Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Yeti ARC

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Terkel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    140

    Yeti ARC

    Does anyone have experience with this frame? I spoke to a guy today who said something about left stay from seattube to droput had a tendency to bend when mounting discs... Anybody heard of a similar problem?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: moodster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    79

    No issues

    I have an '02 and an '04 running only discs on them and I have had no problems and I have not heard of this issue with anybody!? Looking at the construction of the frame I do not see why this would be an issue?

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jet fixer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    194

    Ditto

    I'm running disks on a 00 and 05 mechanicals on the 00 and hydro on the 05. Never had a problem

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Reporterkyle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    472
    I ran hydros on my '03 ARC -- stolen last week -- and never had any problems. I've never heard of such a thing.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Joules's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    2,258
    not meaning to be a smarta$$ but who is this guy who told you about this, and why do you believe him? Unless he works for Yeti, I have a hard time believing he has worked on or even seen many ARCs - there just arent that many of them around, I doubt most Yeti dealers even see more than 1 or 2 a year.

    Honestly I thing the idea of added stress from discs is really overblown. A big rider landing hard puts a lot more stress on that part of the frame than brakes do, and rim-brakes stress the seatstays as just as much as discs; possibly moreso because energy is transfered to the middle of the span, away from where the chainstays brace the seatstay. Really the only argument that makes any sense to me is the additional stress is due to the additional power of discs - and in ideal braking conditions they aren't that much more powerful (at least with the smaller rotors you'd be likely to run on an ARC).

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Terkel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    140
    He is a mechanic in a shop. He is one of those guys "Go to him and he will solve the problem that nobody else could" -guy http://weightweenies.starbike.com/ph...ic.php?t=16789 Apparently there have been a couple of things that Yeti was quick at solving since few people heard of them...

  7. #7
    Fall Branch Felon
    Reputation: toydeluxe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    178
    ARC frames not a common thing?

    Hmmm.....

    They're pretty common around here.........as well as the FRO.

    Maybe it's just where we live.
    "That which does not kill you, only makes you stronger"



    Haro WERX XCR
    Ibis Alibi
    Interloc Scandium Elite

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Terkel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    140
    Quote Originally Posted by toydeluxe
    ARC frames not a common thing?

    Hmmm.....

    They're pretty common around here.........as well as the FRO.

    Maybe it's just where we live.
    I think that I've only seen one ARC IRL in Denmark...

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    351
    Due to a brake fluid leak, the paint in the region where my rear disc brake mount and dropout are joined to the loop stays is absent. When looking closely there's a very fine hairline crack (or non-welded joint) that runs across the forward leading edge of the brake mount/dropout. I was alerted to this by a store who were previously my LBS of choice when my bike was in for a fork service (wrong end of the bike I know, please don't get the wrong idea that they were being extra thorough because the fork locked up after about 24 hours and the Aust manitou distributor who I sent it to for repair said it hadn't been lubricated or serviced properly, but that's another issue)

    Said store, who were busily drooling over my Yeti ARC frame (presumably while charging me for the fork service) alerted me to this tiny weeny crack but given the extra meat of welds in the region I'm not overly concerned. That's the only sign of a weakness/cracks that i can pick that is in any way related to the disc brakes on an ARC frame. For the record, mine is, i believe, an 03.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Terkel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    140
    Thanks a lot. I knew I should post here :-) Is it possible for you to take a picture? And maybe a serial number? It'd be nice to have i confirmed that yours is a 2003 and not a 2004...

  11. #11
    Grand Poobah
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    265

    Brakes on an ARC

    I've got a 1998 ARC frame with no disc mount. I was sort of upset that I could not go to a rear disc on it, but I'm pretty happy with the setup at this point. I've got an Avid Arch Rival in the rear with a front disc. It's light and still has plenty of braking power.

    Since most of the braking power is at the front wheel, and since rim brakes (in general) are lighter, you may want to just run a strong and light weight V-brake in the rear and a disc in the front. That will alleviate any concerns of stress on the left chainstay. As you can see, mine is 8 years old now and still riding strong.

    Last year I swapped out the suspension fork for one of the Sibex titanium rigid forks. I probably saved 2-3 pounds off the bike. The last thing that I would like to swap out in the future is the crank/BB.


    Bigger photo and others at my bikes page.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Terkel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    140
    Quote Originally Posted by minus9
    I've got a 1998 ARC frame with no disc mount. I was sort of upset that I could not go to a rear disc on it, but I'm pretty happy with the setup at this point. I've got an Avid Arch Rival in the rear with a front disc. It's light and still has plenty of braking power.

    Since most of the braking power is at the front wheel, and since rim brakes (in general) are lighter, you may want to just run a strong and light weight V-brake in the rear and a disc in the front. That will alleviate any concerns of stress on the left chainstay. As you can see, mine is 8 years old now and still riding strong.

    Last year I swapped out the suspension fork for one of the Sibex titanium rigid forks. I probably saved 2-3 pounds off the bike. The last thing that I would like to swap out in the future is the crank/BB.


    Bigger photo and others at my bikes page.
    I'm gonna go with discs no matter what. One of the reasons for doing so is the danish weather. This was last weekend. http://mtb.dk/gallery/albuo50 V-brakes just isn't the best choice because of the wet danish summer and winter.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    351
    Quote Originally Posted by Terkel
    Thanks a lot. I knew I should post here :-) Is it possible for you to take a picture? And maybe a serial number? It'd be nice to have i confirmed that yours is a 2003 and not a 2004...
    will see what i can do, may take a few days.

    Drew

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •