2019 Motobecane HAL Boost EAGLE LTD (12 spd) Versus 2017 Salsa Bucksaw GX1 (11 spd)- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    2019 Motobecane HAL Boost EAGLE LTD (12 spd) Versus 2017 Salsa Bucksaw GX1 (11 spd)

    Me: 6'1" x 225 lbs. Live in NoCal and mostly trail ride with my son.

    OK, so I am getting close to pulling the trigger on a new bike. Seems to be what I want is something with capability of going up to at least 27.5" x 3.0" at a minimum. I am not against buying some extra rims to get to wider / bigger rim/tire sizes.

    Save Up to 60% Off LTD QTYS of these 6 Inch / 140mm Travel Full Suspension 27.5Plus / Boost Mountain bikes 2019 Motobecane HAL Boost EAGLE LTD SRAM Eagle 27.5PLUS Full Suspension Mountain Bikes SRAM EAGLE 1x12 Speed Shimano XT Hydraulic Disc Brakes R

    or

    https://salsacycles.com/bikes/bucksaw/2017_bucksaw_gx1

    Anyone have a 2018 or newer Hal BOOST and can share experience? I hate that the Salsa is still the 2017 model to be honest, but I do also like it's versatility with going true fat bike. I just wish they would release a 2019...

    The HAL Boost is $1999 (12 spd + dropper) versus the Salsa Bucksaw GX1 (11 spd - No dropper) is $2699. Can the Bucksaw justify the +$700 especially given it's a 2 year old model? Also, I assume that means 2 years old components...

    I am thinking this thing will need to last me for a LONG time based upon the death stare I get from the Mrs everytime the topic of a new bike comes up

    Any and all thoughts appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Actually looks like a smokin deal.

    Only two negatives in my book.
    Rim width but you can always lace up wider rims later if you decide you want to stay with fatter 27.5 plus tires.

    BB appears to be a little low as well at just over 13 inches with their 27.5 tires. Will be higher with bigger tires or 29er tires.

    A true 4 bar link with pivot on the chainstay.

    Might be fun in 29er mode if indeed you can fit the wider tires.
    From the site: (Riders are reporting there is Room for some 27x3.5" and 29x2.8 tires, not all tires will fit)

    You might check out the motobecane forum too.

    Remember Motobecanes are for people whose wives don't let them buy a new bike every few months!
    My brain went from "you probably shouldn't say that" to WTF!

  3. #3
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    It'll be a fine bike if you only want to spend $2000.

    The weak link is the frame, unknown design and quality. Motebecane has had frame issues including breakage, poor quality finish, and misaligned welds.

    I had a Motobecane Lurch, it was a cheap foot in the door for a fat bike before I knew what I wanted.

    If you ride now and know what you like, I'd spring for something better; something you can test ride.
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  4. #4
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    Kinesis appears to make their frames:

    "Brands also manufactured by Kinesis include Commencal, Diamondback Bicycles, Felt Bicycles, GT Bicycles, Haro, Ideal, Jamis, K2, Kona, Kross, Raleigh, Redline Bicycles, Santa Cruz Bicycles, Schwinn, Storck, Sunn, Titus Cycles, Torker, and Trek[4] ó as well as the brands marketed by the U.S. company Bikesdirect.com: Motobecane USA, Dawes USA, Cycles Mercier, Windsor America.[5][6]"

    I know of a guy who buys bikes all the time without test riding them!

    Lots of reviews of this bike in the motobecane forum.
    My brain went from "you probably shouldn't say that" to WTF!

  5. #5
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    Those Motobecanes are surprisingly nice looking bikes. This is a rare instance I would be more interested in that over the Salsa.
    I was building wheels for a shop that sold 90% fat bikes back when the Bucksaw was introduced. He couldn't keep them on the floor. Everywhere I went riding, I saw people riding Bucksaws. Now, I never see one. Can't remember the last time I saw one.
    I like turtles

  6. #6
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    Salsa makes good bikes, but the Motobecane clearly has a better Groupo. Iím not a huge Eagle fan, itís to finicky for me, but itís a quality system, just need to keep it clean and lubed.

