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  1. #1
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    I need a coil-sprung fork for a Pro-Flex with 26" wheels.

    Yes, I know coil-sprung forks and 26" wheels are old tech, but my Pro-Flex 756 is old too. I actually have a coil-sprung fork on it now, a 2003 Manitou Black Super, and I'd be fine keeping that fork on there forever except it's always felt squirrelly. Back when I rode on a daily basis it didn't matter because I got used to it, but since I don't ride much anymore the squirrelly feeling of the fork is a big turn-off, and it makes me want to ride the bike even less. I don't know what exactly is going wrong, but in every corner it feels like the front wheel wants to spin around backwards, so I have to fight that, and it makes the bike feel very unstable. Maybe it's the steep steertube angle on the Pro-Flex 756 (it's an old-school XC climber), or maybe it's the reverse arch on that fork, I dunno, but the front-arch fork I had on there prior to 2005 was much more stable in corners. (yes, I know it's taken me a stupidly long time to address this problem.)

    Finding 26" forks is a challenge nowadays; it's even more of a challenge to find a 26" fork that uses real honest-to-god springs instead of little bubbles of compressed air, which have never felt right to me, even if they are much lighter. Where I live the ambient temperature changes significantly day-to-day, and air springs respond by getting firmer or softer as I ride and they adjust to the ambient temperature, which drives me freaking crazy. I suppose that's not an issue on the West coast where most of this stuff is designed and built, but it's a problem for me.

    So anyway, if someone could point me in the direction of a halfway decent 26" fork with coil springs and adjustable compression that isn't a no-name special on eBay (I have nothing against Chinese products, but I want someone's reputation to be at risk if the thing breaks in half), that would be a huge help. If it happens to be painted silver to match the rear suspension on my Pro-Flex 756, that would be perfect.

    Help? And don't suggest buying a new bike; of course I can do that, but that's not the point.

    EDIT: I suppose a fork with a coil + air spring would be good, if anyone still makes those. I do appreciate the infinite adjustability of air springs, but I appreciate the predictability of coil springs more.
    Last edited by deusexaethera; 08-25-2018 at 01:37 AM.

  2. #2
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    Isn't the Black an air fork (but with coil for small bump initial stroke)? (maybe the other way around but thought it was mainly air spring)
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  3. #3
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    There were versions of the Black that had air springs, but I bought the version I did specifically because it had a coil spring. I'm an average weight (170lbs), so I don't have to worry about swapping springs either.'

    Like I said, the Black Super would stay on my bike forever, except that it feels unstable in turns and I no longer have the patience to put up with that.

  4. #4
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    yeah there were, but the black was the air fork, at the very least it has an air spring in it...well, according to the manual anyway.
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  5. #5
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    the biggest issue with getting a new fork, is that coil is going to be aither a super cheapy fork, or an gravity focused fork that isn't going to fit, so you're going to have to look for older forks either way.
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  6. #6
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    Manitou abandoned their entire early-2000's lineup in the late-2000's. Even their own tech support team doesn't seem to know all the models they used to sell. My fork says "Manitou BLACK" on it, and there is definitely a coil spring inside, with no air assist, because there's nowhere to add new air. In place of the filler cap there is a travel-length adjuster knob.

    Anyway, yeah, the only coil forks I've been able to find are downhill forks and cheap forks made by SR Suntour. I'm hoping someone else has some ideas I haven't thought of yet.

  7. #7
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    I have a coil sprung Pro Flex fork if you are interested. I think it's off a 756 but not sure. It is in nice condition.

  8. #8
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    If you used a 27.5 fork with the 26in wheel on it, that should change the front only about half a degree slacker. Rockshox XC 30 is coil and the 30 silver is available with coil.

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    You can use a 27.5" fork with a 26" wheel? I mean, okay, I get that the hub and disc will fit the same on any size wheel, but...well...won't it look kinda goofy with the arch way above the surface of the tire?

    Good to know that the Rockshox XC30 has a coil spring. Maybe I can find an older model designed to fit 26" wheels; if not, I guess I'll head to my local bike shop with my front wheel and ask to test-fit it on a bike with a 27.5" fork.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by piston honda View Post
    I have a coil sprung Pro Flex fork if you are interested. I think it's off a 756 but not sure. It is in nice condition.
    Thanks for the offer, but I never really liked the Girvin/Noleen linkage forks. The "J-path" design that makes the front wheel tuck backwards a bit as the suspension compresses has the same problem as my Manitou Black fork -- it makes the bike feel unstable when cornering. The "J-path" was one of those ideas that made perfect sense on paper, but not in real life; there's a reason nobody else ever copied it.

  11. #11
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    The 30 Silver is indeed available in a 26" size, as is the 30 Gold. The 30 Silver has steel stanchions and V-brake bosses, though; I wonder if I could fit a coil spring from a 30 Silver into a 30 Gold?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by deusexaethera View Post
    The 30 Silver is indeed available in a 26" size, as is the 30 Gold. The 30 Silver has steel stanchions and V-brake bosses, though; I wonder if I could fit a coil spring from a 30 Silver into a 30 Gold?
    Doesn't the 30 silver have both V-brake bosses and disc mounts?
    I have a 30 Gold on my trail bike and from what I can tell it is not convertible to spring. But I am not 100% sure.

  13. #13
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    The 30 gold and silver is a turd of a fork.

    You can get a manitou R7, which is excellent, for about $150 on ebay right now. They have disk and v-brake bosses. Its really a premium top level xc race fork, and you're not likely to find anything better at any price. Its *really* good.

    The R7 is worlds better in terms of feel, consistency, and small bump compliance compared to the RS 30.

  14. #14
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    Hey I hopefully have your solution here. I refer quite a few customer to this guy. www.mtbforksbymark.com or 661-296-1075. He has only old school Marzocchi forks. All refurbished to like new condition for the internals. He should have what you are looking for.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by deusexaethera View Post
    Yes, I know coil-sprung forks and 26" wheels are old tech, but my Pro-Flex 756 is old too. I actually have a coil-sprung fork on it now, a 2003 Manitou Black Super, and I'd be fine keeping that fork on there forever except it's always felt squirrelly. Back when I rode on a daily basis it didn't matter because I got used to it, but since I don't ride much anymore the squirrelly feeling of the fork is a big turn-off, and it makes me want to ride the bike even less. I don't know what exactly is going wrong, but in every corner it feels like the front wheel wants to spin around backwards, so I have to fight that, and it makes the bike feel very unstable. Maybe it's the steep steertube angle on the Pro-Flex 756 (it's an old-school XC climber), or maybe it's the reverse arch on that fork, I dunno, but the front-arch fork I had on there prior to 2005 was much more stable in corners. (yes, I know it's taken me a stupidly long time to address this problem.)

