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  1. #1
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    Help with 90's Stumpjumper

    Hey all, new to the forum, new to mountain biking generally, and new to working on bikes (besides easy stuff).

    I picked up this old Stumpjumper (early 90's I believe) for a $75 on craigslist. I was hoping it would be in better shape than it is, but overall it's pretty clean considering the age. My plan is to fix it up and use it as a commuter around Flagstaff and for light trail riding.

    Clearly, the fork is toast and needs to be replaced. I wouldn't mind getting a different stem setup as well. Can anyone help me identify what kind of fork would be appropriate? I'm not sure what size it is, etc. I think it's 1 1/8th threaded? Also, I'm not looking to spend a ton of money, so something economical and practical is what I'm aiming for.

    Thanks!Help with 90's Stumpjumper-img_1106.jpgHelp with 90's Stumpjumper-img_1114.jpg

  2. #2
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    It is indeed a threaded fork, but not sure if it is 1" or 1 1/18th; If you are also getting a new stem you can go threadless with a new headset. Are you wanting a suspension fork, or will a rigid work ok for you? That looks like a 1994?

    Nice score! I just did the same thing with a 90's Specialized, but I converted to a SS as well at the same time.
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  3. #3
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    I'm wanting to keep a suspension fork on there so I can get on some mellow trails (and handle the crappy streets of Arizona). Looking online, there aren't a ton of forks for under $100... I'm starting to think I could just buy another older bike for less to use for parts on this bike. But I have enough random bike parts laying around. So I'm wondering if there's a lower-end suspension fork that someone might suggest...

  4. #4
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    You may also want to post this in the Specialized as well as the Vintage/Retro/Classic forum, you'll probably get a better and more educated response there.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickbeauregard View Post
    I'm wanting to keep a suspension fork on there so I can get on some mellow trails (and handle the crappy streets of Arizona). Looking online, there aren't a ton of forks for under $100... I'm starting to think I could just buy another older bike for less to use for parts on this bike. But I have enough random bike parts laying around. So I'm wondering if there's a lower-end suspension fork that someone might suggest...
    You've got a few things working against you if you want to keep a suspension fork; needs to have v-brake bosses, threaded steerer, and if it is a 1". Will be hard to find something that checks all those boxes, but ebay is a good place to start. I have an Indy XC 1998 fork laying around, but it is 1 1/8th.
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  6. #6
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    Cool Stumpy! I think Dimension sells a threaded rigid fork that could work. Otherwise you scour the internet and other local bike spots for a period rigid or suspension fork. Finding a sus fork to fit will be difficult, it will be used, and probably in need of rebuilding if that's actually possible. I think you should go rigid based on your intention of commuting and tooling around. Blaklabl has a good suggestion to cross post in the vintage forum. Those guys and gals seem to know just about everything and possible where to find it!
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  7. #7
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    Just looking at it, it looks like a 1 1/8", not a 1". An easy way to confirm this without tearing the whole thing apart is to take off your stem (loosen the allen bolt on the top of it but don't take it out) and measure the o.d. of the steerer tube. An even easier (but not as surefire) way of figuring this out is to measure the diameter of the headset lockring with calipers. Typically 1" threaded will be 32mm and 1 1/8" threaded will be 36mm.

    If it's 1" headtube your only options are used vintage forks or to buy a rigid fork.

    If it's 1 1/8, you will have more options, but finding a suspension fork for the bike will still require a little searching because you will need a fork with brake posts and 60-80mm of travel so the geometry of the bike is retained for the most part. Vintage forks will be clapped out and need a rebuild, so you may be better off going to a 1 1/8 threadless headset (FSA TH-855 can be found for $10) and threadless stem with a 25.4 clamp that fits your existing bars as this will open up your suspension fork options.

    There are a few modern forks to choose from but they can be difficult to find as many have been recently discontinued. A good replacement fork to hunt down would be the Rockshox XC32 with 80mm of travel and brake posts. They were discontinued a couple years back but can still be found. A Manitou R7 would work as well but that is most likely out of your price range. However, you would have to replace your headset and stem as I mentioned above. If you have other bikes lying around you could probably scavenge a Suntour fork with brake posts, but just make sure you get one with 80mm of travel or it will mess with the geometry and make the bike handle poorly.

