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  1. #1
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    Yeti ASR5 C for racing

    Reading alot of posts here and there which talk about the asr5 being a perfect trail bike that rips the downhill and can occasional race. Why occasionally? With the fork at 120 and Propedal on, knowing that what goes up must come down, what make a Spec Epic 26 or 29er a better racer? The frame is the same weight, and I can get the same carbon wheels if I want/need. I don't want to be the guy who shows up at the weekly races with the hardtail but never rides it otherwise. But I am a midpack Expert class weekly racer with yearly trips to moab and yearly 100-miler endurance races, who wants ONE bike (and I need a new one). Is it the ASR5? Help me out here. Any thoughts?

  2. #2
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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by rickonayeti View Post
    Reading alot of posts here and there which talk about the asr5 being a perfect trail bike that rips the downhill and can occasional race. Why occasionally? With the fork at 120 and Propedal on, knowing that what goes up must come down, what make a Spec Epic 26 or 29er a better racer? The frame is the same weight, and I can get the same carbon wheels if I want/need. I don't want to be the guy who shows up at the weekly races with the hardtail but never rides it otherwise. But I am a midpack Expert class weekly racer with yearly trips to moab and yearly 100-miler endurance races, who wants ONE bike (and I need a new one). Is it the ASR5? Help me out here. Any thoughts?
    I had no problem racing my asr-5c this year and last year. My lap times were actually faster with the 5 then the asr 4 I can attribute that to the extra travel kept me fresher and it climbs just as fast. My current bike weights in under 23lbs 5 inch travel. It's the best kept secret out there. Cheater bike! I suck in 29ers all the time!

  3. #3
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    No reason at all why you can't race the 5C. I picked up mine to replace my Racer-X for racing and I'm loving this bike. The RX is a classic XC race bike but I never really enjoyed riding it so it got hung up in the garage when the race was over. The 5 is a completely different story. Just as fast as the RX but I love riding it for fun as well. Personally, I think that will be the direction for endurace racing rigs going forward. 29'r hardtails, steep short travel XC bikes, you might as well put a road bike out there. What fun is that?

    I've ridden the Epic 26 & 29'r as well as a bunch of the other standard racing bikes. Sure they're light and pedal fast but compared to the 5C w/Thru axle they are flexy and sketchy when things go downhill. Plus they're all over the place with techy climbs.

    If I'm on a bike for 24 hours straight I want to enjoy the bike I'm on, not put up with it because it pedals fast. That's just me though, I guess...

  4. #4
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    My ASR-5C recently put me 3rd in a 12 hour open class race and 2nd in a local race series(sport class), where 29'ers rain supreme. I'd say it's about as good of an endurance race bike as you can buy out there.

  5. #5
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    I'm not just talking about the 12/24/endurance races. I mean the local 1hour MTB "time trials" as well. Short, not too technical, a few ups, a few downs. Even the weekend area race series--1 to 2.5 hour races on roads and singletrack, rocks and trees, some technical, climbing 2000-4000 feet...
    I guess the main question is this: Does it take a 71-72 degree head tube angle, and a short amount of travel, (and maybe a 29er, although I won't touch THAT arguement), to smoke (relative to your fitness) the local fast races? Is there something inherent in this 68 degree, slacker head tube angle that makes it a endurance ride that CAN race, rather than a racer rig that is great for endurance and longer rides? I don't mean slacker head tube angles in general, I mean THIS bike.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickonayeti View Post
    I'm not just talking about the 12/24/endurance races. I mean the local 1hour MTB "time trials" as well. Short, not too technical, a few ups, a few downs. Even the weekend area race series--1 to 2.5 hour races on roads and singletrack, rocks and trees, some technical, climbing 2000-4000 feet...
    I guess the main question is this: Does it take a 71-72 degree head tube angle, and a short amount of travel, (and maybe a 29er, although I won't touch THAT arguement), to smoke (relative to your fitness) the local fast races? Is there something inherent in this 68 degree, slacker head tube angle that makes it a endurance ride that CAN race, rather than a racer rig that is great for endurance and longer rides? I don't mean slacker head tube angles in general, I mean THIS bike.
    I'm currently racing in a weekday 4 race series, ~12 miles. At this particular course I do find the 68* HT a little slack, so I run a little lower pressure in the fork. The bike is fast and don't think I'd really gain anything racing on an ASRC, however a 29 hardtail may be a little faster here, but that's another debate. I'm currently 3rd place in the series with one more race left, fwiw.

    For me the longer races 20+ miles and endurance races are where this bike shines, where out of the saddle sprinting is less important than having a smooth rhythm. If you are looking for a do-all trail bike, endurance and short track racker, the ASR5C is a pretty sweet ride.

    action shot

  7. #7
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    A very good "one" bike for all needs

    The ASR5 is a great "one" bike (mine is the alu enduro version). I can't really fit two bikes in my apartment, so had to choose carefully and bought mine over a year ago. It'll do everything you ask of it, plus once you learn to corner with the slacker head angle, you'll wonder why you ever rode with twitchy steering. It is so much more confidence inspiring especially at speed downhill. I reckon all bikes will go this way with head angle soon as riders develop a feel for it. You'll start riding things you didn't before and you'll ride for longer.

    I've found the pro-pedal not to really be much of a lockout, (had an RP2 on my last bike which really did stop the back bobbing at all) but is does do something to help accelerations. I wouldn't say it was the best for agressive out of the saddle riding, so if your races are all sprints, it might not be the best fit. But my bike is 29lbs and it sounds like your budget will get you a lighter ride, so perhaps it's get up to speed quicker. Riding on the road is definitely slower because of the lack of real lockout. I tend to be a sit and grind all day rider so comfort is more important for me. Along with Blantonator, I did the same12 hour race and came in first in my solo catagory - so there must be something about the bike

    However, I give you a heads-up that I just plumbed for a Big Top and a friend reckons I'll never ride my full squish again - we'll see....

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