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  1. #1
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    SB95, OE Fox 34 include spacer?

    Sorry, I couldn't find this on a quick search.

    Since the fox 34 that comes stock is at 120mm, does it include a 20mm spacer? Just curious if you could either replace with a 10mm, or remove completely to achieve 130/140 in the front.

    Thanks.


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  2. #2
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    I know the sb95 can run a fork at 140 I also believe this is just a spacer plug in the fork. From what I have read you should be able to switch your 120 to 140 fairly easy and quick.

  3. #3
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    You cannot switch the travel on CTD forks like you could on previous Float forks. Not sure exactly what changed internally, but I have heard from good sources that it is different.

  4. #4
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    My SB95, that I received June 3rd, came with a 2013 Fox Float 29 CTD, and I removed the 20mm spacer to push it out to 140mm travel with very little drama.

    850 trail miles later it's just riding fabulously.

    OTHER 2013 Float 29 CTD models may be different, I don't know, I just know about the one that came with my bike. ;^)

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bear View Post
    My SB95, that I received June 3rd, came with a 2013 Fox Float 29 CTD, and I removed the 20mm spacer to push it out to 140mm travel with very little drama.

    850 trail miles later it's just riding fabulously.

    OTHER 2013 Float 29 CTD models may be different, I don't know, I just know about the one that came with my bike. ;^)
    Thanks, bear. I like the geo numbers with the 140 on Yeti's site, but that would suck if none of their fork options had that availability.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by chargerfan View Post
    Thanks, bear. I like the geo numbers with the 140 on Yeti's site, but that would suck if none of their fork options had that availability.
    FWIW, I love how mine rides at 140.

    Takes a little more control effort in the "XC tight and twisties" - but not so much I care. Totally gobbles trail everywhere else!

  7. #7
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    I just talked to Fox, tried to order a 2013 34 CTD and they said they could only lower it to 130 because of a new air spring? Kinda a bummer. I just sold my 2012 on a bike and enjoyed the ability to change the travel.
    Enjoy every ride!

  8. #8
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    I'd love to know what the difference is that causes it.

    My fork *is* a 2013 MY Float 34 CTD (kashima, bla bla bla).

    They must have made a running spec change.

    130mm would surely be fine though.

  9. #9
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    Ya Bear, me too? I tried to figure it out with the sales guy on the phone and his only reply was "its the new air spring." But you can still get the Talas at 110? Curious....there was a bunch of bikes speced this year with 120/34, I guess they would go Talas or 130?
    Enjoy every ride!

  10. #10
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    10mm isn't a LOT of change (we're talking less than 1/2 degree head tube angle change, and maybe a stem spacer change).

    Still, curious.

    Love to see a tear-down of one of the new-new 2013 & 1/2 CTD forks.

  11. #11
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    bringing this thread back to life.

    just received my 95 and i'm loving the bike. this thing is "get myself in trouble" fast.

    so...does the bike ship at 120mm or 140mm? i didnt quite understand the quote above about only lowering it to 130mm.

    if it's stock at 120, can someone point me to a link with how-to instructions on removing the spacer.
    did a quick search and this is where i ended up. my local yeti dealer is saying that they'd have to charge me the overhaul fee to dig into the fork.

    TIA

    seann

  12. #12
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    ships at 120, last I heard.

    The reason they will charge overhaul is that they need to drop the lowers completely off the fork, which necessitates replacing the oil (and capturing the old).

    If you're anywhere near mechanically inclined it's easy to do, doesn't require any special tools, and doesn't really require you even completely remove the air piston from the fork once the lowers are out.

    Here's the short form of my simplistic cheater directions. I cheat and don't even bother removing the fork from the bike. Assuming nothing is screwed up here you won't even add wear-n-tear to the o-rings on your air piston, nor lose any Float Fluid out of the air spring.


    Disclaimer: If you follow my directions and something goes awry, on your own head be it. I didn't do the work, I'm human, I may have forgotten something too! Review all and make sure you understand and am comfy before beginning work!

    You'll need

    - 5mm hex to get the brake caliper off the fork.

    - a 2mm hex to get the rebound knob off, and I believe a 15mm socket to remove the foot-nuts.

    - a pair of snap-ring pliers to get the c-clip off the bottom of the air spring leg (and put it back).

    - replacement oil but not a lot of it - 10wt oil is recce by fox, 30ml to both lower legs - and a syringe of 30ml or more capacity makes for most-clean replacement of oil into fork

    - zip ties, maybe (something to temporarily attach the brake caliper to the handlebar)

    - catch basin for oil, wide enough to catch from both legs at the same time

    - clean rags/shop towels (lint free!), and isopropyl alcohol for cleanup

    - plastic-tipped mallet or wood block and hammer (for gently tapping cartridges free from lowers)

    You may want some good grease - like Slick Honey - but again won't need much of it at all.

    - remove all air from the air spring ( for safety, lean on the bike while depressing the schraeder valve to ensure all is removed. This is WAY important as you don't want Projectile Parts when you remove the c-clip later on.