    Finding 26" forks is a challenge nowadays; it's even more of a challenge to find a 26" fork that uses real honest-to-god springs instead of little bubbles of compressed air, which have never felt right to me, even if they are much lighter. Where I live the ambient temperature changes significantly day-to-day, and air springs respond by getting firmer or softer as I ride and they adjust to the ambient temperature, which drives me freaking crazy. I suppose that's not an issue on the West coast where most of this stuff is designed and built, but it's a problem for me.

    So anyway, if someone could point me in the direction of a halfway decent 26" fork with coil springs and adjustable compression that isn't a no-name special on eBay (I have nothing against Chinese products, but I want someone's reputation to be at risk if the thing breaks in half), that would be a huge help. If it happens to be painted silver to match the rear suspension on my Pro-Flex 756, that would be perfect.

    Help? And don't suggest buying a new bike; of course I can do that, but that's not the point.

    EDIT: I suppose a fork with a coil + air spring would be good, if anyone still makes those. I do appreciate the infinite adjustability of air springs, but I appreciate the predictability of coil springs more.
    The Black came with either a coil or a the MARS air system. If your fork truly was a Black Super, it would have the MARS air system, which used a small coil for initial travel and the air for the mid and end stroke. Most likely, you have a coil version of the Black with the wrong decal.

    For the fork, you could just get something like this:

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Manitou-Axe...sAAOSwMKNbHS0x
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  16. #16
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    The Manitou Axel you linked appears to have an identical lower to the Black fork that I want to replace. I'm looking for a fork that doesn't have the same problem feeling unstable in corners.

    I'll take a look at the Manitou R7. I hadn't paid much attention to Manitou lately since the one reverse-arch fork I have doesn't feel good to ride on.

    What makes the 30 Gold a "turd"? I've never owned a Rockshox fork before, only Manitou forks, so I have no experience with them other than seeing lots of them pre-installed on bikes at shops.

    I found a Marzocchi Bomber MX Pro on eBay, new-old-stock, and it's even painted silver. It would be perfect, except that the steer tube has been cut to 150mm, which makes no sense to me. 150mm is about 40mm too short to fit on ANY mountain bike.

  17. #17
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    Rockshox uses a very rudimentary damper in all their forks, except the charger-damper forks (pike, etc).

    The 30 uses an even more basic, less functional damper than their normal forks, and on top of that it uses heavy materials. It ends up being heavy, but not stiff and very poorly damped. Literally the worst of all everything, they pack into the 30 silver. The damper is essentially a plastic plate with a hole drilled in it.

  18. #18
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    So the damper consists of a plastic piston with holes drilled into it? What *should* it be? That is essentially how the dampers in my Manitou forks worked, except they had two pistons with bypass valves pointing in opposite directions, so one piston handled compression damping and the other piston handled rebound damping. But at the end of the day, they were still just plastic pistons with holes in them.

    Also, if it's as simple as you say, how does the 30 Silver have externally-adjustable compression and rebound damping? There must be adjustable valves somewhere in the assembly, even if the base damping rate is set by the size of the holes in the piston.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by deusexaethera View Post
    I found a Marzocchi Bomber MX Pro on eBay, new-old-stock, and it's even painted silver. It would be perfect, except that the steer tube has been cut to 150mm, which makes no sense to me. 150mm is about 40mm too short to fit on ANY mountain bike.
    Probably becasue it's an OEM meant to fit a small frame with a zero stack headset, mt GF's old scott scale came with a fox that had a hsteerer super short, but that frane still used spacers under the stem. For wouldn't even come close to fitting a normal sized frame.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by deusexaethera View Post
    So the damper consists of a plastic piston with holes drilled into it? What *should* it be? That is essentially how the dampers in my Manitou forks worked, except they had two pistons with bypass valves pointing in opposite directions, so one piston handled compression damping and the other piston handled rebound damping. But at the end of the day, they were still just plastic pistons with holes in them.

    Also, if it's as simple as you say, how does the 30 Silver have externally-adjustable compression and rebound damping? There must be adjustable valves somewhere in the assembly, even if the base damping rate is set by the size of the holes in the piston.
    It will work similar to the fork you currently have, but will also be heavier.

    As noted above, the R7 is an excellent fork, it works really well, only bad thing I'd say about it is I find it a bit flexy, but that's in comparison to my Marzocchi corsa...or just that i'm lardy, or that it's attached to a flexy ti frame (or both)... however it's an air fork.
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  21. #21
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    It doesn't help that my only personal experience owning an air fork involved having to disassemble it and send the air cartridges to White Brothers for service as soon as I bought the bike brand-new, because they leaked from day one. It took about six weeks for the cartridges to be rebuilt. But even after the leaks were fixed (both cartridges leaked), it still had the problem of changing spring-rate when I'd go outside in different weather conditions, which was particularly irritating because my shock pump was too large to mount on my bike. But despite all that, if anyone's figured out how to make air shocks that don't change spring-rate in different temperatures (maybe that's what the negative air chamber is for? I dunno?), then I'd be willing to consider another air fork on my next bike -- but my current bike has a coil rear shock with no option to upgrade to an air shock, and I don't want mismatched shock feel between the front and rear.

    It seems like my options are as I suspected -- buy a cheap heavy fork, or get lucky and find a pristine old high-end fork that has miraculously not been scraped and gouged over the years. At least if I go the cheap heavy fork route, I know of a couple more options than I previously did.

  22. #22
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    Dude, I think you are way over thinking this. Your pro-flex is over 20 years old. I would not worry about the fork breaking - the rest of your bike may break first!

    The big question is also how much you weight? The Black series had 30 mm stanchions and was very light - like 3.5 lbs. With a QR axle, it was meant for a time when the average rider was 165 lbs. Most of us are not like that anymore. If you want to replace it - you will need to go heavier.

