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  1. #1901
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinnybex View Post
    A few updates for my 5.5
    Eagle and Hope E4 brake's
    It comes in Gold? Take my $!

    Looks like the CC wheels are nice and dirty, still happy with them over the ENVE's? Had any good rim strikes on them yet?
    I can see some gold Yeti custom decals for them in your future, haha.

    Hard to justify the ENVEs for a extra $1000 if the 2 year CC warranty is easy to deal with as they claim. In know the ENVEs are warranted/replaced nearly next day, but being able to drive to CC from where I live for me is attractive when/if I break one.

  2. #1902
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    Quote Originally Posted by surfndav View Post
    Yes I'm definitely sold on the Yeti. And I am 5'11" weigh 180. So I think the 29ers a good choice. I plan to go with the Trq Eagle build large. I'm somewhat friendly with a couple of people over at Pivot, and I want to like their bikes but I just loved my Yeti's and I miss the camaraderie that comes with having a Yeti.
    I wrote above that I have top 10 Strava segments. In my head if there's 1500 people have ridden a segment and I'm in the top 150, that means I'm in the top 10. I meant percentage, had to get that off my chest, I didn't mean to make up a story, cause I probably don't have any top tens.
    Anyways, any comparisons to the old 575 and the new 5.5 ?
    I'd have to concur with Crit Rat here - given the financial position you're in, if you go Yeti - I'd actually be looking somewhere other than the full-on Turq/Eagle setup - Instead, the PerformanceElite equipped Carbon 5.5c, with the Eagle upgrade (or if you're keeping pennies tighter, you can keep the XT/SLX drivetrain, get a DT XD driver freehub body and e13 9-46T cassette - more range than Eagle, and cheaper than the $700 cost bump) is the Yeti I'd be looking at - only required upgrade might be brakes - but throw some Guide RE/RSC or XT's at it and you're there.

    The new SB line from Yeti are basically an entirely different animal, and in a very good way. They're actually plusher on descent (but not by a whole lot), but with the right build they're veritable rocketships on climbs. Very sporty feel in wide open trails - but the only area I felt a compromise on setup is required is when dealing with successive square-edged hits, I wanted to run less air spring pressure to keep it more stable to where it somewhat compromises the efficiency and spritely nature everywhere else.

    To be completely honest, a YT Jeffsy actually sounds like a preferable answer - you can get into Eagle for less money, and in rockier terrain where you're not giving it full gas (because crashing hard among sharp rocks takes a long time to recover from - this isn't a personal judgement, but one doesn't make it to ripe ages with the ability to still ride through making consistently reckless decisions) I really think the bikes which are kinematically more forgiving in the mid-stroke are probably a better fit for your riding style.
    Me personally - I'm pretty similar. Slow on the uphills (tragically so), but top few percentile on the downhills. On the types of trails I enjoy, pedaling efficiency is going to take a back seat to maximizing grip on decomposing granite, and ensuring composure over persistent chunder with loose-over-hard grip levels... coupled with my proclivity to installing myself and my bike into cacti, I end up building with overkill tires, so I'm happier with different compromises where the Yeti doesn't shine quite as brightly. Zooey captured that pretty well and concisely.

  3. #1903
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    I love my 5.5 but the rear suspension is very spiky on really sharp rocks. Like too much HSC.
    Which shock setup is this with? I'm really curious about your feedback in this regard - mostly because I have my personal suspicion that throwing money at it for suspension parts (Ohlins RXF // TTX Coil) could lead to a bike that suits a more diverse riding style, but also comes with a pretty loopy price tag.

  4. #1904
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    Float X that comes on the Turq.

    I'll be installing an X2 and playing with the shock wiz by next weekend. Couldn't resist.

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  5. #1905
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    I got my first ride in this past weekend. This bike rocks! It rolled over everything and carried a ton of speed as expected. However, I was really surprised by how playful this bike is. My previous rig was a 26 150mm BMC Trailfox and I'd say the 5.5 is just as much if not more than capable and fun out on the trails at less than ballistic speeds.

    My local trail isn't super technical so for the most part the recommended suspension setup from Fox felt pretty dialed. I'll be heading out to Moab later this month and I'm sure I'll be tweaking the setup some more. For now the Fox 36 and X seems like a great combo for my local trails.

  6. #1906
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    Confirmed stock shock valving stack on my 5.5. I called Fox with the code on the shock and they called it "extra firm compression stack".

    That's why the shock feels so abrupt on baby heads, it is!

    I hope I don't lose a bunch of efficiency. I ordered the X2 with the new lockout switch but I'll never use the switch on my trails.

  7. #1907
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTBMike Colorado View Post
    It comes in Gold? Take my $!

    Looks like the CC wheels are nice and dirty, still happy with them over the ENVE's? Had any good rim strikes on them yet?
    I can see some gold Yeti custom decals for them in your future, haha.

    Hard to justify the ENVEs for a extra $1000 if the 2 year CC warranty is easy to deal with as they claim. In know the ENVEs are warranted/replaced nearly next day, but being able to drive to CC from where I live for me is attractive when/if I break one.
    I'm still loving my 2 CC Carbon wheel sets. I did crack my rear 29'er wheels but CC covered shipping both ways and rebuilt the wheel and no cost to me. It took 6 days total including shipping. If that's not A+ customer service then I don't know what is.

  8. #1908
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    Quote Originally Posted by Levelheadsteve View Post
    Looks great skinny.
    Thanks Bro. I was only home 2 days but I rode my 5.5 both days out on our most Gnarly trails and the bike was flawless with only a couple of nasty drops I refused to ride due to the concequences of going down and riding Solo .

  9. #1909
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    Quote Originally Posted by dimitrin View Post
    I live and ride in Austin and struggled with this choice as well. I decided on the 5.5 and am glad I did. It makes all the ledgy, rooty, rocky chunk easier.
    I have a Anthem X 29, 100mm rear Maestro suspension, 120mm front that I am coming off of with 30mm internal hoops, 2.4 tires. It has been an amazingly capable trail bike and I have been riding it on my local trails for 5 years... this includes 6'-8' drops.
    I've been riding that same bike on the same trails so often and for so long that my body has muscle memory for each feature. When I roll up on a technical feature that requires a lot of effort and commitment, whichever muscle groups that are involved already know how much effort and finesse to apply to clear the feature. First thing I noticed on the 5.5 was that all the technical bits became easier. I am less fatigued at the end of technical rides.

    If you race cross country I would suggest the 4.5. You should really try to ride one of each first though.
    Where are you finding 6-8' drops in the Austin area?


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  10. #1910
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    There is at least one solid 6' drop at brushy. You can contact freeride 512 for some of the other stuff.

  11. #1911
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    I went and pulled the trigger. I've ordered a Large Silver SB 5.5 Truq Eagle from JensonUsa. They don't have it in stock, but I was told that Yeti has been on the ball lately and that Jenson should get it in about a week, then another week before I get it.
    After some intense negotiations I was able to convince my wife that I need to keep my current bike. So I will have two bikes after all.
    If anyone wants to chime in on how this build is working out. Like thoughts on the wheel set and so on. I've used a set of the Guide RS breaks, and I think they'll be fine for a while. I'm really anxious to see how I feel about how the Eagle group works. I think the bike comes with a 30T chainring, that seems on the small side even for me, but I'll give it a try.
    So I'm very excited about this bike. I live in the Phoenix area and every summer I normally let myself get out of shape (a little) due to the hot temps. I'm looking forward to a lot of sweaty early morning rides this year. I'm counting on some new bike stoke to get me out of bed early. As well as a few trips to Sedona Flagstaff, and Moab. I will ride Captain Ahab someday soon!
    Yes life is good.
    Better than most, not as good as some.

  12. #1912
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    Quote Originally Posted by surfndav View Post
    I went and pulled the trigger. I've ordered a Large Silver SB 5.5 Truq Eagle from JensonUsa. They don't have it in stock, but I was told that Yeti has been on the ball lately and that Jenson should get it in about a week, then another week before I get it.
    After some intense negotiations I was able to convince my wife that I need to keep my current bike. So I will have two bikes after all.
    If anyone wants to chime in on how this build is working out. Like thoughts on the wheel set and so on. I've used a set of the Guide RS breaks, and I think they'll be fine for a while. I'm really anxious to see how I feel about how the Eagle group works. I think the bike comes with a 30T chainring, that seems on the small side even for me, but I'll give it a try.
    So I'm very excited about this bike. I live in the Phoenix area and every summer I normally let myself get out of shape (a little) due to the hot temps. I'm looking forward to a lot of sweaty early morning rides this year. I'm counting on some new bike stoke to get me out of bed early. As well as a few trips to Sedona Flagstaff, and Moab. I will ride Captain Ahab someday soon!
    Yes life is good.
    What's wrong with the guide rs brakes? Seems like a great brake, what else do u need

  13. #1913
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    [QUOTE=ceblanch;13111790]Where are you finding 6

    There is a 12' drop out at Travis Country and about 10 drops from say 3' - 6' out there. THese are NOT rollable. hen there are 2-3' drops there are probably 30 of them out there.

