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  1. #1
    MarkyMark
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    AS-R from a Blur

    I have an '04 SC Blur Classic. It's getting tired some I'm thinking of getting something new, like an AS-R. I haven't test rode one, so I'm wondering if anyone that has ridden both can give me some advice or feedback. Things like if I'll notice the lack of VPP, etc. You can send me a p-mail and I'll keep it confidential.

    The reviews on the ASR here are very positive so I have a good feeling that I'll probably be happy if I go with the ASR. I'd just like to hear the opinions of those who've tried both bikes.

    BTW, I did try to get a ride during a demo up in the Bay Area, but the Yeti's run HUGE so I was way too small for the large I wanted to try (5'10). All of the mediums were out (good sign that they're popular) so I tried some other bikes. I was impressed with the 575 when I test rode it, but it was too much bike for the normal XC riding that I do.

  2. #2
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    Closest I've come to your position is the Blur LT to a 575. The VPP always has that 'lengthening' feeling at the start of travel which I couldn't really get used to. The 575 is much better at the start of its travel.
    I've only had 1 ride on a blur xc, and the asr I've got is much better pedalling wise due to the propedal shock, and this can be tuned to your riding style.

  3. #3
    mutaullyassuredsuffering
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    Blur

    After riding ASR's for 4 years I just switched to a Blur XC Carbon. The suspensions are totally different animals. The ASR is heavily damped with the stiffest propedal to combat the Single Pivot. As a result it accelerates like a banshee and won't bob, but it is also not nearly as active as the Blur. If you leave the propedal off, or on a light setting it will be less efficient, but descend equally as well.

    I think of the ASR as riding like a HT, with a magic switch you can flip (propedal) and have a couch for the way down. It was perfect for the hardpack or fireroad climbs and tough descents. It is a great race bike when you need to accelerate and hammer out of corners (you will get flex out of the rear triangle but the bike still launches). You will get some brake jack, but It never bothered me much.

    The Blur is more of a true FS, where you have to pedal smoothly to avoid bob, but it is incredibly active, and therefore better on rolling terrain, flat rooty terrain, slickrock, and really rough climbs. It's also alot easier on the body after long hours due to the plushness.The VPP also really shines when you stand and hammer.

    I think it comes down to the type of terrain you will be on.

    PM me if you want more info.
    Free will is an illusion, people will always choose the perceived path of greatest pleasure.

  4. #4
    Awesomist™
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    My girlfriend went from a Blur XC to an AS-R, and although it's not first hand experience I can relay a bit of her findings...

    First off, she's about 5'1" and rides an XS in both bikes. Not sure that would make a big difference, but it should be noted. I don't know that she is heavy enough to notice any "flex" in either bike.

    In the climbing, she felt both bikes were very capable, with similar efficiency. She didn't notice a great deal more effort needed with one bike or the other. Put good tires on either, with the rear suspension set up correctly and she could clean as much technical stuff on either, and whoop me to the top by about the same amount on either bike.

    The big difference for her was in the descents: within 20 yards of her first descent on the AS-R she felt the difference was night and day better with the Yeti. She would describe the Blur as feeling unstable at speed, like it "was going to explode into a million pieces underneath" her she would say. The Yeti has a bit longer wheelbase but similar geo everywhere else which could account for this? Overall, she likes the way the Yeti handles better for descending and cornering and such.

    Maintenance-wise, it seemed the Blur was ALWAYS in need of a tune. The rear derailler would come out of adjustment every other ride it seemed, and the story we have heard is the VPP design gets funky like that on the really SMALL SC bikes, due to chainstay length, hangar placement, etc. That's just the story we've heard from a few shop mechanics and a couple component industry folks. Sorry to be vague, just don't wanna name names.

    She also demo'd the 575 on a couple BIG rides as well before making the Yeti purchase, but really didn't care for the slacker geo of the 575 and went with the AS-R. Now of course she's on Yeti #2 with her recent purchase of a 303R-DH, both ends of the spectrum I suppose!
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  5. #5
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    A friend just got rid of his Blur (but went to a superlight) due to maintenance issues. Bottom pivot was forever wearing out, and the VPP depends on this to work.

