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  1. #1
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    Help - should I replace my front fork?

    I have a 2003 trekfuel 100. The front forks are not holding air, bike shop thinks they are shot.

    Is it worth tryingto find a replacement?
    Where can I look?
    Do I need an exactreplacement can I use something similar. If so any suggestions?
    Iím able to dosimple repair work on my bikes. I have a stand. Can I do this myself? Any tipsor places to look for help?


    In the long run Iplan to buy a new 27 or 29er hardtail but would like to keep this as a back up

  2. #2
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    Whether to replace it would depend on what shape the rest of the bike is in. If everything else is in good working order, then it may be worthwhile to replace it. Based on the specs, looks like it was a top-end bike back in 2003: 2003 Fuel 100 - Bike Archive - Trek Bicycle.

    Yes, replacing a fork is a reasonably easy thing to do yourself. Lots of videos on youtube as to how to do it. You likely won't find one that is color matched. I would look for a 100mm travel fork which should be easier to find than the original 63/80mm and won't affect the geometry too much. You need one with a 1 1/8" straight steerer and 9mm Quick Release (QR). They are getting harder to find new, so buying used is an option too. Look on Pinkbike's buy and sell and eBay for options. Make sure to measure the length of the steerer on the old fork and when you buy one, make sure it's the same length or longer.

    Something like this will work, but it's not as good a shock as your original one: https://www.ebay.com/itm/372196737106. How much money are you willing to spend on it?

  3. #3
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    That's a great bike and worthy of keeping up imo. Swapping forks is really easy. If it we're me I'd put a new fork on and swap over to a 15x100 from t hub/axle at the same time. It'll noticeably stiffen up the front compared to the old qr and will make finding a fork easier.

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  4. #4
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    +1^^

    Definitely worth replacing forks of the rest of the bike is in good shape. High end bike in its day and 26" parts are cheap now even for the good stuff. I wouldnt hesitate to replace the forks to be able to keep that bike going.

    If you can afford it, I agree with the change to 15mm thru axle. It is a performance improvement. But going the latest model higher end forks you can find will be a huge upgrade as well.

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  5. #5
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    Before you go down the new fork road, I'd either check out the fork yourself or get another opinion. A lot of local bike shops don't service forks and some of these guys wouldn't know the insides of a fork from a hole in the ground. It's possible the fork is toast but it might be fixable.

    Whatever the travel length is you can add about 20mm to that without terrible things happening. Maybe a bit more with a change of stem.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikePilot1 View Post
    That's a great bike and worthy of keeping up imo. Swapping forks is really easy. If it we're me I'd put a new fork on and swap over to a 15x100 from t hub/axle at the same time. It'll noticeably stiffen up the front compared to the old qr and will make finding a fork easier.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
    Thanks for the input. The rest of the bike is in good shape from what I can tell. I did some work from a former racer and he put some addons like Chris King hubs.

    What should I look to spend on a new / used form. Where do I look? Pink Bike and eBay. Anywhere else?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparkman999 View Post
    Whether to replace it would depend on what shape the rest of the bike is in. If everything else is in good working order, then it may be worthwhile to replace it. Based on the specs, looks like it was a top-end bike back in 2003: 2003 Fuel 100 - Bike Archive - Trek Bicycle.

    Yes, replacing a fork is a reasonably easy thing to do yourself. Lots of videos on youtube as to how to do it. You likely won't find one that is color matched. I would look for a 100mm travel fork which should be easier to find than the original 63/80mm and won't affect the geometry too much. You need one with a 1 1/8" straight steerer and 9mm Quick Release (QR). They are getting harder to find new, so buying used is an option too. Look on Pinkbike's buy and sell and eBay for options. Make sure to measure the length of the steerer on the old fork and when you buy one, make sure it's the same length or longer.

    Something like this will work, but it's not as good a shock as your original one: https://www.ebay.com/itm/372196737106. How much money are you willing to spend on it?
    I feel a few hundred is worth it. A new bike is going to cost a few grand right?