    Iím sure youíll like whatever you buy, especially if youíre not too picky.
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    I've got a 2005 Kinesis hardtail that I still ride on a regular basis. It's survived 2x freeride hardtail builds, a rigid All Mountain build, and several AM trail builds.

    No signs of failure and has a lifetime warranty.

    Kinesis is a good frame builder.
    Last edited by chelboed; 08-24-2018 at 07:05 AM.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for your thoughts guys!

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    can't speak for the HAL Boost EAGLE LTD, but I've owned/purchased/assembled 7+ bikes from BD. Some were ok, some had issues. I'm not a huge fan of BD or motobecane anymore. But with that being said, I have no alternative brand advise to offer at the moment. Given your rep, I assume you can build and fix bikes?

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    Have a look at the Marin Hawk Hill and B17 in that range.


    That BD at that price is pretty tempting, though. I think it's usually closer to $2500, which makes it somewhat less compelling.

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    That Hal really is quite a build for the price. Personally, I'm hung up on short chainstays, so that at 449 wouldn't be my choice.

    I had a BD fatbike for a while, okay for what it was, but took a bath trying to sell it - so bear brand snobbery in mind if resale is a consideration.

    As far as the Salsa goes - if you think you might actually really want/use/like a fatbike, it might well bear a closer look. I got my fat out of my system already, and definitely like 2.6-3.0 tires over other options.

    As Anger mentions - your rep suggests you know a thing or two, so maybe buying used is a better choice. I have to imagine some of the 27.5+ bikes with new geo (2016+ maybe?) are coming up for sale by now.
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  12. #12
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    Ok, my two cents on the Bucksaw..... as I have had one for 2 years.... itís a great bike for trails that make other riders cry. I live in north New Jersey, one thing you should know about NJ, any trails north of RT80 are nothing but rocks. There is no flow trails, just rock crawling. The Bucksaw is a great bike for that. I have a 120mm Mastodon and the bike is unstoppable. I took the bike to Kingdom trails in VT and it was too much bike for the trails. As a result I have mounted some 26x3.0ís rangers from WTB. The bike is much faster .
    The one thing you should look at on HAL is the frame layout, itís very 3-4 years ago. The chain stays are longer and the top tubes are shorter than the ďtrend ď. IMO, I could not give a crap about the chain stays, short chain stays are for skinny tires. With skinny tires you need to get the riders weight over the tires for traction..... fat and plus bikes donít need this because they have traction everywhere....if you have a long torso, you might want to think about the top tube size.

  13. #13
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    You'll never catch me on a Motobecane. Yes, I'm one of those "snobs" who cares.

    Why?
    The way BD markets is the same way they've always marketed, claiming you get more than you actually do. If you're paying $2,000, you're getting a $2,000 bike. They just find ways to cut costs that are less obvious.

    One of those ways they cut costs is by QC. SO MANY bikes from BD with major QC problems. They've scrapped more than one entire model line because their whole design was trash and the bikes just kept breaking.

    Just because Kinesis makes them doesn't mean $hit. Kinesis makes them the way BD tells them to make them. Any frame mfr has the capability to make excellent frames as well as trash.

    I own a Bucksaw. Mine came on the first order, and it's been my primary mtb since then. It's a great bike, but it's not for everything. I absolutely agree that it's an outstanding bike for crawling chunky stuff. Especially slow speed crawling. At least with 26x4 wheel/tire setups, it gets in over its head on sustained, fast downhills like I encounter in Pisgah. I've been unable to tune the suspension adequately to counteract the extra bounce from the full fat tires. Putting plus wheels on it would probably tame that troublesome aspect some. I haven't done that, however.