    There are several big man made drops of varying sizes at that 512 members only place. Not rollable I would join but I get very little ride time so it would be wasted.

    There are 1-3 scary drops at Jester. 6-7'. Not rollable. Inverted in fact.

    There is 1 or 2 at Brushy (off the main line) about 4-7'.Some rollable but 1 for sure is not.

    Emma Long has a few as well. All rollable.

    I literally just recently started doing drops of about 4-5'. I'm ready to go bigger and would like to hit the big boy at Travis but since I ride by myself 95% of the time I'm reluctant to do that.
    Last edited by Suns_PSD; 04-14-2017 at 03:38 PM.

  14. #1914
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbob27 View Post
    What's wrong with the guide rs brakes? Seems like a great brake, what else do u need
    I don't think there's anything wrong with them, I was actually quite happy with the set I already have. Until they quit working on me. The lever would not return to the extended position. I took them to my bike shop they send them to Sram, and now I have a new set sitting on my shelf in my garage.
    Better than most, not as good as some.

  15. #1915
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    Yeti SB 5.5c discussion

    Yes I did mention my age, but I'm not dead yet. I can still ride. And yeah, I've ridden South Mountain on several different bikes even my old Hardtail. I want a bike that will ride those trails fast.
    I don't know if you care to or if you can even see it. But my profile picture was taken on National about three years ago.
    Better than most, not as good as some.

  16. #1916
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    50's are the new 40's man, you've gots lots of miles in you yet if you keep your body balanced with other movements and/or gym work.

    Any congrats on the bike! I've got a 5.5 turq x01 build, about a month of riding and it's been awesome. I wrote some about it above but I did regrease, torque and loctite all pivot bolts following the procedure in the manual and that did result in more supple action but break in was a factor too.

    I had a good hop in my rear wheel after the first real ride but was able to true it out and haven't had anything since, so could have been a loose nipple.

    Enjoy!

  17. #1917
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    I'm about four months in on an XO1 Eagle Turq build. Trails are open here in Durango now so I've had a chance to shake the bike down on some varied terrain here, in Moab, and also the Phoenix area.

    The Eagle drivetrain works really well. The chain/chainring interface is slightly smoother when mashing hard than my previous bikes' 1x11 XO1 kit. Shifting works about the same. Shifter actuation takes a bit more effort than I like but so be it. I'm not sure if thats from the long cable housing or what, but my old XTR stuff was way lighter action than any SRAM. The 30/50 combo is perfect for me. I never spin the bike out and the granny gear is a true small spinning gear that helps when I'm tired or I just want a high cadence on steep terrain. I've been mountain bike riding and racing religiously since 1986 and I'll take that granny gear any day, especially on a 29" monster like the 5.5 in the mountains of Colorado.

    The stock wheels are holding up perfectly. No issues. They mount tubeless tires really easily. I like the quiet 18 tooth star freewheel in the back but I'll probably upgrade to the 36 at some point. The 30mm internal width is nice and I'm able to run a little less pressure with the increased volume.

    The Guide RS brakes are OK. Great modulation, enough power for me as a relative lightweight. My only complaint about them is that the pad engagement keeps creeping closer to the bar and adjusting it is a small hassle. I've done a few of the SRAM "pad engagement resets" with satisfactory results. To do this, pull out the wheel, and slowly squeeze the lever in towards the bar about 3/4 of the way through the travel, squeezing the caliper without a rotor in it. Then put your wheel back in and see if you got enough lever travel reduction to put it where you want it.

    The stock rear shock works OK for me. I'm 155lbs and run 160psi in it with about 19mm of sag at that setting. I'm now testing an X2. So far so good.

    I swapped the stock tires for a set of WTB Vigilantes, fast/tough (in other words, heavy, meaty, with a nice thick sidewall that damps really well but rolls slow). I'll try the stock DHF/Agressor soon. I wanted to try the WTB's first on the new bike as that's what I'm used to.

    I put a 60mm stem on, Turbine, same as stock, and it put the cockpit just right for me at 6'2" on a L. For really steep tracks I might go back to the 50 but I like the longer reach with the 60. Cut the bars to 780, might go more narrow. I really like the bars. The 8 degree backsweep and 5 degree upsweep are sweet.

    The bike is a total shredder. It climbs well for a "big" bike. It really comes alive when you are seriously hauling ass, the faster the better. It eats up rough and allows me to pedal a bit deeper into the rough than my E29 did. That is the main improvement over the E29. On the 5.5 I can pedal through really rough trail more easily when going downhill when it's not that steep and the rough terrain is sapping speed. I feel no issue with the 140/160 suspension travel difference and wouldn't notice if you never told me. Handling overall is great. It corners really well. It inspires the same kind of confidence that the E29 did in that when things get a little bouncy or you get off line, lean back, hang on, loosen up a little and let the 5.5 eat up whatever you are gonna plow over and it will take you through.

  18. #1918
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    Quote Originally Posted by speeder1 View Post
    I'm about four months in on an XO1 Eagle Turq build. Trails are open here in Durango now so I've had a chance to shake the bike down on some varied terrain here, in Moab, and also the Phoenix area.

    The Eagle drivetrain works really well. The chain/chainring interface is slightly smoother when mashing hard than my previous bikes' 1x11 XO1 kit. Shifting works about the same. Shifter actuation takes a bit more effort than I like but so be it. I'm not sure if thats from the long cable housing or what, but my old XTR stuff was way lighter action than any SRAM. The 30/50 combo is perfect for me. I never spin the bike out and the granny gear is a true small spinning gear that helps when I'm tired or I just want a high cadence on steep terrain. I've been mountain bike riding and racing religiously since 1986 and I'll take that granny gear any day, especially on a 29" monster like the 5.5 in the mountains of Colorado.

    The stock wheels are holding up perfectly. No issues. They mount tubeless tires really easily. I like the quiet 18 tooth star freewheel in the back but I'll probably upgrade to the 36 at some point. The 30mm internal width is nice and I'm able to run a little less pressure with the increased volume.

    The Guide RS brakes are OK. Great modulation, enough power for me as a relative lightweight. My only complaint about them is that the pad engagement keeps creeping closer to the bar and adjusting it is a small hassle. I've done a few of the SRAM "pad engagement resets" with satisfactory results. To do this, pull out the wheel, and slowly squeeze the lever in towards the bar about 3/4 of the way through the travel, squeezing the caliper without a rotor in it. Then put your wheel back in and see if you got enough lever travel reduction to put it where you want it.

    The stock rear shock works OK for me. I'm 155lbs and run 160psi in it with about 19mm of sag at that setting. I'm now testing an X2. So far so good.

    I swapped the stock tires for a set of WTB Vigilantes, fast/tough (in other words, heavy, meaty, with a nice thick sidewall that damps really well but rolls slow). I'll try the stock DHF/Agressor soon. I wanted to try the WTB's first on the new bike as that's what I'm used to.

    I put a 60mm stem on, Turbine, same as stock, and it put the cockpit just right for me at 6'2" on a L. For really steep tracks I might go back to the 50 but I like the longer reach with the 60. Cut the bars to 780, might go more narrow. I really like the bars. The 8 degree backsweep and 5 degree upsweep are sweet.

    The bike is a total shredder. It climbs well for a "big" bike. It really comes alive when you are seriously hauling ass, the faster the better. It eats up rough and allows me to pedal a bit deeper into the rough than my E29 did. That is the main improvement over the E29. On the 5.5 I can pedal through really rough trail more easily when going downhill when it's not that steep and the rough terrain is sapping speed. I feel no issue with the 140/160 suspension travel difference and wouldn't notice if you never told me. Handling overall is great. It corners really well. It inspires the same kind of confidence that the E29 did in that when things get a little bouncy or you get off line, lean back, hang on, loosen up a little and let the 5.5 eat up whatever you are gonna plow over and it will take you through.

