that a 29er would have done better than 27.5 getting up and over that chunk. Maybe the easier acceleration helped.
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  41. #41
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    Bicycles that sell will be the bicycles being sold, so 27.5 will be there alongside 29.
    There are variables to both.

    What is your height OP?

  42. #42
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    We have Nino Schurter to thank for all this confusion. First he insisted on racing a 27.5 hardtail, and lost the Olympics to a 29er guy (Jaroslav Kulhavy). Then he decided to race a tweener full-suspension. That didn't work out so he finally relented to 29ers. Lately he's been going full enduro, 30id rims and 2.4 tires. With big DH racers going 29er as well, this was an unfortunate distraction.

    Now about those new 36er carbon rims...

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by RS VR6 View Post
    The shortest, cheapest, and only 27.5 bike got the farthest up the "impossible climb".

    https://www.pinkbike.com/news/field-...ideo-2020.html
    Tighter bike with a shorter wheelbase and lighter wheels. I wonder how even smaller wheels would do?
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    Well Knolly just released their flagship 160 mm bike as a 27.5, so I don't think its going away any time soon.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skooks View Post
    Well Knolly just released their flagship 160 mm bike as a 27.5, so I don't think its going away any time soon.
    That new Warden looks extremely cool!
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  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skooks View Post
    Well Knolly just released their flagship 160 mm bike as a 27.5, so I don't think its going away any time soon.
    It was interesting listening to them discuss the wheel-size thing in their recent Q&A. They seemed pretty confident that while 29ers have significant advantages for anyone who's main priority is overall speed, 27.5 is still "relevant" and maybe even a better choice for more casual riders who are looking more for fun or manoeuvrability, or who may not have the legs to keep the big wheels spinning.

  47. #47
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    I love my 26" hardtail.........just wait till it's the go to bike again
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  48. #48
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    I recently got an e-mail from Competitive Cyclist about Santa Cruz bikes being 25% off. I quickly jumped on their site to see what kind of deals were available and found all the bikes on sale were 27.5" models. What does that tell you?

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stahr_Nut View Post
    I recently got an e-mail from Competitive Cyclist about Santa Cruz bikes being 25% off. I quickly jumped on their site to see what kind of deals were available and found all the bikes on sale were 27.5" models. What does that tell you?
    New 27.5 models coming?

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus View Post
    Tighter bike with a shorter wheelbase and lighter wheels. I wonder how even smaller wheels would do?
    Quiet, or someone will invent a 26 inch tire!
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  51. #51
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    My guess is the 2021 models being announced in a few months and they need to clear out surplus inventory ahead of time. Why so many 27.5ers? Could be because everyone is raving about the coolest kid on the block and with that hype, everyone is jumping on the 29er bandwagon. I'm guessing bike companies sold much more 29er in the last couple years over 27.5.

  52. #52
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    Competitive cyclist every year over orders Nomads and Bronsons. Nobody likes those models. As for the 5010s, down county bikes are eating up that market segment. Its all about the Tallboy now.

    So long as Danny MacAskill rides a 5010, people are always going to ride and be like him. 27.5 isn’t going away.

  53. #53
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    Is 27.5 bikes fading question has interested me for a while.
    So I compered how many 27.5 threads were opened here on MTBR forum and how many 29er threads.

    On March 28 there were 7,901 threads on 27.5 bikes forum and now there are 7,917, that's 16 new threads opened in this period. 29er bikes forum had 52,423 threads on March 28 and has 52,476 now which is 53 new threads opened in this period.

    If 29er new threads are more than 3 times compared to 27.5, I guess more riders are interested in 29er bikes, and I bet that bike manufacturers are aware of that too and take decisions in accordance with this (and sales, demo days and every other data they have).

    On the other hand, 27.5+ wheels look like they are still here, and manufacturers are making bikes that can accommodate both 27.5+ and 29er wheels.

    Mo.