    Keep in mind that any fatbike still has a "fat tax" which comes down to the fact that fat tires are expensive, and the rims also cost more than skinnier rims of similar construction.

    The Bucksaw hasn't changed since 2017 because its popularity has waned. There was a time when Salsa was blowing them out to reduce stock. Nothing wrong with the frame geo, but they'd do well to tweak component selection. Probably still won't come with anything other than a Bluto, however, since SRAM built that fork FOR the Bucksaw in the first place.

  14. #14
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    Actually, short stays are cool. Nimble, wheelie-dropping...etc. It's no coincidence that Stache has been labeled such a "fun" bike. Short stays bear some of that weight.

    I wonder on the mentioned Bucksaw (off topic) why go 26x3? Why not 27.5x3? You may like it.


    I think the HAL could be fun, but I'd hold out/save for a gently used...something else.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    Actually, short stays are cool. Nimble, wheelie-dropping...etc. It's no coincidence that Stache has been labeled such a "fun" bike. Short stays bear some of that weight.

    I wonder on the mentioned Bucksaw (of topic) why go 26x3? Why not 27.5x3? You may like it.


    I think the HAL could be fun, but I'd hold it/save for a gently used...something else.
    In all the reviews I read about the Stache, it's more like it's the relative ease and response from "throwing" the bike around that impresses the reviewers. They see 29+ and think that can't be very playful, since there's more weight and things are due to be lengthened. Their expectations were surpassed--the strength of this feeling playing on your impressions cannot be understated. Keyword: relative.

    There's more than short chainstays to make a bike easy to throw around. It's more about a short wheelbase and being lightweight, and being in a nice balanced position to actually execute techniques to manipulate the bike. For example, a Ripley OG has 17.5" chainstays, but can be super fun due to its 1100mm wheelbase and how it's more likely to be built up light.


    @Harold, why do you say that being made by Kinesis doesn't mean anything, yet you go on to talk about QC? Is Kinesis not responsible for it? Frame looks a lot like this "catalog design".

    2019 Motobecane HAL Boost EAGLE LTD (12 spd) Versus 2017 Salsa Bucksaw GX1 (11 spd)-p_170508_03563.jpg

    Looking at the spec, I'd personally take off a lot of it and try to use just the frame really. Seems a lot of trouble to do so maybe, to the point that I'd be better off just getting a Niner RIP9 ($1300 fork and frame), and making a big order from bike-discount.de to custom spec it, to get a better set of wheels/tires, brakes, dropper, a more maintenance friendly 1x10 drivetrain (based around Deore 11-42), and personalized cockpit.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    You'll never catch me on a Motobecane. Yes, I'm one of those "snobs" who cares.

    Why?
    The way BD markets is the same way they've always marketed, claiming you get more than you actually do. If you're paying $2,000, you're getting a $2,000 bike. They just find ways to cut costs that are less obvious.

    One of those ways they cut costs is by QC. SO MANY bikes from BD with major QC problems. They've scrapped more than one entire model line because their whole design was trash and the bikes just kept breaking.

    Just because Kinesis makes them doesn't mean $hit. Kinesis makes them the way BD tells them to make them. Any frame mfr has the capability to make excellent frames as well as trash.

    I own a Bucksaw. Mine came on the first order, and it's been my primary mtb since then. It's a great bike, but it's not for everything. I absolutely agree that it's an outstanding bike for crawling chunky stuff. Especially slow speed crawling. At least with 26x4 wheel/tire setups, it gets in over its head on sustained, fast downhills like I encounter in Pisgah. I've been unable to tune the suspension adequately to counteract the extra bounce from the full fat tires. Putting plus wheels on it would probably tame that troublesome aspect some. I haven't done that, however.

    Keep in mind that any fatbike still has a "fat tax" which comes down to the fact that fat tires are expensive, and the rims also cost more than skinnier rims of similar construction.