  6. #6
    On your left.
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    love my ASR

    I had a classic Blur. I thought I liked it. Then I got an AS-R SL. It is such a sweet bike and I have so many memories of races where I am just putting it all out there and the Yeti is my perfect companion. Don't take this weird, but I have a very good relationship with my Yeti. I have sold the Blur. I used to train on it and hated ridding it even for that. It was less maintenance for me to ride the Yeti all the time (and way more fun). I prefer the predictability of the ASR suspension to VPP. It's not about what the design is capable of - it's about what you know it can do. For me, the VPP was often reacting differently than I expected. You need good brakes on a VPP bike; Brakes are optional on the ASR. What Used2Bhard said is true - the ASR is very well damped and although I don't think it rides like a hardtail it is very predictable like a hardtail. The VPP was not well damped and I even had the shock "Pushed". It packed up on descents and seemed very nervous and just wasn't planted through really fast chop. On climbs it would wallow and hang up on roots or big steps. The ASR is easy to climb with and work it over the slow stuff. It is very stiff in the plane of the frame, but it is not a trials bike.
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  7. #7
    mutaullyassuredsuffering
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    yup

    Quote Originally Posted by Motivated
    I had a classic Blur. I thought I liked it. Then I got an AS-R SL. It is such a sweet bike and I have so many memories of races where I am just putting it all out there and the Yeti is my perfect companion. Don't take this weird, but I have a very good relationship with my Yeti. I have sold the Blur. I used to train on it and hated ridding it even for that. It was less maintenance for me to ride the Yeti all the time (and way more fun). I prefer the predictability of the ASR suspension to VPP. It's not about what the design is capable of - it's about what you know it can do. For me, the VPP was often reacting differently than I expected. You need good brakes on a VPP bike; Brakes are optional on the ASR. What Used2Bhard said is true - the ASR is very well damped and although I don't think it rides like a hardtail it is very predictable like a hardtail. The VPP was not well damped and I even had the shock "Pushed". It packed up on descents and seemed very nervous and just wasn't planted through really fast chop. On climbs it would wallow and hang up on roots or big steps. The ASR is easy to climb with and work it over the slow stuff. It is very stiff in the plane of the frame, but it is not a trials bike.
    You bring up a good point. Shock technology has really improved the way that bikes handle. The Blur I'm on has the 2010 RP23, so the sus works great. It also has the same head angle as the asr now which makes descending a breeze. The new carbon frame adresses the stability and stiffness issues. (Pivots TBD, but I like the grease zerks)

    My point is if the OP is going from an older Blur to a new ASR, or a new Blur/Anthem/etc. The improvements made in the last 2 years will be wonderful. My 09 ASRSLc was light years ahead of the 06 I started with. The ASR-C even better.

    It's hard to compare the validity of any suspension design based upon different generations of bikes.

    I loved my ASR's and won around 20 races on them, so I will never complain about their abilities. It's just for the riding I do now, the Blur is a better choice for me. I don't feel one is "better" than the other, they just excel in different terrains.
    Free will is an illusion, people will always choose the perceived path of greatest pleasure.

  8. #8
    MarkyMark
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    Thanks for all of the responses. I'm still looking, but the ASR is near the top of my list. I don't race anymore so I'm not looking for a race rig. I'm looking for something a bit lighter than what I have now while still being fun and comfortable for long rides.

    Maybe I've been lucky, but my Blur has been virtually bullet-proof. I don't do regular maintenance and I only had to replace the bearings last year after I got the squeaking. They've been good ever since. I'm on my original Float R AVA and haven't adjusted it at all. I got it PUSH'd last year and it's been great.

    I've done a lot of climbing and never had any problems. It's not as light and efficient as my HT, but it's very good. I demo'd an '09 Intense Tracer VPP just last month at Mountain Bike Oregon and I couldn't believe how badly it climbed vs my Blur. Even with ProPedal 3, it bob'ed like crazy. I think the Fox RP23 shock needed a lock-out or about 300 lbs of pressure (I weight 170). Fortunately, the ride only had ~3000ft of total climbing so I endured.

