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  1. #1
    In my mind, I can do it!
    Reputation: iviguy's Avatar
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    New bike, new questions...

    I have a couple of items that I need some advice on.

    The front brake caliper bracket was rubbing on the disk itself so I had to adjust that. I got it pretty close but it catches a rub that makes a small squeek while rolling along. Is there a way to adjust disk brakes that makes it easy? Like putting a card inbetween the pads and rotor and squeezing the brakes and then tightening the bolts??

    Also, I have never had hydro brakes so I'm not sure how much mush should be there. If I squeeze the brake handles hard I can take it down to where it is not far from touching my fingers on the grips. Is that normal? If not, how do I make that adjustment?

    I don't know if this is an oops or not, I had the bike upside down and decided to put some air in the RP3. Some blue thick oil came out of it when I released the pump hose. I don't know how exact that oil measurement is in that shock but I doubt it was more than .5cc that came out. That won't affect anything, will it?

    I'm sure I'll think of more....

    So far I am really loving this purchase. The bike just felt so comfortable when I rode it around the neighborhood. I'm not sure how I feel about the wheels that come on the enduro. They are nothing special and seem to have cheapie hubs, Yeti ARC in the front (whatever that is) and Deore M525 rear (I thought it was supposed to be XT). But they seemed pretty light so time will tell.

  2. #2
    Bad Case of the Mondays
    Reputation: Jdub's Avatar
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    The brakes...
    First thing, with the Juicy brakes is loosen up the CPS bolts to where the caliper moves pretty freely side to side over the rotor. Squeeze the lever 5-6 times, then squeeze and hold it. Tighten up the CPS bolts while holding the lever. This should help ensure the brakes are centered. Sometimes I have to eyeball it a bit after doing this, but most of the time it gets the brakes pretty good.

    As for the "mush", that will take a rebleed to get rid of. My suggestion would be to ride the brakes for a couple rides, and at least get them bedded in before attempting a rebleed. Also, you'll need to buy a bleed kit (like $30) for the Juicys, but it makes things very easy. So again, if you can live with it for now I wouldn't mess with it.

    FWIW - My Juicys have very, very little mush at the lever and get nowhere near my bars under very hard stopping so its just a bleed thing I would think. Factory bleeds vary.

    The oil that came out of the RP3 is likely just assembly lube. Seems like Darren from PUSH told me something about this awhile back. I wouldn't be alarmed.

    Bottom line, get out there and enjoy it!

  3. #3
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    Reputation: eatdrinkride's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    Is there a way to adjust disk brakes that makes it easy? Like putting a card inbetween the pads and rotor and squeezing the brakes and then tightening the bolts??

    Also, I have never had hydro brakes so I'm not sure how much mush should be there. If I squeeze the brake handles hard I can take it down to where it is not far from touching my fingers on the grips. Is that normal? If not, how do I make that adjustment?
    .
    You can try leaving the bolts to the mount loose. Squeeze the brake lever (it will self center, more or less) and tighten the bolts while still engaging the brakes. Sometimes this works, sometimes not. I had to fiddle with my brakes for a good hour, even adding thin washers for shims before I got it perfect.

    If your brakes are too mushy and the throw is too far they may be short of fluid. A re-bleed is needed. I also had to do this on my new Hayes. The front lever was mushy compared to the rear. Bleeding fixed that issue. There is also a 'throw' adjustment on the lever down where the caliper is. It's a 2 or 2.5mm hex. If the levers are too close to your hands (or too far for that matter) when static then you need to adjust this screw to move the lever resting position in or out. Do this first before any bleeding, maybe this is all you need.
    Also the brakes may feel mushy at first. Do I remember you saying you have avid mech's on another bike? If so they are much firmer feeling than many hydro's. Add into that, the fact that you now have new pads and rotors that need bedded in, and you may not like them at first. Get the 'throw' correct, and the centering and ride them for a couple of hard rides. If the levers still are 'mushy' and they almost hit your fingers then a bleed is in order.