    Honestly, you should ride your pro-flex as the historical piece that it is and spend you money on another bike. At this point in time, a cheap Walmart bike is better and safer than the old Pro-flex.
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  23. #23
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    To be honest I've only ever use either elastomer forks or air forks (never coil) and not had an issue with air forks, well not in their usable lifetime (so like 15 years). I check air pressure once every now and then to check nothigns wrong (like 3 months) and haven't changed pressure since initial set up and can ride in temps from over 30C (yuk) to -5 (less yuk) and don't notice a thing and that's over 3 different forks (Manitou R7, Marzocchi Corsa, Fox Float 32), I just set and forget.
    Not saying anything bad about coil forks (as I haven't used them or think there is anything bad about them), just that finding them is a harder proposition than air forks which are probably better than white brothers which seem to have a rep of either being utterly brilliant, or utterly terrible depending on who's talking.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by deusexaethera View Post
    So the damper consists of a plastic piston with holes drilled into it? What *should* it be? That is essentially how the dampers in my Manitou forks worked, except they had two pistons with bypass valves pointing in opposite directions, so one piston handled compression damping and the other piston handled rebound damping. But at the end of the day, they were still just plastic pistons with holes in them.

    Also, if it's as simple as you say, how does the 30 Silver have externally-adjustable compression and rebound damping? There must be adjustable valves somewhere in the assembly, even if the base damping rate is set by the size of the holes in the piston.
    The manitou fork uses a shimmed piston, like a motocross fork, or car shock.

    The RS damper is called a port-orifice damper. It is just a plastic plate with a hole, and it has a cover that turns and makes the hole effectively smaller or larger. Thats what the compression and rebound knobs do, but its incredibly ineffective.

    If you have an old manitou black with SPV, it is similar. The SPV days were dark days for manitou! The R7 is significantly improved and wildly better.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus View Post
    Dude, I think you are way over thinking this. Your pro-flex is over 20 years old. I would not worry about the fork breaking - the rest of your bike may break first!

    The big question is also how much you weight? The Black series had 30 mm stanchions and was very light - like 3.5 lbs. With a QR axle, it was meant for a time when the average rider was 165 lbs. Most of us are not like that anymore. If you want to replace it - you will need to go heavier.

    Honestly, you should ride your pro-flex as the historical piece that it is and spend you money on another bike. At this point in time, a cheap Walmart bike is better and safer than the old Pro-flex.
    I'm not sure I can respect the opinion of someone who thinks a Wal-Mart bike is better and safer than a hand-welded Made-In-USA XC racing bike, regardless of its age. I crashed my Pro-Flex into the side of a car back in college (the car turned left and cut me off without signalling), sending me flying over the hood of the car, and sending the bike flying over me. (we both landed really hard.) I had it professionally checked for damage afterwards, and there was none. A Wal-Mart bike would've crumpled like it was made of cardboard toilet-paper tubes. All my Pro-Flex needed was to have the wheels re-trued and the handlebar un-bent. (years later I discovered the crash had also spalled the bearing races in both wheels, and the grease had turned silver from little bits of steel worn-off as I'd continued to ride the bike.)

    But anyway, my Pro-Flex isn't a historical piece; it has components on it ranging from the original 1996 build date up to 2012, which was the last time I bought anything significant for it. I even sent the rear swingarm to a welder to have disc brake tabs welded-on. I'm that guy who would drive a vintage Corvette for the looks, but only after swapping a LS7 engine into it so it would actually run well.

    I weigh 180lbs on a bad day, 160lbs on a good day. Thanks for reminding me that the Black's stanchions are 30mm; for some reason I misremembered that they were 32mm, perhaps because the standard for cheap forks back then was 28mm and I knew that the Black's stanchions were one size wider than that. So the 30 Silver would be on-par, and the steel stanchions would probably be a bit stiffer, but I really don't like the idea of adding another pound of weight to the bike. Nonetheless, since there doesn't seem to be any other good options right now, the 30 Silver is probably what I'll go with. Kinda sucks that I'd have to take it apart to get it repainted, though.

  26. #26
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    Interesting, I didn't know White Brothers had such widely-varying reputation. I thought they were a pretty solid brand. Dunno how it's possible that your air-sprung forks could endure such huge temperature changes without changing pressure too (did you check after the ride, or before?), but I'll have to take your word for it.

    At this point, mostly I'm just irritated that bike companies seem to think people who want good performance also enjoy fiddling with things endlessly -- or perhaps more to the point, that people who don't want to fiddle with things endlessly must not care about good performance. I want to fiddle with things exactly enough to get them just the way I like them, and then I want to be able to ignore them for the next 10 years until I get bored and want to buy new stuff. Can't do that with air shocks. I'd probably run airless tires too, if that were actually a remotely-practical solution.

  27. #27
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    ^thats the thing, I NEVER fiddle with things. I set and forget, I don't notice any performance difference from cold to hot weather, my forks just work. to be honest, when I said I check them every 3 months.. I really should check them soon as it was probably Feb the last time I checked anything.
    put it this way when I bought my FS bike in 2015 I got a shock pump to set it up, the last 2 forks I forks were in 2012 and the one before that, 2004. So from 2004-2015 I did zero to those forks apart from the very first setup. I never even thought about changing stuff till I got my FS bike. I'm not even sure that they should still be working, but they are perfectly(althought the 2004 one is in dire need of a service)

    Not saying you should get an air fork, but just because you had a crap one in the past, don't count out current day ones.

    oh and not saying I rode from -5-30 rides in one day, just that without changing the pressure in the fork over a period of time I have ridden in those temps and noticed zero change in ride characteristics.
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by deusexaethera View Post
    Interesting, I didn't know White Brothers had such widely-varying reputation. I thought they were a pretty solid brand. Dunno how it's possible that your air-sprung forks could endure such huge temperature changes without changing pressure too (did you check after the ride, or before?), but I'll have to take your word for it.

    At this point, mostly I'm just irritated that bike companies seem to think people who want good performance also enjoy fiddling with things endlessly -- or perhaps more to the point, that people who don't want to fiddle with things endlessly must not care about good performance. I want to fiddle with things exactly enough to get them just the way I like them, and then I want to be able to ignore them for the next 10 years until I get bored and want to buy new stuff. Can't do that with air shocks. I'd probably run airless tires too, if that were actually a remotely-practical solution.
    Dude, you clearly have no idea what you are talking about. Nobody fiddles with their air shocks or forks continually. For the most part, they set it and ride it from Alaska to Southern California. Temps change but the impact is minimal on the ride (and yes, I have ridden my air shock when it is 10 degrees Fahrenheit and when it is 100).