    - mount bike in workstand

    - remove brake caliper from fork, I suggest wedging something clean between the brake pads to prevent accidental compression.

    - remove brake hose from hose-guide near the brake arch

    - rotate and lock bike in position with lowers pointing up (prevents oil draining when you free the lowers from the uppers)

    - use 2mm to release grub screw in rebound knob, remove rebound knob and set aside

    - loosen foot-nuts on both sides, use mallet/wood+hammer to break the cartridges free from the lowers, be firm but gentle as you don't want to bend anything (really only a hazard for the rebound knob shaft). I leave the foot-nuts on and use them as a base for tapping, FYI, to spread out the load. *DO NOT COMPLETELY REMOVE THE LOWERS* - yet - that would cause the oil to drain all DOWN your bike and make a mess!

    - set foot-nuts aside, do not confuse which is which. If the crush-washers don't come off with the foot-nuts, gently unscrew/remove them by hand and set them aside with the foot-nuts.

    - once foot-nuts and washers are removed and lowers "free" - rotate bike down with lowers into catch-basin, and finish removing them from bike so that the oil from the legs drains into the basin

    - once all oil removed, completely remove lowers, wipe them down with clean rags to ensure no oil leakage and set aside

    - wipe down uppers with clean rags to prevent oil dripping around, set aside catch basin and close it up so oil is not spilled

    - rotate bike back up so that fork legs are pointing up, to prevent dropping things down

    - using snap-ring pliers, remove the c-clip on the bottom inside of the air spring

    - gently but firmly pull the air spring piston shaft out UNTIL you can see the plastic travel limit spacer adjacent to the negative spring - there is no need to completely remove the piston from the leg - the spacer is about 20mm long and open on one side.

    - by-hand, un-snap the plastic travel limit spacer from the shaft

    - gently push all the bits back into the bottom of the air spring leg

    - replace the c-clip, MAKE SURE it's completely snapped into the groove at the bottom of the leg

    - partially inflate the air spring, should only take 10-20 psi, to force spring piston to max extension and to help hold it there while rebuilding the fork. Make sure the leg is pointed away from you (or anyone else) while doing so - if you didn't get the c-clip properly seated this will be the point you shoot Piston Projectile and start crying about misplaced parts.

    - retrieve fork lowers, verify clean, double-check the dust wipers at the top of the lowers.

    ( if you wanted/needed to replace the dust wipers, now is the time, I'm not documenting that at the moment as I'm pretty sure it's covered elsewhere )

    - optionally wipe some Slick Honey onto the bushings - I like to do this, have been for years, not 100% sure how much it is needed these days

    - gently work lowers back onto upper legs. Make sure the arch FACES FRONT. Be careful to not fold the dust wiper tops while doing so. Don't lose the springs off the top of the dust wipers.

    - gently push the lowers all the way onto the fork, make sure the damper- and spring-piston-feet mate up to the holes they need to go to in the lowers. Sometimes I need to use an awl to help guide the lowers into the holds on the lowers, sometimes everything just lines up.

    - back lowers off a bit so that the holes are clear of the shaft 'feet' - inject 30ml of oil into each lower at this point

    - gently compress lowers onto piston feet, guiding feet through the lowers.

    - replace crush washers and foot-nuts onto appropriate legs

    - torque foot-nuts onto leg lowers to 50 in-lbs - that's not a lot - no ham-handed wrenching here!

    - replace rebound knob, torque grub screw to 4 in-lbs - you may want to use some loc-tite blue on the grub screw to make sure it doesn't vibrate out (I do).

    - rotate bike so fork faces down again, finish airing up.

    - using isopropyl alcolhol, clean and wipe down fork exterior to make sure there is no oil to migrate onto brake parts

    - mount brake caliper loosely, make sure to run brake hose INSIDE the fork leg for safety, do not torque down the caliper into position yet

    - mount brake hose into hose guide

    - mount tire into fork, be sure to gently guide rotor into caliper

    - clamp down the brake lever by hand - maybe pump it a few times to make sure it's centered, and then tighten caliper bolts down. Check for no-drag free-spin. You may need to tweak alignment slightly.

    Check sag on bike, both fork and shock, such that it is as desired. Note that your slightly altered weight distribution may affect pressure setting on the rear shock too.

    Go ride a lot.

    ;^)

    notes:

    Doing this will slacken head and seat tube angles by about 1d - not huge but definitely noticeable.

    This raises the h-bars almost an inch. This is very noticable. That coupled with the angle changes may cause you to want to play with stem-flipping, or headset-spacers, and seat-angle in order to adjust it back to taste.

    This also lengthens wheel-base, pushing the front tire further out. This is noticable.

    Assuming equivalent sag to previous, this will raise the bottom bracket slightly.

    I tend to run a bit more sag at 140 then 120 though, so for me it's a wash.

  13. #13
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    SWEET! thanks bear. you da man.

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