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  1. #1
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    The new ASR-SL- problem with carbon rear?

    Has anyone heard of any problems with the carbon swingarm of the new ASR-SL? It is strong enough but do you guys think it can take a hit in case of a crash on some rocks? I love the bike but I'm wondering if the new carbon rear poses a potential problem.

  2. #2
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    Carbon

    No carbon fiber structure will ever be stong enough to resist much impact. I have never hit my swingarm on anything, but I have ground my seat stays a bit on my carbon hardtail. If you have a history of striking your swingarm on sharp rocky things than you will be hosed!

    As far as defects, I have only seen one problem so far on an ASL. The carbon seperated from the alum at the back of the chain stays during a race last weekend. I think that was a rare manufacturing defect, as it happened to a racer during a flat short-track race.

    I just bought one last week. Every one I race against here in Colorado is riding one of these things, so I'm following their lead. Everyone I've talked to loves the bike an has had good luck. So far I think it is the fastest FS I've ever been on, and the fact that it's nearly .5lb lighter than a Titus is pretty hard to beat!

  3. #3
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    The ASR-SL makes a superb racer but with the new carbon swingarm, I'm a bit hesitant to use it as a light trail bike though it can function perfectly as one. Hmm..I wish they had a non-carbon option too.

  4. #4
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    Agree

    Yup,

    Unless your number one priority is beating your buddies up the hill, I would get something a little more burly. I abuse my trailbike!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by used2Bhard
    , and the fact that it's nearly .5lb lighter than a Titus is pretty hard to beat!
    Your Yeti frame is 4.5 lbs???? I don't think it is half pound lighter.

    Let's get the facts straight.

    Anyways, manufacturers so skimp on weights it is not even funny. The medium ASR-SL weighed in at 5.2bs at the shop. Small was 5.1. (Yeti claims 4.9) Small RX weighed in at 5.1. (Titus claimed 4.8) As I was shopping around, I did some research on weight.
    Last edited by Daffunda; 06-19-2006 at 09:52 AM.
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  6. #6
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    jeez....

    Quote Originally Posted by Daffunda
    Your Yeti frame is 4.5 lbs???? I don't think it is half pound lighter.

    Let's get the facts straight.

    Anyways, manufacturers so skimp on weights it is not even funny. The medium ASR-SL weighed in at 5.2bs at the shop. Small was 5.1. (Yeti claims 4.9) Small RX weighed in at 5.1. (Titus claimed 4.8) As I was shopping around, I did some research on weight.
    I weighed them at my LBS when I was choosing. I don't remember beyond the first decimal point....

    Small ASR 4.9 lbs
    Medium ASR 5.1 lbs
    Medium RX 5.5 lbs

    Maybe they gave me an XL titus frame, but it sure looked like a medium...

  7. #7
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    Well, I already have my All Mountain bike. I'm looking for a short travel bike as well. I have a Medium ASR-SL but I need to move to a Large now (Medium was fine for steep terrain but for epic riding, I prefer a large).

    So I guess the new ASR-SL may be out though not just yet. I'm not feeling much love for the carbon swingarm. I need to find out how much that costs to replace. If it's too much, I may look at the Ventana El Fuego or even the Turner Flux. Damn, I keep wishing they also offered the ASR-Sl without the carbon swingarm.

    Oh well, Yeti can't do that just for me

    I'm calling to find out how much it would cost to replace the swingarm. Of course, the Yeti boys are out for their daily lunch ride. More power to them
    Maybe I should not worry about that swingarm but a worrier is what I am right now- trying to work on it though.
    Last edited by Flyer; 06-19-2006 at 10:52 AM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    Well, I already have my All Mountain bike. I'm looking for a short travel bike as well. I have a Medium ASR-SL but I need to move to a Large now (Medium was fine for steep terrain but for epic riding, I prefer a large).

    So I guess the new ASR-SL may be out though not just yet. I'm not feeling much love for the carbon swingarm. I need to find out how much that costs to replace. If it's too much, I may look at the Ventana El Fuego or even the Turner Flux. Damn, I keep wishing they also offered the ASR-Sl without the carbon swingarm.

    Oh well, Yeti can't do that just for me

    I'm calling to find out how much it would cost to replace the swingarm. Of course, the Yeti boys are out for their daily lunch ride. More power to them
    Maybe I should not worry about that swingarm but a worrier is what I am right now- trying to work on it though.
    The carbon swing arm has a 5 year warranty man. Within the 5 year period it won't cost you anything to replace. I don't think they ask any questions. If it breaks, they replace it.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    The carbon swing arm has a 5 year warranty man. Within the 5 year period it won't cost you anything to replace. I don't think they ask any questions. If it breaks, they replace it.
    Really? So if you do a 8 ft drop and if it breaks, they'll replace it? I think the term "warranty" applies when you're using it reasonably, although "reasonable" is a relative term.
    "Prison sports are really fun. I get used as a frisbee, a dartboard, and a second base!" - Kneemoi

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daffunda
    Really? So if you do a 8 ft drop and if it breaks, they'll replace it? I think the term "warranty" applies when you're using it reasonably, although "reasonable" is a relative term.
    I'm not sure the aluminum rear would take an 8' drop. But I am sure it has exclusions just like EVERY other warranty out there. Still, if you told them that you broke the rear end and they didn't ask, which they probably don't, then yes they would replace it. And think about that strategy too. If they want to build confidence in their carbon rear end it wouldn't do them justice to deny warranty claims based on trivial things, right?

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    ...The flipside of course being that if you take a lightweight XC race bike and do an 8 foot drop on it you're a freaking idiot who deserves to have a broken bike and the derision of all vaguely competent thinking members of the human race...

    I think the term is "intended use"

    There are some bikes that are intended to be suitable for 8 foot drops. An ASRsl (with either alu or carbon chainstays) is not a frame that falls into his group. It's probably not desinged to take 8 inch travel triple clamps either. People don't do the Paris-Dakar in an F1 Williams.

    I assume I'm preaching to the converted here...?

  12. #12
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    Well, I would not be doing drops or anything too crazy. My primary concern is falling on rocks someday and having a rock crush or break the swingarn upon impact. I think I'm leaning away from the new ASR-SL as a trailbike. The rear triangle is $800 to replace.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by used2Bhard
    No carbon fiber structure will ever be stong enough to resist much impact. I have never hit my swingarm on anything, but I have ground my seat stays a bit on my carbon hardtail. If you have a history of striking your swingarm on sharp rocky things than you will be hosed!
    Really? And why not? You can build carbon composites (please note the "composite") that are way stronger and impact resisent that aluminum ... which is not exactly the strongest or most impact resistent material on the planet!!!!

  14. #14
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    OK Fine

    Quote Originally Posted by Davide
    Really? And why not? You can build carbon composites (please note the "composite") that are way stronger and impact resisent that aluminum ... which is not exactly the strongest or most impact resistent material on the planet!!!!

    I should have reworded it for the editors....

    If you made a solid block of Carbon Fiber it would be strong enough, but it also wouldn't save any weight. No Carbon frame out there now will survive a bad crash with sharp objects because they are lightweight and hollow. My point was simply this.... don't buy a currently available frame made of carbon if you are going to crash into rocks!

  15. #15
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    The advantage with carbon composites is that you can build the wall thickness as great as you want it, where you want it. If there are areas that don't need high strength the n the walls can be thin, areas than need 5mm thick walls can have em, sections can be solid if you want.

    Some carbon is light and hollow, some is solid, some will flex in a particular direction, some is rigid. The beauty is that (if you know what you're doing) you can engineer in the physical characteristics you require as you go.

    Take a Scott Ransom for instance. It's a 5 to 6 inch travel bike with a frame made almost entirely from carbon fibre composites. Yet the frame weighs in at about the same as a 575. This means that there must be an awful lot of meat in the Scott where it's required to give additional strength. (or it's an overbuilt kludge)

  16. #16
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    protection

    just be sure it lands on the drivetrain side which has the aluminum cladding! Seriously, I did not know the aluminum triangle was no longer an option. I guess they exclusively target the bike at XC racing. There probably should be something between the ASR-SL and the 575.

    BTW, even if the carbon fiber is really thick if something cuts deep enough to break the outer fibers, the part is done for. Stress is carried in the skin and soon enough that ding will expand and the part will fail. That said I think carbon fiber is much more ding resistant than you may think - the outer layer of epoxy is very tough and thick enough to prevent rock dings from reaching the fiber. Just consider cf handlebars which endure lots of scratches, dings, clamping stress and still support our body.



    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    Has anyone heard of any problems with the carbon swingarm of the new ASR-SL? It is strong enough but do you guys think it can take a hit in case of a crash on some rocks? I love the bike but I'm wondering if the new carbon rear poses a potential problem.
    M

  17. #17
    Mythical Creature
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    Quote Originally Posted by used2Bhard
    If you have a history of striking your swingarm on sharp rocky things than you will be hosed!
    LOL - I used to never wreck and whack my chainstays on rocks and such - until I got my zoot 2006 ASR-SL which I have now had no less than THREE hard, nasty, falling-on-sharp-rocks wrecks and well over 2,500 miles on, and? Not a peep. No problems at all, and I'd say the carbon has resisted impact damage better than any aluminum I've had.

    Did I nearly pee my lycra when I first wrecked like that? Hell yes! Was it OK? Yup.

    Amazing bike - if I can only get my house finished up so I can get riding/racing again it'll all be good.

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  18. #18
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    My Carbon rear end is as new.

    Ok it does sounds like a bullet has hit your bike when it takes a stone flick. But apart from that it feels and sounds solid.

    Just dont take a large hit in the middle of it. And even if you did it would have to be hard granite to trouble it.

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