  8. #8
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    I'd do new, forks really should be serviced regularly and do wear. Spend can vary widely. Figure $200 min and probably $500 max as. The range. Check with King and see if your hub can be converted to 15x100. If not and you want to go that route $100 should get you a nice used wheel in that size. I'd do fork first in case you end up finding a boost or 20x100 fork you like better.


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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by squaly23 View Post
    I feel a few hundred is worth it. A new bike is going to cost a few grand right?
    A new Full Suspension bike with similar components will cost over $5k, but you can get one with lower quality components for a few k. Note that the quality of bikes and components has increased significantly over the last 15 years, but I still think your current bike worth fixing up and keeping as a spare.

  10. #10
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    Parts for that SID are still easy to find: https://www.niagaracycle.com/categor...rvice-kit-28mm

    Find someone who can reseal the fork or DIY (youtube and the Suspension forum can help you). That bike is a super light XC race machine, I wouldn't try to make it something it's not.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparkman999 View Post
    A new Full Suspension bike with similar components will cost over $5k, but you can get one with lower quality components for a few k. Note that the quality of bikes and components has increased significantly over the last 15 years, but I still think your current bike worth fixing up and keeping as a spare.
    The part 'quality of bikes and components has increased significantly over the last 15 years' is the most important part of this statement. It's all fine and dandy to say that a new bike of equal spec would cost over $5k. YEA..RIGHT.

    This is a bike that is over 15 years old. Sure it is made of carbon, but even that has a finite service life, and carbon back then was not as common as carbon is today so it might have cracks and faults that you won't see at first glance. I would take a serious look at the frame to make sure it's going to be worth it.

    Then you can look at the components. An XTR from 15+ years ago, is not the same as XTR or XT now. So don't compare it to current builds. Also again it will have a finite service life and if original parts they too might be near to end of life.

    You really need to remember that if you have been riding this bike for a while then you would have come accustomed to the faults and automatically compensate for them. Doesn't mean they are not there. I am not the one spending your money and have no idea how your current bike rides. But it might be worth it to yourself to take out a newer bike for a test ride to see how it compares to what you have not and give yourself a baseline to rate what you have now against.

  12. #12
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    FWIW I had a similar dilemma with my ancient Caloi. It's not worth spending huge $$$ on but still a fun ride none the less.
    I found a gem on eBay - a Marzocchi Bomber - lightly used, 100mm with fully adjustable, rebound also.
    Think I paid under $140 which I'm more than happy with due to the excellent condition and performance of the fork.
    It breathed new life into the old and I've been tearing it up on the bike again for another year now.

  13. #13
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    Thanks everyone for the ideas, perspectives, and advice. I bought a new Rockshox on Amazon. http://https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/...d_i=B06XWQW7Y5

    I found a Manitou Markhor Fork 26" 100mm Travel, 9mm Axle (also on amazon). I went with the Rockshox for 2 day shipping.

    I also recommend buying the Nashar steer tube cuting guide for $15, totally worth it. I watched a handful of YouTubeís on fork replacement. Look up star screw replacement videos as well, that was the hardest part.

    Thanks again for the advice, this is a solid community, canít wait to ride!!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Help - should I replace my front fork?-5db20d6c-bd21-48b3-b99b-ed94ff4e8105.jpg  


  14. #14
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    Glad you got it sorted, enjoy the forum :0)

  15. #15
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    I am in a similar position (see http://forums.mtbr.com/shocks-suspen...w-1069982.html).

    What Rock Shox did you get? The Amazon link seems dead.
    Hi!
    Location: Richmond, VA
    Style: Mid-Atlantic roots, rocks, & poison ivy

  16. #16
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    The Amazon description is: RockShox Recon Silver TK Fork: 26", 100mm, Solo Air 9mm QR Crown Adjustment, 1-1/8" Alum Steerer Rim Brake and Disc Brake

  17. #17
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    I rebuilt a 2002 Rockshox Duke XC pretty easily for under $25. It's been working well for the past few months. First time doing a rebuild, followed instructions in a service manual PDF and bought O-rings from McMaster.

    The SID would be tempting to tinker with for my '03 Trek 8000 if it has a 215mm+ steerer tube. PM me if you'd consider sending it my way.

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