  54. #54
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    By that logic, 9ers better watch out, 26er is making a comeback! 29 new threads in the 26 Forum last four weeks!
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  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragon21 View Post
    Been looking at lower end full suspension bikes (1500-2000ish) and find that it seems more and more companies are moving away from 27.5 on L and XL size bikes. Not saying I cant find anything, but it seems like there is more of a push for 29. Ive never owned a 29, but have test rode a few and prefer the 27.5. Anyone else feel the industry is starting to push the 29 more and more for certain sizes?
    It is is part of the imaginary "upgrades" pushed by the industry and bought by many. And from an industry perspective it does simplify production.

    It is also partly an unintended consequence of the rise of the full suspension bike. Up to 20 -25years ago we were able to get custom frames, while nowadays the big names in the industry have achieved the holy grail of being pretty much the only way one can get a full suspension bike. You get what they offer in size and geometry. It is the perfect set up to have wave after wave of "trends": call them "better wheels" or "new geometries". You can be sure that when the 29 phase will be over something else will come up. It happened many times just in the last five years. Remember when we were supposed to all use 2.8/3.0 tires? And all the frames needed to be upgraded to fit those rollers?

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davide View Post
    It is is part of the imaginary "upgrades" pushed by the industry and bought by many. And from an industry perspective it does simplify production.

    It is also partly an unintended consequence of the rise of the full suspension bike. Up to 20 -25years ago we were able to get custom frames, while nowadays the big names in the industry have achieved the holy grail of being pretty much the only way one can get a full suspension bike. You get what they offer in size and geometry. It is the perfect set up to have wave after wave of "trends": call them "better wheels" or "new geometries". You can be sure that when the 29 phase will be over something else will come up. It happened many times just in the last five years. Remember when we were supposed to all use 2.8/3.0 tires? And all the frames needed to be upgraded to fit those rollers?
    Nobody was making custom full suspension bike frames then. If they were they are long in the forgotten scrap bin. Custom full suspension frames currently are garbage now. They are at best glorified Orange bikes. Custom only gets you expensive hardtails.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by TylerVernon View Post
    Because when you put durable, aggressive tires on a 29er, the bike becomes less fun feeling than a 27.5.
    Amen!

    Gawd does a 29er steal the feel like no other.

    I relish getting on my bike and having the agility to handle tech, but 29ers suck at tech no matter what you do with the suspension cuz they're just too big.

    I'd sooner ride a 26" for tech than a 29er.

    Both my bikes are 27.5, as is my wife's, and though I have two sets of 29er wheels for my Pistola, they're only for epics and bikepacking that are not technical.
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  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Amen!

    Gawd does a 29er steal the feel like no other.

    I relish getting on my bike and having the agility to handle tech, but 29ers suck at tech no matter what you do with the suspension cuz they're just too big.

    I'd sooner ride a 26" for tech than a 29er.

    Both my bikes are 27.5, as is my wife's, and though I have two sets of 29er wheels for my Pistola, they're only for epics and bikepacking that are not technical.
    That might be down to personal taste. Personally, I found a bike like the Ripmo to be a really fun and capable bike. The current breed to 29ers are really good.
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  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davide View Post
    Remember when we were supposed to all use 2.8/3.0 tires? And all the frames needed to be upgraded to fit those rollers?
    "Then I thought of widening the hubs...so they had to change everything again"


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jj0uBQ7j5c4


  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by RS VR6 View Post
    "Then I thought of widening the hubs...so they had to change everything again"


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jj0uBQ7j5c4

    Yup, marketing and increasing profits!
    Check out this latest and greatest, 8" tires... all yours for X amount of peso's, but wait theres more, theres a new bb standard, it makes the frame stiffer. Get out your credit cards now and SAVE!