    As others have said, there are rigid forks out there that would work with the existing parts on the bike. I urge you to reconsider this option as a rigid fork may be more predictable and unlike an old suspension fork or cheap new fork, won't just bounce around without any damping like a pogostick.

    It's a pretty cool find and I hope you have fun getting it riding again!

  8. #8
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    Look for an 80mm travel Fox Float or similar to maintain geometry. The older 9mm QR axled forks are going pretty cheap. I'd upgrade to front discs while you're at it for not much more money. Looks like 1 1/8th". Definitely go Aheadset, and consider a shorter stem if you do! Wow, those bar ends and stem are a throwback, they put your hands in a different timezone.

  9. #9
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    as others have said, if it's 1-1/8 then swap i to threadless, will make everything so much easier. Kinda
    If not or you really want to keep the threaded headset, then other than vintage stuff off ebay, your going to have to join a retro facebook page or see what you can find on retrobike.co.uk sale sections.

    Any more mordern fork, you want to keep it 80mm or under... arnt going to have a canti stopper, so will require new brakes and levers for v-brakes, you don't have as much problem with a rigid fork as if you get a new stem many have stoppers built in or you can get a hanger for the headset.

    Keeping old stuff going is great, and 'can' be cheap, but it can also be expensive and damn frustrating.

    Also is it an M2 frame?
    All the gear and no idea.

  10. #10
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    Turns out it's 1". This is the only suspension fork I can find online for a reasonable price: https://www.amazon.com/Suntour-Suspe...ct_top?ie=UTF8

    Any thoughts on this fork as a replacement?

  11. #11
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    You want 80mm of travel. 100mm will be too much. This should work and be of similar quality to the Suntour: https://www.ebay.com/itm/RST-Fork-26...gAAOSwk1haAa~m

    Also it's 1" threaded so you will be able to reuse your headset. Just be aware that you may have to have the threads on the fork extended as the fork steerer tube is 250mm long but only 50mm of it is threaded. You will have to have enough space for the threaded portion of the headset to secure to it.

  12. #12
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    It'll be OK, you might find a used fork on Pinkbike buy and sell, like this:
    https://www.pinkbike.com/buysell/2113978/
    Personally, I would look for a frame with a 1 1/8" steerer. Sourcing old/ obsolete parts can be a challenge (or an expensive pain in the ass depending on your perspective.)
    Personally, I'd look for another ride that you will enjoy, and take advantage of all the technology that has transpired in the past 25 years. Riding a somewhat dysfunctional bike may sour you on a pretty great sport. If you inherently love to tinker and scour CL and such, then by all means go ahead and get the Specialized up and running!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickbeauregard View Post
    Turns out it's 1". This is the only suspension fork I can find online for a reasonable price: https://www.amazon.com/Suntour-Suspe...ct_top?ie=UTF8

    Any thoughts on this fork as a replacement?
    Nope, your bike uses a 1-1/8" fork. There are no 1" M2s.

    For mild trails, a rigid fork is your best bet. Or look up your local bike co-op, where you might be able to find things like $5 used forks.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by xcandrew View Post
    Nope, your bike uses a 1-1/8" fork. There are no 1" M2s.

    For mild trails, a rigid fork is your best bet. Or look up your local bike co-op, where you might be able to find things like $5 used forks.
    Looks like 1" to me. Photos below show measurements and comparisons of the fork from this bike with another 1-1/8" fork I got for free that I was hoping would work. Unless I'm missing something, I think it's definitely 1"?

    Help with 90's Stumpjumper-img_1120.jpgHelp with 90's Stumpjumper-img_1121.jpgHelp with 90's Stumpjumper-img_1122.jpg

  15. #15
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    I had the same issue finding a suitable threaded fork for my old 1" HT bianchi. Swapped to a threadless headset, found an older Marzocchi z2 with the bolt on steerer & bought an 1" RST steel steer tube. Steer tube was cheap and pressed into the Marz crown. Z2 bolt on crowns have a 1-1/8 steer tube hole but the RST steer tube has an adapter, its been working well for years & those old Z2's are tough to beat in terms of reliability. Most other old forks are garbage. The z2 will be 63mm of travel, pretty close to stock so it won't mess with your geometry.