    Thanks for the feedback! What's your inseam? I'm 6'-1.5" with a 35" inseam, long arms, and weigh 165 soaking wet, so I'm very close to your height and weight. I'm considering a 5.5 along with a few other bikes, and I'll get my chance to demo at Dirt Fest PA in six weeks. Plan to demo both a L and XL, as it seems I could go either way depending on what size feels best.

  19. #1919
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    Quote Originally Posted by linden44 View Post
    Thanks for the feedback! What's your inseam? I'm 6'-1.5" with a 35" inseam, long arms, and weigh 165 soaking wet, so I'm very close to your height and weight. I'm considering a 5.5 along with a few other bikes, and I'll get my chance to demo at Dirt Fest PA in six weeks. Plan to demo both a L and XL, as it seems I could go either way depending on what size feels best.

    I'm on a L and am 6'.5" with long arms and the large feels great. My legs are not quite long enough to be on a XL and have proper seat height. I haven't measured my inseam so don't know that exactly but my arm span is close to 6'4" and the 50mm stem and 800mm bars on the large feel great.

  20. #1920
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    Wow

  21. #1921
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    Quote Originally Posted by linden44 View Post
    Thanks for the feedback! What's your inseam? I'm 6'-1.5" with a 35" inseam, long arms, and weigh 165 soaking wet, so I'm very close to your height and weight. I'm considering a 5.5 along with a few other bikes, and I'll get my chance to demo at Dirt Fest PA in six weeks. Plan to demo both a L and XL, as it seems I could go either way depending on what size feels best.
    6'2, 32" inseam.

    If you want an enduro race bike, this is a great choice. It is a FAST bike that rewards aggressive riding.

  22. #1922
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crit Rat View Post
    50's are the new 40's man, you've gots lots of miles in you yet if you keep your body balanced with other movements and/or gym work.

    Any congrats on the bike! I've got a 5.5 turq x01 build, about a month of riding and it's been awesome. I wrote some about it above but I did regrease, torque and loctite all pivot bolts following the procedure in the manual and that did result in more supple action but break in was a factor too.

    I had a good hop in my rear wheel after the first real ride but was able to true it out and haven't had anything since, so could have been a loose nipple.

    Enjoy!
    I'm 55 and I still ride quite hard, and some times fast. Are there others riding faster.?.....Yes, and there always have been. I don't feel like I'm slowing down, I ride less than I used to because my work schedule is so full. But when I keep motivated and stick to my fitness plan, I still get stronger.
    It looks like it will be a couple of weeks before my bike is delivered. It will be just like....no better than Christmas on that day. STOKE!!!!
    Last edited by surfndav; 04-06-2017 at 07:09 AM.
    Better than most, not as good as some.

  23. #1923
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    Quote Originally Posted by speeder1 View Post
    I'm about four months in on an XO1 Eagle Turq build.
    Hi,

    I'm waiting for my sb5.5 with the same build. Did you get the race face dropper post? No issues with it? I heard bad things about it. I also heard that yeti replaced it by a Fox dropper post on last models.

    Otherwise, anybody has ridden a sb 5.5 with a fox dhx2 shock?

    Thanks
    Last edited by malvoize; 04-06-2017 at 01:53 AM.

  24. #1924
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    I'm also waiting for my 5.5 Eagle Turq build. JensonUSA told me yesterday that Yeti is waiting for parts, which parts, I have no clue. Jenson said they should receive my bike from Yeti on the 25th. That's like friggin 18 days......I ordered the silver. I hope it is the Fox dropper post, we'll see.
    Anyway after Jenson gets it built and shipped, it hopefully be to me the first week of May. The good news is I will be keeping my current bike. It's a short travel trail bike, I mentioned it in an earlier post. It will be a good back up bike for lighter use or when I have people visit.
    Better than most, not as good as some.

  25. #1925
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    Quote Originally Posted by surfndav View Post
    I'm also waiting for my 5.5 Eagle Turq build. JensonUSA told me yesterday that Yeti is waiting for parts, which parts, I have no clue. Jenson said they should receive my bike from Yeti on the 25th. That's like friggin 18 days......I ordered the silver. I hope it is the Fox dropper post, we'll see.
    Anyway after Jenson gets it built and shipped, it hopefully be to me the first week of May. The good news is I will be keeping my current bike. It's a short travel trail bike, I mentioned it in an earlier post. It will be a good back up bike for lighter use or when I have people visit.
    Just got an email from yeti and they confirmed that they have changed over to the Fox dropper seatpost. For the turquoise color, I have to wait until mid may!

  26. #1926
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    Quote Originally Posted by malvoize View Post
    Just got an email from yeti and they confirmed that they have changed over to the Fox dropper seatpost. For the turquoise color, I have to wait until mid may!
    Yes!!! Get mine this coming week after waiting a month from Jenson and did not realize they had switched to the Fox Dropper. Was sweating getting the RF.


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  27. #1927
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    Yeti SB 5.5c discussion-img_9129.jpg

    This showed up yesterday-been loving the stock fox but heard so many good things about the coil that I pulled the trigger.

    Jeff over at ohlins is a good guy and custom valved this to my riding style for a whole lot less than Push.

    Can't wait to get it bolted in.



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  28. #1928
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckinboulder View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	1130688

    This showed up yesterday-been loving the stock fox but heard so many good things about the coil that I pulled the trigger.

    Jeff over at ohlins is a good guy and custom valved this to my riding style for a whole lot less than Push.

    Can't wait to get it bolted in.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    You're gonna be stoked for sure! Now the front is going to be the weak point, but no worry the RXF 36 can fix that! haha
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  29. #1929
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    I think they are all coming with the Transfer post now. It's a great post. I've been thrashing the same one since September with no issues.

    I'm currently running an X2 and it works well. The stock shock worked well for me too. Be sure to give it a fair chance and a dozen rides or so to get used to it and to the SI rear end. The SI feels quite different than a VPP or a Horst link bike.

  30. #1930
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    Maiden ride on this last weekend.

    I was tossing up between this a 4.5, 5 and few others like the Jeffsy etc, I think I made the right choice, it was outstanding.








  31. #1931
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    I recently swapped out the Fox Performance fork and rear shock. I got a great deal on a 2017 Rock Shox Lyrik 2 Position fork. We have quite a bit of climbing around here so I thought the ability to lower the fork travel to 130 on long, steep climbs would be nice. Right out of the box the Lyrik seems more plush right of the top. Still have some adjustments to make but so far its great!

    I also decided to give the DVO Topaz T3 a shot as most of the other upgrade options were out of my price range. I picked up the DVO for under $400 in the cool box. Even with just the basic sag and air pressure setup the shock feels amazing. Very smooth and controlled AND you can reach the rebound knob with a glove on... haha! Again, I still need to dial it in but the initial impressions are great. I really think the Topaz is a great option if you want to stick with an air shock and not drop $700+. I'll report more once I get some more miles under my wheels. Cheers Tribe!


  32. #1932
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    I'll likely send my stock shock to craig at Avalanche for a custom tune. Cheaper than a new Topaz. He did amazing work on shocks for my pivot and ibis bikes.

  33. #1933
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    Quote Originally Posted by tehllama View Post
    I'd have to concur with Crit Rat here - given the financial position you're in, if you go Yeti - I'd actually be looking somewhere other than the full-on Turq/Eagle setup - Instead, the PerformanceElite equipped Carbon 5.5c, with the Eagle upgrade (or if you're keeping pennies tighter, you can keep the XT/SLX drivetrain, get a DT XD driver freehub body and e13 9-46T cassette - more range than Eagle, and cheaper than the $700 cost bump) is the Yeti I'd be looking at - only required upgrade might be brakes - but throw some Guide RE/RSC or XT's at it and you're there.

    The new SB line from Yeti are basically an entirely different animal, and in a very good way. They're actually plusher on descent (but not by a whole lot), but with the right build they're veritable rocketships on climbs. Very sporty feel in wide open trails - but the only area I felt a compromise on setup is required is when dealing with successive square-edged hits, I wanted to run less air spring pressure to keep it more stable to where it somewhat compromises the efficiency and spritely nature everywhere else.

    To be completely honest, a YT Jeffsy actually sounds like a preferable answer - you can get into Eagle for less money, and in rockier terrain where you're not giving it full gas (because crashing hard among sharp rocks takes a long time to recover from - this isn't a personal judgement, but one doesn't make it to ripe ages with the ability to still ride through making consistently reckless decisions) I really think the bikes which are kinematically more forgiving in the mid-stroke are probably a better fit for your riding style.
    Me personally - I'm pretty similar. Slow on the uphills (tragically so), but top few percentile on the downhills. On the types of trails I enjoy, pedaling efficiency is going to take a back seat to maximizing grip on decomposing granite, and ensuring composure over persistent chunder with loose-over-hard grip levels... coupled with my proclivity to installing myself and my bike into cacti, I end up building with overkill tires, so I'm happier with different compromises where the Yeti doesn't shine quite as brightly. Zooey captured that pretty well and concisely.
    +1 on the lower end Yeti SB55 with XT. I have that with the 46t cassette. Upgraded to XT Brakes and shifter (bought from Jenson and they will happily swap out components and give you credit for the stock build). Personally, a 50T cassette with a 30T chainring is too easy. In rocky stuff it won't give you the horsepower to get over ledgy stuff so you will be in the next gear down anyway. If you want to run a 32T ring, maybe different, but then you only need that so you can max out your pedalling on flats and DH.

    I've not ridden a Jeffsey, but that is a very appealing value. Given it is horst link, I expect it rides like a specialized FSR. I came off of a Stumpjumper. Loved that bike but did not like the upright geo compared to what is available on the market today. Jeffsey addresses that.

    I would say
    Below $4k - YT Jeffsey
    Below $5k - Yeti 5.5c XT build (non-turq)
    Above $5k - SC Hightower CC (Eagle is only option)
    Above $5k - Intense Primer ...this bike climbs very well.
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  34. #1934
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    New shock. X2. Very excited to try it out but we are so rained out here.

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  35. #1935
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    New shock. X2. Very excited to try it out but we are so rained out here.

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  36. #1936
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    picked up my 5.5c today , sooooooooo excited to get to know it in person ,up close and personal , you know so real 1 on 1 time,,,, hahahahahahaha, antway yes yeti switched to the fox transfer instead of raceface. so I have question why are so many folks switching to coils on this bike ??? is it to keep riders at the top of the stroke??? I had a coil (fox van rc) on my Norco sight ,nd it had crazy pedal bob... just curious
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  37. #1937
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    Quote Originally Posted by DABIGSEAT View Post
    picked up my 5.5c today , sooooooooo excited to get to know it in person ,up close and personal , you know so real 1 on 1 time,,,, hahahahahahaha, antway yes yeti switched to the fox transfer instead of raceface. so I have question why are so many folks switching to coils on this bike ??? is it to keep riders at the top of the stroke??? I had a coil (fox van rc) on my Norco sight ,nd it had crazy pedal bob... just curious
    In my opinion the linearity of a coil with Switch Infinity is a great combo, particularly for a heavier rider as the progression of an air can can be hard to match with rebound for that curve. All in all I have better traction when climbing and I had my coil shock tuned for XC/AM riding, so with a quick flick of the lever I'm minimal pedal bob for long climbs or soaking up all the chunder going down. The weight penalty for the spring was well worth it and I'm very XC biased in most of my riding.
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  38. #1938
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    I've been riding the 55 for a few weeks now. Just sold my year old sb6 to pay for it, and I'm undecided on whether that was the right move, the 5.5 is a better all a rounder, pedals better, steeper angle is more comfortable. It's a fast bike, no question, but it doesn't hold a line in the steep tetchy fast stuff the way the 6 did. Which is ironic considering that it's a 29er. In actually feels like a lot smaller bike than the 6. If I had to do it again, I'd probably size up to the xl. I'm 6"1 190 pounds. Curious to see how the bike stacks up in all out enduro racing and park rides. I want to call the guy I sold my 6 to and get it back haha

  39. #1939
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    Quote Originally Posted by DABIGSEAT View Post
    so I have question why are so many folks switching to coils on this bike ??? is it to keep riders at the top of the stroke??? I had a coil (fox van rc) on my Norco sight ,nd it had crazy pedal bob... just curious
    I've only noticed about 2 people that swapped to a coil shock and imo it's a error although I'm sure they can be made to work well thru specialty valving specific to a Yeti SI bike.

    The SI suspension leverage curve is almost perfectly linear, which is NOT ideal for a mountain bike. It's actually a very undesirable trait in isolation. Which is why it works so extraordinarily well in conjunction with the progressivity of an air shock. Which is why every model Yeti arrives with an air shock, and also why the Pros on this bike are also running an air shock. The weight penalty on a bike meant to pedal uphill just as much as downhill is just another reason not to choose a coil shock.

  40. #1940
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    The SI suspension leverage curve is almost perfectly linear, which is NOT ideal for a mountain bike.
    Are you sure about that? If you look at the "travel gif" on the website, the shock compresses straight in for about 50% of travel (linear) and then tilts down significantly for the second half (progressive). If I interpret that correctly, seems pretty much the ideal suspension curve for all around MTB. You get predictable traction and response during pedaling (seated or otherwise) and a quick ramp up at the end to handle jumps and drops.

    If you have the actual leverage ratio for an SI bike I'd really like to see it. All I can find is the curve for the SB66.

    As for pro's riding coils:

    https://www.bikerumor.com/2016/08/22...-shaun-hughes/

  41. #1941
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terp View Post
    Are you sure about that? If you look at the "travel gif" on the website, the shock compresses straight in for about 50% of travel (linear) and then tilts down significantly for the second half (progressive). If I interpret that correctly, seems pretty much the ideal suspension curve for all around MTB. You get predictable traction and response during pedaling (seated or otherwise) and a quick ramp up at the end to handle jumps and drops.

    If you have the actual leverage ratio for an SI bike I'd really like to see it. All I can find is the curve for the SB66.

    As for pro's riding coils:

    https://www.bikerumor.com/2016/08/22...-shaun-hughes/

    See here (translate page to English):

    Yeti SB5.5C 29'' 2016 - Linkage Design

    Essentially a flat leverage curve. Which, with my understanding of leverage curves and ratios (I'm no expert though), would match exactly what @Suns_PSD said in the post above. The SI linkage seems much better suited for a progressive air shock than a linear coil spring.

  42. #1942
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    I've only noticed about 2 people that swapped to a coil shock and imo it's a error although I'm sure they can be made to work well thru specialty valving specific to a Yeti SI bike.

    The SI suspension leverage curve is almost perfectly linear, which is NOT ideal for a mountain bike. It's actually a very undesirable trait in isolation. Which is why it works so extraordinarily well in conjunction with the progressivity of an air shock. Which is why every model Yeti arrives with an air shock, and also why the Pros on this bike are also running an air shock. The weight penalty on a bike meant to pedal uphill just as much as downhill is just another reason not to choose a coil shock.
    the ratio is similar to the sb6 and richie uses coil shock on the sb6 most of the races. agree that coil works better with progression ratio but that's not the same as saying air shock works better for linear ratio

    and honestly yeti shock and all brands for that matter is a thing I cannot understand! :-) most bikes are under spec when it comes to rear shock choice

  43. #1943
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    For sure any level of Progressivity can be built in to the valving of a coil shock and when being timed downhill is your primary consideration, a coil shock offers undeniable advantages in terms of heat management and suppleness.

    An air spring has the advantage (for our application) of having built in progressivity.

    This chart has the SB6 4th from the top meaning it essentially has a linear shock ratio.

    Another interesting point to consider is that on a linear ratio when you set shock travel at 30% sag, you get 30% at the rear wheel. However, when your leverage ratio is progressive, 30% at the shock is unlikely to lead to 30% at the wheel. Hard to take in to account as measuring rear heel travel would be quite hard to do accurately.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Yeti SB 5.5c discussion-pogressivity-1.png  


  44. #1944
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    ^^ I think that chart starts from least progressive to most?

    Interesting discussion - how do you build in progressivity without resorting to progressive coils on the shock?
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  45. #1945
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    Yes, the chart goes least progressive to most. The first 2 frames are regressive, the 3rd frame is completely linear, and then the Yeti has a small amount of progressivity at 5%.

    Average progressivity for an Enduro bike is 20%. Average for a downhill bike is 40%.

    This is the SB6. Generally the more aggressive the bike, the more progressivity it will have built in.

  46. #1946
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terp View Post
    Are you sure about that? If you look at the "travel gif" on the website, the shock compresses straight in for about 50% of travel (linear) and then tilts down significantly for the second half (progressive). If I interpret that correctly, seems pretty much the ideal suspension curve for all around MTB. You get predictable traction and response during pedaling (seated or otherwise) and a quick ramp up at the end to handle jumps and drops.

    If you have the actual leverage ratio for an SI bike I'd really like to see it. All I can find is the curve for the SB66.