    I'm speaking from my experience with my new Hayes Mags (the 9's are nearly the same)
    If you have Avids you can use the dial adjust instead of the hex screw.

  4. #4
    Bad Case of the Mondays
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    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride
    If you have Avids you can use the dial adjust instead of the hex screw.
    I think he has the 5s (like what I have), which do not have the pad contact adjuster dial. That is the difference between the 5s and the 7s.

  5. #5
    EDR
    Reputation: eatdrinkride's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jdub
    I think he has the 5s (like what I have), which do not have the pad contact adjuster dial. That is the difference between the 5s and the 7s.
    ahhhhh....

  6. #6
    In my mind, I can do it!
    Reputation: iviguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jdub
    The brakes...
    First thing, with the Juicy brakes is loosen up the CPS bolts to where the caliper moves pretty freely side to side over the rotor. Squeeze the lever 5-6 times, then squeeze and hold it. Tighten up the CPS bolts while holding the lever. This should help ensure the brakes are centered. Sometimes I have to eyeball it a bit after doing this, but most of the time it gets the brakes pretty good.

    As for the "mush", that will take a rebleed to get rid of. My suggestion would be to ride the brakes for a couple rides, and at least get them bedded in before attempting a rebleed. Also, you'll need to buy a bleed kit (like $30) for the Juicys, but it makes things very easy. So again, if you can live with it for now I wouldn't mess with it.

    FWIW - My Juicys have very, very little mush at the lever and get nowhere near my bars under very hard stopping so its just a bleed thing I would think. Factory bleeds vary.

    The oil that came out of the RP3 is likely just assembly lube. Seems like Darren from PUSH told me something about this awhile back. I wouldn't be alarmed.

    Bottom line, get out there and enjoy it!
    I just looked at the manual that explains the bleed process. Man, this is nothing like bleeding the brakes on a car.... It might be worth is to just have an LBS do it if that is needed.

  7. #7
    Bad Case of the Mondays
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    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    I just looked at the manual that explains the bleed process. Man, this is nothing like bleeding the brakes on a car.... It might be worth is to just have an LBS do it if that is needed.
    It really isn't that hard. I had never bled brakes on a car or anything else before my first set of hydros (Shimano XTRs). When I switched to the Juicys, I bought the bleed kit and its really pretty simple and well documented in the technical document you can get from SRAM.com.

    Of course, if you don't feel comfortable doing it, then by all means have a LBS do it. DOT brake fluid can be pretty nasty stuff to deal with if something goes wrong.

  8. #8
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    In addition

    1. play with the QR position on the front wheel to see if there is a sweet spot/tension where there is no hub.
    2. Check the rotor for trueness. If it's slightly warped, take a super-clean 6" crescent wrench and straighten it the best you can...
    3. I'm not familiar with the Juicy's (I have XTR and Hayes on my bikes) but try pumping it a few times to see if it helps... Bleeding hydraulics is a relatively easy task (although I think Shimano is easier than Hayes to bleed).
    4. Don't worry about the oil from the RP3. Mine did the same thing. The oil spray will also happen when you pump up (or down) the negative chamber on your Rev. Since it's close to the front rotor, make sure you either cover up the rotor when removing the shock pump and/or wipe the rotor thoroughly with alcohol and a clean rag after.

  9. #9
    Bad Case of the Mondays
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    Quote Originally Posted by flipnidaho
    4. Don't worry about the oil from the RP3. Mine did the same thing. The oil spray will also happen when you pump up (or down) the negative chamber on your Rev. Since it's close to the front rotor, make sure you either cover up the rotor when removing the shock pump and/or wipe the rotor thoroughly with alcohol and a clean rag after.
    One trick I learned from my Pike was to flip the bike upside down to fill up the negative chamber. The oil will run away from the valve and result in a whole lot less oil coming out.

    Of course, make sure you set it right side up for the positive side for the same reasons.

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