Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: SB-66 vs. ASR-5

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KevinGT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    756

    SB-66 vs. ASR-5

    I've been planning to buy an ASR-5 this year but was surprised to see the aluminum version being phased out. Seems Yeti is putting all their focus on the SB models. I hadn't considered the SB because it seemed like overkill for my riding style, location, and background.

    I've been on a HT since the early 90s (rigid before that) and am 47 years old. I don't jump or hit massive drop offs. My riding style is more XC than trail. I ride in the Atlanta area where we have lots of nice, SORBA-built flowy singletrack with short climbs and no major obstacles.

    The ASR-5 seemed like the perfect fit. I want to try FS but everything I've read says it rides like a HT when you want it to. But the SB-66 caught my eye.

    The heavier frame is justified by the longer travel. A tradeoff I don't need. With my terrain and style, two pounds of frame weight is more important than an extra inch of travel.

    But what I don't know is how the Switch technology performs compared to the single pivot ASR. Given that I've never ridden a FS bike, would I even know the difference?

    I'm assuming the SB-66 is the eventual replacement for the ASR. Should I grab an ASR in what is possibly their last production year or just jump right to the SB?
    Last edited by KevinGT; 01-09-2013 at 05:14 PM.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    346
    If I lived where you are describing and ride how you describe I would seriously consider the SB95. Sounds like it may be more suited to your style. If a 9er is not your style I totally understand. I have sworn one off til I am at least 40.

    I have a 66, I ride my bike on more aggressive terrain and love jumps, drops, root and rock sections, oh and climbing too haha, it feels like this bike was made for me. You may have very valid points on ASR over SB, I know I love my SB though. Maybe consider the SB66c to shed some of the weight?
    Want a one of a kind bike? Message me for a one of a kind paint job.

    The internet is a tough place to ride

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    52
    I was set on buying a ASR5 - and then I rode a SB66. Now I'm getting the SB66 for sure. Pedaling was very responsive and I didn't feel the extra weight.

    I have a hard time seeing anyone go wrong with the SB66.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    309
    What you have is a true conundrum that can only be solved by buying both.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: andrewnielson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    617
    I live in Colorado but grew up racing XC in the Woodstock/Marietta area and also up in northern Georgia. I just came back from a Christmas visit and rode the SB95 up at sixes road/blankets creek area and LOVED it! Seems like it would be the perfect bike for most of the terrain in that area. See if you can test ride one if you're not sold on the 29er yet. On the other hand, my buddy races his ASR5 frequently in that area too and loves it. I just purchased an ASR7 even though they were discountinued just like the ASR5 will be most likely as well. Don't look elsewhere when they are still great bikes and especially if you are on a budget as they would be almost half the cost as a new SB95 or SB66. Good luck!

  6. #6
    Spring! Spring! Spring!
    Reputation: bear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    5,278
    My SB95 loves flowy buff stuff. You may want to ditch the 2.4" front tire in favor of a 2.2" to match the back but that's a personal tradeoff. I dunno if the weight of the bike would faze you, I never notice it (whole build about 31-32# with phat tyres) but it sure is nice having a bike that feels like it's going to last for the Long Haul.

    Of course, the SB95 also loves the bumpy stuff, and drops, and jumps. She's a very playful gal.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bpnic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    1,170
    I've spent considerable time on and owning both. The Sb-66 pedals differently, but noticably more efficient, and feels faster. I owned them back to back with identical builds and front travel.

    The two handled exactly the same terrain for me (Techy stuff ) with ease based on each having similar geometry and builds. The big difference was price; so I now own only a beefy build Asr5A.
    If money were no object, I'd buy a Sb66C.


    I've owned 2 Sb-66A's (small and medium) and 2 Asr5's (Carbon and Alum). Also, and Asr7.
    I'd hit it, but I bruise like a peach.

  8. #8
    > /dev/null 2&>1
    Reputation: Procter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,273
    I haven't ridden an sb66 or sb95 (clearly people love em), but for the type of riding you describe, and since weight is more important to you than travel, i say seriously consider an asr5c, which, if you find in the sales right now, should be around the same price point as the sb al models. Very light bike, shock is tuned to stay stiff until it gets rough, with pro pedal in I'd bet its as stiff as most vpp/dw link/switch bikes on the pedal bob front.

