Jamis Dragonslayer 27.5+ vs Salsa Timberjack 27.5+- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Jamis Dragonslayer 27.5+ vs Salsa Timberjack 27.5+

    Really need help figuring out which bike would be best for me. I want to climb on gravel logging roads, rip down muddy, flowing single track. Not tying to jump it! Interested in Bikepacking later down the road. Right now just focuesed on losing weight (6'3 -300lbs)

    set up looks nearly identical, one is aluminum and one is Steel though.

    which one?

  2. #2
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    Could you post links to them?
    Have you been able to or is it possible to test them?

    My initial thought is that at 300lbs you may want steel. It could ride a lot nicer for you.

    Salsa makes great bikes, but I do have a soft spot for Jamis, to be honest.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by MitchFromOregon View Post
    Really need help figuring out which bike would be best for me. I want to climb on gravel logging roads, rip down muddy, flowing single track. Not tying to jump it! Interested in Bikepacking later down the road. Right now just focuesed on losing weight (6'3 -300lbs)

    set up looks nearly identical, one is aluminum and one is Steel though.

    which one?
    I'm not sure which frame material is better for heavyweights, but I just got a Timberjack and I freakin love it.

  4. #4
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    Really doesn't matter that much. Aluminum will be stiffer, steel (unless it rusts which is guaranteed) is likely to last longer and a bit more compliant.

    Being size ( I'm big too) I've found that frame stiffness (or lack of) is far more noticeable. Material matters less than design.

    I would say go test ride each one and see what you like better. Can't go wrong with either.

    That said I've considered the above bikes, ended up with a Cannondale Beast of the East. And damn glad (not just the deal I got) I went that route. Freaking love it!

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  5. #5
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    I was looking at both of these bikes as well when choosing which B+ hardtail to get. I agree on doing test rides (ironically, I bought my bike without ever having even seen it in person).

    I personally prefer steel bikes, but either bike should serve you well. If you can test ride both, I'd suggest taking each one up a good hill on the road, standing up out of the saddle and hammering. This could give you some better insight on frame flex, especially at the bottom bracket.
    Crashing mountain bikes since 1990.

  6. #6
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    I bought the Dragonslayer a few months ago, and while I haven't ridden it too many times, I really like the ride and handling of it. I also love steel frames and have a couple of Salsa bikes, but I was able to get a Sport version of the Jamis for $1100, so I couldn't pass it up. The fork is a little weak, and I hate Shimano hydro brakes, but other than that the frame is beautiful, plus the sliding drop-outs are a real bonus.
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  7. #7
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    At your weight I'd think the steel bike will be a bit more compliant and is more likely to be a bike you want to get out and ride more often on back to back days. Also, definitely consider getting a burly fork w/ 34mm+ stanchions. When I got back into trail riding I was 225-230 and I couldn't believe what a difference going from a noodly 32mm fork to a Pike made... I'm 185-190 now and it's still awesome to be able to get SUPER rowdy with a beefy fork!

  8. #8
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    Do they publish a weight limit for these bikes? I'm a steel fan as well, I've got 5 steel frames.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  9. #9
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    Certainly a steel frame for you. Have seen several cracked aluminum MTB's in my lifetime. This is also implied by the fact that Salsa will cover its aluminum frames only for 3 years while Jamis will offer you lifetime warranty on their steel frames, as long as you can proof you're the original owner. That should seal the deal right there for you on which one to choose.

  10. #10
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    I looked at both and went with the Dragonslayer and absolutely love it. i have an xl sport and it was about 33 lbs out of the box and doesnt ride like it. I'd def reccomend it. im surprised there isnt more talk about this bike.

  11. #11
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    I think the answer is more apparent than you think. The Salsa is longer and lower. So it will have a more XC oriented "fit". The Dragonslayer is taller at the bars with shorter reach. It will be more comfortable on your back. It will be easier for Monster trucking and wheelie drops. Etc...

  12. #12
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    I love that dragonslayer. I almost want to order one at full price, they sell quick. But my cheap azz won't pay full retail. Just can't do it...

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by GiantTurd View Post
    Timberjack is taller in the front then the Dragon, depending on model, taller headtube plus the A/C length on the Manitou is tall.
    Right, but stack is the relation of the bar height to your feet, not the ground. So you can raise the front of a bike up on a cinder block, but the feel of the bike will still be in relation to the vertical distance from the bottom bracket to the top of the head tube.

    Case in point... i can drop my fork on my hardtail 30mm. The "fit" of the bike is unchanged, because my feet pedaling are still the same distance from my bars. You can have a shorter head tube but more bottom bracket drop and it will increase stack height. You can have a huge head tube but very little bottom bracket drop and the stack could be shorter.

    Top tube length, head tube height, and seat tube length are poor ways to fit yourself to a bike online.

    Reach and stack are very reliable.

    The Jamis will feel more upright to the rider.

  14. #14
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    Actually my best fitting bikes were "ordered" based off ETT to start. ETT and as long as standover is lower than my inseam. Seat tube length and head tube length combined with angle tell me whether ETT will be where I need it with my seat in the range where I set it.

    Stack is adjustable many different ways.

    I guess reach can be the same as ETT but by definition it can be adjusted as well via seat position and stem/bars.

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  15. #15
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    Nice bikes. I rode both around the parking lot. Dragonslayer Sport looks really nice in person. I imagine the Pro is beautiful. I went with the Timberjack GX1, got it for $1,240. Haven't ridden it yet here in Wisconsin.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by RAKC Ind View Post
    Actually my best fitting bikes were "ordered" based off ETT to start. ETT and as long as standover is lower than my inseam. Seat tube length and head tube length combined with angle tell me whether ETT will be where I need it with my seat in the range where I set it.

    Stack is adjustable many different ways.

    I guess reach can be the same as ETT but by definition it can be adjusted as well via seat position and stem/bars.

    Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk
    Stack is adjustable by adding headset spacers which is extremely limited in a factory cut fork. Angled stem will ext geo. Taller bars works well. But why not begin with the one that fits best?

    If you like XC oriented, go one way, more upright, go the other.

  17. #17
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    As I said, get close. Some brands have huge jumps between bike sizes, others not so much. Thing is most bike the head tube length doesn't vary much between sizes, neither does stack. It's small amounts. A stem with slightly more rise won't change anything for geo if reach created remains the same.

    I wish head tube length varied more but it's not much. Reach/ETT is a massive factor as shorter/longer stems will play havoc with bike handling. At least in my experience. My BOE needed bars with slightly more rise to get me where I wanted to be and done.

    But that works for me. And gave me the best fitting bike I've ever owned.

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  18. #18
    CS2
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Do they publish a weight limit for these bikes? I'm a steel fan as well, I've got 5 steel frames.
    Just read a review of the Jamis and it said 30.5 lbs.
    A garage full of steel frames means happiness.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by CS2 View Post
    Just read a review of the Jamis and it said 30.5 lbs.
    Lol. 2-1/2 years later. By "weight limit" I meant for the rider, not the weight of the bike. Not sure why I was asking that, though as I am only around 150lbs.


    EDIT: ah, the OP is/was 300 lbs.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Lol. 2-1/2 years later. By "weight limit" I meant for the rider, not the weight of the bike. Not sure why I was asking that, though as I am only around 150lbs.


    EDIT: ah, the OP is/was 300 lbs.
    We should check in and see where his adventures went and what he bought and weight, health etc.....

    My steelie is 30.5 too btw !
    "Before you criticize, you should walk a mile in their shoes. You'll be a mile away from them and you have their shoes"

  21. #21
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    Does the Jamis come in a frame only model?

  22. #22
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    Rode them both...
    Dragonslayer Pro has tall top tube & way too long of a stem. (probably because top tube is almost an inch shorter than the timberjack). Didnt turn right at high speed, couldn't keep the line where I pointed it. It has tons of rack mount points. Great at wheelies, though.
    Timberjack felt lower & more controlled at high speed. Closer to a trail bike, better at small jumps, could bunny hop small stuff, but still not ready for really rowdy stuff.

    It really depends on how you want to ride. The list below gets more aggressive towards the bottom. I have ridden all of them.

    Dragonslayer - Bike packer/XC
    Timberjack - Trail
    Chameleon - Trail
    Orbea Loki - Trail
    Ragley Bigwig - Enduro

    If I had to pick ONLY ONE, I would take the Timberjack. It's the most versatile of all of them. They make any drop out you want to run. You can use any wheel you want. 67 degree head angle. Right in the middle. Good climbs & still fast downhill. That bike will do anything.

    I do own the Ragley, but it's not a good all around bike. Head angle is pretty slack so it's a bit hard to pick the right line on technical climbs. It's really an enduro bike. Point it down hill & hang on.

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