    As for pro's riding coils:

    https://www.bikerumor.com/2016/08/22...-shaun-hughes/
    From the article, "Richie was on a Yeti SB6c, taking full advantage of the 6″ of rear travel which for the race included a Fox X2 Air shock. Yeti team mechanic Shaun Hughes mentioned he swapped out the coil shock after the race."

  47. #1947
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    i like the linkage design blog, as well as andre's (which is where I think I've seen the table that Suns posted) but it's worth noting that they are modeling their results based on images of the bikes without taking actual measurements, and sometimes their are inconsistent opinions about the same bike.

    for example, I believe Push manually tests frames in connection with their shock tuning, especially for building the 11-6 to speciific bikes, and Darren has posted here on MTBR with very different results -- I'm recalling the original Mojo HD because I owned one at the time, where the Linkage Design blog said it was regressive and Darren said it actually was fairly progressive and an excellent fit for a coil.

    using another Push example, the 2016 Spec Enduro 650b, which is listed as more progressive on Sun's table than the Yeti, has a rider weight limit if you want to spec an 11-6 from Push on that bike. whereas the Yetis have no weight limit for an 11-6 -- suggesting that Push doesn't need to tune in as much progressivity into the shock.

    anyway, all of that is to say that it may be a more nuanced answer about using a coil. I can say definitively that Hikers Only, who posted his 5.5 earlier in this thread, is an absolute shredder and loves the CC Inline coil on his bike for our local gnar trails. I'll prob try a DHX2 in a few months when bike park season gets going just to see how it goes. currently liking the X2 but don't feel like it's mind-meltingly better than the Float X, which I thought was quite good on the 5.5

  48. #1948
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    *facepalm*

    A lot of jumping to conclusions here, much being incorrect. This is one big reason why people hate forums, because stupidity like this is common and unchecked.

    Saying X is better, Y is best, Z is not ideal, and using virtually worthless support like correlation as evidence... *shakes head* these are the things you say when you want to troll people. For example, Bambi is the best Disney movie of the 70s. Mulan is better, since it spawned more merchandise-based revenue. CG is not ideal for animation, see how poorly it works in anime. I purposely added questionable support, but my point is can you see how this promotes rage and argument? At best, people merely learn how ignorant others can be from the pointless debate that ensues.

    How about verifying some of the preconceived notions here, like why is linear not ideal for mtb? Things are no where near as simple as people make them out to be. The focus on leverage curve is disturbing, as it's not as valuable as people make it out to be. How about a more results-based perspective? Do you want faster times? Do you want more comfort? Do you want to erase bumps? Do you want the bike to pop out of deep compressions to jump higher? Do you want the bike to pop off of small bumps? Do you want the bike to be responsive to your inputs? You can't just say, I want it all, since you have to trade one for the other.

    The stock Yeti trades bump erasing comfort for faster times, responsiveness. It favors pop off of smaller compressions. It's light footed in a way. A coil improves this. It's the trait of a linear suspension; it's sporty, like a track car. A progressive suspension is heavy footed, sitting deep into travel, popping out of deep compressions like berms and kickers. It's a natural bike-park jumper, erasing braking bumps, but lacks the responsiveness and speed when every second counts; it's like an off-road 4x4 that is expected to see air time. It's a matter of preference. Yeti decided to go the "race-bred" route, but it's not like you can't change it with a different shock. Looking at the kind of trails people ride, how much of it is generally smooth, taking all the fastest lines? If you answer along the lines of "a vast majority of it", then you can see why linear suspension has an application here. I can see someone that seeks a forgiving suspension that can save them from mistakes, opting for progressivity, but under someone that has practiced lines with utmost precision, that progressivity isn't really helping them.

    You should run more sag with progressive suspension, and less with linear suspension, to bring out their best traits. It would feel awful trying the opposite. Air springs are becoming more coil-like these days, but with very high pressures that prevent bottom out. If a rider is having trouble utilizing full travel, feeling like they need to run extra sag, which spoils the sporty feel, a coil with less could be the solution. Switching to an old air can (without the extra negative chamber volume), will give the SI suspension more plushness, but it will lack the supple/sensitive feel on small bumps--it becomes more progressive, but ironically, it becomes far easier to bottom out (example of how things are not so simple). A rider might prefer air on a SB6, but coil on a Nomad, but might later find his level of aggressiveness might put him somewhere in between, regarding how much progressivity he likes. Can tune that with spacers on a SB6, but can't really do anything to bring the progressivity down on a Nomad without new link (a longer upper link maybe)? A lot of brands, including Santa Cruz, have flattened out their curves to be more linear on their trail bikes. Bikes designed for jumping are a different story.

    It's a huge world out there, with diff terrain and diff levels of rider aggressiveness. Think about this for a moment, an unfit rider going off of a drop at a walking speed vs a pro rider launching off the drop at 15 MPH, both riders weighing the same, which would put more stress on the rear shock upon landing? If you picked the pro, and are certain of it, you're probably delusional. The slower unfit rider is essentially sandwiching the frame between him on the earth and all the gravitational force from the freefall is going to the parts that give most--while the faster pro turned more of it into additional forward momentum (tires take a lot more stress though). If the pro's bottoming out their shock, they're probably riding poorly.

    Basically, what you want is not what others want. Why bother stating that their choices are wrong? Started off with an innocent question, why are people going coil. Maybe it's just their preferred level of progressivity, + the typical pros of coil, such as set-and-forget consistent spring rate no matter the temp or how hard you ride. What I've said is just the basics of basics. Want to know how damping plays a role too? Well, get a solid understanding of the basics first, as it builds off of it. Maybe "graduate" from analyzing the leverage curve to the understanding the forces curve (leverage curve + spring rate curve combined) as your next step.

    TL;DR: Linear susp is sporty, fast, and efficient. Going fast and being able to readily pop off of small features is fun. Riding well on linear suspension is rewarding. How much progressivity a person might want is personal preference, depending on how much forgiveness, bump erasing, and jump boosting they want. Linear susp brings out your A-game, while progressive susp can give a false sense of security.

  49. #1949
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    I like bikes!

    Seriously, I've been riding about 3 years and the learning curve has been steep. That said I'm reasonably smart and can deduce a few things in the few spare minutes I have per day.

    The 5.5 is a much faster bike up and down, then my previous Bronson was. I hope to not change that! So I didn't want too big of a change and I certainly didn't want the additional weight of a coil. But I didn't like the very spiky LSC of the stock Float X and wasn't surprised when I read the shock code to Fox and they told me it was valved "extra firm LSC'.

    With my limited understanding of rear bike suspension (seriously, maybe 1 hour of YT videos) I made the best decision I could, and that was an improved air shock instead of the fancy coil shock.

    ~ take care

  50. #1950
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    I like bikes!

    Seriously, I've been riding about 3 years and the learning curve has been steep. That said I'm reasonably smart and can deduce a few things in the few spare minutes I have per day.

    The 5.5 is a much faster bike up and down, then my previous Bronson was. I hope to not change that! So I didn't want too big of a change and I certainly didn't want the additional weight of a coil. But I didn't like the very spiky LSC of the stock Float X and wasn't surprised when I read the shock code to Fox and they told me it was valved "extra firm LSC'.

    With my limited understanding of rear bike suspension (seriously, maybe 1 hour of YT videos) I made the best decision I could, and that was an improved air shock instead of the fancy coil shock.

    ~ take care
    And what improved air shock did you find with a specific tune to the 5.5? Fox sure didn't have anything to offer not even 6 months ago that was tuned specific to the Yeti 5.5. Yet there are at least 2 coil offerings with dyno tuned and trail tested specific to the 5.5. I can only speak for the Ohlins TTX but my times only improved up and down with the Ohlins, and majority of my rides are 150bpm 2 hour affairs minimum,...aka spirited XC riding. I made technical climbs for the first time with a coil that I'd not made on another Yeti let alone the 5.5 with air can usually due to spinning out/traction loss. So while I know it's not for everyone, it's definitely for me and every argument you've listed deciding against it were also my concerns,..however proven to be baseless going off my few months of pedaling with a coil over the same trails day in day out.
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  51. #1951
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    I spoke to Fox specifically about the OEM shock tune. It just has extra stiff LSC, everything else is off the shelf valving, same as if you bought the shock from any vender. I specifically asked Fox if I needed to start with my X2 utilizing the same base valving stack. They said no, that simply turning in the LSC would get me to the exact same spot. I actually like how the bike stock rides high in the stroke (LSC) it's the HSC on baby-heads that I find, unforgiving. That adjustability is what I was after with the X2. No complaints otherwise.