    My asr5c is just as good on the pedal bob as my dwlink firebird is, albeit, you have to engage the pro pedal on the asr5 while on the dw link bike, pro pedal doesn't seem to make a huge difference. The tradeoff is that the dw link bike activates for much smaller hits, and a rearward travel path in dw link/vpp/switch bikes should handle square edges better and feels more plush in general. But, you hint that this isn't critical for you. So, all in, based on your description, i haven't ridden sb's yet, but I'd bet asr5c fits your needs a little better.

    My yeti is at 25.3 lbs with a dropper post and it smokes up climbs.
    ------------------------------------------------
    They're justified and they're ancient and they like to roam the land

  9. #9
    nero
    Reputation: nerofinis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    70
    I am riding an ASR5 and live in Augusta GA. Near Atlanta and have been out to blankets and other trails in the Atlanta area. The bike seems perfect for the terrain here. Although as others have said I don't think you can go wrong with a 95 or 66. The bike - ASR5 suffers a little on square edged hits but other than that its a beast. It has bought me a tremendous amount of joy.

  10. #10
    Snapper
    Reputation: johnd663's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    478
    I have gone from 29ers to a yeti 5A. the head angle is really slack and will be very different to your hardtails. Have you considered a ASR-C - 4 inch XC bike - cant help but think 5 - 6 is completely overkill considering what you have come from.
    I find the 5 to be very capable but have been thrown by the relaxed angles after being used to 29er XC steep angles. i would love to own a 66 but i just dont have the terrian to warrent it.
    Or another hardtail
    Just throwing it out there.

  11. #11
    DLd
    DLd is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    980
    Quote Originally Posted by johnd663 View Post
    I have gone from 29ers to a yeti 5A. the head angle is really slack and will be very different to your hardtails. Have you considered a ASR-C - 4 inch XC bike - cant help but think 5 - 6 is completely overkill considering what you have come from.
    I find the 5 to be very capable but have been thrown by the relaxed angles after being used to 29er XC steep angles. i would love to own a 66 but i just dont have the terrian to warrent it.
    Or another hardtail
    Just throwing it out there.
    I'll second that. It sounds like you wouldn't be using more than 4 inches of travel on any bike, so why weigh yourself down. My L ASR-C frame and shock weighed just under 5 lbs. I finally weighed the complete bike last night and it came in at 21.6 lbs. I'm still shocked myself. Plus it rides fantastic. I agree the SB's are great bikes, but why pay the weight penalty for capabilities you don't need. There's great deals on the 5's and ASR-C's now, put the savings toward some carbon wheels. That's what I did.

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2
    "Great things are not accomplished by those who yield to trends and fads and popular opinion."-Jack Kerouac

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KevinGT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    756
    Great discussion and fantastic insight. Thank you all for your comments.

    One added bit of information: I'm 5' 6", 169 lbs. Does being a smaller rider sway the recommendation either way? I think I'm spot-on for a small frame size for either the ASR or SB. Fortunately, I have a local shop where I can demo both in a small.

    The final piece is that I absolutely love the look of the ASR. It's the second-best looking mountain bike of all time, in my opinion (The ARC being the best). If I can find the ASR-5A in white, I will buy it on the spot. I hadn't considered the ASR-Carbon but will start a search for those as well.

  13. #13
    Snapper
    Reputation: johnd663's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    478
    Quote Originally Posted by KevinGT View Post
    Great discussion and fantastic insight. Thank you all for your comments.

    One added bit of information: I'm 5' 6", 169 lbs. Does being a smaller rider sway the recommendation either way? I think I'm spot-on for a small frame size for either the ASR or SB. Fortunately, I have a local shop where I can demo both in a small.