    You have a 30 year old thin walled aluminum frame (made in Taiwan- I only thought the 856 and higher were made in USA - along with Girven fork) that had a bad habit of ovalizing the shock bolt. Aluminum has a shelf life. 30 years is well beyond it. And the problem with that bike is that the swing arm is the strongest part and will not break, so what will is the frame - either at the head tube or seat tube. If you want to ride around the neighborhood and look cool to all the kids, go for it. But honestly, you will get a better and safer ride on the trails from a MTB from Walmart.
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus View Post
    Aluminum has a shelf life. 30 years is well beyond it. And the problem with that bike is that the swing arm is the strongest part and will not break, so what will is the frame - either at the head tube or seat tube. If you want to ride around the neighborhood and look cool to all the kids, go for it. But honestly, you will get a better and safer ride on the trails from a MTB from Walmart.
    I dunno, there was arecall on those swing arms...don't know if this model was involved, but the swingarm looks the same, but my had a few freinds who had them (mostly Animals) who had them replaced, a couiple failed, but most were just replaced. but it was the 96 model year that seemed to be affected. Although if it hasn't broken by now it probably never will, they all failed pretty quickly.
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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by mik_git View Post
    I dunno, there was arecall on those swing arms...don't know if this model was involved, but the swingarm looks the same, but my had a few freinds who had them (mostly Animals) who had them replaced, a couiple failed, but most were just replaced. but it was the 96 model year that seemed to be affected. Although if it hasn't broken by now it probably never will, they all failed pretty quickly.
    I knew lots of people that had the seat tube break right at the bottom gusset. K2 - who really did not need to do so - would warranty the all. But you are right, the seat stays can break on most FS bikes.
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  31. #31
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    Maybe I missed where this was explained, but do you know WHY this fork feels off to you? Because if you donít what it is that makes it feel wrong to you, how do you know a new fork will feel any better?
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus View Post
    Dude, you clearly have no idea what you are talking about. Nobody fiddles with their air shocks or forks continually. For the most part, they set it and ride it from Alaska to Southern California. Temps change but the impact is minimal on the ride (and yes, I have ridden my air shock when it is 10 degrees Fahrenheit and when it is 100).

    You have a 30 year old thin walled aluminum frame (made in Taiwan- I only thought the 856 and higher were made in USA - along with Girven fork) that had a bad habit of ovalizing the shock bolt. Aluminum has a shelf life. 30 years is well beyond it. And the problem with that bike is that the swing arm is the strongest part and will not break, so what will is the frame - either at the head tube or seat tube. If you want to ride around the neighborhood and look cool to all the kids, go for it. But honestly, you will get a better and safer ride on the trails from a MTB from Walmart.
    Someone's math skills aren't up to par. 2018 - 1998 (the year I actually bought the bike) = 20, not 30. Also, aluminum's "shelf life" is not based on age, it's based on repetitive stress. I don't huck my bikes off jumps, so the frame is nowhere near its limit for safe usage. And it was not made in Taiwan.

    I'm glad air forks have worked well for you. The couple that I've tried were unreliable and changed spring-rate noticeably in different weather conditions. (not to mention, the good ones cost $600 or more -- double the cost of good coil-sprung forks 10 years ago.) My loss, I guess.

    I don't like your tone, and I will not reply to you further.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by mik_git View Post
    ^thats the thing, I NEVER fiddle with things. I set and forget, I don't notice any performance difference from cold to hot weather, my forks just work. to be honest, when I said I check them every 3 months.. I really should check them soon as it was probably Feb the last time I checked anything.
    put it this way when I bought my FS bike in 2015 I got a shock pump to set it up, the last 2 forks I forks were in 2012 and the one before that, 2004. So from 2004-2015 I did zero to those forks apart from the very first setup. I never even thought about changing stuff till I got my FS bike. I'm not even sure that they should still be working, but they are perfectly(althought the 2004 one is in dire need of a service)

    Not saying you should get an air fork, but just because you had a crap one in the past, don't count out current day ones.

    oh and not saying I rode from -5-30 rides in one day, just that without changing the pressure in the fork over a period of time I have ridden in those temps and noticed zero change in ride characteristics.
    Noted. It's good to know they've improved the seals since 2011.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    Maybe I missed where this was explained, but do you know WHY this fork feels off to you? Because if you donít what it is that makes it feel wrong to you, how do you know a new fork will feel any better?
    I can describe what it does that I dislike, but no, I can't explain the physics of why the current fork misbehaves. All I can say is it doesn't seem to hold the wheel at precisely the steering angle I intend when I turn the handlebars, which causes the front wheel to feel like it's going to slide-out, or dig-in and turn too sharply, alternating rapidly between the two. It's done this with multiple tire tread patterns, whereas the previous fork I had never did it. Other people online reported that the Manitou Black had an annoying tendency to pull to one side when braking, which leads me to conclude the lowers are simply too flexible.

  35. #35
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    are we talking disc or v-brake, if disc there's every likelyhood it's overloading the stiffness of the fork and it can't cope.

    or maybe soemthings gone bung inside and each leg isn't wroking together so you get twisting

    or.. it's jsut not stiff enough.

    As i said above, I like my R7, but due to my weight or the frame its mounted on, or jsut the fork, I do find it flexy and the front wheel can track all its own sometimes, unoike my marzocchi which is solid as a rock through the same terrain.

    I would say jsut buy a newish air fork and see how you like it... but well...it's an expensive way to try stuff.
    All the gear and no idea.

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    I converted the bike to full-disc in 2009, but it's had a front disc since 2001. The previous fork didn't have the same problem, either when braking or when cornering.

    Here's a picture of the bike, if anyone's curious. Look at how old and rickety it is! I'm definitely insane for riding it instead of hanging it on the wall as a conversation piece.

    I need a coil-sprung fork for a Pro-Flex with 26" wheels.-sffxduk.jpg

    I admit after all the encouragement I am tempted to buy an air fork and see how I like it. I suppose as long as I don't cut the steertube (and don't crash and impale myself on it), I could resell the fork pretty easily if I don't like it. Or I could just stick with what I know I like, and just work on fixing the one problem (flexy fork) without potentially introducing a new problem (mushy air spring) in the process.