    Might be a bit tough to find but the appear on ebay often enough. They hold value well, and are easily rebuildable. Oil & seals are still easy to find. Plus the oil & coil survives much better than air or elastomers
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Help with 90's Stumpjumper-marzz2.jpg  


  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickbeauregard View Post
    Looks like 1" to me. Photos below show measurements and comparisons of the fork from this bike with another 1-1/8" fork I got for free that I was hoping would work. Unless I'm missing something, I think it's definitely 1"?
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Looks like a conversion headset for 1" fork to 1-1/8" frame. Feel inside the head tube/headset for a larger head tube ID than that opening suggests. Or measure head tube ID, 34 mm for 1-1/8" frame vs. 30 mm for 1" frame. You might be able to estimate without tapping a cup out.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by xcandrew View Post
    Looks like a conversion headset for 1" fork to 1-1/8" frame. Feel inside the head tube/headset for a larger head tube ID than that opening suggests. Or measure head tube ID, 34 mm for 1-1/8" frame vs. 30 mm for 1" frame. You might be able to estimate without tapping a cup out.
    Woah you're right! Looks like I've got myself a 1-1/8" tube! I guess I should just get a new threadless headset and try out the 1-1/8" Manitou Axel fork I found in someone's "brush & bulky" trash pile this weekend.

  18. #18
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    I have a 94 M2 stumpy and its 1 1/8 threadless. it does okay with a 100mm fork. Sag brings it down anyway. Back in the early 90s I don't think they even set sag. I use this as my gravel grinder set up with conti race kings and 3X9 drivetrain. Its pretty quick.Help with 90's Stumpjumper-20171203_123033.jpg

  19. #19
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    Okay yall. So I was having trouble getting the headset out so I took it to the bike co op around the corner and they got it out for me, but they are now trying to convince me that it's actually 1". I can fit my 1-1/8" fork through the tube, but there's not much room for a headset. This is my first time messing around with headsets so before I go back on the hunt for a 1" fork, I'd like to make sure that these folks are right about the size. Some pictures are below...

    Rough measurement of the tube:
    Help with 90's Stumpjumper-img_1123.jpg
    Tube with 1-1/8" fork inserted:
    Help with 90's Stumpjumper-img_1124.jpg
    Here's part of the headset (I think they didn't give me back the top part):
    Help with 90's Stumpjumper-img_1126.jpgHelp with 90's Stumpjumper-img_1127.jpg

    Any ideas?

  20. #20
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    If a 1-1/8" steer tube is that tight than it's a 1" head tube. No room for the headset otherwise. The M2 head tube might look misleading because of the rather thick aluminum compared to most 1" head tube models being steel. So regardless of what it looks like from the outside, you have a 1" head tube M2. Probably made for a short period before the 1&1/8" standard took off. Your bike shop is correct.

    The headset itself is also a bit misleading since it has relatively large outboard bearings and housing. Looks to be a conversion, but obviously isn't if a 1-1/8" tube is the that tight. You can have your shop place a 1-1/8" headset on top of the head tube to show you there is no way it'll fit.

    Keep the XT headset even if you don't reuse it, they have excellent resale value.

    Here's a pic of my 1" HT bianchi with a Marz Z2, also have a steel stumpy (kid hauler) with a 1", not so uncommon.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Help with 90's Stumpjumper-sunny-day-2017-1.jpg  

    Help with 90's Stumpjumper-new-green-bits1.jpg  


  21. #21
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    I'd ask over in the vintage/retro/classic forum as iirc very early M2 frames still had 1 inch headsets (this guy same thing http://forums.mtbr.com/passion/man-i...l#post10031904) and someone there will know exactly whats up.
    All the gear and no idea.

  22. #22
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    eshew: I love that green Stumpy. A few years ago I was on my way with the wife to a symphony orchestra in St. Paul and stopped at the gas station on the way. I saw a large trailer of scrap that had that bike in it and I muddled in mind about how I could explain stuffing that bike in the trunk and shrug off the mud and bike grease stains on my nice suit from trailer diving to the wife. In the end, I let it go but still wonder about that moment and if I made the right decision.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  23. #23
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    Yes, definitely a 1" tube.

    I would really like to keep a suspension fork on this thing, but I can't find any I like/within my price range (under $100). Any suggestions on a rigid fork? I feel like I'd need something suspension corrected?

  24. #24
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    90's Stumpjumper head tube sizes

    Quote Originally Posted by nickbeauregard View Post
    Yes, definitely a 1" tube.