    LOL

  61. #61
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    I think the fact that racing across the board (XC, enduro, downhill) is pretty much all 29er obviously makes a big difference. But I think there's still a lot of scenarios where 27.5ers makes sense. And still a lot of really cool 27.5 bikes being made, especially by boutique brands. It's just a question of whether people will buy them or not.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by roma258 View Post
    I think the fact that racing across the board (XC, enduro, downhill) is pretty much all 29er obviously makes a big difference. But I think there's still a lot of scenarios where 27.5ers makes sense. And still a lot of really cool 27.5 bikes being made, especially by boutique brands. It's just a question of whether people will buy them or not.
    I will! I like a slightly more nimble, but yet capable bike. Longer-travel 27.5 bikes do that. 140mm+ travel 29ers feel a bit numb to me.
    Dirt Merchant Bikes
    www.dirtmerchantbikes.com
    Seattle area dealer for Turner Bikes & Cleary Bikes

  63. #63
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    Yup, Competitive Cyclist is closing out 2019 models and I bought a Bronson during the sale. I’m pretty sure they’re a Santa Cruz liquidator.

    It wouldn’t surprise me if the Bronson was Santa Cruz’ #1 seller. It was the most common SC to see on the trail where I lived last year and also the most common to see where I live now.

    It would stand to reason that a manufacturer would crank out production of a best seller and as such have a bit more stock at the end of a model year. Just a thought anyway.

    For the riding I enjoy best (twisty flow) I prefer 27.5. I don’t think it’s going anywhwere.

  64. #64
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    SC has continued to push 27.5 and 29er parity across the line and their new Heckler ebike is basically a Bronson, so those are good signs.

    The funny thing is that gravel riders have been moving from 29" to 27.5" (not all of course) and their bikes are looking more and more like late 80s rigid mountain bikes. I think the upshot is that things like geometry, good suspension components and droppers are what really matter. Also, if you're like me and live on the East Coast, the current geo might even be going to extreme for the trails I regularly have access to.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fajita Dave View Post
    Seems like most people are going for 29er so that's what manufactures are going to supply. I'm 5'9" and ride a medium but prefer 29er wheels even though I'm still on 27.5 at the moment.

    My next bike a few years from now will be 29 unless we're switching to 28.25 by then.

    A couple of things: first, if something is boosted (which chances are it probably is), then the frame is really 29 / 27.5+, so you can call it either bike. I think some manufacturers are missing out on a marketing opportunity by not offering two wheelsets with a new bike, one something around 29 x 2.4 and one 27.5 x 2.8/3.0. Sure it would cost a few hundred dollars more but it would really press home the point that boosted is very versatile and the frame can double duty for two different wheel sizes.

    Second, and I was thinking about posting this anyway: I agree that it's time for 28.25. I'm finding more and more on a 27.5 that a taller tire really does have better rollover, but the problem is that I really don't like how it handles once it gets around 28 inches or higher. So why would I want 28.25??? Because it's not just the height that affects handling, it's the width. And if you want to get a 27.5 tire up to 28.0 inches or more, you have to widen it to a 2.6 or more which is plus territory. If there was 28.25, the more narrow sizes like 2.2 or 2.4 would still be able to fit into 27.5 frame and fork, they would just clear the triangle and fork arch, but they would be able to supply rollover and momentum/top speed without the handling penalty of a 29" that's 0.75 inches higher for the same width of tire. That's the silver lining to 28.25. The downside is that anything over 2.4 or 2.5 with that rim size may need a 29" fork and frame, unless they have a plus (boosted) 27.5 fork.

    But for traditional 27.5" frames, you could still run up to maybe a 2.5 and all you have to do is buy the 28.25 wheelset and tires, you can keep the 27.5" bike as is. That way, you could have a 28 x 2.4 tire that's around 28.25 inches high, a bit higher than 27 x 2.6 and roughly the same height as 27 x 2.8, but without the more sluggish handling of those wider tires.

  66. #66
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    This post actually made me create an account.
    I bought my latest bike back in 2014 and it was a 27.5, now it is time to buy a new bike and most brands stopped offering 27.5 wheels on 2k euro/dollar bikes in europe. You can find them on cheaper bikes though. This leaves me with only 2 bikes/brands to choose from really (for those interested it's the Orbea M25 and Rose Psycho Path 2).

