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  1. #1
    In my mind, I can do it!
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    Yeti riding tips..

    I'm not quite sure how to attack some obsticals now that I have a longer suspension bike. Techy sections that I used to be careful on while descending for instance... Is there some different way to ride techy sections with an AM bike vs a short travel XC? For example, I rode some technical sections where there were steep stair step type rocks spaced apart just enough so that the front and back tires fall at the same rate.

    Is this kind of riding best served by just bombing through it or should I ride as I normally did before?

  2. #2
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    hmmm technical/steep sections? Stay off the brakes as long as you can, that's the only tip I can give, but it doesn't depend on suspension... hmm you can go faster through technical sections with more suspension
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  3. #3
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    There is only one way to ride stuff....Upright.

    I say whatever method you use for getting through stuff is correct. I found I had to adjust my climbing style between a hardtail and a dual squish, but descending just meant traveling faster and taking the fun line instead of the smooth line.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jdub
    There is only one way to ride stuff....Upright.

    I say whatever method you use for getting through stuff is correct. I found I had to adjust my climbing style between a hardtail and a dual squish, but descending just meant traveling faster and taking the fun line instead of the smooth line.
    I think I am not allowing for the benefits of the extra squish. My loss of skin is the result of that too. I think I need to learn to trust that the bike is going to absorb a lot more than I am giving credit for. I also have it setup with a more XCish feel with about 16-18% sag. I may need to take it out a bit and let the squish be more noticable.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    I think I am not allowing for the benefits of the extra squish. My loss of skin is the result of that too. I think I need to learn to trust that the bike is going to absorb a lot more than I am giving credit for. I also have it setup with a more XCish feel with about 16-18% sag. I may need to take it out a bit and let the squish be more noticable.
    I can tell you one thing, and I bet others will agree, you will get hurt more often riding slow through technical sections than riding fast. In fact I can say that every crash I have had happened when I was being too cautious. Momentum is your friend (within reason). Recently I was talking with a freeride dude on the infamous Chubb Trail steps near St. Louis. While we were talking a rider and his girlfriend, each outfitted with new Specialized S-Works Epics and all the latest gear, rode up. The guy had to impress his gal by riding the steps. We all knew what was coming. He hit his brakes in the worst spot and did an endo on that new $5,000 bike, failing to impress her...
    What, me hurry?

  6. #6
    Hi!!!
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    Did the carbon fiber crack?


    These are two pix of sections of trails I crashed on over the weekend...




    The reason I crashed was cuz of the following....
    1) My balls weren't big enough.
    2) I didn't have the technical skills.
    3) I was going way too damn slow.

    One thing I keep learning about the 575 (and this probably applies to alot of other FS AM bikes out there) is that it can do alot more than what I'm willing to let it do. Hence why I either tend to walk or ride SLOWLY through rough terrain. I THINK that if I let 'er rip and let the suspension do alot of the work, I'll get through a rough spot unscathed. Maybe my ass will be puckered, but that's alot better than a slow speed crash.
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  7. #7
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    get your ass back behind the seat and your chest low....i mean low, like almost level with the bars, or at least what feels like level with the bars. Let the bike drop off the steps naturally but try to keep your upper body independant of the bike.

    If you think a stair step is steep try this. Get off your bike and stand next to it. "Roll" the bike down the stairstep and you will see how far the bike is from actually being able to flip. In most cases I have found it's rediculousy far from being in any danger. The problem is we keep our bodies far far too upright and then wham! Superman! I'm no expert, just giving my .02 cents

    -as far as hitting stair steps where the tires want to roll both rear and front at the same time.... Hold on and pray, open your eyes at the bottom

  8. #8
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    can't resist:
    the best way to ride a yeti is with velcro gloves so you can keep hold of their fur!

    Sorry, I'm delerious from withdrawl from riding my 575 due to studying for medical boards. One more week and then I can get my yeti back on the trail where it deserves to be.

  9. #9
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    A couple of pieces of advice I have heard on the trail, talking about rocky/rooty sections, on hardtails:

    "Close your eyes and pedal harder!"
    "Don't go around every stone. Find a line, go straight, just avoid the ones that look really threatening!"

    I am not saying that I am any good, but just trying to adjust my riding in those directions (well, not closing my eyes) seems to improve my chances of clearing a section.
    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride
    Get off your bike and stand next to it. "Roll" the bike down the stairstep....

    as far as hitting stair steps where the tires want to roll both rear and front at the same time.... Hold on and pray, open your eyes at the bottom
    "Rolling" the bike has helped me at a few places where I had some doubts.