    Your climbing testimonial is convincing, but I can ride up vertical walls on my stock 5.5, the only thing limiting me is my wattage, not the traction or anything else. I only feel limited by the shock when the rear tire is hitting consecutive and perfectly vertical rocks, it doesn't deal well with that situation imo and the bike's momentum tries to stall out.

    Going downhill is where I hope to see some 'coil like' performance out of the new X2 as my Float X got real chattery and a bit out of control as I tried to increase downhill speed. It's not nearly as smooth in the rear as my Fox forks or even my VPP with a Cane Creek Inline on my previous Bronson.

    PS. I did call Push about their nice coil shock, and in so many words the guy told me not to waste my money. Told me point blank, and his honesty was appreciated, that they had tried and had not came up with a valving stack that was really an improvement over stock in an air or the coil shock. That was about 1 month ago.

    I do run Ohlins front and rear on my KTM and it's great stuff for sure. But like I said, I'm more comfortable with the air shock for this bike and my application.

  52. #1952
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    The whole reason I tried a coil was because of rear end chatter that was most definitely rebound deficiency with the stock Fox. It just isn't optimized for any load requiring more than 250ish psi in my opinion. The higher the PSI the more rebound to slow things down when speeds increase. The coil fixed that in spades. Keep in mind the only rear tire I've had for back to back comparison is the Vitorria Mezcal which is a nice fast rolling XC tire, not a ton of traction up or down though, specially in any loose terrain so it was extra sensitive to traction skip of any sort. I went from the rear tire wanting to hop/skip out braking into turns with stock Fox air can to drifting predictably with the Ohlins as it wasn't hopping, that's beneficial down hill or XC just not necessarily for a hucker.
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  53. #1953
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbob27 View Post
    I've been riding the 55 for a few weeks now. Just sold my year old sb6 to pay for it, and I'm undecided on whether that was the right move, the 5.5 is a better all a rounder, pedals better, steeper angle is more comfortable. It's a fast bike, no question, but it doesn't hold a line in the steep tetchy fast stuff the way the 6 did. Which is ironic considering that it's a 29er. In actually feels like a lot smaller bike than the 6. If I had to do it again, I'd probably size up to the xl. I'm 6"1 190 pounds. Curious to see how the bike stacks up in all out enduro racing and park rides. I want to call the guy I sold my 6 to and get it back haha
    At your height, I probably would have sized up too. 5'10" here and riding a size L also.

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  54. #1954
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    I spoke to Fox specifically about the OEM shock tune. It just has extra stiff LSC, everything else is off the shelf valving, same as if you bought the shock from any vender. I specifically asked Fox if I needed to start with my X2 utilizing the same base valving stack. They said no, that simply turning in the LSC would get me to the exact same spot. I actually like how the bike stock rides high in the stroke (LSC) it's the HSC on baby-heads that I find, unforgiving. That adjustability is what I was after with the X2. No complaints otherwise.

    Your climbing testimonial is convincing, but I can ride up vertical walls on my stock 5.5, the only thing limiting me is my wattage, not the traction or anything else. I only feel limited by the shock when the rear tire is hitting consecutive and perfectly vertical rocks, it doesn't deal well with that situation imo and the bike's momentum tries to stall out.

    Going downhill is where I hope to see some 'coil like' performance out of the new X2 as my Float X got real chattery and a bit out of control as I tried to increase downhill speed. It's not nearly as smooth in the rear as my Fox forks or even my VPP with a Cane Creek Inline on my previous Bronson.

    PS. I did call Push about their nice coil shock, and in so many words the guy told me not to waste my money. Told me point blank, and his honesty was appreciated, that they had tried and had not came up with a valving stack that was really an improvement over stock in an air or the coil shock. That was about 1 month ago.

    I do run Ohlins front and rear on my KTM and it's great stuff for sure. But like I said, I'm more comfortable with the air shock for this bike and my application.
    What are your thoughts thus far regarding your switch to the x2 from the X? I see you even played around with the shock wiz. I have an X2 on mine since day 1 and have yet to try the stock X shock. Even with the X2, I can relate to the high speed spikes you're referring to, running HSC full out is really the only way to calm it down some. I too feel like it wants to hang up and stall rather easily on the sharp edged roots & rocks more than I'd like, especially for a 29er. I'm sure to an extent this maybe a characteristic of this susp design but... I remember the original Switch linkage having a similiar characteristic as well.

    I may toss the OE shock on to see how it feels as the X2 does seem to gobble up some energy and push into mid stroke pretty easily. I get a sense from others reviews of the stock X setup that the X2 is most likely taking away some of the playfulness and pedal efficiency in return for more burly plow factor. I've run the X2 so far with anywhere from 0-2 spacers at pressures varying 165 - 190. Currently at 1 spacer and 175 psi, LSC 20, HSC 24, LSR 19, HSR 21 seems to be the best setup for rooty rocky chunk trails. I'm around 185lbs kitted FWIW.

  55. #1955
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    No real time on the X2 yet unfortunately.

    My rear cassette was giving me massive problems on the 1 ride I attempted and now I'm awaiting a replacement.

  56. #1956
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    PS. I did call Push about their nice coil shock, and in so many words the guy told me not to waste my money. Told me point blank, and his honesty was appreciated, that they had tried and had not came up with a valving stack that was really an improvement over stock in an air or the coil shock. That was about 1 month ago.
    .
    ??? On what bike? Any application that we release an ELEVENSIX for has been thoroughly tested before being released to provide a significant performance gap or we don't release it.

    In the case of the Yeti SB's we even go so far as to machine specific compression valves to work with the unique nature of their leverage characteristics. That's correct....not valving changes, we actually install different valves with a different flow rate.

    Darren

  57. #1957
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    Darren, I think you were the guy I spoke to regarding my 5.5. Did you tell me your wife rode a Yeti as well? I called right after someone mistakenly announced a group buy on the Push shocks.

    I'm really trying to remember without being incorrect. Maybe the conversation was more like:

    "we have not been able to improve the valving on the OEM shock & it doesn't sound like for your riding you would see much gain in an 11-6 shock."

    Where what I took from it, was that 'I will see no notable improvements'. My sincerest apologies if I am recalling incorrectly.

    But now that we have got you here Darren I have questions!

    1) The Euro dude that maps linkage rates for various bikes, does he have it right in general but more specifically does he have it right for the 5.5?

    2) More to the point, is SI really as linear as he claims?

    3) How do you guys create a valving set up for a particular bike?

    4) Is a coil shock the best choice for an enduro ridden SI linkage bike?

    Thanks.



    Thanks

  58. #1958
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    Darren, I think you were the guy I spoke to regarding my 5.5. Did you tell me your wife rode a Yeti as well? I called right after someone mistakenly announced a group buy on the Push shocks.

    I'm really trying to remember without being incorrect. Maybe the conversation was more like:

    "we have not been able to improve the valving on the OEM shock & it doesn't sound like for your riding you would see much gain in an 11-6 shock."

    Where what I took from it, was that 'I will see no notable improvements'. My sincerest apologies if I am recalling incorrectly.

    But now that we have got you here Darren I have questions!

    1) The Euro dude that maps linkage rates for various bikes, does he have it right in general but more specifically does he have it right for the 5.5?

    2) More to the point, is SI really as linear as he claims?

    3) How do you guys create a valving set up for a particular bike?

    4) Is a coil shock the best choice for an enduro ridden SI linkage bike?

    Thanks.



    Thanks
    It wasn't me...otherwise you'd already be riding an ELEVENSIX and signing the praises!

    To answer your quesitons,

    1. I haven't spent a lot of time looking at his/her work, but in what I've seen on the forums there has been a lot of information that doesn't match up with what we've experienced with the actual bike. I believe his study of the leverage comes from an image which is not the most accurate representation....especially considering manufacturer images are often photoshopped prototypes! In the case of the Yeti curves I would disagree with some of what is published.

    2. The Yeti's fall into the "flatter" leverage characteristic category for sure.

    3. In the case of the SB's, or any bike in that case, it's not just valving... You have to look at the spring and damping system. With the 5.5 we use a high flow piston with lighter low speed compression and higher high speed valving, our highest flow compression valve, lighter level rebound valving, lighter spring rates, and a mid to high level progressive bump stop density. This gives us decreased resistance at low velocities where the bike doesn't generate a lot of mechanical leverage maximizing small bump sensitivity and off camber traction. The mechanical pedal efficiency of their design allows us to achieve that without penalizing efficiency. The more progressive spring characteristic matched with an early initialization of high speed damping help control the bigger impacts.