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    I need a coil-sprung fork for a Pro-Flex with 26" wheels.

    How much travel are you looking for? Did you change the fork height much going from the old fork to the Black? Being from 1996 I canít see this frame being originally specíed with anything more than 80mm, if it even had that much. Any chance that having a taller fork is part of the issue?

    Regarding temperature, and air shocks: I have run several different air forks, and coil forks, as well as air and coil shocks over the past 20 years. I have never had an issue with fork or shock air pressure changing with temperature enough to notice. If you do the math, it would have to be a really big temperature difference. The difference in air pressure from 65F to 90F is just a hair over 4%.

    But hey, I canít blame a guy for wanting coil, it has generally been my first choice as well. After trying a few different forks jn the early 2000ís I settled on a Pike Uturn coil in 2005 and rode it for 13 years (got a PUSH tune along the way). Kept it through 6 different FS frames. But I am on an air fork now (2013 Lyrik). I bought it used and rebuilt it thinking I would keep an eye out for an old trashed U-Turn coil version and swap the springs, but honestly I love the action of the fork. Air (and forks in general) has come a looong way. My 2007 Reba (on a different bike) has never once leaked air. Nor have any of my rear air shocks since the mid 2000ís.

    You need this fork to be QR?
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  38. #38
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    Did these come origianlly with that gawd awful parrallelogram fork? As that was 100mm iirc (I remember my buddie used to hassle me over having so much more travel front and rear than my manitou frame...but i'd take my manitou over his animal any day... well apart from the cracking and the not being ridable after 15 minutes)

    edit* only 2.5 inch of travel

    Too bad the manitou doesn't have brake bosses, you could chuck on a $2 brake booster to stiffen things up and see if that helps, but oh well.
    All the gear and no idea.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mik_git View Post
    Did these come origianlly with that gawd awful parrallelogram fork? As that was 100mm iirc (I remember my buddie used to hassle me over having so much more travel front and rear than my manitou frame...but i'd take my manitou over his animal any day... well apart from the cracking and the not being ridable after 15 minutes)

    edit* only 2.5 inch of travel

    Too bad the manitou doesn't have brake bosses, you could chuck on a $2 brake booster to stiffen things up and see if that helps, but oh well.
    Yes, it came with a Girvin parallelogram fork. I never liked it and replaced it with a Manitou SX-R as soon as I could afford it. (hooray for college internships! back when they actually paid money, anyway.) I should've kept that fork, because it worked just the way I wanted, but I got suckered into upgrading for the sake of upgrading.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    How much travel are you looking for? Did you change the fork height much going from the old fork to the Black? Being from 1996 I canít see this frame being originally specíed with anything more than 80mm, if it even had that much. Any chance that having a taller fork is part of the issue?

    Regarding temperature, and air shocks: I have run several different air forks, and coil forks, as well as air and coil shocks over the past 20 years. I have never had an issue with fork or shock air pressure changing with temperature enough to notice. If you do the math, it would have to be a really big temperature difference. The difference in air pressure from 65F to 90F is just a hair over 4%.

    But hey, I canít blame a guy for wanting coil, it has generally been my first choice as well. After trying a few different forks jn the early 2000ís I settled on a Pike Uturn coil in 2005 and rode it for 13 years (got a PUSH tune along the way). Kept it through 6 different FS frames. But I am on an air fork now (2013 Lyrik). I bought it used and rebuilt it thinking I would keep an eye out for an old trashed U-Turn coil version and swap the springs, but honestly I love the action of the fork. Air (and forks in general) has come a looong way. My 2007 Reba (on a different bike) has never once leaked air. Nor have any of my rear air shocks since the mid 2000ís.

    You need this fork to be QR?
    The original front travel was about 63mm of super-awesome elastomer action. (I'm kidding; it was effing horrible, though still better than a rigid fork.) The Manitou SX-R I upgraded to increased the travel to 80mm, and the Manitou Black increased the travel to 90mm. (it's a 90-120mm adjustable-travel fork, but I always used it on the shortest setting.) Currently I'm looking at 100mm forks, because OMG this frame desperately needs a slacker headtube angle, and every previous suspension-length increase has made a noticeable difference in calming the steering. It's SO twitchy, because it was built for technical climbs where twitchy steering is a huge advantage. I'm pretty sure there are cyclocross bikes nowadays with slacker steering than my Pro-Flex has.

    Maybe the air forks I tried had really small air chambers, or something. I seem to recall reading, back when air forks were becoming popular, that tiny air chambers amplified the effect of temperature changes, though I no longer remember the reason. Maybe it's because undersized air chambers would heatsoak faster as the suspension did its job? I dunno.

    It could also be that the air where I live is generally very humid in warm weather (it was 94% humidity last night), and water vapor changes volume with temperature much more dramatically than air does. Maybe I should drain and refill the air fork on my second bike in the middle of the winter, when the relative humidity indoors is around 5%? I suppose it couldn't hurt.

    Yeah, it needs to be QR. I don't have any thru-axle wheels yet, and I probably won't in the foreseeable future.

    - - -

    This bike has come so far. It originally had elastomer shocks with friction damping, cantilever brakes, pinned-together rims, green Michelin tires, and a riding position that made me question my sexuality every time I saddled-up. Now it has oil-damped coil shocks, disc brakes, welded rims, a more comfortable riding position, and still Michelin tires but at least they're a respectable color. It makes me sad to think that in a couple more years it will be so obsolete I won't be able to find any new parts to fit it, except for cheap heavy junk parts. A good bike shouldn't have to get heavier and slower just because companies get bored with making good parts for older bikes.

  41. #41
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    Any chance your front hub is convertible to 20mm or 15mm TA?

    If you can convert to 20mm, i would look for a older RS Pike UTurn Coil. As long as the bushings in the lowers are OK, then the rest is ridiculously easy to rebuild to a like-new function (one of the things I really like about a lot of RS stuff). And with the uturn you can dial it down to as little as 95mm.

    Or if you canít covert the hub, if you get a hold of a first generation RS Revelation (they were QR), I am pretty sure you can swap the air spring for a U-turn coil from a Pike.