    Any hints for going UP a couple of stairs that are close to bike length? Hit it fast and fly over it?
    Last edited by perttime; 07-06-2006 at 10:53 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    Any hints for going UP a couple of stairs that are close to bike length? Hit it fast and fly over it?
    Approach at low gear and fast and keep the momentum pedaling. Move your weight forward when front wheel clears the top step.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenBonty
    Approach at low gear and fast and keep the momentum pedaling. Move your weight forward when front wheel clears the top step.
    Should I lift the front or allow the first step to kick it high?

  12. #12
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    Momentum is crucial

    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    Should I lift the front or allow the first step to kick it high?
    Yes, you raise your nose so you don't just bump into the first step and get bounced back. If you over do it however, you loose momentum as well. Don't forget to keep the cranks working for you.

  13. #13
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    Hi Ivyguy,
    Let some air out of that shock!
    For XC you should have about 25% or half an inch of sag - it will be much better through the rough descents cos once a few hits get you into about 50% of the travel it will be super plush at soaking up the bumps and you will be able to rip faster with more control.
    Remember if you are not pedaling....you are not going fast enough!
    Trust the beast.
    Chaser

  14. #14
    In my mind, I can do it!
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    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride
    get your ass back behind the seat and your chest low....i mean low, like almost level with the bars, or at least what feels like level with the bars. Let the bike drop off the steps naturally but try to keep your upper body independant of the bike.

    If you think a stair step is steep try this. Get off your bike and stand next to it. "Roll" the bike down the stairstep and you will see how far the bike is from actually being able to flip. In most cases I have found it's rediculousy far from being in any danger. The problem is we keep our bodies far far too upright and then wham! Superman! I'm no expert, just giving my .02 cents

    -as far as hitting stair steps where the tires want to roll both rear and front at the same time.... Hold on and pray, open your eyes at the bottom
    I am sure I was not far enough back. Moving slow on a steep techy section but staying more upright is not the right way to do things... apparently....

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chaser
    Hi Ivyguy,
    Let some air out of that shock!
    For XC you should have about 25% or half an inch of sag - it will be much better through the rough descents cos once a few hits get you into about 50% of the travel it will be super plush at soaking up the bumps and you will be able to rip faster with more control.
    Remember if you are not pedaling....you are not going fast enough!
    Trust the beast.
    Chaser
    Yeah, I think you are right. I have noticed that it's not swallowing the bumps like it should. Just me trying to merge that XC feel with an AM bike I guess. Now if I can just manage to keep air in my tires I should have a good weekend. I think I am going to change my name to "Flats Domino". Seriously, I have had more flats lately. I have gone through 2 tubes and about 9 or 10 patches since I got this new bike. And that is with slime tubes! Some of the holes are on the rim side.... hmmm.

  16. #16
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    like this!!!

    weight back and good balance. Having a fork that doesn't have too much brake dive is a good thing as well.
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  17. #17
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    nice! a 575 in it's natural environment.

    Ant
    (I would've worn padding)

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by antonio
    nice! a 575 in it's natural environment.

    Ant
    (I would've worn padding)
    I would have walked! J/k

    Iviguy,

    My 2 cents.
    Before the descent, lower your saddle all the way down. This helps getting your butt over the rear tire.
    Last edited by Pic-n-Sav; 07-07-2006 at 01:37 PM.

  19. #19
    In my mind, I can do it!
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZmtncycler
    weight back and good balance. Having a fork that doesn't have too much brake dive is a good thing as well.
    where's the video??

  20. #20
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    sorry

    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    where's the video??
    picture only. This is the typical terrain we ride down here in AZ. Kinda rocky.... eh
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  21. #21
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    Hey Ivyguy,
    Maybe those crossmarks are not so good after all?
    Punctures on inside of rim??? Check spokes and rim tape.
    Maybe you are getting pinch flats from funning the rear sus / fork too hard?
    Depends where you ride too.
    In the UK if the farmers have trimmed the Hawthorn hedges it's punctures by the dozen.
    Keep smiling.. at least you are getting punctures riding a Yeti!
    Cheers,
    Chaser

  22. #22
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    Ivyguy, I meant Running [sorry tired and can't spell] Chaser.