    I don't have any experience riding a 29 inch wheelset since my buddies are much taller than me (i am a humble 5'5 or 168cm). I understand that companies want to save money by purchasing and selling only 29 inch wheels since anything above a small frame will be fine with 29ers, but for small riders this is not pleasant.

    I just wonder how other people of around my height feel about this. And if i should just go out and try a bunch of 29-ers (which will than be heavier and my medical back-problems will not like).

  67. #67
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    Honestly about every assumption you are making about 29ers is false.

    I know 12yr old kids that race XC on 29ers. And win.

    29ers are not heavier just because they are a 29". This isnt Walmart.

    Go test ride some and see what you think then decide if you want to stick to 27.5 or not.

    Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelBolton View Post

    I don't have any experience riding a 29 inch wheelset since my buddies are much taller than me (i am a humble 5'5 or 168cm).

    I just wonder how other people of around my height feel about this. And if i should just go out and try a bunch of 29-ers (which will than be heavier and my medical back-problems will not like).
    It just seems logical to go out and ride a few 29ers, otherwise, how will you know?

    In 2016, or so, I was looking to get a new bike. I tried several high end 29ers and really didn't care for them. I then tried, really liked, and got a Yeti SB5c - "brunch" ride 160 fork. Great bike.

    In 2018 I demo'd a few 29ers and the jump in capability over the ones I tried 2 years earlier was remarkable - they'd been dialed in!

    I ended up with a short travel 29er that is more capable in all areas than my 27.5. I'm climbing faster and more comfortably in the Wasatch (Utah) in every type of terrain, and cleaning downhill sections in Moab that I didn't/couldn't on the Yeti.

    Initially, I too thought the bike was sluggish in quick, successive S-type turns, but after a while realized I had to slightly modify my technique and now it's at least as quick.
    27.5's aren't and shouldn't go away, but you should at least ride a couple of 29ers - probably short travel - and make up your own mind.

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by dontcallmebrave View Post
    As long as they keep making short people like me 27.5 will stick around lol
    This makes so much sense, but rarely gets brought up.

    Kids go from 20" to 24" to 26" from about 4'0" to 5'5".

    Yet, all adults should ride the same size wheels? In the USA, 1% and 99% heights are roughly:

    Men: 5ft 1.5in to 6ft 3.5in
    Women: 4ft 9in to 5ft 10in.

    Even 10% to 90% range from a 5' female to a 6' 1" male. So even if manufacturers are not looking to optimize for the extremes, they really need a decent fit across a 20% height delta. A 29er is only about 5% bigger than a 27.5. If 26 wasn't "dead", they could be offering XS bikes with 26" wheels and appropriately short chainstays, 27.5 for S and M, and 29 for L and XL. That would be very proportionate.


    EDIT: since this is turning into the same old 27.5 vs 29er debate... I own 29ers and would never buy a 27.5. I like speed, and big wheels are faster. But I also love borrowing friend's 27.5 bikes for occasional rides on tight descents. They are just that little bit "carvier".

    Oh, and 29ers feel like they pay a higher price for heavy wheels and tires. I run carbon rims and <1000g tires, even for rowdy use. On 27.5 I don't mind some alloy rims or DD casing tires as much.

  70. #70
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    I went with GT over Giant specifically because I could get a S 27.5 but still get things like 120mm air fork.

    I'm 166cm (somewhere between 5'5" and 5'6") with a 29" inseam and fairly short arms, most manufactures want to put me on a M 29er but the reach and stand over would suck and the bike would end up parked.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smackem View Post

    So long as Danny MacAskill rides a 5010, people are always going to ride and be like him..
    LOL!

    I've always wondered if people had that delusion when they buy products of world-class athletes. Like roadies always quoting "TDF winner bla bla bla, rides this bike, with a crank length of bla bla bla." Like that's somehow going to translate to anything tangible for us sub-humans in the real world.

    I'm getting a 5010, but not because of MacAskill. The geometry just suits me and I do prefer 27.5

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