    Seems like a bit of work and rebuilding, but I am stumped to think of any high end, 26Ē, non-tapered, coil forks with 100mm travel or less that have been made on the recent past. I suggested the ones I did because I know from experience just how easy they are to do a full rebuild on. And the Motion Control they use is a pretty decent system.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  42. #42
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    i have a used X-fusion Velvet i'll let go of for the cost of shipping. 100mm travel, qr drops. the lowers are gouged up, but the stanchions are fine


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    Quote Originally Posted by .WestCoastHucker. View Post
    i have a used X-fusion Velvet i'll let go of for the cost of shipping. 100mm travel, qr drops. the lowers are gouged up, but the stanchions are fine
    I've never heard of that brand before. Looking at their website, it looks like the steertube is tapered, which won't work for my bike.

  44. #44
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    i've been at this game for a long tome. i wouldn't have offered you a tapered steerer fork...


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    Just sayin', I couldn't find straight-steertube forks on their website, so I suppose that means they're not supporting them anymore.

  46. #46
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    ^nobody really supports straight steerers anymore, a few will make them, but they are the low end, I think fox is the last that will sell you a "decent" level fork with a straight steerer.
    All the gear and no idea.

  47. #47
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    Since you're dics braked, then that opens up a lot of options for 2nd hand or NOS stuff from a few years ago... try rim brake forks, it's much more sucktastic.
    All the gear and no idea.

  48. #48
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    there is a huge difference between still making a product and still supporting it, considering the steerer size is the only change. good luck in your search though...


  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by deusexaethera View Post
    Just sayin', I couldn't find straight-steertube forks on their website, so I suppose that means they're not supporting them anymore.
    If the guy is offering you a free fork that meets all of your requirements, who cares of they still make it with a straight tube.

    They make your frame anymore, either.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  50. #50
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    All (or nearly all) of MRP forks have an option for straight steerer tubes. Get an MRP Loop SL and be set!
    Manitou makes a CSU that is straight steerer tube for the Mastodon, sure you have to buy it separately, but it exists.
    I'd take a fork for the cost of shipping in a second! Gotta look at what you (could) have... otherwise you'll miss out on some great things.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    If the guy is offering you a free fork that meets all of your requirements, who cares of they still make it with a straight tube.

    They make your frame anymore, either.
    My frame doesn't have as many moving parts to wear-out -- just the main swingarm pivot and the two tiny pivots at the end of the rear shock strut. Fork are far more complex internally than that.

    If the fork were new-old-stock, I would agree that OEM support isn't important, but since it's well-used, I could end up needing to repair it shortly after buying it. If parts aren't available at a reasonable price (as opposed to eBay "rare! vintage!" prices), then I'd basically be screwed and have to buy a new fork anyway.

    The Second Law of Thermodynamics: "There is no winning."

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    I'm just going to get a Rockshox 30 Silver for now. It meets my basic functional requirements, and it's the least-expensive way to empirically test that the handling problem with my bike is the result of a badly-designed fork rather than a frame that's past its expiration date. I'm confident the fork is the problem, but nothing beats real-world testing. The 30 Silver isn't even heavier than the Manitou SX-R I used to have, and I was fine with the weight of the bike back then, so...it's good enough for now.

    Besides, I have a baby coming in two months and I don't have $700 to throw at a new fork for my bike anyway. That's 2-3x more expensive than a good fork cost back in Y2k, in case y'all have forgotten. (I can't believe Fox is selling forks for over a thousand dollars now! What on earth are they thinking?)

    From the perspective of my engineering expertise, that's the thing that really pisses me off about air-sprung forks: They replaced coil springs with air springs to save a couple hundred grams, and to get them to perform as consistently as coil springs, they had to make the design of the air springs so enormously complex that the final product costs 100-200% more for a weight savings of maybe 15% max. Hopefully those percentages make it obvious how far beyond the point of diminishing returns modern fork designs are. Yes, they work better now, but the vast majority of the improvements are not related to the air springs -- they're the result of using better alloys, better lubricants, better surface coatings, and better seal designs that have been commonplace in other industries for so long that they are quite inexpensive in large quantities. Not to mention most of the improvements in stiffness are merely the result of using wider-diameter tubes, which the fork companies could've implemented at any time for minimal cost, rather than the slow incremental improvements every few years, which were done for no reason other than planned obsolescence. You can't sell the public a new product every few years if you make the first version of the product as good as possible, after all.

    I understand air springs are lighter and infinitely adjustable. That's great. The infinite adjustability does make it easier to dial-in the suspension feel to suit your exact weight and riding style at any given time, though I question the actual benefit to anyone who doesn't race bikes for a living. But the lower weight is completely counteracted by the huge increase in cost, so riders with budgets (which is basically everyone) end up having to buy cheaper heavier parts for the rest of their bike -- or they end up taking more time to save up for a new bike, forcing them to ride their older heavier bike for longer anyway. The total number of calories "wasted" hauling around "extra" weight is probably pretty close to the same in any scenario. You can drop several hundred grams by cleaning out extra tools that you never use from your ride kit, or by just going to the bathroom before a ride -- and both of those solutions are free.

    The heaviest component of any bicycle is the rider. Never forget that.

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    Well, I'd certainly take a fork for the cost of shipping. They are pretty simple, but I guess not for you.
    Deflated - buy parts to sell parts to buy more parts.. bikes are my drug of choice

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  54. #54
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    I need a coil-sprung fork for a Pro-Flex with 26" wheels.

    Quote Originally Posted by deusexaethera View Post
    I'm just going to get a Rockshox 30 Silver for now. It meets my basic functional requirements, and it's the least-expensive way to empirically test that the handling problem with my bike is the result of a badly-designed fork rather than a frame that's past its expiration date. I'm confident the fork is the problem, but nothing beats real-world testing. The 30 Silver isn't even heavier than the Manitou SX-R I used to have, and I was fine with the weight of the bike back then, so...it's good enough for now.

    Besides, I have a baby coming in two months and I don't have $700 to throw at a new fork for my bike anyway. That's 2-3x more expensive than a good fork cost back in Y2k, in case y'all have forgotten. (I can't believe Fox is selling forks for over a thousand dollars now! What on earth are they thinking?)