  23. #23
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    What Azmtncycler said is important....a fork that does not have big dive really helps.
    When I am about to hit a slow/rocky d/h section with stairsteps I move the compression dial on my Pike to about half way. This really helps the front tire from 'sticking' in a rock and causing unpleasant carnage

  24. #24
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    I have been riding my AS-X for a while now. It is my first FS bike. The stability going down and in anything rough is amazing compared to my Banshee Scirocco HT (with short fork).

    There is one thing that disturbs me, though: every time I have both wheels in the air, it seems that the front is in a big hurry to get back to the ground... I have been thinking that either it is the weight of the Breakout+, and I need to adjust my posture to compensate, or my suspension is not in balance. Any hints?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    I have been riding my AS-X for a while now. It is my first FS bike. The stability going down and in anything rough is amazing compared to my Banshee Scirocco HT (with short fork).

    There is one thing that disturbs me, though: every time I have both wheels in the air, it seems that the front is in a big hurry to get back to the ground... I have been thinking that either it is the weight of the Breakout+, and I need to adjust my posture to compensate, or my suspension is not in balance. Any hints?
    You'll need to preload and lift the front of a big bike more forcefully than a bike with a lighter and shorter front end... Either that or scoot way back in the saddle to compensate for a front heavy landing...

  26. #26
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    Hey Gary --- can you ride up those wooden steps near the RC track at Fort Boise? I've tried it a couple of times and end up crapping up on the 3rd or 4th step from the bottom.
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    I have been riding my AS-X for a while now. It is my first FS bike. The stability going down and in anything rough is amazing compared to my Banshee Scirocco HT (with short fork).

    There is one thing that disturbs me, though: every time I have both wheels in the air, it seems that the front is in a big hurry to get back to the ground... I have been thinking that either it is the weight of the Breakout+, and I need to adjust my posture to compensate, or my suspension is not in balance. Any hints?
    One thing is for sure, it's not the weight of the fork. I guess you have to change your technique somehow. You can't just let the front end roll over a kicker or drop. You always have to pull it a lil bit.
    Does it happen on jumps/doubles or drops ??
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by BelaySlave
    Hey Gary --- can you ride up those wooden steps near the RC track at Fort Boise? I've tried it a couple of times and end up crapping up on the 3rd or 4th step from the bottom.
    I know which steps you are talking about but I haven't tried that yet. I'll give it a shot the next time down the Mil Reserve however. If I remember the section correctly, you can do it one of 2 ways since the steps have a bit of spacing in between:
    1. do it slow, lifting the front end up on each step and letting the rear absorb the step.
    2. do it fast, hovering over the bike, light on the front and letting the bike absorb the bumps beneath ya...
    SJ and I may plan on it tonight if we ride there...

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by goRz
    I guess you have to change your technique somehow. You can't just let the front end roll over a kicker or drop. You always have to pull it a lil bit.
    Does it happen on jumps/doubles or drops ??
    I think I need more practice... and getting used to the bike.

    Better get to the trails at the small neighborhood ski slope and work on it. I have mainly been riding pretty slow trails: speed and jumps have been rare, so far.

    ... have to remind myself to pick the lines that do not twist between the trees ...

    edit: played with the bike a bit today. Managed to pull the bars more and move my weight differently. It seems to help. The bike is so big (not a DH sled but bigger than anything I have ridden before) that it still feels a bit foreign.
    I also added some pressure to the SPV: it was actually below Manitous recommendations, if I can trust my pump. Now it did not feel like riding on a sponge...
    Last edited by perttime; 08-08-2006 at 10:47 AM.

  30. #30
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    Iviguy- you're running too little sag. At 16%-18%, you're doing what I have done and ending with a a high BB height (hence less stability) and a "tippy" bike that will be very unstable going downhill. It will kick you off the seat and feel "endoey" for sure. You may be inadvertently steepening your headtune angle as well. You are also not experiencing the traction you should with a FS bike.

    Never less than 20% and you really should measure the exposed mm on the shock and use right at 25% of that. You will not have 5.75 inches exposed so don't use 25% of that. Use 25% of the exposed shock stanchion as long as your shock is not stuck down. If in doubt, call Yeti and ask them how many mm of sag 20% and 25% equates to. Write those #s down and use them religiously. Millimeters of sag is more intuitive than a percentage. I keep a soft measuring tape handy to measure sag.

  31. #31
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    Gnaarlsville!

    Quote Originally Posted by AZmtncycler
    weight back and good balance. Having a fork that doesn't have too much brake dive is a good thing as well.
    Nice pic! How did you handle the gap before the big rock at the end?