    I've done some fast descents (Downieville) and never had a problem with my Blur feeling unstable at speed.

    I think the ASR is a mature, proven design so I'm quite sure I wouldn't be disappointed. Yeti's are relatively rare in NorCal so that's another reason why I'm interested. Santa Cruz is 30 minutes away so Blurs are common.

  9. #9
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    If you don't race and are looking for all-day comfort then a light build (XC style parts) onto a 575 would also be an option. I'm one of those people who runs the 575 with a 120mm fork - it just feels better for me - and for XC to light trails its perfect. I've got it with XO, Reba team forks and I9 Ultralight wheels. Its a bit over 11kg, but rides almost as light as my ASR.
    Another option is to put 120mm forks on the ASR. The Yeti website shows the frame specs for this travel now.

  10. #10
    FAT CHANCE!
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexRandall
    If you don't race and are looking for all-day comfort then a light build (XC style parts) onto a 575 would also be an option. I'm one of those people who runs the 575 with a 120mm fork - it just feels better for me - and for XC to light trails its perfect. I've got it with XO, Reba team forks and I9 Ultralight wheels. Its a bit over 11kg, but rides almost as light as my ASR.
    Another option is to put 120mm forks on the ASR. The Yeti website shows the frame specs for this travel now.
    what build kit do you have on your ASR and do you think the 575 climbs just as nice as your ASR? That weight on a 575 is impressive.

  11. #11
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    I've got hand picked kit on the ASR:

    XO with gripshift; K-force 2x9, dura-ace FD, SID team forks, 1320g wheels with Alex Sc rims; Elixir mag CR brakes; Time Carbon Ti pedals...so full top line race kit (approx 9.6-9.7kg).
    As the ASR is full-on race set-up, the 575 doesn't climb as well - but Its only by comparison - but descends much better. I've got a pretty light kit on the 575 too.
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  12. #12
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    Thought i would ask the qustion here since this topic is similar to my question. I am currently deciding on my next bike and had targeted the Blur LT as my next purchase but figured i would do some research first since my first full suspension bike was purchased with little knowledge as I was relatively new to the sport. LBS sold me on an 08 Stumpy Elite which overall is great bike except they sold me a medium frame and I am 6' tall 210lbs. They simply told me that was the right size for me and as stupid as it may sound I believed them. I know now that I belong on a large after many rides and although the Stumpy is a great bike I will not go back to that LBS for another purchase.

    My plan is to by a frame and swap the parts from my Stumpy over because the parts on there are pretty good. After reading about the 575 and the Blur LT, I do not know which way to go now or possibly the ASR. I do not believe I have a Yeti dealer anywhere close but i do have a SC dealer in town so it is difficult for me to test ride the Yeti so I will most likely need to rely on honest feedback from people like you that have ridden both or at least give me the pros and cons of each. any help wpould be greatly appreciated as I plan to be over educated on my purchase this time.

  13. #13
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    From my riding of the two, the 575 is more pedallable than the blur LT. It is a very capable bike but if your plan is to ride down insane stuff and get away with it then the LT or ASR 7is probably more your type of bike.

  14. #14
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    To me it sounds like the OP would be in the right bracket for the new ASR-5?

    If you don't race anymore but are looking for a light xc bike then the ASR-5 seem like an ideal choice with a light build. Go carbon if you have the money.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexRandall
    From my riding of the two, the 575 is more pedallable than the blur LT. It is a very capable bike but if your plan is to ride down insane stuff and get away with it then the LT or ASR 7is probably more your type of bike.

    Nope, nothing insane I just want a very capable trail bike that I do not have to baby. Without test riding it I just do not know the handling characteristics. I have ridden the Blur but only on paved lots or trails but I did like the feel and by the looks of it the 575 would be a great bike also. I have also heard that the SC needs more maintaining than some others.

  16. #16
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    The 575 is a very XC capable trail bike. Especially if you put a travel adjustable fork on it. The ASR 5 is a trail capable XC bike, with a stiffer tuned shock. You can set up either in a similar way, but the 575 is best with 140-160mm forks, the ASR5 with 120mm approx forks (according to the website).

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