    From the perspective of my engineering expertise, that's the thing that really pisses me off about air-sprung forks: They replaced coil springs with air springs to save a couple hundred grams, and to get them to perform as consistently as coil springs, they had to make the design of the air springs so enormously complex that the final product costs 100-200% more for a weight savings of maybe 15% max. Hopefully those percentages make it obvious how far beyond the point of diminishing returns modern fork designs are. Yes, they work better now, but the vast majority of the improvements are not related to the air springs -- they're the result of using better alloys, better lubricants, better surface coatings, and better seal designs that have been commonplace in other industries for so long that they are quite inexpensive in large quantities. Not to mention most of the improvements in stiffness are merely the result of using wider-diameter tubes, which the fork companies could've implemented at any time for minimal cost, rather than the slow incremental improvements every few years, which were done for no reason other than planned obsolescence. You can't sell the public a new product every few years if you make the first version of the product as good as possible, after all.

    I understand air springs are lighter and infinitely adjustable. That's great. The infinite adjustability does make it easier to dial-in the suspension feel to suit your exact weight and riding style at any given time, though I question the actual benefit to anyone who doesn't race bikes for a living. But the lower weight is completely counteracted by the huge increase in cost, so riders with budgets (which is basically everyone) end up having to buy cheaper heavier parts for the rest of their bike -- or they end up taking more time to save up for a new bike, forcing them to ride their older heavier bike for longer anyway. The total number of calories "wasted" hauling around "extra" weight is probably pretty close to the same in any scenario. You can drop several hundred grams by cleaning out extra tools that you never use from your ride kit, or by just going to the bathroom before a ride -- and both of those solutions are free.

    The heaviest component of any bicycle is the rider. Never forget that.
    Air springs are not all that complicated or expensive.

    If you compare models that came in both air and coil over the past 10-15 years, the air was not much more. When I was looking at a Lyrik about 6 years ago, the Coil and Solo Air prices were in spitting distance of each other. One or two coil spring swaps and the the price was a wash. Price difference can be more if it was one with travel adjust, like Foxís TALAS, or Rock Shox Dial Position Air, but even in that case the premium was maybe 25% tops (if ever that much).

    The increase in cost of the highest end forks compared to 2000 are the improved dampers, the improved chassis, and most significantly, inflation.

    And looking at the cutting edge forks does not give you a good idea what things generally cost. There are plenty of perfectly reliable air forks out there for under $400 that will outperform any (non-DH) coil fork from the year 2000.
    Last edited by kapusta; 09-02-2018 at 11:10 AM.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

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    What do you have for the shock on that Proflex?

    I had an 857... it really soured me on the strut rear suspension design. Went through a couple of NR2 shocks on it. Flexy and none too plush.

    I now have an old Diamondback bike -- just 3 years younger than the Proflex -- with an X-Fusion O2 on the back and I love it... Wish I had an X-Fusion Velvet on the front, LOL...

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    As others have said - don't be afraid of an air fork... I ride technical east coast trails with air forks and can't really complain. I weigh more than you so sometimes setting the fork up is a challenge, but in your weigh bracket - air spring won't feel mushy - if anything it may feel stiff compared to coil. These days straight steerer 26 inch wheel forks are hard to find, but I would suggest finding a used Manitou Minute 2:00 with 100mm travel, or even Minute Super with 120mm... Even old Manitou X-vert with 100mm was an awesome air fork. I found Skareb too flexy, but the R7 wasn't bad at all though the bottom seals started leaking after a while, but that can be easily fixed. I think any older Fox forks may be a good option, as there is more supprt for them in terms of servicing.

    BTW I agree on how companies decided to abandon support of 26ers, it wouldn't be so bad if they kept making XT level replacement goodies. I have 5 "obsolete" bikes that I'll ride until either I can't ride anymore or I run out of parts to swap, or the frames break.

    Quick question - is it possible that the problem is with the front wheel and not the fork? If the wheel is poorly built, or not properly tensioned, it could be responsible for poor tracking.
    Last edited by Emax; 09-05-2018 at 06:05 AM.

  57. #57
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    'Happy to read this thread and see I'm not the only lunatic who thinks an old gently-used high-end bike still has some value (aluminum has a shelf-life? Really?)
    I'd love to ask some of the naysayers if they'd pass on adding upgrade parts to a '64 Mustang that was driven only on fair-weather Sundays...

    Anyway, I'm in the same boat with the front fork gig on my '97 Proflex Beast (though my issue is a seized spring adjust collar on the Oil Damped System shock up front). I sent an email off to Mark the Marzocchi guy to see if there's anything he can offer.

    Cheers to the vintage ride!

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by robbnj View Post
    'Happy to read this thread and see I'm not the only lunatic who thinks an old gently-used high-end bike still has some value (aluminum has a shelf-life? Really?)
    I'd love to ask some of the naysayers if they'd pass on adding upgrade parts to a '64 Mustang that was driven only on fair-weather Sundays...

    Anyway, I'm in the same boat with the front fork gig on my '97 Proflex Beast (though my issue is a seized spring adjust collar on the Oil Damped System shock up front). I sent an email off to Mark the Marzocchi guy to see if there's anything he can offer.

    Cheers to the vintage ride!
    Yes, aluminum has a shelf and usage life. Ask any maker of aluminum bikes.

    Your 64 mustang is not made of aluminum.
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    Aluminum doesn't have a shelf life... will be good indefinitely if not being corroded or stressed.

    The NEWEST B-52 in the Air Force is over 50 years old...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus View Post
    Yes, aluminum has a shelf and usage life. Ask any maker of aluminum bikes.

    Your 64 mustang is not made of aluminum.
    Iím afraid I donít know any bike mfgrs.
    Can you share the tech specs on the shelf life of aluminum?
    Maybe put it in bike terms (ie ďNOS aluminum frame that is 20 y.o. has reached point of failure)?

    I did find this tidbit at unitedaluminum.com (no affiliation): ďDoes aluminum have a shelf life? Does it age harden while in storage?
    Aluminum does not have a specified ďshelf lifeĒ and will not age harden. Age hardening requires special heat treatment and applies only to a few alloys.Ē
    Last edited by robbnj; 09-13-2018 at 10:29 AM. Reason: Clarity

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by phantoj View Post
    Aluminum doesn't have a shelf life... will be good indefinitely if not being corroded or stressed.

    The NEWEST B-52 in the Air Force is over 50 years old...

    Correct. My wording was poor. Fatigue or stress life would be better. If your bike was never ridden it won't go bad sitting on the shelf. And depending upon the aluminum used the stress life could vary.