    Iviguy, FWIW I've continued to let air out of my Float to the point that it seems ridiculously squishy... until I hit a bunch of rocks and the fork lives up to its name. I compensate by reaching for the lockout or low speed compression more often. As for the rear, I love mine set to 25% sag in the soft setting. This leaves me with a very verstile shock - no boing on the stiff setting during an out-of-the-saddle hammer, yet plush enough in the middle setting to absorb miles of babyheads with grace (as it did last weekend - righteous!).
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrMountainHop
    Nice pic! How did you handle the gap before the big rock at the end?

    Iviguy, FWIW I've continued to let air out of my Float to the point that it seems ridiculously squishy... until I hit a bunch of rocks and the fork lives up to its name. I compensate by reaching for the lockout or low speed compression more often. As for the rear, I love mine set to 25% sag in the soft setting. This leaves me with a very verstile shock - no boing on the stiff setting during an out-of-the-saddle hammer, yet plush enough in the middle setting to absorb miles of babyheads with grace (as it did last weekend - righteous!).
    I may need to set mine a bit less as well. I still feel some kickback on the saddle when I hit 5" logs and I figure I shouldn't feel that much. But it is by far much better than what I was running before. Probably time to adjust again now that the shock is more broken in.

  33. #33
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    (Going UP a couple of steps)
    Quote Originally Posted by GreenBonty
    Approach at low gear and fast and keep the momentum pedaling. Move your weight forward when front wheel clears the top step.
    ...been a while since I've been to that particular spot, in that direction. Just reminded myself to keep pedaling. Amazing...
    Also managed to cross a few small ditches without chickening out.

  34. #34
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    the line veers to the right

    Quote Originally Posted by MrMountainHop
    Nice pic! How did you handle the gap before the big rock at the end?

    Iviguy, FWIW I've continued to let air out of my Float to the point that it seems ridiculously squishy... until I hit a bunch of rocks and the fork lives up to its name. I compensate by reaching for the lockout or low speed compression more often. As for the rear, I love mine set to 25% sag in the soft setting. This leaves me with a very verstile shock - no boing on the stiff setting during an out-of-the-saddle hammer, yet plush enough in the middle setting to absorb miles of babyheads with grace (as it did last weekend - righteous!).
    the line going down this particular descent veers to the right (from the photo) and you go over another large step, then around the big rock that is pictured closest to the photographer. We call this the 'chute' and is the toughest section to clean on the Mormon trail (24th st. descent for those AZ folks).
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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by BelaySlave
    Hey Gary --- can you ride up those wooden steps near the RC track at Fort Boise? I've tried it a couple of times and end up crapping up on the 3rd or 4th step from the bottom.
    RRB and I finally got to the RC Track at the Mil Reserve on our SS. I took some photos of the steps I think you're talking about.... It wasn't so bad to make it up. You just have to carry some speed. On the 575, you probably won't even feel the steps...
    Sorry for the poor quality. It was taken using my cell...
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  36. #36
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    Like how much speed? When I tried it a couple of weeks ago I was going pretty slow trying to climb up it instead of using momentum. I figured it would be good practice to tackle it slow as if they were rock ledges. Not that we have many of those in the Foothills....
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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by BelaySlave
    Like how much speed? When I tried it a couple of weeks ago I was going pretty slow trying to climb up it instead of using momentum. I figured it would be good practice to tackle it slow as if they were rock ledges. Not that we have many of those in the Foothills....
    just enough speed to coast up the top of the steps.... by the time we get up to the last step we may have to do half a pedal stroke or so... i can also imagine that if we were on the 575, we can also just do it nice and slow, pedaling all the way to the top, but the easiest, smoothest way is with a bit of speed.

  38. #38
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    Got steps??????

    Here's what the 575 is capable of climbing....
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    Last edited by AZmtncycler; 08-17-2006 at 08:30 AM. Reason: more photos
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  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by BelaySlave
    Like how much speed? When I tried it a couple of weeks ago I was going pretty slow trying to climb up it instead of using momentum. I figured it would be good practice to tackle it slow as if they were rock ledges. Not that we have many of those in the Foothills....
    I'd also approach this fairly slowly. On a pretty high (stiff) gear so that I could lift the front end helping myself with a pedal stroke. Than apply heavy stroke when the rear wheel goes up the step. This works for me on similar just bit higher steps.
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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by BelaySlave
    Like how much speed? When I tried it a couple of weeks ago I was going pretty slow trying to climb up it instead of using momentum. I figured it would be good practice to tackle it slow as if they were rock ledges. Not that we have many of those in the Foothills....
    I'd go fast too. About as fast I can. Those steps look so small that the wheels should roll over them without any problems. I have some roots going up hill, a little bigger than those, on my regular trails; and the surest way to get over them, without stalling, seems to be to keep up as much speed as I can and just hit them.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZmtncycler
    Here's what the 575 is capable of climbing....
    Not with me on it! That's an awesome climb. Maybe it's the orange color?? I would have been thinking of the penalty for failure.
    What, me hurry?