    I would really like to keep a suspension fork on this thing, but I can't find any I like/within my price range (under $100). Any suggestions on a rigid fork? I feel like I'd need something suspension corrected?
    nickbeauregard,
    thanks for posting the detailed pics and process of figuring out the size of your steerer. I feel like a lot of people have trouble figuring out which years of 90's Stumpjumper frames had which size head tubes.

    Does anyone have a good resource that lists the years and head tube / steerer sizes? I've looked on the old catalogs at retrobike.co.uk and MTB Unterlagen aus "prähistorischer" Zeit, but Specialized was not very specific with their specs (unlike old Trek catalogs).

    From everything I've seen, I'm pretty sure that by 1994 all stumpjumpers had threadless 1 1/8" headsets, but 1992 and 1993 are murkier.

    If anyone has either authoritative knowledge on this, or a can point me to a resource, I'd really appreciate it. I've had my eye on Craigslist for a 1990's steel Stumpjumper with a 1 1/8" head tube, and want to make sure that I'm looking for all the relevant years.

    Thanks!

  25. #25
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    Throwing in my 2 cents to further muddy the waters:
    I have a 93 or 94 Hardrock, but the shock it has had for as long as I've known it is unusual. It is a Specialized FutureShock that I've never seen on any other Hardrock, only on Stumpjumpers... It's a 1 3/8' threaded (I think, never measured!) Very hard to find info on this, but it'd look perfect if you could find one...
    Help with 90's Stumpjumper-futureshock.jpg
    I want something good to die for
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  26. #26
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    Thanks! So confusing. I ended up grabbing a 1995 Stumpjumper FS, in Champagne paint. The Rockshox Mag 21 is shot, so I'm looking for a nice rigid steel 1 1/8" steerer fork now! Also, I found this thread on retrobike where one of the posters says he has a lot of the 90's Specialized catalogs. He seems willing to help people look up specific models and years.

    90's Specialized sizing | Retrobike

  27. #27
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    Don't throw away that mag 21. You can fix em, or part them out. Or my favorite, mother's polish on the lowers and aluminum & turn it into a lamp! Marzocchi Z2 would also be an acceptable and long term solution.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by adlu View Post
    Thanks! So confusing. I ended up grabbing a 1995 Stumpjumper FS, in Champagne paint. The Rockshox Mag 21 is shot, so I'm looking for a nice rigid steel 1 1/8" steerer fork now! Also, I found this thread on retrobike where one of the posters says he has a lot of the 90's Specialized catalogs. He seems willing to help people look up specific models and years.

    90's Specialized sizing | Retrobike
    Wow, that's a pile of info! I'm filled with nostalgia! And regret... Used to have a copy of the 95 catalog, chopped it up for a college Graphic Design project. Also had some Ground Control tires in grey, they were the stickiest things ever! Also had some Dirt Baldies, got rid of them when my hairline started to match the tires. And some gloves, Prybaby tire levers, and a Ribcage bottleholder... I thnk I got a little too into Spesh for a minute...

    Alas, I am also filled with confusion. My Hardrock doesn't exist in any of those catalogues, at least not as I have known it since 1995...
    I want something good to die for
    To make it beautiful to live
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  29. #29
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    eshew, thanks for the tip! I know nearly nothing about suspension forks. I'm building this bike for a long term bikepacking trip thru Latin America, so people have advised me to go rigid to reduce any risk of a suspension fork needing maintenance or failing.

    could you give me some rough estimates on how long it would take an unexperienced person to overhaul a Mag 21? Which overhaul kit would you recommend? And final question - typically how long would this fork last between overhauls?

    thanks!

  30. #30
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    Can't comment on Mag 21's for longevity. But You can sell knobs & boots off of them to recoup some cash.

    If you're running V-brakes I would highly recommend a Marzocchi Z2, circa 96-98. They are easy to refresh, seals & oil is maybe $45. But with fresh seals and oil they can go for years without servicing. They are super tough & actually have pretty great damping especially considering the age. They are coil sprung, so not a lot to fail.

    I have rebuilt around 10 of em, and have them on a few bikes. Only failure I've ever seen is seals going bad after many years of riding.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Help with 90's Stumpjumper-z1_z2_wmtb.jpg  

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  31. #31
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    Thanks for the tip! I actually have a Marzocchi bomber z2 from 2001 that came with another old bike I bought. Unfortunately it's a 1" threaded steerer so I can't put it on the Stumpjumper, but maybe I'll hold onto it and overhaul it for the learning experience.

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