    I would assume that Boeing when it made the B-52's determined the number of flight hours before failure. That would be standard practice in any engineering study. In addition, it is not like all B-52's made in the 50-60's have be flown with no issues and no major structural repairs.
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    2 years ago I put a Manitou Match Comp on my 2003 Giant Warp DS. I believe this is a coil front shock. It is not high level but way beyond the 2004 Marzocchi Bomber it replace. Had a straight steerer and cost around $220. I've been very happy with it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus View Post
    Dude, you clearly have no idea what you are talking about. Nobody fiddles with their air shocks or forks continually. For the most part, they set it and ride it from Alaska to Southern California. Temps change but the impact is minimal on the ride (and yes, I have ridden my air shock when it is 10 degrees Fahrenheit and when it is 100).

    You have a 30 year old thin walled aluminum frame (made in Taiwan- I only thought the 856 and higher were made in USA - along with Girven fork) that had a bad habit of ovalizing the shock bolt. Aluminum has a shelf life. 30 years is well beyond it. And the problem with that bike is that the swing arm is the strongest part and will not break, so what will is the frame - either at the head tube or seat tube. If you want to ride around the neighborhood and look cool to all the kids, go for it. But honestly, you will get a better and safer ride on the trails from a MTB from Walmart.
    Shelf life, wtf? Weíre not talking about bread, itís aluminum and it doesnít just go bad from sitting around. Unless the bike has been thrashed itíll be fine and totally fun, safe and cool to ride.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus View Post
    Yes, aluminum has a shelf and usage life. Ask any maker of aluminum bikes.


    Your 64 mustang is not made of aluminum.

    Wow! This is the most uninformed post Iíve read yet today. Looks like you better run down to the local harbor or marina and tell everyone with an aluminum boat to get out of it immediately as it could catastrophically fail if itís not brand new. Youíll be a hero and save thousands of lives. After that run around your neighborhood and tell everyone to throw away their aluminum ladders cause they might die! After that, run down to the parking lot of some big store and leave notes on the windshields of everyone with a 1/2 ton full-size pickup thatís a few years old and tell them to stop driving. You alone are the only one who can save them from their aluminum upper control arms in their front suspension. After that go to the nearest motocross track and flag down every rider and tell them to stop riding their aluminum frame dirt bike because they will die. Then you can finally rest and have a cold beer, in a bottle of course, because an aluminum can could explode and kill you in a slip and fall accident.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by deusexaethera View Post
    I'm just going to get a Rockshox 30 Silver for now. It meets my basic functional requirements, and it's the least-expensive way to empirically test that the handling problem with my bike is the result of a badly-designed fork rather than a frame that's past its expiration date. I'm confident the fork is the problem, but nothing beats real-world testing. The 30 Silver isn't even heavier than the Manitou SX-R I used to have, and I was fine with the weight of the bike back then, so...it's good enough for now.

    Besides, I have a baby coming in two months and I don't have $700 to throw at a new fork for my bike anyway. That's 2-3x more expensive than a good fork cost back in Y2k, in case y'all have forgotten. (I can't believe Fox is selling forks for over a thousand dollars now! What on earth are they thinking?)

    From the perspective of my engineering expertise, that's the thing that really pisses me off about air-sprung forks: They replaced coil springs with air springs to save a couple hundred grams, and to get them to perform as consistently as coil springs, they had to make the design of the air springs so enormously complex that the final product costs 100-200% more for a weight savings of maybe 15% max. Hopefully those percentages make it obvious how far beyond the point of diminishing returns modern fork designs are. Yes, they work better now, but the vast majority of the improvements are not related to the air springs -- they're the result of using better alloys, better lubricants, better surface coatings, and better seal designs that have been commonplace in other industries for so long that they are quite inexpensive in large quantities. Not to mention most of the improvements in stiffness are merely the result of using wider-diameter tubes, which the fork companies could've implemented at any time for minimal cost, rather than the slow incremental improvements every few years, which were done for no reason other than planned obsolescence. You can't sell the public a new product every few years if you make the first version of the product as good as possible, after all.

    I understand air springs are lighter and infinitely adjustable. That's great. The infinite adjustability does make it easier to dial-in the suspension feel to suit your exact weight and riding style at any given time, though I question the actual benefit to anyone who doesn't race bikes for a living. But the lower weight is completely counteracted by the huge increase in cost, so riders with budgets (which is basically everyone) end up having to buy cheaper heavier parts for the rest of their bike -- or they end up taking more time to save up for a new bike, forcing them to ride their older heavier bike for longer anyway. The total number of calories "wasted" hauling around "extra" weight is probably pretty close to the same in any scenario. You can drop several hundred grams by cleaning out extra tools that you never use from your ride kit, or by just going to the bathroom before a ride -- and both of those solutions are free.

    The heaviest component of any bicycle is the rider. Never forget that.
    Air springs do suck and are problematic. Thatís why MX bikes are going away from them (again). Funny how things are cyclical and one would have thought they learned back in the 70ís that air forks sucked. The bike industry is no different from chasing idiotic trends.

  65. #65
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    This is cross-posted on other forums. I'm sure there are resources here that are not on other forums, and vice-versa.

    As I continue to slowly work towards replacing the Girvin on my Proflex Beast with a more current fork (an experiment which will probably kill me on the trail ), I'm finding something really odd about this bike.

    I've measured the actual steerer tube on the bike with a caliper and it measures at exactly 1" in diameter, not 1 1/8". Yet, I've seen more than one reference on the 'net that says the bike it set up for a 1 1/8 assembly.
    Are the numbers use for reference similar to lumber and plumbing in that nothing is actually the "printed" measurement, or is 1 1/8" what is used for threaded steerers and 1" for the threadless (which my Girvin fork has)?

    An example of one piece of data I found:
    Handlebar Stem: Girvin Reversible forged
    Headset: 1 1/8inch threadless Dia-Compe Kontak Aheadset AL-2

    And here's an excerpt from the 1998 Crosslink assembly manual: "The crown race should have an inside diameter of 30.0mm (1 1/8ď Standard)".
    http://idriders.com/proflex/resource...ink_manual.pdf

    Color me confused!
    I didn't even think about it until now, but I wonder if the headset has part numbers on it...

  66. #66
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    Personally, I've always preferred the feel and durability of a good coil shock over an air shock given the choice, but air shocks have come a LONG way over time and I run them front and rear on all my bikes besides DH rigs and though they don't typically feel quite as good to me, they are a helluva lot closer than they used to be.
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