    4. Yes, absolutely with the ELEVENSIX. A coil shock without some form of progressive spring characteristic would need to be over-sprung to help with bottoming and may not give you the notable difference that you would expect over an air shock.

    Darren

  59. #1959
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    Quote Originally Posted by PUSHIND View Post
    It wasn't me...otherwise you'd already be riding an ELEVENSIX and signing the praises!

    To answer your quesitons,

    1. I haven't spent a lot of time looking at his/her work, but in what I've seen on the forums there has been a lot of information that doesn't match up with what we've experienced with the actual bike. I believe his study of the leverage comes from an image which is not the most accurate representation....especially considering manufacturer images are often photoshopped prototypes! In the case of the Yeti curves I would disagree with some of what is published.

    2. The Yeti's fall into the "flatter" leverage characteristic category for sure.

    3. In the case of the SB's, or any bike in that case, it's not just valving... You have to look at the spring and damping system. With the 5.5 we use a high flow piston with lighter low speed compression and higher high speed valving, our highest flow compression valve, lighter level rebound valving, lighter spring rates, and a mid to high level progressive bump stop density. This gives us decreased resistance at low velocities where the bike doesn't generate a lot of mechanical leverage maximizing small bump sensitivity and off camber traction. The mechanical pedal efficiency of their design allows us to achieve that without penalizing efficiency. The more progressive spring characteristic matched with an early initialization of high speed damping help control the bigger impacts.

    4. Yes, absolutely with the ELEVENSIX. A coil shock without some form of progressive spring characteristic would need to be over-sprung to help with bottoming and may not give you the notable difference that you would expect over an air shock.

    Darren
    This just translates to, there's more than one way to skin a cat, but this is how we do it. High flow requires such tuning of the circuits. A regular person shouldn't think that their existing shock should have lighter LSC, higher HSC, lighter rebound and spring rate, with fairly progressive bottom out for such a flat leverage. It's just their recipe for grip and control, just like how Trek has their Re:Aktiv recipe, and Cane Creek has theirs. They might have just thought that the SI could use with more sensitive fine tuning to get an improvement on such a high performance platform, hence higher flow (which comes with its own downsides).

    Glad to see someone who takes suspension seriously help cut the foolishness here, trying people to get the entire picture of factoring everything to get the desired end result, rather than yapping pointlessly about isolated factors like leverage curve and "valving" (seeing this word being thrown around as meaninglessly as "kinematics"), as if they are the master key to good suspension. Though, I have to admit that I'm getting really poor-taste marketing vibes from the last post, with all the techno-jargon that I doubt a majority will understand.

    BTW, what parts of the analysis do you disagree with? Seems pretty straightforward to me without the software, that I can't find anything that I disagree with from the charts.

  60. #1960
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    The Yeti web site now shows the SB5.5 is now spec with a Fox Dropper post. Still waiting on Jenson, they say the will have the bike on the 26th......
    Better than most, not as good as some.

  61. #1961
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    Fox are out of transfers apparently. I assume they're releasing a revised model at sea otter which will be available shortly thereafter.

  62. #1962
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    Has anyone tried to fit a Maxxis WT 29x2.5 tires into the back of the 5.5 yet? Or the new Schwalbe Nobby Nic 2.6? I'm curious if either would fit... I'd like to run them if possible.

  63. #1963
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    Quote Originally Posted by RaptorAddict View Post
    Has anyone tried to fit a Maxxis WT 29x2.5 tires into the back of the 5.5 yet? Or the new Schwalbe Nobby Nic 2.6? I'm curious if either would fit... I'd like to run them if possible.
    DHF 2.5 on rear at tightest point.

    The NN 2.6 is actually more narrow.

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  64. #1964
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    DHF 2.5 on rear at tightest point.

    The NN 2.6 is actually more narrow.

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    CHEERS! That's a great photo! Really appreciate it.

  65. #1965
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    DHF 2.5 on rear at tightest point.

    The NN 2.6 is actually more narrow.

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    Remind us what rims you're using?

  66. #1966
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    I'm sure this has already been covered, (been looking but no joy) but has anyone dropped their fox36 fork down to 150mm or built up a 5.5 with a 150mm fork and is it even a noticeable difference in terms of steering/climbing?

  67. #1967
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    Suns, have you ridden with the 2.5 DHF in the rear yet? I know you hadn't a few weeks back.

    My stock Aggressor is getting pretty chewed up so time for a new tire soon.

    Have to say that I have been very happy with the Aggressor as an all around tire. Rolls quite well, is reasonably tough and has pretty awesome grip for the amount of tread it has. Might try a DD aggressor next.

  68. #1968
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    Quote Originally Posted by OMEGANOX View Post
    I'm sure this has already been covered, (been looking but no joy) but has anyone dropped their fox36 fork down to 150mm or built up a 5.5 with a 150mm fork and is it even a noticeable difference in terms of steering/climbing?
    People have. Consensus was that the bike did climb better and had quicker handling.

  69. #1969
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    Quote Originally Posted by RaptorAddict View Post
    CHEERS! That's a great photo! Really appreciate it.
    Is that a DHF 29 x 2.5 WT? I can't find the WT casing listed on the Maxxis site for the DHF in a 29" size, only 27.5.

    The Shorty comes 29 x 2.5 WT.

  70. #1970
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    Quote Originally Posted by speeder1 View Post
    Is that a DHF 29 x 2.5 WT? I can't find the WT casing listed on the Maxxis site for the DHF in a 29" size, only 27.5.

    The Shorty comes 29 x 2.5 WT.
    The DHF 2.5 WT is the stock front tire...


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  71. #1971
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    Quote Originally Posted by marinrider View Post
    The DHF 2.5 WT is the stock front tire...


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    You sure about that? Maxxis doesn't list a WT model in a DHF 29'er tire. Mine isn't specifically labeled WT on the sidewall whereas the WT models I had on my Nomad specifically said "WT".

  72. #1972
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crit Rat View Post
    People have. Consensus was that the bike did climb better and had quicker handling.
    I rode a 5.5 with a 150 diamond and it was great. I really like how the bike climbed and felt like it gave up nothing on the downhill.

    I never bumped up to 160 so i cant comment on the differences. 150 for me was perfect.

  73. #1973
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    Quote Originally Posted by rondre3000 View Post
    You sure about that? Maxxis doesn't list a WT model in a DHF 29'er tire. Mine isn't specifically labeled WT on the sidewall whereas the WT models I had on my Nomad specifically said "WT".
    Rondre there is no 2.5 version that is in 29 or 27.5 that is not WT in the DHF or the 2.4 DHRII.

  74. #1974
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowsed341 View Post
    Rondre there is no 2.5 version that is in 29 or 27.5 that is not WT in the DHF or the 2.4 DHRII.
    Maxxis has had a 29x2.5 DHF for years. Look at their specs: WT versions are clearly noted as such. The 2.5 DHF isn't.

    http://www.maxxis.com/catalog/tire-468-121-minion-dhf

  75. #1975
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    Quote Originally Posted by evasive View Post
    Remind us what rims you're using?
    35-36mm ID Nox wheels. Sorry, forget the model name.

  76. #1976
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crit Rat View Post
    Suns, have you ridden with the 2.5 DHF in the rear yet? I know you hadn't a few weeks back.

    My stock Aggressor is getting pretty chewed up so time for a new tire soon.

    Have to say that I have been very happy with the Aggressor as an all around tire. Rolls quite well, is reasonably tough and has pretty awesome grip for the amount of tread it has. Might try a DD aggressor next.
    I have ridden with the DHF 2.5 in the rear and it has mad traction, and mad drag honestly. It's also a bit too close for my tastes to the chain stay.

    That said, I have become a pretty powerful rider over the last 6 months and don't seem to have any problems keeping up (on the climbs!) with some very good riders (not XC Pros however).

    The traction is REALLY good. We have some loose rock, steep extended climbs, and that DHF on the rear really allows you to get away with some bad technique. Like you don't need any momentum, you can just stand on the pedals and it'll motor on up. But it's a slow roller for sure.

    For me, I'd like to try an Aggressor on the rear, but just a bit wider than the narrow 2.3 they currently offer which is what kept me away from it. I might stray from Maxxis for my rear next time. I've always preferred WTB tires actually and if they release the Convict and Breakout in appropriate sizes I'm all over it.

    As far as the front Shorty I'm running, I see no downsides at all. It doesn't roll any slower that I can tell than a 2.5 DHF, yet it has more traction pretty much everywhere and it doesn't lose knobs either (90% loose dry rocky terrain). The width is actually considerably more narrow than a 2.5 DHF but that doesn't hurt it at all.