    The Bucksaw hasn't changed since 2017 because its popularity has waned. There was a time when Salsa was blowing them out to reduce stock. Nothing wrong with the frame geo, but they'd do well to tweak component selection. Probably still won't come with anything other than a Bluto, however, since SRAM built that fork FOR the Bucksaw in the first place.
    Any direct sales brand will almost always cost less than buying through a dealer. To survive a brick and mortar store has to take a significant markup.

    I owned a bike shop back in the day and it is a dog eat dog world and it is even much harder today to survive.

    Supporting local shops is cool but when all they sell is foreign made product then they aren't supporting their customers or the workers who produce product in the US.

    Instead of filling our garages full of cheap shit perhaps it is time to buy less crap but more quality and not stuff our landfills full. I remember when we used to fix stuff and not just toss it.

    That said I have two titanium BD frames and fork sets I bought from them and the quality and longevity of them has been incredible. Tens of thousands of miles on them.
    My brain went from "you probably shouldn't say that" to WTF!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    @Harold, why do you say that being made by Kinesis doesn't mean anything, yet you go on to talk about QC? Is Kinesis not responsible for it? Frame looks a lot like this "catalog design".
    My point is that a given manufacturer can make both excellent and terrible frames. So saying it's made by Kinesis doesn't really mean much on its own. What matters most comes from the company that sells it. How do they support problems? What sorts of problems crop up? BD does not have an excellent history here. It seems to be a bit of a crapshoot as to whether you'll get a good bike or a paperweight from them.

    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf View Post
    Any direct sales brand will almost always cost less than buying through a dealer. To survive a brick and mortar store has to take a significant markup.

    I owned a bike shop back in the day and it is a dog eat dog world and it is even much harder today to survive.

    Supporting local shops is cool but when all they sell is foreign made product then they aren't supporting their customers or the workers who produce product in the US.

    Instead of filling our garages full of cheap shit perhaps it is time to buy less crap but more quality and not stuff our landfills full. I remember when we used to fix stuff and not just toss it.

    That said I have two titanium BD frames and fork sets I bought from them and the quality and longevity of them has been incredible. Tens of thousands of miles on them.
    I'm not opposed to direct sales companies by any stretch. I've purchased direct sales bikes in the past and I will do so again if I like the bike and the company. I just think BD as a company is trash, and you can do better, even from other direct sales companies.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    Actually, short stays are cool. Nimble, wheelie-dropping...etc. It's no coincidence that Stache has been labeled such a "fun" bike. Short stays bear some of that weight.

    I wonder on the mentioned Bucksaw (off topic) why go 26x3? Why not 27.5x3? You may like it.


    I think the HAL could be fun, but I'd hold out/save for a gently used...something else.
    Money, two 26x3.0 tires=$117, a new wheelset+tires= over $600

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    Quote Originally Posted by MUSTCLIME View Post
    Money, two 26x3.0 tires=$117, a new wheelset+tires= over $600
    Gotcha. Me too, usually.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    My point is that a given manufacturer can make both excellent and terrible frames. So saying it's made by Kinesis doesn't really mean much on its own. What matters most comes from the company that sells it. How do they support problems? What sorts of problems crop up? BD does not have an excellent history here. It seems to be a bit of a crapshoot as to whether you'll get a good bike or a paperweight from them.



    I'm not opposed to direct sales companies by any stretch. I've purchased direct sales bikes in the past and I will do so again if I like the bike and the company. I just think BD as a company is trash, and you can do better, even from other direct sales companies.

    I have two of their ti frames and two of my friends have the same bikes but bought complete. Both have over 20,000 miles on their bikes. One friend (hard rider) cracked his frame near the chainstay and they replaced it no problem. All three of us ride them for bikepacking.

    I think you need to give some examples of why they are trash?

    The only bike I have ever broken was a trek and one of our high school racers broke two of their frames in less than a year.

    I think the best thing to do is if someone is interested in one of their bikes is to go to the motobecane forum or do an online search.

    To me their best value bikes are probably their ti bikes. When I went plus for both my bike and my wife's bike I went with Trek and airborne.
    My brain went from "you probably shouldn't say that" to WTF!

  21. #21
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    I have had a couple BD bikes, they all have been good.... the problem is in the speck of the bikes. Look at the wheels, they all had crap rear hubs . If you are a hard rider, expect to upgrade the rear wheel at some point.

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    Never looked at the geo, so it has 449mm chainstays?

    Well, my first thought is the suspension design requires more chainstay length to prevent tire to frame contact.

    In my mind thatís evidence of a poorly designed frame.

    Thereís no good reason to have that long of a chainstay on a 27+ bike.
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    650c x 3.0 is 28.9 in inch diameter .... so your shortest chain stays are 14.5 inches.... add half the diameter of the B.B. and you need extra clearance for the cross brace on the chain stay..... bottom line, larger wheels = longer chain stays..... itís just the math.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Never looked at the geo, so it has 449mm chainstays?

    Well, my first thought is the suspension design requires more chainstay length to prevent tire to frame contact.

    In my mind thatís evidence of a poorly designed frame.

    Thereís no good reason to have that long of a chainstay on a 27+ bike.
    Long chainstays ride more comfortably and track the ground better, offering more control/stability and less traction loss.

    Short chainstays encourage you to ride more actively, forcing such work on you. People consider this a challenge and find it fun/engaging.

  25. #25
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    Lol, donít forget that really short chain stays do not climb steep assents well. A bike that is easy to wheelie, will have a loose front wheel on climbs.

    As for the op, if you order the HAL make sure you get an extra DR Hanger. They seem to be hard to find.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by MUSTCLIME View Post
    Lol, donít forget that really short chain stays do not climb steep assents well. A bike that is easy to wheelie, will have a loose front wheel on climbs.
    This is true, no question.

    But if it's a short blast, easy to stand and mash. If it's a longer climb, I find that there is tipping point where it's too long to mash, and I'm not strong enough to spin (32x42). On those segments, I tend to run out of legs and lugs and front end weight right at the same time.

    Totally worth the trade off to have something so easy to throw around.
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by MUSTCLIME View Post
    Lol, donít forget that really short chain stays do not climb steep assents well. A bike that is easy to wheelie, will have a loose front wheel on climbs.

    As for the op, if you order the HAL make sure you get an extra DR Hanger. They seem to be hard to find.
    You make a lot of sense.

    Some people prefer to strain themselves to get into a more ideal position for climbing steeps... they exclaim that it's technique and that it's not the bike, and it's true. xD

    Ironically, they demand the bike geo to be DH capable, but only limit tweaks to dimensions/angles forward of the rear wheel. It's like any changes to the rear end needs to be accepted according to their religion, be it sub-17" CS, a fancy hub that plays a pleasing mechanical note, specific materials for rim or chainstay, suspension advertised to have youthful mojo...

    What they end up on is a bike with extremely rearward weight bias, where they often have to compensate by moving forward. They'll pedal up a steep climb with their butt hovering in front of their saddle, considering that holding such an uncomfortable position is part of the challenge. They'll also descend with weight forward, saying that it's a proper attack position, maybe even trying to convince shorter beginners to do the same.
    Last edited by ninjichor; 10-21-2018 at 04:36 PM.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    Some people prefer to strain themselves to get into a more ideal position for that... they exclaim that it's technique and that it's not the bike, and it's true. xD

    Ironically, they try to make the bike handle as much as possible on the DH, but only limit it to things forward of the rear wheel. It's like anything back there needs to be accepted according to their religion, be it sub-17" CS, a fancy hub that plays a pleasing mechanical note, specific materials for rim or chainstay, suspension advertised to have youthful mojo...
    Ya a lot of bullshit being thrown around and much if it by people who don't even bother to keep a bike long enough to get it dialed in or by people who are brand ambassadors, etc.
    I know my Ti bike does long steep climbs better than my stache even though it has "old school" geometry.
    My brain went from "you probably shouldn't say that" to WTF!

  29. #29
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    Wow lots of great info and perspectives to consider. Thanks!

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    People who say they would never ride one, have most likely never ridden one. I have always ridden Specialized Stumpy's. My road bike is an all Ultegra Motbecane (2007) and it is INCREDIBLE. Light weight, fast...NO issues.....and still going. It was time for a new bike so I looked at the Moto's.

    I just got my 2019 Hal Boost 27.5+ Team about a week ago. The bike came quickly. It was packed well. Assembly was a breeze.


    I have 37 miles on this bike so far in varying terrain. Some flowy and a lot of tech. All I can say is this bike is AWESOME. It handles unbelievabley. This is my first full suspension bike.....having come from a 2012 Specialized Carbon Stumpjumper. I am only sorry I didn't switch to FS sooner! The only complaint I have is the cranks seem much lower so it took a bit to get used to it.

    The XO Eagle 12 speed is AMAZING. It shifts so smooth and quiet, I keep looking down to make sure it changed gears! LOL. The Maxxis Rekon's are grippy...even with tubes in them and 30 psi. (need to convert to tubeless) This bike can climb anything. I don't see much difference from my carbon hard tail.

    I have added an e*thirteen TRS+ 125mm dropper and Oury grips. (The 150mm won't fit the large frame). If they added a dropper to this bike it would be absolutely perfect! But, I guess you can't have everything at once! But, you sure get a lot for $2399! I'm sure there are some weak parts somewhere....but I haven't noticed them yet.

    The welds on the frame are beautiful. The fit and finish is perfect. No problems to speak of.

    Ride on!

  31. #31
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    OP, the best advise I can give you is to consider 2 things....
    1) what would be the best bike for the trails you like to ride?
    2) consider what you are good at and what you are not good at. My advice is to buy a bike that excels at what you are not good at. I have seen roadies buy full on race 29ers hard tails, go on a tech trail, fall 3 or 4 times and quit. I have also seen really strong tech guys that hated to climb buy bikes that were great descenders but sucked up hill. Then they spent all their time trying to avoid hills that you need to climb...get a bike that helps you do better at what you are not good at.... it will be more fun.

  32. #32
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    Let's just agree to disagree.

    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    Long chainstays ride more comfortably and track the ground better, offering more control/stability and less traction loss.

    Short chainstays encourage you to ride more actively, forcing such work on you. People consider this a challenge and find it fun/engaging.
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    I have yet to see reviews other then. ďThis is my first FS and it kicks ass, or ďMy last bike was a 1992 26Ē HT, this bike kicks ass. It might, just have not seen much talk about it from people comparing it to other modern bikes ridden.
    I have a 2015 BD ti 29er and it kicks ass, I tell people that all the time. You know what? The bike before that was an old school HT 26er so in some regards, Iím talking out of my ass.

    I looked at the Hal, but in the end have decided Iím done with BD because of the employee communication. The direct to consumer game is much more competitive nowadays and I feel BD will be in a world of hurt and fade away like Kmart.
    Sometimes Rickety, not a turd

  34. #34
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    Do you honestly think that people don't get why you throw jabs at people who disagree with you?

    You need to get over it and move on.

    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf View Post
    Ya a lot of bullshit being thrown around and much if it by people who don't even bother to keep a bike long enough to get it dialed in or by people who are brand ambassadors, etc.
    I know my Ti bike does long steep climbs better than my stache even though it has "old school" geometry.
    Guerilla Gravity Shred Dogg
    Fezzari Signal Peak (For Sale)
    Pivot Shuttle (wife's)

  35. #35
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    Hal Boost= Rossignol All-Track Trail

    Look what I discovered.

    I've been lurking a while and a Hal Boost is on my short list for upgrading to a FS+ bike in the Spring. While casually scrolling Facebook, a very familiar-looking bike shows up in an ad.
    The Hal Boost has a Rossignol clone. Upon further research, Rossignol bought Felt bicycles and are in collaboration for their own bike line.

    https://www.rossignol.com/int-en/catalog/product/view/id/165323/s/rossignol-all-track-trail-black-red-bikes-bike-rmh0004-000-2018-2019/category/1061/

    https://www.rossignol.com/int-en/cat...category/1061/

    They also have an enduro bike that has been reviewed here:

    https://youtu.be/zaEj9vk66fk
    Last edited by Jluman; 10-21-2018 at 04:13 PM. Reason: Missing link

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jluman View Post
    Look what I discovered.

    I've been lurking a while and a Hal Boost is on my short list for upgrading to a FS+ bike in the Spring. While casually scrolling Facebook, a very familiar-looking bike shows up in an ad.
    The Hal Boost has a Rossignol clone. Upon further research, Rossignol bought Felt bicycles and are in collaboration for their own bike line.

    https://www.rossignol.com/int-en/cat...category/1061/

    https://www.rossignol.com/int-en/cat...category/1061/

    They also have an enduro bike that has been reviewed here:

    https://youtu.be/zaEj9vk66fk
    Good linking Rossignol to Felt, as Felt also gets frames made by Kinesis.

    That enduro bike is also a Kinesis catalog frame:

    2019 Motobecane HAL Boost EAGLE LTD (12 spd) Versus 2017 Salsa Bucksaw GX1 (11 spd)-p_170508_04122.jpg

  37. #37
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    Also, has anyone actually measured the chainstay on the Boost? The Rossignol lists their bike having a 435 stay while the Hal lists a 448. Someone has a misprint because I've zoomed in on both bikes at length and can find no differences beyond the color. I would sincerely hope that BD is showing a misprint and the 435 is correct

  38. #38
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    I've been looking at this one for quite some time. To me, the most 'crap' part of this bike is the dropper post - it would have to be replaced immediately. Replace that, you've got quite a component spec for the price. But then I saw the 2019 YT Jeffsy AL BASE at $2,299. Fairly even apples-to-apples comparison regarding component spec when you consider the YT comes with a decent dropper. And the frame on the YT is probably a bit more modern regarding geometry versus the catalog Kinesis frame from BD. But the Pike fork on the BD - very nice! YT does seem more mainstream and a much better brand and customer service. So at that price point, I think YT is the way to go. IMHO...

  39. #39
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    Funny you should bring up YT after these months. For black Friday, YT dropped the price $600 on the Jeffsy AL Comp. That instantly made it the least of all compromises and I couldn't pass up that deal.Got it for $2300 shipped. Have since swapped out the 2.4 Highroller 2s with 2.8 Nobby Nics (I wanted a plus tire anyway). Yes, they fit on the Large 27.5 frame. The 19s look sweet, bt I feel I made the right move for me. Oddly, I notice they still have the 18 L and XL in stock and haven't dropped the price down below the 19.

  40. #40
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    Some dissenting voices re: the short chain stay thread. Longer chain stays make for a longer wheelbase, better stability, more comfort, better climbing. Shorter chain stays are skittish, easier to lift the front wheel, inferior climbing, faster cornering?

    https://www.vitalmtb.com/forums/The-...tays-Suck,9344

    https://www.brooklynbicycleco.com/bl...grant-petersen

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by westernmtb View Post
    Some dissenting voices re: the short chain stay thread. Longer chain stays make for a longer wheelbase, better stability, more comfort, better climbing. Shorter chain stays are skittish, easier to lift the front wheel, inferior climbing, faster cornering?

    https://www.vitalmtb.com/forums/The-...tays-Suck,9344

    https://www.brooklynbicycleco.com/bl...grant-petersen
    More fun to manual, better for monster trucking, wheelie drops...

    You can't recommend a bike that works well in one terrain to someone who rides another terrain.

    All that you say is true. But it doesn't make it better. Just different.

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