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim Mac
    Not with me on it! That's an awesome climb. Maybe it's the orange color?? I would have been thinking of the penalty for failure.

    We all do.

    I ride the same trails as him but I don't claim in any way to be able to tackle the same terrain in the same manner. AZmtncycler is obviously way skilled.....What I have learned is that it really is a matter of where you ride. The more you ride knarly rock climbs with deathly descents like at South Mountain the more comfortable you become with it. I can clear some scary stuff compared to out-of-towners who are not used to the terrain. Overall they might be better riders endurance wise, but the comfort level on serious tech stuff only comes with experience, no other way...Apply that to whatever you ride and it WILL become easier each and every time.

    Not sure what my point is other than YOU CAN do it! You just need to ride it a lot.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZmtncycler
    Here's what the 575 is capable of climbing....
    Very impresive!!!!.
    How much speed do you cary?.

  44. #44
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    just enough...

    Quote Originally Posted by GreenBonty
    Very impresive!!!!.
    How much speed do you cary?.
    I approach this obstacle in granny/3 and carry enough momentum over the top ( I do pedal as I crest it) and then accelerate up and over the 2nd large step. We call this #1 and it's the first really tech spot on the "National Trail" . There are more after this...
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  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZmtncycler
    I approach this obstacle in granny/3 and carry enough momentum over the top ( I do pedal as I crest it) and then accelerate up and over the 2nd large step. We call this #1 and it's the first really tech spot on the "National Trail" . There are more after this...
    Post more of these great action shots.
    The area is so beautifull as well!. Have been to Phoenix numerous times but never hiked or biked.

  46. #46
    a.k.a. MTBMaven
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    I am jumping on this one pretty late. There has been some pretty good advice given so far. Keep your momentum going but under control, trust your bike more, use your entire body to help control the bike (especially your upper body), practice getting behind the seat quickly. You should feel comfortable riding, not pedaling, behind the seat and way behind the seat. If you are too upright, with you seat sky high, you will never clear somethings. Drop that seat way down and get your ass inches away from the rear tire. I also second the comment about brake dive. Too little compression can kill you with too much brake dive or kill your momentum on a large rock when going too slow.
    I thought of that while riding my bicycle. ~ Albert Einstein on the theory of relativity

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride
    get your ass back behind the seat and your chest low....i mean low, like almost level with the bars, or at least what feels like level with the bars. Let the bike drop off the steps naturally but try to keep your upper body independant of the bike.

    If you think a stair step is steep try this. Get off your bike and stand next to it. "Roll" the bike down the stairstep and you will see how far the bike is from actually being able to flip. In most cases I have found it's rediculousy far from being in any danger. The problem is we keep our bodies far far too upright and then wham! Superman!
    I am sure I was not far enough back. Moving slow on a steep techy section but staying more upright is not the right way to do things... apparently....
    At first, inexperienced rides indeed tend not to lean back far enough. Ironically, however, once they get a handle of that, the common problem is leaning too much = more than actually required, which adversly affects your steering (as well as front braking) due to front wheel being too light. I'm often guilty of that sin myself; things appear to be steeper than they really are...

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tomasz
    At first, inexperienced rides indeed tend not to lean back far enough. Ironically, however, once they get a handle of that, the common problem is leaning too much = more than actually required, which adversly affects your steering (as well as front braking) due to front wheel being too light. I'm often guilty of that sin myself; things appear to be steeper than they really are...
    Guilty as charged, and I've been at it for nearly 15 years! When I get a little nervous it's in my nature to slide back, hence straightening my arms. When I'm all cocky my arms are bent my chin's somewhere down towards the bar and everything' ssweet. It's a mind game.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZmtncycler
    Here's what the 575 is capable of climbing....
    Thats on national, is it not?

  50. #50
    trail "cleaner"
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    why yes....

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover Nick
    Thats on national, is it not?
    it is.. It's the first tech spot on National. My crew call it #1.
    No dabs allowed!

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