  77. #1977
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    As far as the front Shorty I'm running, I see no downsides at all. It doesn't roll any slower that I can tell than a 2.5 DHF, yet it has more traction pretty much everywhere and it doesn't lose knobs either (90% loose dry rocky terrain). The width is actually considerably more narrow than a 2.5 DHF but that doesn't hurt it at all.
    Is your Shorty a 29x2.5WT model or a 29x2.3?

  78. #1978
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    Quote Originally Posted by evasive View Post
    Maxxis has had a 29x2.5 DHF for years. Look at their specs: WT versions are clearly noted as such. The 2.5 DHF isn't.

    Minion DHF | Maxxis Tires USA
    @rondre I stand corrected and apologize for the mis information.

    the 27.5 version looks like wt only in a non DH version.

  79. #1979
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    Quote Originally Posted by rondre3000 View Post
    Is your Shorty a 29x2.5WT model or a 29x2.3?
    It is the 2.5WT.

    Literally could not find it anywhere in the US, so order it from Germany and it was super cheap. And got here within like 5 days.

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  80. #1980
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    Quote Originally Posted by evasive View Post
    Maxxis has had a 29x2.5 DHF for years. Look at their specs: WT versions are clearly noted as such. The 2.5 DHF isn't.

    http://www.maxxis.com/catalog/tire-468-121-minion-dhf
    Their website has always been full of wrong information. Every 29x2.5 available now is a WT tire.


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  81. #1981
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    I now have 3 rides in on my new 5.5, and I am loving it! I am dialing in my settings, and I noticed that the Switch link doesn't really move that much. Anyone know how much it's supposed to translate? I'm seeing about 3 mm each direction. Is that right? Doesn't seem like that would do that much...
    If white is the "new black", then thanks but I'll stick with the old black...

  82. #1982
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    Wow...interesting that the 2.5 Shorty is visibly more narrow than the 2.5 DHF. Thanks for the heads-up!

  83. #1983
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    Quote Originally Posted by marinrider View Post
    I now have 3 rides in on my new 5.5, and I am loving it! I am dialing in my settings, and I noticed that the Switch link doesn't really move that much. Anyone know how much it's supposed to translate? I'm seeing about 3 mm each direction. Is that right? Doesn't seem like that would do that much...
    Yes, this minimal movement is by design. You won't ever see much more than a few mm's of movement in either direction. If you do, something is very wrong.

  84. #1984
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    Quote Originally Posted by rondre3000 View Post
    You sure about that? Maxxis doesn't list a WT model in a DHF 29'er tire. Mine isn't specifically labeled WT on the sidewall whereas the WT models I had on my Nomad specifically said "WT".


    Yep! I'm sure. Funny, my last bike was a Nomad too.



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  85. #1985
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    Quote Originally Posted by marinrider View Post


    Yep! I'm sure. Funny, my last bike was a Nomad too.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Sorry, that wasn't a great pic...


    There...


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  86. #1986
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    Quote Originally Posted by marinrider View Post
    Sorry, that wasn't a great pic...


    There...


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    I would say that looks like the WT model alright. Thanks for the pic, clearly the website doesn't make things any clearer than that.

    I don't think mine has that WT on it. My bike came to me in December. Oh well. The tire is good. The thing grips really well.

  87. #1987
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    Quote Originally Posted by speeder1 View Post
    I would say that looks like the WT model alright. Thanks for the pic, clearly the website doesn't make things any clearer than that.

    I don't think mine has that WT on it. My bike came to me in December. Oh well. The tire is good. The thing grips really well.
    Mine doesn't either. Must have been a rolling change.

  88. #1988
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    I wanted to throw this on here in case others have the same issue. On my 4th ride on my new 5.5 my shock failed. I have the stock Float X Performance level. Basically it got stuck in Firm mode regardless where the selector is at. Took it to my LBS who got in touch with Fox. Fox told them to send it back, it seems there has been some issues with some of the performance level shocks that were produced oversees, some contamination issues. My LBS hooked me up with loaner shock and my shock will be replaced. Other than that this is the most amazing bike I have ever owned and that's coming off a Nomad and a 575 before that.

  89. #1989
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    Just wanted see if anyone wants or know of someone selling a XM481 wheel set. I would like to buy it.

  90. #1990
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    Quote Originally Posted by evasive View Post
    Mine doesn't either. Must have been a rolling change.
    Btw, it's debatable whether or not the stock rim should even have the WT spec. Maxxis claims that's designed for a 35mm inner width. The stock XM481's inner width is 30mm...
    If white is the "new black", then thanks but I'll stick with the old black...

  91. #1991
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    Check Pinkbike, I think I saw a set for sale a few days ago.

  92. #1992
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    35-36mm ID Nox wheels. Sorry, forget the model name.
    How do you like the NOX? Do you have any back to back comparison to an alloy rim? Curious to know how much efficiency can be recovered with a carbon set.

  93. #1993
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    Quote Originally Posted by Techspec360 View Post
    How do you like the NOX? Do you have any back to back comparison to an alloy rim? Curious to know how much efficiency can be recovered with a carbon set.
    I don't have an exact back to back comparison, but I ran Nox Farlows (29mm ID) on my last bike, and I'm currently running alloy wheels on my 5.5. I really liked the Farlows, they were light (1600ish grams with DT 350 hubs) and they held up through two race seasons and 10-15 bike park days, plus me riding out a few flat tires on the rim without any issues other than rebuilding the rear wheel once with fresh spokes.

    on the 55, I planned to swap out the alloy wheels with a set of carbon hoops right off the bat, but they feel pretty good so I haven't gotten around to it yet. carbon and alloy feel noticeably different, but I'm not sure one is necessarily better than the other in terms of feel. when I got my first set of carbon wheels (LightBike) several years ago, I felt like they were amazing and I could never go back to alloy. I dunno, maybe the Boost spacing is more than just marketing and has kept aluminum wheels in the game. it's nice not having to sweat about tire pressure as much with the alum wheels.

  94. #1994
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    Quote Originally Posted by Techspec360 View Post
    How do you like the NOX? Do you have any back to back comparison to an alloy rim? Curious to know how much efficiency can be recovered with a carbon set.
    Its all I know so I can't offer much insight.

    I purchased the wheels used when putting this bike together and I'd probably go to around a 30mm ID rear wheel if I had to order a set right now. Not sure really.

    My feeling is that 2.2-2.4 tires are a good match for a 30mm ID wheel whereas 2.5-2.8 work well with 35mm wheels.

  95. #1995
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    Quote Originally Posted by pdqmach26 View Post
    Check Pinkbike, I think I saw a set for sale a few days ago.
    They sold the day before I contacted seller.

  96. #1996
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    Quote Originally Posted by hardboiled View Post
    I don't have an exact back to back comparison, but I ran Nox Farlows (29mm ID) on my last bike, and I'm currently running alloy wheels on my 5.5. I really liked the Farlows, they were light (1600ish grams with DT 350 hubs) and they held up through two race seasons and 10-15 bike park days, plus me riding out a few flat tires on the rim without any issues other than rebuilding the rear wheel once with fresh spokes.

    on the 55, I planned to swap out the alloy wheels with a set of carbon hoops right off the bat, but they feel pretty good so I haven't gotten around to it yet. carbon and alloy feel noticeably different, but I'm not sure one is necessarily better than the other in terms of feel. when I got my first set of carbon wheels (LightBike) several years ago, I felt like they were amazing and I could never go back to alloy. I dunno, maybe the Boost spacing is more than just marketing and has kept aluminum wheels in the game. it's nice not having to sweat about tire pressure as much with the alum wheels.
    NICE! Yeah Farlows sound like a good choice.....and can't top that durablility it sounds like!

  97. #1997
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    Its all I know so I can't offer much insight.

    I purchased the wheels used when putting this bike together and I'd probably go to around a 30mm ID rear wheel if I had to order a set right now. Not sure really.

    My feeling is that 2.2-2.4 tires are a good match for a 30mm ID wheel whereas 2.5-2.8 work well with 35mm wheels.
    Makes sense.

  98. #1998
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    Does anyone know what that tube strap is that's on Richie's bike? Or do you know of something similar? My electrical tape solution is functional and all, but...Yeti SB 5.5c discussion-s1200_bt_20170423_untitled_shoot_303.jpg
    If white is the "new black", then thanks but I'll stick with the old black...

  99. #1999
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