    The final piece is that I absolutely love the look of the ASR. It's the second-best looking mountain bike of all time, in my opinion (The ARC being the best). If I can find the ASR-5A in white, I will buy it on the spot. I hadn't considered the ASR-Carbon but will start a search for those as well.
    your size should steer you to a 26er rather than a 29er - just wont get the bars low enough. The ASR-c looks just like a ASR 5 so if you like the looks. Check a few different online websites to get an idea of closeout sales. Is a Yeti hardtail completely out of the picture?
    great that you can demo your size on your local trails - goodluck

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    12
    Based on what you described about where you ride, your size and preferences I think you should give serious consideration to the ASR-C. But don't rule out the 29er. I had similar considerations and eventually narrowed it down to the ASR-5 or C but went with the C. Weight (my ASR-C is 21.8 #) and head tube angle did it for me. But I did get a Big Top 29er HT as well so agree with poster above who advises to get both! I have a 650b wheel/tires that I put on the ASR-C when I am doing more technical downhill stuff that benefits from the FS and the rollover capabilities of the bigger tire/wheels. I highly recommend it.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KevinGT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    756
    Quote Originally Posted by johnd663 View Post
    . Is a Yeti hardtail completely out of the picture?
    Funny you should ask...

    My dream bike, from the time I first saw one in the late 80s or early 90s, has been a Yeti ARC. I absolutely love that bike but never owned one.

    My current bike is a 2005 HT that I built up with fantastic components (XT, Thompson, Easton, Avid BB7s) but a cheapo frame. About a month ago, I decided, in addition to buying either an ASR or an SB-66, to buy an ARC frame and swap those great components over to the new frame. Easy, no?

    How about impossible?

    I've checked every online retailer going 25 Google pages back and not one has an ARC in a small for sale. So I went directly to Yeti...no reply. I went to local shops and asked them to contact Yeti. None available and they even checked their scratch-and-dents.

    I then started emailing retailers across the country listed on Yeti's website. No luck, even going out to CA.

    So I then started looking to Europe. I've, so far, found ONE dealer in Europe that may have the frame. It's going to cost me over $1100 with the exchange rate and shipping and I'm not even convinced they actually have one.

    One shop I contacted said that Yeti has reconsidered killing the ARC and may produce some more in 2013. I hope it happens!

    I'll pay full price for a new ARC (any year from 2005 on!) and a good price for a used one! As long as it has disk brake bosses, a 1 1/8" head tube, and team colors (white and turquoise), I'll take it!!

  16. #16
    Snapper
    Reputation: johnd663's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    478
    Quote Originally Posted by KevinGT View Post
    Funny you should ask...

    My dream bike, from the time I first saw one in the late 80s or early 90s, has been a Yeti ARC. I absolutely love that bike but never owned one.

    My current bike is a 2005 HT that I built up with fantastic components (XT, Thompson, Easton, Avid BB7s) but a cheapo frame. About a month ago, I decided, in addition to buying either an ASR or an SB-66, to buy an ARC frame and swap those great components over to the new frame. Easy, no?

    How about impossible?

    I've checked every online retailer going 25 Google pages back and not one has an ARC in a small for sale. So I went directly to Yeti...no reply. I went to local shops and asked them to contact Yeti. None available and they even checked their scratch-and-dents.

    I then started emailing retailers across the country listed on Yeti's website. No luck, even going out to CA.

    So I then started looking to Europe. I've, so far, found ONE dealer in Europe that may have the frame. It's going to cost me over $1100 with the exchange rate and shipping and I'm not even convinced they actually have one.

    One shop I contacted said that Yeti has reconsidered killing the ARC and may produce some more in 2013. I hope it happens!

    I'll pay full price for a new ARC (any year from 2005 on!) and a good price for a used one! As long as it has disk brake bosses, a 1 1/8" head tube, and team colors (white and turquoise), I'll take it!!
    well ill be ......
    there are many great cheap small HT frames out there if the Yeti doesnt come through mate.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Boxer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    459
    WHat size tires did you put on the ASRc for the 650b? Maybe ill start a new thread.
    Pedal Dammit!

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by Boxer View Post
    WHat size tires did you put on the ASRc for the 650b? Maybe ill start a new thread.
    I'm quite curious as well, as I saw clearance on my rear of ASR-5 is not big with 2.25 tire.

  19. #19
    DLd
    DLd is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    980
    I wonder what the benefit of 27.5 is on an ASRc. I mean, I thought of doing it for the front, along with a 27.5 fork, so there wouldn't be any limitations, greater rollover, etc., But for the rear, if you can just fit a 1.9 on a 27.5 as opposed to a 2.35 on a 26 with the same clearance, hence same diameter, what would the benefits of going with the 27.5 wheel be, besides increased weight, and more risk of a pinch flat?
    "Great things are not accomplished by those who yield to trends and fads and popular opinion."-Jack Kerouac

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •