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  1. #1
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    missed my Bontrager yesterday

    Hello
    I took my new 575 on short ride yesterday to an area full of rock gardens and some rock steps. Again and again I faced the same problem. When tryed to climb/cross a rock step, the rear suspension was active (which is great in many situations ) and reduced the ground clearance such that I hit the rock with the pedal. It happened repeatedly on rocks that I always clean which was very frustrating.
    I don't believe this is a 575 issue (I've noticed the problem when I first demoed the bike) but rather a FS general thing.
    Anyways I wonder weather this is just me who needs to get used to the bike and learn to use some finer moves or this is a known trade off between HTs and FS.
    BTW the RP3 was on the stiffest (right) position and the TALAS travel was reduced by 3 clicks (~120mm) at all times.
    Last edited by GreenBonty; 08-14-2006 at 10:17 AM.

  2. #2
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    Hmm - I think I understand what your describing. Hasn't been a problem for me. Maybe you're just a half-second too slow in shifting your weight forward after you pop your front-wheel onto the ledge? Or am I completely off?

    Ant

  3. #3
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    talked to the guys at LBS who rides both HT and FS and they said they were familiar with "my problem". May need to take new approaches when attacking a rock.
    Don't get me wrong here. The bike rocks!, climbing (especially technical) and descending are much easier now but this issue is still somewhat dissapointing.
    Any specifics on how to attack rocks, especially when you must pedal (don't have enough inertia) will be appreciated.
    Thanks
    GB

  4. #4
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    I went to a 575 from a Gary Fisher Cake, which has a much higher (I'm assuming, although I havn't looked it up) bottom bracket height. Probably it's just that you're familiar with a HT with a higher BB height, so your slapping more rocks with your pedals. The trade off is a bike that handles better (especially at speed) and corners like a pair of GS skis.

    Just try to time your pedal strokes so that your not nailing them on stuff. Also, make sure you don't have too much sag (even in the full propedal setting), as that will lower you a bit more.

  5. #5
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    I had a Bontrager Race, and I agree: I miss it sometimes, especially when clearing logs. That was my biggest shock when transitioning to the 575, when my big ring slammed into logs and rocks that I would normally clear on my Bontrager with no problem.

    That being said, I'm getting used to the 575. My speed has picked up, I'm doing more technically challenging things like drop-offs, and I recently installed a bashguard to protect my middle and small ring.

    Here's an old picture of my Bontrager - which I kept!

    [IMG][/IMG]

  6. #6
    Ride on
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    My hardtail actually had a lower BB, so I guess I don't understand Can you wind your TALAS all the way out? It might not be comfortable at first, but you can get used to the taller, slacker front end. I have a 130mm Vanilla and I regularly ride trails with tons of logs and step-ups with no chainring contact issues.

  7. #7
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    it gets better

    First, I've adjusted the RP3 rebound control that was to slow (now it 5 clicks form slowest).
    With the new rebound setup, the ground clearance lost at impact recovers fast. Second, if you you move your weight forward in synch with the rebounds, you gain enough ground clearance to climb the step.
    One new issue however, found after todays ride. When lifting the bike from saddle and handlebar, it kinds of "tops out"the RP3. This click may come from another loose link on the rear suspension. Any similar experience?.
    Thanks
    GB

  8. #8
    Bad Case of the Mondays
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenBonty
    One new issue however, found after todays ride. When lifting the bike from saddle and handlebar, it kinds of "tops out"the RP3. This click may come from another loose link on the rear suspension. Any similar experience?.
    Thanks
    GB
    Mine did the same thing about about 50 miles. Basically needed to snug up the bolts in the shock and linkage that had loosened up a bit. Good news is that it has only happened once and they've stayed snug since then.

  9. #9
    Positive Vibe Technician
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    When lifting the bike from saddle and handlebar, it kinds of "tops out"the RP3. This click may come from another loose link on the rear suspension. Any similar experience?.
    Thanks
    GB[/QUOTE]

    This sounds like what I have going on right now - I tightened all the linkage bolts? I'm taking here to the shop first thing in the am.
    If you are gunna be dumb, ya gotta be tough

  10. #10
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    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by GreenBonty
    Hello
    I took my new 575 on short ride yesterday to an area full of rock gardens and some rock steps. Again and again I faced the same problem. When tryed to climb/cross a rock step, the rear suspension was active (which is great in many situations ) and reduced the ground clearance such that I hit the rock with the pedal. It happened repeatedly on rocks that I always clean which was very frustrating.
    I don't believe this is a 575 issue (I've noticed the problem when I first demoed the bike) but rather a FS general thing.
    Anyways I wonder weather this is just me who needs to get used to the bike and learn to use some finer moves or this is a known trade off between HTs and FS.
    BTW the RP3 was on the stiffest (right) position and the TALAS travel was reduced by 3 clicks (~120mm) at all times.
    Well, I could'nt resist temptation and took my Bonty for a ride this afternoon.
    After 7 weeks on my 575, V brakes felt like there was no brake at all and the 85mm Zoke felt like rigid. Droped a curb and landed harshly and the short rocky descend at the park entrance was soooooooo bumpy. After few more minutes the old faithfull 97 Bonty reminded me how efficient it is on the flats and how nicely it accellerates. Out of the saddle attack is no brainer but that was not all. Headed to the rock gardens and the Bonty just remembered the way and led me safely through everything. Dono how low BB is (much lower than the 575) but pedals cleared the rocks easily.
    Today, I realy thought I'd say I don't miss my Bonty any more but I can't.
    Now I don't think there is any surprise with my recent description as the two bikes are completly different but.... . It is great to have two great bikes!.
    Yeti outclimb (technical) my Bonty and smoke it on the downhills and dropes.

    One thing I'd like to challange all the AM bikers (not just the Yeti guys) is the "myth" that an AM bike will keep you fresher on the longer rides. I'll be modest and say that this effect skipped me so far (maybe my saddle is not broken in yet but it's more than that). Nor did I feel the "placebo effect" of a new bike on my times. I have not improved any of my ride times as of yet.
    All is good, just food for thoughts.

  11. #11
    In my mind, I can do it!
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenBonty
    talked to the guys at LBS who rides both HT and FS and they said they were familiar with "my problem". May need to take new approaches when attacking a rock.
    Don't get me wrong here. The bike rocks!, climbing (especially technical) and descending are much easier now but this issue is still somewhat dissapointing.
    Any specifics on how to attack rocks, especially when you must pedal (don't have enough inertia) will be appreciated.
    Thanks
    GB
    If you don't use the large chainring why not get a bashguard?

  12. #12
    Who is John Galt?
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    Well I've got to say at times I miss the hardtail too. I seem to have lost some confidence after switching to the Yeti. I think a big part of it is I am afraid of wrecking this thing and tearing up such an expensive piece of bike. The other issue is I haven't yet gotten used to what that rear suspension is going to do. With the hardtail you just knew it was going to bounce up and kick you in the behind so you got ready for it. I've had a few surprises on the FS Yeti, most of them pleasant. Last week I took the Yeti up a hill I've done many times before. It starts out real steep but you first have to cross a bridge at right angles to the trail so there is no way to get any speed up. It's like starting from a dead stop. Then right away it gets technical going up. I took one look at that hill and bailed, then walked the Yeti up. Made me feel pretty stupid. All my issues have been with uphills, going down is a no-brainer with all that travel.

    Anyone else having confidence problems?
    What, me hurry?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim Mac
    Well I've got to say at times I miss the hardtail too. I seem to have lost some confidence after switching to the Yeti. I think a big part of it is I am afraid of wrecking this thing and tearing up such an expensive piece of bike. The other issue is I haven't yet gotten used to what that rear suspension is going to do. With the hardtail you just knew it was going to bounce up and kick you in the behind so you got ready for it. I've had a few surprises on the FS Yeti, most of them pleasant. Last week I took the Yeti up a hill I've done many times before. It starts out real steep but you first have to cross a bridge at right angles to the trail so there is no way to get any speed up. It's like starting from a dead stop. Then right away it gets technical going up. I took one look at that hill and bailed, then walked the Yeti up. Made me feel pretty stupid. All my issues have been with uphills, going down is a no-brainer with all that travel.

    Anyone else having confidence problems?
    Had some confidence issues at the begining but I think now it's behibd me. I think I know what to expect from the Yeti now it's just that I am not always sure how to counter act. This will improve with time for sure and you will gain your confidence soon.
    I don't share the feeling you have about the yeti giving any trouble at any technical climb. When I demoed the 575 I made sure it cleared every thing my Bonty did and it excelled especially on the technical climbs. The only terrain I had and still have issues with is rock gardens.
    GB

  14. #14
    Who is John Galt?
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    How different we all are! I just love the rock gardens now. I've got a lot of sag in the Yeti and I just fly through that stuff. I really think the bike's only limitations are the rider and that's what's hurting me on the climbs. That and I switched to Time pedals and still have that little voice telling me I need to unclip just when I really need to be clipped in. Just need a lot more rides I'm sure.
    What, me hurry?

  15. #15
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    I'm with you Big Jim... I only fall or crash when I'm not confident and going too slowly. Almost always that's because I'm afraid of being clipped in and not being able to get out if my legs give out when going up that technical rock climb. I did my first endo yesterday coming down because I was tired and going to slowly... the front dropped first and I grabbed the brake like a tard and whoomp - my first endo! Bike took the spill like a champ, as did I. This first year in clipless for me (Candy Ti) and I usually only fall when I stop... but it still keeps my confidence down a bit... Oh well, when I commit and am confident the 575 eats whatever terrain I throw at it.

    As a side note, I haven't had many problems with banging my pedals on rocks... not sure if it's because I'm shifting my weight well and watching my pedals around rocks, or only going over wuss rocks.. lol I'm pretty new to this stuff, so it's probably the latter...

  16. #16
    Oni
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    F/S leaves me fresh (but not clean!)

    [QUOTE=GreenBonty].
    One thing I'd like to challange all the AM bikers (not just the Yeti guys) is the "myth" that an AM bike will keep you fresher on the longer rides. QUOTE]

    Ahh Bontragers. What a nice frame. Would have bought one years ago except for the silly horizontal drop outs. Great quality and a very nice bottique bike.

    I have to say, switching to F/S from my ti-hard tail made a huge difference in my freshness. Wasn't as wiped out at the end of a four or five hour ride as I was before. My first weekend with my F/S was a 24 hour race, and while I was tired after my laps, wasn't dead to the world.

    So to me, it's not a myth. Less beat up and fresher on a F/S frame.

    Oni

  17. #17
    Who is John Galt?
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    I think the key is we gotta get those legs in shape. I've run four marathons and it hasn't helped me one bit on the bike. Not even the wind. But I do have the muscle that when it gets tough I can really mash the gears. Problem is the legs and lungs tend to give out at the same time. Has anyone had an experience where the yeti let them down and not the other way around?
    What, me hurry?

  18. #18
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    [QUOTE=Oni]
    Quote Originally Posted by GreenBonty
    .
    I have to say, switching to F/S from my ti-hard tail made a huge difference in my freshness. Wasn't as wiped out at the end of a four or five hour ride as I was before. My first weekend with my F/S was a 24 hour race, and while I was tired after my laps, wasn't dead to the world.

    So to me, it's not a myth. Less beat up and fresher on a F/S frame.

    Oni
    I was realy looking forward to feel the same. I hope I will in the near future.
    I did complement my Bonty with a thudbuster seatpost to get a softail ride in the last 2-3 years which helped much.
    I don't do many epics these days and usually ride less than 3 hours but one thing I remember from long smooth climbs is that I had to leave the saddle to let some blood go to sensitive areas every 10-15minutes. I feel this more with the Yeti since it's smooths my climbs.
    The other thing is efficiency where you can not beat a good HT.
    I guess my shoulders and hands are less beated on the downhills and fresher today with the TALAS upfront. I started thinking about an FS after I developed some shoulder pains.

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